US Treasury yields tick higher as investors await key central bank meetings

US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster… The latest Amcham survey shows that some U.S. firms in China are speeding up their move away from the mainland as increasing tariffs bite. China Economyread more


US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster… The latest Amcham survey shows that some U.S. firms in China are speeding up their move away from the mainland as increasing tariffs bite. China Economyread more
US Treasury yields tick higher as investors await key central bank meetings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, central, mainland, bank, latest, speeding, increasing, survey, meetings, firms, china, yields, treasury, shows, await, key, tariffs, tick, investors, investment, higher


US Treasury yields tick higher as investors await key central bank meetings

US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster…

The latest Amcham survey shows that some U.S. firms in China are speeding up their move away from the mainland as increasing tariffs bite.

China Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, central, mainland, bank, latest, speeding, increasing, survey, meetings, firms, china, yields, treasury, shows, await, key, tariffs, tick, investors, investment, higher


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Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000

Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday. The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working


Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday. The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working
Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: jeff cox, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payrolls, working, workers, unemployment, underemployed, growth, job, expectations, increased, increase, increasing, short, wall, rise, 130000, falls, rate


Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000

Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday.

The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working part-time for economic reasons.

Wage growth remained solid, with average hourly earnings increasing by 0.4% for the month and 3.2% over the year; both numbers were one-tenth of a percentage point better than expected.

Labor force participation also increased, rising to 63.2% and tying its highest level since August 2013. The total number of Americans considered employed surged by 590,000 to a record 157.9 million, according to the household survey, which is conducted separately from the headline establishment count.

The difference between the two surveys inspired some optimism.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: jeff cox, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payrolls, working, workers, unemployment, underemployed, growth, job, expectations, increased, increase, increasing, short, wall, rise, 130000, falls, rate


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How Amazon is fighting back against workers’ increasing efforts to unionize

Three big unions are among those talking to Amazon workers — the Teamsters, the United Food & Commercial Workers Union and the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. Recent worker protests point to organizing efforts. On Prime Day in July, a handful of Amazon workers at a fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, went on strike. Amazon workers at Prime Day strike in Shakopee, Minnesota, on July 15, 2019. “The people who participated in today’s event are mainly outside organizers who are


Three big unions are among those talking to Amazon workers — the Teamsters, the United Food & Commercial Workers Union and the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. Recent worker protests point to organizing efforts. On Prime Day in July, a handful of Amazon workers at a fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, went on strike. Amazon workers at Prime Day strike in Shakopee, Minnesota, on July 15, 2019. “The people who participated in today’s event are mainly outside organizers who are
How Amazon is fighting back against workers’ increasing efforts to unionize Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workplace, center, unionize, 15, increasing, efforts, workers, fighting, amazon, employees, protests, strike, union, worker


How Amazon is fighting back against workers' increasing efforts to unionize

Throughout Amazon’s 25-year history, there have been multiple rumblings of workers trying to unionize, but to no success. With record-breaking sales numbers and newly doubled shipping speeds, however, momentum to organize has picked up among some of Amazon’s more than 650,000 worldwide employees. Three big unions are among those talking to Amazon workers — the Teamsters, the United Food & Commercial Workers Union and the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. Recent worker protests point to organizing efforts. On Prime Day in July, a handful of Amazon workers at a fulfillment center in Shakopee, Minnesota, went on strike. It was the first strike by U.S. workers during the company’s annual sales events that started five years ago, and one of several protests in the U.S. in the past year.

Amazon workers at Prime Day strike in Shakopee, Minnesota, on July 15, 2019. Katie Schoolov

The protests were organized by the Awood Center, an East African worker advocate group that’s backed in part by the Teamsters and the Service Employees International Union, along with local labor groups like the Minneapolis Regional Labor Federation. “The people who participated in today’s event are mainly outside organizers who are uninformed about what it’s really like to work inside an Amazon fulfillment center,” Amazon spokesperson Rachael Lighty said at the time. “With only 15 employees who participated from this site, that tells me that our employees truly do believe that they are working in a safe and innovative workplace.” Last year, Amazon led the industry by raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour, and it’s known for generous benefits. Its Career Choice program pays up to 95% of tuition for associates studying high-demand fields. And last month, Amazon pledged $700 million to retrain a third of its U.S. workforce by 2025 to move to more advanced jobs. “We’re already offering what unions are asking, which is industry leading pay, great benefits and a safe and innovative workplace,” Lighty said.

A training video for managers

Leaked Amazon training video sent to Whole Foods managers in 2018


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: katie schoolov
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workplace, center, unionize, 15, increasing, efforts, workers, fighting, amazon, employees, protests, strike, union, worker


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Elizabeth Warren says the ‘warning lights are flashing’ for the next economic crash

Elizabeth Warren speaks at her campaign for the Democratic nomination for the 2020 United States presidential election during a Community Conversation at Prairie Winds Event Center in Orange City. Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren warned on Monday that the next financial crisis is on its way. Whether it’s this year or next year, the odds of another economic downturn are high — and growing,” Warren wrote in a post on the blogging platform Medium. Citing a top economist, Warr


Elizabeth Warren speaks at her campaign for the Democratic nomination for the 2020 United States presidential election during a Community Conversation at Prairie Winds Event Center in Orange City. Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren warned on Monday that the next financial crisis is on its way. Whether it’s this year or next year, the odds of another economic downturn are high — and growing,” Warren wrote in a post on the blogging platform Medium. Citing a top economist, Warr
Elizabeth Warren says the ‘warning lights are flashing’ for the next economic crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, presidential, crash, flashing, trump, shock, odds, economic, sector, manufacturing, warning, increasing, lights, elizabeth, wrote


Elizabeth Warren says the 'warning lights are flashing' for the next economic crash

Elizabeth Warren speaks at her campaign for the Democratic nomination for the 2020 United States presidential election during a Community Conversation at Prairie Winds Event Center in Orange City.

Democratic presidential contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren warned on Monday that the next financial crisis is on its way.

“Warning lights are flashing. Whether it’s this year or next year, the odds of another economic downturn are high — and growing,” Warren wrote in a post on the blogging platform Medium.

The Massachusetts Democrat said that increasing household and corporate debt has left the economy on precarious footing. Citing a top economist, Warren wrote that a failure to raise the debt ceiling in September could be “more catastrophic” than the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers.

She also noted weakness in the manufacturing sector, putting the blame for its recent slowdown on President Donald Trump, who has tangled with China over trade. Despite Trump’s pledge to bring back manufacturing jobs, the sector is now in recession, she wrote, and wages for the industry lag the national average.

“The country’s economic foundation is fragile. A single shock could bring it all down. And the Trump Administration’s reckless behavior is increasing the odds of just such a shock,” Warren wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warren, presidential, crash, flashing, trump, shock, odds, economic, sector, manufacturing, warning, increasing, lights, elizabeth, wrote


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Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr


President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr
Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices.

The executive order will direct the Department of Health and Human Services to require hospitals and insurers to disclose negotiated rates for services, as well as provide patients with out-of-pocket costs before their procedures.

“We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order.

Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “greatly” and has cost Americans millions of dollars in health care costs.

Price transparency can “empower” patient choice, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a call Monday with reporters.

“The president has a clear vision for American health care,” Azar said. “That’s the promise he’s made to American patients, and today represents a historic step for delivering on that promise.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


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Wall Street is ‘looking for opportunities’ in Saudi Arabia, the country’s finance minister says

The finance minister of Saudi Arabia told CNBC that a recent fall off in foreign investment to his country will end as Wall Street money was now “looking for opportunities.” Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Thursday, Mohammed Al-Jadaan, said the financial conference held in Riyadh this week which was attended by high-profile figures from HSBC, J.P. Morgan and BlackRock, showed that foreign investment was ready to make a return. “Money is looking for opportunities. Infrastructure is being buil


The finance minister of Saudi Arabia told CNBC that a recent fall off in foreign investment to his country will end as Wall Street money was now “looking for opportunities.” Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Thursday, Mohammed Al-Jadaan, said the financial conference held in Riyadh this week which was attended by high-profile figures from HSBC, J.P. Morgan and BlackRock, showed that foreign investment was ready to make a return. “Money is looking for opportunities. Infrastructure is being buil
Wall Street is ‘looking for opportunities’ in Saudi Arabia, the country’s finance minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: natasha turak, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, looking, week, talking, money, wall, countrys, saudi, finance, minister, investment, built, told, increasing, arabia, opportunities, foreign


Wall Street is 'looking for opportunities' in Saudi Arabia, the country's finance minister says

The finance minister of Saudi Arabia told CNBC that a recent fall off in foreign investment to his country will end as Wall Street money was now “looking for opportunities.”

Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Thursday, Mohammed Al-Jadaan, said the financial conference held in Riyadh this week which was attended by high-profile figures from HSBC, J.P. Morgan and BlackRock, showed that foreign investment was ready to make a return.

“Money is looking for opportunities. We have mega projects being built around the kingdom. Infrastructure is being built, health care demand is increasing, and hospitality is significantly increasing,” he said.

“We have heard from top international investors and they are committing billions. We are not talking about a little money in the years to come.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: natasha turak, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, street, looking, week, talking, money, wall, countrys, saudi, finance, minister, investment, built, told, increasing, arabia, opportunities, foreign


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Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs

Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs12:09 PM ET Wed, 24 April 2019Snap’s co-founder and CEO responds to the stock’s decline despite the company’s earnings beat. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs12:09 PM ET Wed, 24 April 2019Snap’s co-founder and CEO responds to the stock’s decline despite the company’s earnings beat. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.
Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: adam galica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, increasing, means, engagement, responds, julia, stocks, reports, evan, ceo, costs, spiegel, higher, snap


Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs

Snap CEO Evan Spiegel: Increasing engagement means higher costs

12:09 PM ET Wed, 24 April 2019

Snap’s co-founder and CEO responds to the stock’s decline despite the company’s earnings beat. CNBC’s Julia Boorstin reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: adam galica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, increasing, means, engagement, responds, julia, stocks, reports, evan, ceo, costs, spiegel, higher, snap


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‘Jaws of death’: England could face water shortages within the next 25 years

England could experience water shortages within the next 25 years, the chief executive of the Environment Agency has warned. Because of the effects of climate change, the U.K. will have summers that are hotter and drier, which will lead to an increasing number of water shortages, Bevan noted. The speech will highlight the importance of reducing demand and increasing supply. This could be achieved through a range of methods, from cutting leakages and more water metering to increasing supply throu


England could experience water shortages within the next 25 years, the chief executive of the Environment Agency has warned. Because of the effects of climate change, the U.K. will have summers that are hotter and drier, which will lead to an increasing number of water shortages, Bevan noted. The speech will highlight the importance of reducing demand and increasing supply. This could be achieved through a range of methods, from cutting leakages and more water metering to increasing supply throu
‘Jaws of death’: England could face water shortages within the next 25 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: anmar frangoul, christopher furlong, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, environment, death, jaws, supply, england, liters, face, need, increasing, uk, 25, waterwise, water, change, shortages, bevan


'Jaws of death': England could face water shortages within the next 25 years

England could experience water shortages within the next 25 years, the chief executive of the Environment Agency has warned.

James Bevan delivered remarks at the Waterwise Conference in London on Tuesday, and stated that in around 20 to 25 years from now, the country would face a “jaws of death – the point at which, unless we take action to change things, we will not have enough water to supply our needs.”

Because of the effects of climate change, the U.K. will have summers that are hotter and drier, which will lead to an increasing number of water shortages, Bevan noted.

He explained how, by the middle of the century, the amount of available water could drop by 10 to 15 percent, with many parts of the country facing “significant water deficits by 2050.”

Climate change, coupled with population growth, will result in an “existential threat” to “our economy, environment, security, happiness, way of life,” Bevan said. “We can choose to ignore this problem. Or we can choose to tackle it.”

The speech will highlight the importance of reducing demand and increasing supply. This could be achieved through a range of methods, from cutting leakages and more water metering to increasing supply through the construction of new desalination plants and reservoirs.

Crucially, people will also need to cut the amount of water they waste. “We need water wastage to be as socially unacceptable as blowing smoke in the face of a baby or throwing your plastic bags into the sea,” Bevan said. “We need everyone to take responsibility for their own water usage.”

Bevan noted that the average person in the U.K. currently uses 140 liters a day. This is a figure that Waterwise, an independent NGO, estimates can be cut to 100 liters a day.

People will need to undertake several measures to reduce their usage. These include taking short showers instead of deep baths, using low flush toilets, and turning the tap off while brushing teeth.

“If by 2050 we reduced per capita consumption to 100 liters a day, leakage by 50 percent, and did nothing else, it would provide enough water for an additional 20 million people without taking any more from the environment,” Bevan explained, noting that while the goal of long-term water resilience was ambitious, “it is also achievable.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: anmar frangoul, christopher furlong, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, environment, death, jaws, supply, england, liters, face, need, increasing, uk, 25, waterwise, water, change, shortages, bevan


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Now is a great time to land a top job. Here’s how

Employers increasingly are seeking employees with so-called soft skills, such as communication, organization and attention to detail, according to CareerBuilder. “Rather than having hard skills, employers are looking more generally,” said Michelle Armer, chief people officer at CareerBuilder. In fact, 80 percent of employers said soft skills will be equally or more important than hard skills when hiring candidates. “You may already be a stellar candidate when it comes to ‘soft skills,'” she said


Employers increasingly are seeking employees with so-called soft skills, such as communication, organization and attention to detail, according to CareerBuilder. “Rather than having hard skills, employers are looking more generally,” said Michelle Armer, chief people officer at CareerBuilder. In fact, 80 percent of employers said soft skills will be equally or more important than hard skills when hiring candidates. “You may already be a stellar candidate when it comes to ‘soft skills,'” she said
Now is a great time to land a top job. Here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, -caroline ceniza-levine, career coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, increasing, hard, technology, heres, workers, employers, science, land, great, job, according, tech, soft, skills


Now is a great time to land a top job. Here's how

Yet to land one of today’s most in-demand positions, particularly tech jobs, which often come with the highest salaries, your interpersonal skills may matter most.

Employers increasingly are seeking employees with so-called soft skills, such as communication, organization and attention to detail, according to CareerBuilder.

“Rather than having hard skills, employers are looking more generally,” said Michelle Armer, chief people officer at CareerBuilder.

While a skills gap has made it harder for companies to find top talent, 59 percent of employers said they plan to train and hire workers who may not be 100 percent qualified but have potential, CareerBuilder found.

In fact, 80 percent of employers said soft skills will be equally or more important than hard skills when hiring candidates.

More from Invest in You:

How to survive your own financial crisis

Stashing cash finally starts to pay off

Kids with debit cards? Maybe it’s not such a bad idea after all

Meanwhile, the demand for workers in science, technology, engineering and math occupations is increasing at every education level and across every industry, according to a report by Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce.

There are nearly 500,000 computing job openings nationwide and fewer than 64,000 computer science students graduated into the workforce last year, according to code.org, a nonprofit dedicated to expanding access to computer science.

But even without an undergraduate degree in STEM, the increasing popularity of classes, coding programsand boot camps makes it possible for anyone to get up to speed on the latest technology, said Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career coach and co-founder of SixFigureStart.

“You may already be a stellar candidate when it comes to ‘soft skills,'” she said. “Updating your tech skills will certainly help you feel more competitive.”

Then, highlight those new abilities on your resume and LinkedIn profile as well as in networking emails and any other job-related interactions, she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images, -caroline ceniza-levine, career coach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, increasing, hard, technology, heres, workers, employers, science, land, great, job, according, tech, soft, skills


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PepsiCo earnings in line with estimates but forecasts weak 2019

PepsiCo on Friday reported quarterly earnings and revenue that met analysts’ expectations, but is forecasting weaker-than-expected earnings for 2019, like rival Coca-Cola. The food and beverage giant is forecasting that it will earn $5.50 per share during 2019, down from its 2018 earnings per share of $5.66. Wall Street had expected the company to earn $5.86 in 2019, according to Refinitiv estimates. Among other factors, PepsiCo called out an increased tax rate and currency headwinds as reasons


PepsiCo on Friday reported quarterly earnings and revenue that met analysts’ expectations, but is forecasting weaker-than-expected earnings for 2019, like rival Coca-Cola. The food and beverage giant is forecasting that it will earn $5.50 per share during 2019, down from its 2018 earnings per share of $5.66. Wall Street had expected the company to earn $5.86 in 2019, according to Refinitiv estimates. Among other factors, PepsiCo called out an increased tax rate and currency headwinds as reasons
PepsiCo earnings in line with estimates but forecasts weak 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: amelia lucas, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, share, wall, pepsico, weak, net, increasing, 2019, company, reported, forecasts, estimates, earnings, line


PepsiCo earnings in line with estimates but forecasts weak 2019

PepsiCo on Friday reported quarterly earnings and revenue that met analysts’ expectations, but is forecasting weaker-than-expected earnings for 2019, like rival Coca-Cola.

The food and beverage giant is forecasting that it will earn $5.50 per share during 2019, down from its 2018 earnings per share of $5.66. Wall Street had expected the company to earn $5.86 in 2019, according to Refinitiv estimates.

Among other factors, PepsiCo called out an increased tax rate and currency headwinds as reasons for the weak outlook. Excluding currency fluctuations, it expects full-year earnings per share to decline by 1 percent. The company’s earnings last year were also boosted by selling assets and lapping franchising costs.

It is targeting annual savings of at least $1 billion through 2023, which it will achieve in part through automation, changing its go-to market systems and simplifying its organization. The program is an extension of a prior savings plan that was expected to end in 2019.

The company also said in a statement that it plans to make 2019 “a year of substantial investment,” including increasing marketing and advertising.

Shares of the company rose than 1 percent in premarket trading.

Here’s what the company reported compared with what Wall Street was expecting, based on a survey of analysts by Refinitiv:

Earnings per share: $1.49 vs. $1.49 expected

Revenue: $19.52 billion vs. $19.52 billion expected

The company reported net sales of $19.52 billion, matching analysts’ expectations and unchanged from a year earlier.

PepsiCo’s once-struggling North American beverage business continued its comeback this quarter, seeing 2 percent organic growth. The company has been increasing its spending on marketing and advertising, particularly on its Pepsi and Mountain Dew sodas. It has also been investing in its higher-growth water and sports drinks segments, with brands like Gatorade Zero and Lifewtr.

Its snack business remained strong, with Frito-Lay North America delivering 4 percent organic revenue growth. The company said that it is continuing to add more nutritious snacking options.

PepsiCo reported fiscal fourth-quarter net income of $6.85 billion, or $4.83 per share, up from a loss of $710 million, or 50 cents per share, a year earlier.

Excluding merger and integration charges, net tax benefits and other items, PepsiCo earned $1.49 per share, in line with Wall Street’s expectations.

In December, it completed its $3.2 billion acquisition of SodaStream, the at-home sparkling drink maker. With the exception of the SodaStream deal, PepsiCo under former CEO Indra Nooyi largely stayed away from making deals larger than $200 million in her last few years as chief executive. Current CEO Ramon Laguarta took the reins in October.

The company also announced Friday that it is increasing its dividend by 3 percent, to $3.82 from $3.71, beginning in June.

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: amelia lucas, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, share, wall, pepsico, weak, net, increasing, 2019, company, reported, forecasts, estimates, earnings, line


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