Amazon’s $1 billion investment in India is no big favor, trade minister says

Mobile dealers and members of Ahmedabad Mobile Dealer’s Association hold placards as they protest against online shopping platform Amazon outside their closed mobile shops in Ahmedabad on January 15, 2020. Amazon hasn’t done India any big favors by investing $1 billion in the country, its trade minister said on Thursday, laying bare the tensions with the U.S. online retail giant during a visit by its CEO Jeff Bezos. “They may have put in a billion dollars but then if they make a loss of a billio


Mobile dealers and members of Ahmedabad Mobile Dealer’s Association hold placards as they protest against online shopping platform Amazon outside their closed mobile shops in Ahmedabad on January 15, 2020.
Amazon hasn’t done India any big favors by investing $1 billion in the country, its trade minister said on Thursday, laying bare the tensions with the U.S. online retail giant during a visit by its CEO Jeff Bezos.
“They may have put in a billion dollars but then if they make a loss of a billio
Amazon’s $1 billion investment in India is no big favor, trade minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dollars, mobile, investment, minister, indian, amazon, billion, favor, trade, india, online, amazons, visit, big, small


Amazon's $1 billion investment in India is no big favor, trade minister says

Mobile dealers and members of Ahmedabad Mobile Dealer’s Association hold placards as they protest against online shopping platform Amazon outside their closed mobile shops in Ahmedabad on January 15, 2020.

Amazon hasn’t done India any big favors by investing $1 billion in the country, its trade minister said on Thursday, laying bare the tensions with the U.S. online retail giant during a visit by its CEO Jeff Bezos.

Amazon and Walmart’s Flipkart are facing mounting criticism from India’s brick-and-mortar retailers, which accuse the U.S. giants of violating Indian law by racking up billions of dollars of losses to fund deep discounts and discriminating against small sellers. The companies deny the allegations.

“They may have put in a billion dollars but then if they make a loss of a billion dollars every year then they jolly well have to finance that billion dollars,” Indian trade minister Piyush Goyal told a security conference in New Delhi.

“So it’s not as if they are doing a great favor to India when they invest a billion dollars.”

Bezos, who is currently in India, said on Wednesday Amazon would invest $1 billion to bring small businesses online in the country, seen as part of the company’s efforts to dispel criticism.

Ahead of Bezos’ visit, the Competition Commission of India launched a probe into Amazon and Flipkart to look at allegations of deep discounts and whether the companies discriminate against small sellers.

Goyal said the allegations were “an area of concern for every Indian.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dollars, mobile, investment, minister, indian, amazon, billion, favor, trade, india, online, amazons, visit, big, small


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon partners with Future Retail to further its push into the Indian market

Amazon is partnering with a leading Indian retail group as it continues its push into the world’s second most populous country. Under a new deal announced Monday, Amazon will become the official online sales channel for India’s Future Retail. Future Retail operates six retail chains, including popular hypermarket Big Bazaar, and has more than 1,500 stores across India. In partnering with Amazon, customers will be able to order products from those stores, with those in Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, a


Amazon is partnering with a leading Indian retail group as it continues its push into the world’s second most populous country.
Under a new deal announced Monday, Amazon will become the official online sales channel for India’s Future Retail.
Future Retail operates six retail chains, including popular hypermarket Big Bazaar, and has more than 1,500 stores across India.
In partnering with Amazon, customers will be able to order products from those stores, with those in Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, a
Amazon partners with Future Retail to further its push into the Indian market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, india, partners, fashion, push, indian, amazon, partnering, market, retail, sales, products, stores, indias


Amazon partners with Future Retail to further its push into the Indian market

Amazon is partnering with a leading Indian retail group as it continues its push into the world’s second most populous country.

Under a new deal announced Monday, Amazon will become the official online sales channel for India’s Future Retail.

Future Retail operates six retail chains, including popular hypermarket Big Bazaar, and has more than 1,500 stores across India. In partnering with Amazon, customers will be able to order products from those stores, with those in Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, and Hyderabad able to have them delivered via Amazon India’s Prime Now two-hour delivery program.

The deal will focus on two product categories: groceries and general merchandise, and fashion and footwear.

Amazon and Future Retail will also create a team dedicated to growing sales through initiatives in areas like distribution and marketing.

“Future Retail’s national footprint of stores offering thousands of products across fashion, appliances, kitchen and grocery will now be available to millions of customers shopping on Amazon.in in hours across more than 25 cities,” Amit Agarwal, senior vice president and country head of Amazon India, said in a press release Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, india, partners, fashion, push, indian, amazon, partnering, market, retail, sales, products, stores, indias


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tourists stay away from Taj Mahal, other Indian attractions as protests flare

Officials estimate about 200,000 domestic and international tourists cancelled or postponed their trip to the Taj Mahal in the past two weeks, one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions. “There has been a 60% decline in visitor footfalls in December this year,” said Dinesh Kumar, a police inspector overseeing a special tourist police station near the Taj Mahal who has access to visitor data. The Taj Mahal, situated in the town of Agra, attracts over 6.5 million tourists every year, gene


Officials estimate about 200,000 domestic and international tourists cancelled or postponed their trip to the Taj Mahal in the past two weeks, one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions.
“There has been a 60% decline in visitor footfalls in December this year,” said Dinesh Kumar, a police inspector overseeing a special tourist police station near the Taj Mahal who has access to visitor data.
The Taj Mahal, situated in the town of Agra, attracts over 6.5 million tourists every year, gene
Tourists stay away from Taj Mahal, other Indian attractions as protests flare Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stay, travel, tourism, indian, agra, tourists, protests, countries, taj, flare, attractions, worlds, tourist, away, weeks, mahal


Tourists stay away from Taj Mahal, other Indian attractions as protests flare

India’s tourism industry has been hit by a wave of violent anti-government protests against a new citizenship law that have rocked several cities this month, with at least seven countries issuing travel warnings.

At least 25 people have been killed in clashes between police and protesters, and demonstrations against the law continue.

Officials estimate about 200,000 domestic and international tourists cancelled or postponed their trip to the Taj Mahal in the past two weeks, one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions.

“There has been a 60% decline in visitor footfalls in December this year,” said Dinesh Kumar, a police inspector overseeing a special tourist police station near the Taj Mahal who has access to visitor data. He said the decline was compared to December last year.

“Indian and foreign tourists have been calling our control rooms to check security. We assure them protection, but many still decide to stay away,” said Kumar.

The 17th century marble monument is in Uttar Pradesh, the northern state that has witnessed the highest number of deaths and intense bursts of violence in two weeks of unrest.

A group of European tourists travelling in a group across India said they now planned to cut short their 20 day trip.

“We are all retired folks, for us travel has to be slow and relaxing. The newspaper headlines have led to a sense of concern and we will leave sooner than we had planned,” said Dave Millikin, a retired banker living on the outskirts of London, who spoke to Reuters from the capital New Delhi.

The Taj Mahal, situated in the town of Agra, attracts over 6.5 million tourists every year, generating nearly $14 million annually from entrance fees.

A foreign tourist pays 1,100 rupees (about $15) to enter the grounds, although nationals from neighbouring countries get a discount.

Managers in luxury hotels and guest houses around the Taj Mahal said last minute cancellations during the festive season have further dampened business sentiment at a time when the country’s economic growth has slowed to 4.5%, its slowest pace in more than six years.

In a bid to clamp down on violence and unrest, authorities have suspended mobile internet services in Agra.

“Blocking the internet has affected travel and tourism in Agra by about 50-60%,” said Sandeep Arora, president of the Agra Tourism Development Foundation that groups over 250 tour operators, hotels and guides.

The United States, Britain, Russia, Israel, Singapore, Canada and Taiwan have issued travel advisories asking their citizens to either refrain from visiting or to exercise caution when visiting regions embroiled in India’s protests.

Jayanta Malla Baruah, the head of the Assam Tourism Development Corp., said the state, home to the world’s largest concentration of one-horned rhinoceroses, is visited on average by 500,000 tourists during December.

“But this time, due to the ongoing protests and travel advisories by various countries, the number is down by 90% if not more.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-29
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stay, travel, tourism, indian, agra, tourists, protests, countries, taj, flare, attractions, worlds, tourist, away, weeks, mahal


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Indian police ban protests amid citizenship law outrage

A senior police officer speaks to students at the Town Hall during a demonstration held against India’s new citizenship law in spite of a curfew in Bangalore on December 19, 2019. Police detained several hundred protesters in some of India’s biggest cities Thursday as they defied a ban on assembly that authorities imposed to stop widespread demonstrations against a new citizenship law that opponents say threatens the country’s secular democracy. Dozens of demonstrations were planned around the c


A senior police officer speaks to students at the Town Hall during a demonstration held against India’s new citizenship law in spite of a curfew in Bangalore on December 19, 2019.
Police detained several hundred protesters in some of India’s biggest cities Thursday as they defied a ban on assembly that authorities imposed to stop widespread demonstrations against a new citizenship law that opponents say threatens the country’s secular democracy.
Dozens of demonstrations were planned around the c
Indian police ban protests amid citizenship law outrage Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protesters, state, law, indian, citizenship, ban, india, indias, outrage, muslims, hindu, illegally, amid, detained, protests


Indian police ban protests amid citizenship law outrage

A senior police officer speaks to students at the Town Hall during a demonstration held against India’s new citizenship law in spite of a curfew in Bangalore on December 19, 2019.

Police detained several hundred protesters in some of India’s biggest cities Thursday as they defied a ban on assembly that authorities imposed to stop widespread demonstrations against a new citizenship law that opponents say threatens the country’s secular democracy.

Dozens of demonstrations were planned around the country as opposition widened to the law, which excludes Muslims. The legislation has sparked anger at what many see as the Hindu nationalist-led government’s push to bring India closer to a Hindu state.

Historian Ramchandra Guha, a biographer of independence leader Mohandas Gandhi, was among those detained in Bangalore, the capital of southern Karnataka state. The state government issued a ban on groups of more than four people gathering.

Reached by phone, Guha said he was in a bus with other detainees and did not know where the police were taking them.

In New Delhi, Yogendra Yadav, the chief of the Swaraj India party, was among those detained as protesters demonstrated at New Delhi’s iconic Red Fort and the surrounding historic district.

Officials said more than 100 people were detained at the fort.

The protesters were loaded into buses and other vehicles. The main roads leading to the fort were blocked off and police did not let pedestrians go to nearby temples or shopping areas.

Internet and phone services were blocked around the fort and in some other parts of New Delhi, a tactic Indian authorities use in other parts of the country, such as disputed Kashmir, to try to stop people from organizing protests. The measure, however, is rarely used in the capital.

The new citizenship law applies to Hindus, Christians and other religious minorities who are in India illegally but can demonstrate religious persecution in Muslim-majority Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan. It does not apply to Muslims.

Critics say it’s the latest effort by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist-led government to marginalize India’s 200 million Muslims, and a violation of the country’s secular constitution.

Modi has defended it as a humanitarian gesture.

The law’s enactment last week follows a contentious process in northeastern Assam state intended to weed out people who entered illegally. Nearly 2 million people in Assam were excluded from an official list of citizens, about half Hindu and half Muslim, and have been asked to prove their citizenship or else be considered foreign.

India is also building a detention center for some of the tens of thousands of people the courts are expected to ultimately determine have entered illegally. Modi’s interior minister, Amit Shah, has pledged to roll out the process nationwide.

Some Muslims fear it’s a way for Hindu nationalists to put them in detention or deport them from the country.

On Wednesday, authorities tightened restrictions on protesters, expanding a blockade of the internet and a curfew in Assam.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protesters, state, law, indian, citizenship, ban, india, indias, outrage, muslims, hindu, illegally, amid, detained, protests


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The best tech companies to work for in India right now

Software company SAP has topped the charts as the best technology company to work for in India right now. The German multinational took first place in Indeed’s “Top-rated workplaces 2019” — a list which named established international names alongside homegrown start-ups among India’s best tech employers. The job portal’s list of 15 names was based on companies that had received the highest employee ratings on its site. Jose Luis Pelaez IncWhile the top spots were dominated by global tech names,


Software company SAP has topped the charts as the best technology company to work for in India right now.
The German multinational took first place in Indeed’s “Top-rated workplaces 2019” — a list which named established international names alongside homegrown start-ups among India’s best tech employers.
The job portal’s list of 15 names was based on companies that had received the highest employee ratings on its site.
Jose Luis Pelaez IncWhile the top spots were dominated by global tech names,
The best tech companies to work for in India right now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, work, companies, toprated, right, indian, workplaces, india, list, took, vmware, tech, tata, best


The best tech companies to work for in India right now

Software company SAP has topped the charts as the best technology company to work for in India right now. The German multinational took first place in Indeed’s “Top-rated workplaces 2019” — a list which named established international names alongside homegrown start-ups among India’s best tech employers. Adobe, VMware and Microsoft took second, third and fourth place, respectively, while The Indian Space Research Organization rounded out the top five. The job portal’s list of 15 names was based on companies that had received the highest employee ratings on its site. An algorithm was then used to rank the companies overall using a variety of factors such as average rating, number of reviews and history of job openings.

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc

While the top spots were dominated by global tech names, the list also featured a high proportion of Indian companies. Myntra.com, Paytm and Flipkart were among the homegrown e-commerce names listed, while IT service providers Mphasis and Tata Consultancy Services also made an appearance.

India’s 15 top-rated tech workplaces 2019

15. Mphasis 14. Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) 13. Genpact 12. Amdocs 11. Apple 10. Flipkart.com 9. IBM 8. Paytm 7. Myntra.com 6. Cisco 5. Indian Space Research Organization 4. Microsoft 3. VMWare 2. Adobe 1. SAP

Creating inclusive cultures


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-19  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, names, work, companies, toprated, right, indian, workplaces, india, list, took, vmware, tech, tata, best


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Indian taxi firm Ola signs up 10,000 drivers as it looks to take on Uber with London launch

Indian ride-sharing firm Ola claimed Tuesday it has now signed up 10,000 drivers in London as it prepares to launch in the U.K. city. Ola announced in November that it was to enter the London market, revealing the strategy just days after rival Uber was stripped of its London license. Uber continues to operate in London under appeal. The company has not announced an official launch date but one source told CNBC last month that Ola may attempt a full roll in mid-January next year. A source, who p


Indian ride-sharing firm Ola claimed Tuesday it has now signed up 10,000 drivers in London as it prepares to launch in the U.K. city.
Ola announced in November that it was to enter the London market, revealing the strategy just days after rival Uber was stripped of its London license.
Uber continues to operate in London under appeal.
The company has not announced an official launch date but one source told CNBC last month that Ola may attempt a full roll in mid-January next year.
A source, who p
Indian taxi firm Ola signs up 10,000 drivers as it looks to take on Uber with London launch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ola, told, looks, uber, firm, source, roll, midjanuary, drivers, signs, indian, london, taxi, launch


Indian taxi firm Ola signs up 10,000 drivers as it looks to take on Uber with London launch

Indian ride-sharing firm Ola claimed Tuesday it has now signed up 10,000 drivers in London as it prepares to launch in the U.K. city.

Ola announced in November that it was to enter the London market, revealing the strategy just days after rival Uber was stripped of its London license. Uber continues to operate in London under appeal.

Ola claims to be one of the world’s biggest ride-hailing companies with operations extending across more than 250 cities across India, U.K., Australia and New Zealand.

The company has not announced an official launch date but one source told CNBC last month that Ola may attempt a full roll in mid-January next year.

A source, who preferred to remain anonymous due to the information not yet being public, told CNBC that Ola may look to soft launch in London in December, with a full roll out due in mid-January 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ola, told, looks, uber, firm, source, roll, midjanuary, drivers, signs, indian, london, taxi, launch


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India citizenship law protests spread across campuses

Protests over a new Indian citizenship law based on religion spread to student campuses on Monday as critics said the Hindu nationalist government was pushing a partisan agenda in conflict with the country’s founding as a secular republic. Critics say the law, which does not make the same provision for Muslims, weakens India’s secular foundations. Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the main opposition Congress party, said the Modi government was dividing up Indian society through the citizenship law an


Protests over a new Indian citizenship law based on religion spread to student campuses on Monday as critics said the Hindu nationalist government was pushing a partisan agenda in conflict with the country’s founding as a secular republic.
Critics say the law, which does not make the same provision for Muslims, weakens India’s secular foundations.
Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the main opposition Congress party, said the Modi government was dividing up Indian society through the citizenship law an
India citizenship law protests spread across campuses Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, indian, tear, law, india, spread, students, campuses, state, told, citizenship, university, sharma, city, protests


India citizenship law protests spread across campuses

Protesters take part in a demonstration against the Indian government’s Citizen Amendment Bill (CAB) in Guwahati on December 14, 2019.

Protests over a new Indian citizenship law based on religion spread to student campuses on Monday as critics said the Hindu nationalist government was pushing a partisan agenda in conflict with the country’s founding as a secular republic.

Students pelted stones at police who locked up the gates of a college in the northern city of Lucknow to prevent them from taking to the streets. About two dozen students at another college in the city sneaked out to protest.

Anger with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government was fuelled by allegations of police brutality at Jamia Millia Islamia university on Sunday, when officers entered the campus in the capital New Delhi and fired tear gas to break up a protest. At least 100 people were wounded.

There were similar scenes at the Aligarh Muslim University in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, where police also clashed with protesters.

Under the law passed by parliament last week, religious minorities such as Hindus and Christians in neighbouring Muslim-majority Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan who have settled in India prior to 2015 will have a path to citizenship on grounds they faced persecution in those countries.

Critics say the law, which does not make the same provision for Muslims, weakens India’s secular foundations.

The head of Jamia Millia demanded an investigation into how police were allowed to enter the campus. “It is not expected of the police to enter the university and beat up students,” Najma Akhtar told a news conference.

Students said police fired tear gas and windows were broken in the library. They ducked under desks and switched off the lights as advised by teachers.

Hundreds of people gathered outside the New Delhi police headquarters to protest against alleged police brutality and the detention of students. Police said they acted with restraint.

Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the main opposition Congress party, said the Modi government was dividing up Indian society through the citizenship law and a plan to launch a national citizenship register.

“The best defence against these dirty weapons is peaceful, non-violent Satyagraha,” he said in a tweet referring to the strategy of passive political resistance advocated by independence leader Mahatma Gandhi.

The most violent protests during the past few days took place in the northeastern state of Assam, where mobs torched buildings and train stations, angry the law would help thousands of immigrants from Bangladesh become lawful citizens. At least two people were killed.

Protests were held in Mumbai’s Indian Institute of Technology and Tata Institute of Social Sciences overnight and on Monday and more were planned at Bombay University and in the southern city of Bengaluru later in the day.

Some Bollywood celebrities like actress Konkona Sen Sharma, and directors Mahesh Bhatt and Anubhav Sinha, also criticized the police action on Twitter and called on others to speak up.

“We are with the students! Shame on you @DelhiPolice,” Sen Sharma tweeted.

Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party denies any religious bias. It says the new law is meant to help minority groups facing persecution in the three nearby Muslim countries.

Modi has said the law has been passed by parliament and there is no going back on it. He told a rally on Sunday the decision was “1000 percent correct”.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, indian, tear, law, india, spread, students, campuses, state, told, citizenship, university, sharma, city, protests


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Why Indian markets are ‘moving ahead of fundamentals’

Why Indian markets are ‘moving ahead of fundamentals’Pramod Gubbi of Marcellus Investment Managers says Indian markets are “clearly” moving ahead of fundamentals in anticipation of more reforms and stimulus announcements, which could include a personal tax cut.


Why Indian markets are ‘moving ahead of fundamentals’Pramod Gubbi of Marcellus Investment Managers says Indian markets are “clearly” moving ahead of fundamentals in anticipation of more reforms and stimulus announcements, which could include a personal tax cut.
Why Indian markets are ‘moving ahead of fundamentals’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reforms, markets, fundamentals, personal, tax, moving, ahead, managers, marcellus, stimulus, indian


Why Indian markets are 'moving ahead of fundamentals'

Why Indian markets are ‘moving ahead of fundamentals’

Pramod Gubbi of Marcellus Investment Managers says Indian markets are “clearly” moving ahead of fundamentals in anticipation of more reforms and stimulus announcements, which could include a personal tax cut.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reforms, markets, fundamentals, personal, tax, moving, ahead, managers, marcellus, stimulus, indian


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

French influence thrives on an exotic island in the Indian Ocean

The Republic of Mauritius, located off the east coast of Africa, is full of Indians who speak French. But in informal settings, at home and with friends, most people speak Mauritian Creole. Born during French rule among the majority slave population, the lingua franca remains an integral part of the islanders’ heritage and identity. In 1723 during French rule, a law was passed that required all slaves brought to Mauritius be baptized Catholic. Except for the French gastronomy offered by the high


The Republic of Mauritius, located off the east coast of Africa, is full of Indians who speak French.
But in informal settings, at home and with friends, most people speak Mauritian Creole.
Born during French rule among the majority slave population, the lingua franca remains an integral part of the islanders’ heritage and identity.
In 1723 during French rule, a law was passed that required all slaves brought to Mauritius be baptized Catholic.
Except for the French gastronomy offered by the high
French influence thrives on an exotic island in the Indian Ocean Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: verne maree, lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, islands, french, influence, indian, thrives, ocean, getty, indomauritians, speak, island, exotic, mauritius, english, rule, mauritian


French influence thrives on an exotic island in the Indian Ocean

The Republic of Mauritius, located off the east coast of Africa, is full of Indians who speak French. The story of how it got that way is an intriguing one. Visitors may be surprised at the predominance of French influence on this island state in the Indian Ocean — a destination best known for its powdery beaches, aquamarine lagoons and reefs teeming with marine life. That influence pervades not just the spoken language — be it French or Kreol Morisien, the local dialect — but also the island’s religion, law and architecture.

Aerial view of the Republic of Mauritius. Norbert Figueroa / EyeEm | EyeEm | Getty Images

Spoken by 90% of the population, French is a vital element of Mauritian culture. English is the medium of instruction in schools, but French predominates in daily discourse and in the media. For example, just one or two of the 16 pages in the island’s mostly widely read newspaper, L’Express, are in English. Although English is spoken in Parliament, by law French is allowed there too.

How the Indo-Mauritians got here

There are more than 1.26 million people living in Mauritius, and Indo-Mauritians make up 75% of the population. Most of today’s Indo-Mauritians trace their lineage back to the Girmityas, indentured laborers who migrated to work on colonial British sugarcane plantations around the world. Between 1830 and 1924, half a million of them went to Mauritius alone.

Harvesting sugar cane in Mauritius. santosha | E+ | Getty Images

Why Indo-Mauritians speak French

Like many former colonies, Mauritius experienced separate, distinct periods defined by who was in charge: Dutch control from 1664 to 1710, French rule from 1715 to 1796, and finally British rule from 1814 to independence in 1968. Given that the British ruled the island for such a long time, it would be reasonable to expect the English language to dominate. Two reasons explain why it doesn’t: First, when France handed the country over to Britain, in terms dictated by the 1814 Treaty of Paris, the British agreed to respect the language and laws of the inhabitants. Second, Britain regarded the island as too small and insignificant for settlement, so very few English speakers ever settled there.

A traditional creole Sega dance at sunset in Ville Valio, Mauritius. Dmitry_Chulov | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

Hotel manager Pierrot Barbe described himself as a true Mauritian. “I’m a real mix with my mother’s family having come from Tamil Nadu and my father from Madagascar.” A polyglot like most of his fellow countrymen, he prefers to write in English and speak in French. But in informal settings, at home and with friends, most people speak Mauritian Creole. Born during French rule among the majority slave population, the lingua franca remains an integral part of the islanders’ heritage and identity. It’s mainly French-based, said Barbe, although the meanings of some words have shifted. It contains some English words and borrows from African and Southeast Asian languages, too.

Religion and architecture

Around a third of Mauritians are Christians, with 80% of that group identifying as Roman Catholics. In 1723 during French rule, a law was passed that required all slaves brought to Mauritius be baptized Catholic. Later, French doctor and Catholic missionary Jacques Desiré Laval (1803-1864) was said to have converted over 67,000 people; he was beatified in 1979. As a result, churches are ubiquitous. Two stunning Roman Catholic examples are Cap Malheureux’s much-photographed red-roofed Notre Dame Auxiliatrice Chapel in the north and Mahébourg’s Notre Dame des Anges in the southeast. French colonial houses and public buildings also add lashings of architectural charm to the island. Well worth a visit is Château de Labourdonnais in the north, named for the first French governor, Mahé de Labourdonnais. He founded the capital, Port Louis, which boasts two fine examples: Government House and the 26-acre Line Barracks compound. One of the island’s top attractions, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam (SSR) Botanic Gardens at Pamplemousses, not far from Port Louis, was established by the Lyonnais missionary-turned-entrepreneur, horticulturist and botanist Pierre Poivre (1719-1786). Famous for its variety of tropical plants and its long pond of giant Amazonia lily pads, it is also home to the charming Château de Mon Plaisir.

Giant water lilies in Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Botanical Garden, Mauritius. Romeo Reidl | Moment | Getty Images

Another architectural jewel is Château des Aubineaux (1872). Located in the south, it is home to a museum dedicated to the history of tea-growing in Mauritius. The chateau proprietors own the flourishing Bois Chéri tea factory, where visitors can take a tour and then taste the renowned black vanilla tea.

What about French cuisine?

Except for the French gastronomy offered by the higher end of the island’s 150-plus hotels and resorts, there is little French influence on modern Mauritian cuisine. Seafood predominates, as do Indian-style curries eaten with rice and breads, particularly the flatbread known as faratas.

An amalgam of laws


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: verne maree, lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, islands, french, influence, indian, thrives, ocean, getty, indomauritians, speak, island, exotic, mauritius, english, rule, mauritian


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Devastating factory fire kills at least 43 in Indian capital

In February, 17 people were killed in a blaze that started in a six-story building’s illegal rooftop kitchen. The building’s owner, Rihan, who goes by one name, was detained on suspicion of culpable homicide not amounting to murder, Mittal said. They earned as little as 150 rupees ($2.10) per day making handbags, caps and other garments, sleeping at the factory between long shifts. Many of the victims were asleep when the blaze began, according to Yogesh, a police spokesman who uses one name. Ab


In February, 17 people were killed in a blaze that started in a six-story building’s illegal rooftop kitchen.
The building’s owner, Rihan, who goes by one name, was detained on suspicion of culpable homicide not amounting to murder, Mittal said.
They earned as little as 150 rupees ($2.10) per day making handbags, caps and other garments, sleeping at the factory between long shifts.
Many of the victims were asleep when the blaze began, according to Yogesh, a police spokesman who uses one name.
Ab
Devastating factory fire kills at least 43 in Indian capital Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: sheikh saaliq, ashok sharma
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, victims, mittal, making, kills, indian, buildings, handbags, workers, relatives, devastating, building, factory, capital, inside, blaze


Devastating factory fire kills at least 43 in Indian capital

Mukhtar Alam, who lost his relative in a fire, cries as he waits for the body outside a mortuary in New Delhi, India, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019.

A fire believed to be caused by an electrical short circuit engulfed a building in India’s capital on Sunday where handbags and other items were made by workers earning as little as 2 dollars per day, killing at least 43 people.

The blaze in New Delhi’s Karol Bagh neighborhood, a warren of narrow alleyways with electrical wiring strung helter-skelter, was the second major fire there this year. In February, 17 people were killed in a blaze that started in a six-story building’s illegal rooftop kitchen.

Karol Bagh contains the city’s largest wholesale market for household goods, known as Sadar Bazaar. The area’s aging buildings are stacked with apartments, shops, storage facilities and manufacturing units.

Assistant New Delhi police commissioner Anil Kumar Mittal said that “the fire appears to have been caused by an electric short circuit,” adding that authorities were investigating whether the factory was operating legally. Building laws and safety norms are routinely flouted in New Delhi, making fires common.

The building’s owner, Rihan, who goes by one name, was detained on suspicion of culpable homicide not amounting to murder, Mittal said.

Firefighters had to fight the blaze from 100 meters away because it broke out in one of the area’s many alleyways, tangled in electrical wire and too narrow for vehicles to access, authorities said.

A resident of the area, Mohammed Naushad, said he was woken by people wailing at around 4:30 a.m. He went outside to find smoke and flames shooting out of a building near Sadar Bazaar. Inside, he found the fourth floor engulfed in flames. One floor below, he saw “20 to 25 people lying on the floor.”

“I don’t know if they were dead or unconscious, but they were not moving,” Naushad said.

He said he carried at least 10 people out of the flames on his shoulders and into the arms of emergency responders.

Maisuma Bibi, a day laborer making plastic handbags, survived the blaze. She said she was sleeping in a room with about 18 other women and children on the building’s first floor when she woke to find a bag full of plastic parts on fire. Her brother-in-law carried her to safety, she said.

Outside a mortuary that was guarded by dozens of police officers, some of the workers’ relatives said they had received phone calls from the men trapped inside, who begged them to call the fire brigade. Family members identified the dead from photos on police officers’ phones.

Many of the men were migrant workers from the impoverished border state of Bihar in eastern India, relatives said. They earned as little as 150 rupees ($2.10) per day making handbags, caps and other garments, sleeping at the factory between long shifts.

Many of the victims were asleep when the blaze began, according to Yogesh, a police spokesman who uses one name.

Dr. Kishore Singh said rescuers brought victims to his government-run hospital and two others in the city. Another 16 people were being treated for burns or smoke inhalation and were in stable condition, Singh said.

Police barred relatives from entering Lok Nayak hospital, where some of the victims were taken. Relatives of the workers cried, consoled one another and jostled for information.

“I was told by someone my nephew is inside, but I haven’t seen him,” said Mohammad Moti, who was searching for his 22-year-old nephew, Mohammad Chedi.

Fire Services chief Atul Garg said it took 25 fire trucks to put out the blaze. About 60 people, including some of the dead, were taken out of the building, said Mittal, the assistant police commissioner.

New Delhi’s chief minister, Arvind Kejriwal, appeared at the scene of the fire, promising victims’ families compensation.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi described the fire as “extremely horrific.”

“My thoughts are with those who lost their loved ones. Wishing the injured a quick recovery,” Modi tweeted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: sheikh saaliq, ashok sharma
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, victims, mittal, making, kills, indian, buildings, handbags, workers, relatives, devastating, building, factory, capital, inside, blaze


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post