Mueller report expected Thursday. Here’s what to watch and what’s next

Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders. Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump. On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.” “No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,”


Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders. Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump. On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.” “No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,”
Mueller report expected Thursday. Here’s what to watch and what’s next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: kevin breuninger, cliff owen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, obstruction, york, trump, barr, conclusions, probe, muellers, whats, heres, information, expected, mueller, watch


Mueller report expected Thursday. Here's what to watch and what's next

Democrats and Republicans alike have clamored to see the final conclusions from the highly guarded investigation.

But like the probe itself, the process of preparing the report for its public rollout has been the subject of intense scrutiny and controversy on Capitol Hill.

Less than two days after receiving the lengthy report, Barr summarized what he said were its main conclusions in a four-page letter to congressional Judiciary Committee leaders.

Barr shared two main conclusions from Mueller’s probe, both of which were celebrated by Trump.

The special counsel did not establish conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, Barr wrote, quoting an excerpt from the report itself.

On the question obstruction, Barr quoted Mueller saying the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime, [but] it also does not exonerate him.”

Mueller’s lack of a definitive stance on obstruction left the final decision to Barr and Rosenstein. They concluded: “The evidence developed during the special counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the president committed an obstruction of justice offense.”

Both sides of the political aisle were quick to respond that evening.

“No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION,” Trump tweeted, even though he was not exonerated by Mueller.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately went after Barr’s credibility, saying in a statement that the attorney general “is not a neutral observer and is not in a position to make objective determinations about the report.”

Some Democrats had voiced concerns that Barr may have pre-judged the Mueller probe in light of an unsolicited memo he sent to the Justice Department last June criticizing the Mueller probe’s obstruction inquiry as “fatally misconceived.”

In addition, reports from The New York Times and Washington Post citing several members of Mueller’s team poured gasoline on the firestorm of controversy following Barr’s summary. The team members, speaking on the condition of anonymity, reportedly said that the evidence that Trump tried to obstruct the probe is stronger than Barr has publicly suggested.

Barr holds the ultimate authority on the report’s release. He gained oversight responsibilities from Rosenstein, who himself adopted those duties after former DOJ head Jeff Sessions recused himself from any investigations into Russian election meddling.

While Barr has vowed to be as transparent as possible in the handling and release of the report, he has made clear that both Congress and the public will see a version of the report that contains redactions in four areas. The attorney general said the redactions will be color-coded, so that readers can better understand why certain information was hidden.

That material includes information about intelligence sources and methods, details of ongoing investigations and other information that would “unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.”

But the most controversial redaction category involves the DOJ’s insistence that information related to Mueller’s grand jury cannot be released under federal law. Democratic lawmakers, led by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York, have pushed back on that argument, claiming Barr could share that information with Congress if he wanted to.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: kevin breuninger, cliff owen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, obstruction, york, trump, barr, conclusions, probe, muellers, whats, heres, information, expected, mueller, watch


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here’s why

The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC. The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote. He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. The Russian government


The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC. The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote. He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. The Russian government
The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: silvia amaro, thomas trutschel, photothek, getty images, -andrew foxall, director at the henry jackson society, -donald tusk, european council president
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eu, russian, deal, european, information, disinformation, told, campaign, elections, russia, influence, heres, foxall, ready


The EU is not ready to deal with Russian influence in its elections. Here's why

The European Union is having a hard job building a sufficient firewall when it comes to election interference, experts have told CNBC.

The European Parliament — the EU’s legislative arm — has launched a campaign to tackle online disinformation ahead of its elections in May. But there are certain loopholes that mean there could still be outside influence in the vote.

“Russia will attempt to influence the parliamentary elections using its usual tool kit, including targeted propaganda, and the stealing and leaking of information,” Andrew Foxall, director of the Russia and Eurasia studies at the Henry Jackson Society, told CNBC via email.

He added that there are a number of steps that European institutions should take to prevent such influence. EU countries could share information with each other on “fake news” stories or disinformation; make public any influence attempts — whether from Russia or elsewhere; pledge not to use stolen data in their campaigns and make campaign financing more transparent, Foxall said.

The Russian government was not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: silvia amaro, thomas trutschel, photothek, getty images, -andrew foxall, director at the henry jackson society, -donald tusk, european council president
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eu, russian, deal, european, information, disinformation, told, campaign, elections, russia, influence, heres, foxall, ready


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai


If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai
Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help.

As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo.

But what users can’t do yet is connect with a doctor or a therapist through the device, and it might be a few years before they can. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors.

Developers focused on digital health have concerns about using home speakers like the Echo and Google Home for medical consults because privacy issues continue to emerge and there’s too much risk in sensitive health information falling into the wrong hands. Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that thousands of employees listen in to snippets of conversations on Alexa to supposedly improve the product experience.

“It’s tricky,” said Robbie Cape, CEO of 98point6, a Seattle-based company that provides virtual medical consults via smartphones and the web. “To uphold user trust, I can imagine that Amazon Alexa would need to confirm they’re talking to the right person, but also that there’s no one else in the room listening to the conversation.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency

The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well. One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues. Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investme


The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well. One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues. Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investme
How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eric rosenbaum, fort worth star-telegram, tribune news service, getty images, wolfgang kaehler, lightrocket, krisanapong detraphiphat, moment, dominick reuter, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparency, issues, disclose, official, address, seeks, key, investors, index, does, votes, information, funds, social, voting, fund, sec


How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency

The era of low-cost index funds from asset management giants such as Vanguard Group and BlackRock has simplified the fund-buying process — and that has been a good thing — but there is more work to be done.

The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well.

One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues.

Mutual fund investors have learned that there are a few critical pieces of information to ask about before making an investment purchase: How much does the fund cost, and how has its performance compared with other funds and the index? But that leaves out a layer of information that is becoming increasingly important to a new generation of investors: Does your fund care about social conditions across the Earth today and the future of the planet itself?

Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investments. But the vast majority of investors are still in funds designed to buy stocks first and deal with the social repercussions after as they cast votes at annual meetings — the most votes of any public company shareholders.

Those proxy voting records of big fund companies on issues — including climate change, human rights, gun control and CEO pay — are a key metric to measure their social responsibility. On issues such as climate change, they’ve proven to be more talk than action.

“We should be showing how votes are cast with Americans’ dollars at the point of sale,” Jackson said in a recent interview with CNBC. “When you sit down with a broker and they put you in a fund, that investor ought to know how the money voted.”

While mutual funds are required by the SEC to disclose their proxy voting record once a year in a public document called an N-PX, that information remains hidden from most investors — who wouldn’t be able to understand the disclosure even if they knew how to find it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eric rosenbaum, fort worth star-telegram, tribune news service, getty images, wolfgang kaehler, lightrocket, krisanapong detraphiphat, moment, dominick reuter, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparency, issues, disclose, official, address, seeks, key, investors, index, does, votes, information, funds, social, voting, fund, sec


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass


Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass
The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

The indictment describes a relationship that ran from January to May 2010. During that time, Chelsea Manning, an Army intelligence analyst then known as Bradley Manning, sent “nearly complete” databases from U.S. government agencies to Wikileaks at Assange’s request. The data included 90,000 Afghan war reports, 400,000 Iraq war reports, 800 assessment briefs of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more.

Assange is alleged to have helped Manning break a password associated with the U.S. government’s Secret Internet Protocol Network, encouraged Manning to provide various records and information from several different departments and helped Manning conceal her identity while doing it.

The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. For this, Manning used a Linux-based software tool, the Justice Department alleges, though it’s unclear where Manning obtained the software.

These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information.

Assange also allegedly pushed Manning for more information.

“After this upload, that’s all I really have got left,” Manning allegedly said in early 2010 after the initial leaks.

“Curious eyes never run dry in my experience,” Assange replied, according to the indictment.

The army arrested Manning for the leaks in July 2010. Wikileaks publicly released the data starting later that year.

Assange used the diplomatic cables to take U.S. government officials and media outlets on a months-long ride, involving promises of massive file dumps, allegedly damaging data held as “insurance,” and various other teases throughout 2010. The data dumps provided Wikileaks with significant media attention and caused diplomatic headaches and long-lasting repercussions in the relationships between the U.S. and its European allies.

Manning has said she leaked the information to Wikileaks because of grave concerns that media and government portrayals of success in Iraq and Afghanistan were a stark contrast to the starker, uglier reality she had been observing in her Army role.

At her sentencing in August 2013, she said, “When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people. At the time of my decisions I was dealing with a lot of issues.” She was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Throughout her court martial, Manning was often described by her attorneys as “emotionally fragile,” and she said she became involved with Wikileaks staffers because they sympathized with her personally and made her feel like she could “be myself.” Manning has so far fought a subpoena to testify in the case against Assange.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass


Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more. The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information. Ass
The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


The Assange indictment shows how hard it is to protect classified information in the modern era

The indictment describes a relationship that ran from January to May 2010. During that time, Chelsea Manning, an Army intelligence analyst then known as Bradley Manning, sent “nearly complete” databases from U.S. government agencies to Wikileaks at Assange’s request. The data included 90,000 Afghan war reports, 400,000 Iraq war reports, 800 assessment briefs of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and 250,000 diplomatic cables.

Assange also allegedly provided support to Manning, and encouraged her to keep leaking terabytes of information even after she said she couldn’t access any more.

Assange is alleged to have helped Manning break a password associated with the U.S. government’s Secret Internet Protocol Network, encouraged Manning to provide various records and information from several different departments and helped Manning conceal her identity while doing it.

The indictment also outlines an alleged “password cracking agreement,” in which Assange helped Manning find sensitive passwords and attempt to crack them, in order to give her greater access to classified information. For this, Manning used a Linux-based software tool, the Justice Department alleges, though it’s unclear where Manning obtained the software.

These are the basis of charges that Assange conspired to hack government computers and steal classified information.

Assange also allegedly pushed Manning for more information.

“After this upload, that’s all I really have got left,” Manning allegedly said in early 2010 after the initial leaks.

“Curious eyes never run dry in my experience,” Assange replied, according to the indictment.

The army arrested Manning for the leaks in July 2010. Wikileaks publicly released the data starting later that year.

Assange used the diplomatic cables to take U.S. government officials and media outlets on a months-long ride, involving promises of massive file dumps, allegedly damaging data held as “insurance,” and various other teases throughout 2010. The data dumps provided Wikileaks with significant media attention and caused diplomatic headaches and long-lasting repercussions in the relationships between the U.S. and its European allies.

Manning has said she leaked the information to Wikileaks because of grave concerns that media and government portrayals of success in Iraq and Afghanistan were a stark contrast to the starker, uglier reality she had been observing in her Army role.

At her sentencing in August 2013, she said, “When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people. At the time of my decisions I was dealing with a lot of issues.” She was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Throughout her court martial, Manning was often described by her attorneys as “emotionally fragile,” and she said she became involved with Wikileaks staffers because they sympathized with her personally and made her feel like she could “be myself.” Manning has so far fought a subpoena to testify in the case against Assange.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: kate fazzini, henry nicholls
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, modern, shows, helped, era, 2010, data, media, manning, allegedly, classified, assange, indictment, protect, diplomatic, hard, wikileaks, information


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post