What inspired these top advisors to help others manage money

But how about the financial advisor you’ve been working with all these years? More from Financial Advisor 100:CNBC FA 100 2019 list of top-rated financial advisory firmsTop-ranked advisory firms help meet their client’s financial goals10 years on, ‘personal touch’ will still dominate financial advice spaceWe asked eight financial advisors from wealth management firms ranked in the 2019 FA 100 list what exactly inspired them to get into the financial advisory business. My first purse, at 5 years


But how about the financial advisor you’ve been working with all these years? More from Financial Advisor 100:CNBC FA 100 2019 list of top-rated financial advisory firmsTop-ranked advisory firms help meet their client’s financial goals10 years on, ‘personal touch’ will still dominate financial advice spaceWe asked eight financial advisors from wealth management firms ranked in the 2019 FA 100 list what exactly inspired them to get into the financial advisory business. My first purse, at 5 years
What inspired these top advisors to help others manage money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, salem investment counselors, prapass pulsub, moment, getty images, jose luis pelaez, -mark a pitre, principal, california financial advisors, -dale brown
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisory, firms, advisor, manage, money, list, 100, working, financial, advisors, inspired, help


What inspired these top advisors to help others manage money

Everyone loves a good origin story, whether it’s fictional, like Superman’s, or real life — think Warren Buffett or Steve Jobs — or even somewhere in between. But how about the financial advisor you’ve been working with all these years? What motivated him or her to work with numbers and balances and figure out how those, well, figures impact people’s lives?

Financial professionals sometimes get stereotyped as bean counters and calculator-button pushers, but in speaking with top executives at leading advisory firms that made CNBC.com’s FA 100 list this year, it’s apparent that there are two themes common to most of their background stories: first, a fascination with the mechanics of money, math and markets — in short, “finance” — and second, a desire to interact with and truly help people — in other words, “service.” It’s no coincidence, then, they ended up in financial services.

More from Financial Advisor 100:

CNBC FA 100 2019 list of top-rated financial advisory firms

Top-ranked advisory firms help meet their client’s financial goals

10 years on, ‘personal touch’ will still dominate financial advice space

We asked eight financial advisors from wealth management firms ranked in the 2019 FA 100 list what exactly inspired them to get into the financial advisory business. Their replies follow.

California Financial Advisors , San Ramon, California

• Michelle Perry Higgins, principal: “My family owned several businesses when I was growing up, and I was completely obsessed watching my dad pay the bills, count the money after closing and work with customers. I knew early on I had a love for money management. My first purse, at 5 years old, was a Bank of America money bag.”

• Mark A. Pitre, principal: “Personally, as I went through college, I realized that there were a few interests that I wanted in my career: One, I wanted to help people, and two, I enjoyed working with numbers. As I considered various careers, I realized that the financial planning/investment advisory industry provided both. In this industry, to be successful, you have to want to help people first and foremost. Without that being your main objective, you will struggle as an advisor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, salem investment counselors, prapass pulsub, moment, getty images, jose luis pelaez, -mark a pitre, principal, california financial advisors, -dale brown
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, advisory, firms, advisor, manage, money, list, 100, working, financial, advisors, inspired, help


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The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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How ‘FOMO’ inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game

Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao. Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board.


Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao. Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board.
How ‘FOMO’ inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reality, zhao, millennial, inspired, sandbox, build, experience, funding, founder, vr, game, 71, virtual, kong, hong, business, steve, really, milliondollar, fomo


How 'FOMO' inspired this millennial founder to build a $71 million-dollar virtual reality game

When Steve Zhao was looking for investment for his virtual reality arcade business, he did something unconventional: He lined up all his meetings back-to-back and had the investors sit together in the same waiting room. It was part of the young founder’s “FOMO” strategy — fear of missing out — to build a hype around his business. And it seemed to work. Within five days, Sandbox VR closed out its Series A funding round with a total of $68 million, led by famed Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. That took the company’s total funding raised to $71 million. “Investors are emotional beings, just like everybody else,” Zhao told CNBC Make It. “It’s important for VCs (venture capitalists) to see you’re in demand.”

Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR. RISE

It was the idea of Siqi Chen, the company’s chief product officer and the brains behind journaling app Heyday. As a serial entrepreneur, Chen knew the value of creating demand for a product, Zhao explained at RISE tech conference in Hong Kong. So they made it clear that their immersive gaming experience was hot property. It was just the boost the young entrepreneurs needed to make it big, explained 36-year-old Zhao.

Getting in on the game

At that stage, in 2018, Sandbox VR had already won $3 million in early-stage funding, including from Chinese tech giant Alibaba. Zhao himself put in a personal investment of $300,000. But they felt they had to build a following in the U.S. to really get their start-up off the ground. “We started Sandbox VR in 2016, when the hype of VR was very palpable,” said Zhao.

Players experience Sandbox VR’s immersive virtual reality game. Sandbox VR

The engineer, who had relocated from the U.S. to Hong Kong for business, had seen the growing popularity of VR while working on a separate mobile gaming app, and decided to pivot. At that time, other immersive VR gaming attractions — such as The Void and MindTrek VR — were beginning to emerge in major cities. But Zhao dreamed of creating an experience that put greater emphasis on in-headset interactions between players. “There were a lot of VR experiences like what you experience at home. Then there were full immersive ones. We didn’t do any of that. We felt the game experience was not about the environment, but your friend,” said Zhao.

We thought ‘okay, this is the VR center globally, we can either fail really hard here or not.’ Steve Zhao founder of Sandbox VR

However, he lacked conviction from investors. “Our business felt like a paradox. Lots of money was going into VR in the U.S., Japan etc., but not Hong Kong. People didn’t see the VR tech potential in Hong Kong — they thought it would only have a local reach, ” he said. While Hong Kong has long been recognized as a global financial center, it has so far struggled to gain traction as a major start-up hub, particularly with regard to emerging technologies such as VR and artificial intelligence.

Sandbox VR’s virtual reality graphics in action. Sandbox VR

Finding funding in the Valley

So, with their team of six having successfully built a pop-up venue and amassed a small cult following for its games in Hong Kong, they decided in 2018 to take their business stateside — to the mecca of VR, Silicon Valley. “We thought ‘okay, this is the VR center globally, we can either fail really hard here or not,'” said Zhao. But, rather than fail, they launched a Sandbox VR center in San Francisco and quickly signed up investors to get on board. “That was the second paradox: People were curious about us being from Hong Kong, so they were interested in investing,” said Zhao.

Andrew Chen, partner at Andreessen Horowitz, Siqi Che, chief product officer at Sandbox VR, and Steve Zhao, founder and CEO of Sandbox VR, after singing an investment deal at 1am at an In N Out Burger restaurant. Sandbox VR

Before long, the company attracted investment from U.S. venture capital firms Floodgate Fund and Andreessen Horowitz, and Stanford University with whom Zhao signed a deal at 1 a.m. in a local In-N-Out Burger restaurant in San Francisco. That funding round, which closed in January 2019, took Sandbox VR’s total funds raised to date to $71 million. With it, the company has expanded to new markets including Vancouver, Canada; Jakarta, Indonesia; Macau, greater China; and Singapore. Zhao said those venues enjoy around 90% occupancy during peak hours, which are on weekends and in the evenings from 6 p.m.

It’s a fundamentally human experience, so the scope is global. Steve Zhao founder and CEO, Sandbox VR

Virtually limitless potential

Sandbox VR now plans to open new locations in a range of U.S. cities, including Austin, Chicago and New York, as part of the company’s plans to target leading global markets. “It’s a fundamentally human experience, so the scope is global. But we’re aiming for countries with high GDP (gross domestic product) initially,” said Zhao, pinpointing other parts of the U.S., the U.K., Japan and China. A 30-minute session in the U.S. currently costs $48. At the same time, Zhao’s team of developers, which had grown to 75, started looking for other VR avenues to pursue beyond the traditional zombie, pirate and futuristic franchises. “Zombies are easy,” said Zhao. “Comedy and Esports are really exciting.” It’s part of Zhao’s grand ambition to create a “new movie industry” of VR content. For that, the entrepreneur will be looking to raise more funds next year. Perhaps this time, he’ll need to find a bigger waiting room. Don’t miss: What this couple learned from Facebook and Google about building a Chinese mega app Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reality, zhao, millennial, inspired, sandbox, build, experience, funding, founder, vr, game, 71, virtual, kong, hong, business, steve, really, milliondollar, fomo


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A Bill Gates speech inspired Zoom founder to start an internet business—now he’s a billionaire

In 1994, Yuan was just out of college and working in Japan for a few months at the same time that Gates was in that country to give a speech. The talk reignited something in Yuan that he had been thinking about for a few years already. He’d first thought of the idea for a videoconferencing company as a college freshman in China in 1987. Yuan spent those train rides daydreaming about ways he could see his girlfriend without making such a long journey. And every day I thought about that,” Yuan say


In 1994, Yuan was just out of college and working in Japan for a few months at the same time that Gates was in that country to give a speech. The talk reignited something in Yuan that he had been thinking about for a few years already. He’d first thought of the idea for a videoconferencing company as a college freshman in China in 1987. Yuan spent those train rides daydreaming about ways he could see his girlfriend without making such a long journey. And every day I thought about that,” Yuan say
A Bill Gates speech inspired Zoom founder to start an internet business—now he’s a billionaire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: tom huddleston jr, victor j blue, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billionaire, company, speech, zoom, start, internet, yuan, videoconferencing, train, remembers, hes, gates, inspired, thought, talk, founder, businessnow


A Bill Gates speech inspired Zoom founder to start an internet business—now he's a billionaire

When Eric Yuan was in his early 20s, he heard a speech from then-Microsoft CEO Bill Gates about the promise of the internet, and Yuan decided he wanted to move from China to the US to be a part of the Silicon Valley tech boom.

Today, Yuan is the 49-year-old founder and CEO of videoconferencing cloud software company Zoom, which debuted on the Nasdaq exchange on Thursday in an IPO that currently values the company at more than $16 billion.

In 1994, Yuan was just out of college and working in Japan for a few months at the same time that Gates was in that country to give a speech. At the time, Gates was in his late 30s himself, and Microsoft was still a year away from releasing its Internet Explorer web browser as part of the Windows 95 operating system.

In an interview with GGV Capital last year, Yuan simply remembers that he was “inspired by this speech” that Gates delivered in Japan on the future of the internet, which was then not yet as ubiquitous as it is today.

The talk reignited something in Yuan that he had been thinking about for a few years already. He’d first thought of the idea for a videoconferencing company as a college freshman in China in 1987. Yuan and his girlfriend (now his wife) lived in different cities and he had to take a 10-hour train ride each way just to see her.

Yuan spent those train rides daydreaming about ways he could see his girlfriend without making such a long journey. He remembers telling her, “Someday, if I can have a smart device and with just one click I can talk with you, can see you.’ That was my daydream, right? And every day I thought about that,” Yuan says in the GGV Capital interview.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: tom huddleston jr, victor j blue, bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billionaire, company, speech, zoom, start, internet, yuan, videoconferencing, train, remembers, hes, gates, inspired, thought, talk, founder, businessnow


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Women-led companies have more engaged and inspired employees, new survey finds

Workers prefer female-led companies’ approach to corporate strategyThe biggest difference the survey noted between women-led companies and similar male-led ones comes down to purpose. When workers rated how inspired they felt by the purpose and mission of their organization on a 10-point scale, women-led companies scored 0.8 points higher. (Women-led companies scored 0.3 points higher on this topic.) Engagement and worker autonomy rise at female-led companiesIn addition to strategy, companies wi


Workers prefer female-led companies’ approach to corporate strategyThe biggest difference the survey noted between women-led companies and similar male-led ones comes down to purpose. When workers rated how inspired they felt by the purpose and mission of their organization on a 10-point scale, women-led companies scored 0.8 points higher. (Women-led companies scored 0.3 points higher on this topic.) Engagement and worker autonomy rise at female-led companiesIn addition to strategy, companies wi
Women-led companies have more engaged and inspired employees, new survey finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, pixelfit, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, engaged, strategy, finds, women, engagement, employees, work, higher, companies, female, workers, inspired, womenled


Women-led companies have more engaged and inspired employees, new survey finds

If you want to feel more satisfied at work, switching to a company headed by women might just be the antidote.

Organizations where women hold at least half of executive positions are more likely to have employees who believe in the company’s mission, products and strategy, leading such companies to do a better job meeting the needs of its workers. That’s according to a new survey of 57,483 workers conducted over four years by Peakon, an HR data platform that gathers and analyzes employee feedback.

Workers prefer female-led companies’ approach to corporate strategy

The biggest difference the survey noted between women-led companies and similar male-led ones comes down to purpose. Workers at the female-headed firms felt more positive about their organizations’ corporate strategy and mission, both understanding and agreeing with the overall strategy at a higher rate than did employees at companies with more male executives.

When workers rated how inspired they felt by the purpose and mission of their organization on a 10-point scale, women-led companies scored 0.8 points higher. That might seem like a small difference, but Peakon co-founder Kasper Hulthin told CNBC Make It that it is actually quite significant. Because of the survey’s large pool of respondents, Hulthin says it very rare to see large differences between groups, and that a 1-2-point difference would be exceptional.

“The interesting thing here was all the questions related to strategy stood out for women-led organizations,” adds Hulthin.

Workers at women-led businesses were also more likely to say that they felt the goals and strategies set by senior leadership were moving the company in the right direction. (Women-led companies scored 0.3 points higher on this topic.)

That difference might be explained by communication: The survey found workers scored female leaders 0.6 points higher than male leaders when it came to explaining and sharing the goals and strategies top executives had set for the company.

Engagement and worker autonomy rise at female-led companies

In addition to strategy, companies with a greater share of female execs tended to have more a more engaged workforce and fewer employees just collecting a paycheck. Their staffs were likelier to report feeling absorbed in and enthusiastic about their work and believe in the company. Women-led companies, for example, scored 0.6 points higher when it came to employees’ willingness to recommend their company’s products or services to family or friends.

Finally, women-led organizations appear to feature less micro-managing and more employee autonomy, allowing workers to complete tasks as they see fit and offering better remote work policies, according to the survey.

Hulthin says Peakon regularly surveys employees on a variety of factors, but did not find any areas where male-led organizations outshone women-led ones, instead the two groups were very similar on other workplace issues such as peer relationships, management support, compensation and rewards, employee growth, cultural fit, recognition and workload.

Women might not be the cause for the differences

While the data might suggest at first glance that the greater presence of women is the cause behind these positive changes in worker’s engagement and commitment to their employer, Hulthin cautions against such a conclusion.

The differences seen between women and men-led companies could be due to that fact that industries that promote female leaders or attract top female talent might already be higher-performers when it comes to strategy and autonomy.

In other words: Female leadership might not be the cause of these findings, but the result.

That theory lines up with other research done on the topic, including a 2016 Gallup poll, which argued that men and women’s job choices may explain the difference between their engagement levels.

Men were more likely to work in manufacturing and production jobs, which typically have lower worker engagement, whereas women were likely to hold professional jobs that have higher engagement levels. So women who work their way up to leadership roles may have positioned themselves at companies that had solid employee engagement levels to begin with, regardless of the gender makeup of their executive staff.

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Don’t miss: 11 high-paying jobs you should avoid


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, pixelfit, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, engaged, strategy, finds, women, engagement, employees, work, higher, companies, female, workers, inspired, womenled


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Cramer Remix: How my father’s mistakes inspired me to buy stocks

If you want to invest in individual stocks, you have to be ready to do your homework, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on his show Thursday. The “Mad Money” host told a story from his childhood about how his father, “Pops,” began buying stocks of National Video through a tip that he received from his brother. “One of the precepts of ‘Mad Money’ is to know how to invest in an individual stock if you are going to do so,” Cramer said. “Tips, as I like to say, are for waiters … You must do homework if you a


If you want to invest in individual stocks, you have to be ready to do your homework, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on his show Thursday. The “Mad Money” host told a story from his childhood about how his father, “Pops,” began buying stocks of National Video through a tip that he received from his brother. “One of the precepts of ‘Mad Money’ is to know how to invest in an individual stock if you are going to do so,” Cramer said. “Tips, as I like to say, are for waiters … You must do homework if you a
Cramer Remix: How my father’s mistakes inspired me to buy stocks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: tyler clifford, scott mlyn, michael fein, bloomberg, getty images, daniel acker, ashlee espinal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fathers, inspired, stock, tip, buy, video, cramer, stocks, individual, remix, money, pops, mistakes, buying, homework


Cramer Remix: How my father's mistakes inspired me to buy stocks

If you want to invest in individual stocks, you have to be ready to do your homework, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said on his show Thursday.

The “Mad Money” host told a story from his childhood about how his father, “Pops,” began buying stocks of National Video through a tip that he received from his brother. Pops, he said, eventually put a large chunk of his life savings into the equity as the price was rising. Once the stock began falling, Pops, like many people, had no idea what to do besides asking his brother to fetch another tip from his friend, Cramer said.

The tip was to keep buying National Video and the only thing that Pops knew to do was continue buying the stock, which means he was at the “mercy” of the stock’s movement, he said.

“One of the precepts of ‘Mad Money’ is to know how to invest in an individual stock if you are going to do so,” Cramer said. “Tips, as I like to say, are for waiters … You must do homework if you are going to own individual stocks … [and] if you can’t do homework then own an index fund.”

But if you fear losing money, “don’t own stocks at all,” he said.

Click here to hear the full story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: tyler clifford, scott mlyn, michael fein, bloomberg, getty images, daniel acker, ashlee espinal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fathers, inspired, stock, tip, buy, video, cramer, stocks, individual, remix, money, pops, mistakes, buying, homework


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Instagram rolls out sensitivity screens in the wake of teen suicide

The head of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, announced on Tuesday that company is implementing changes that it hopes will stop younger users from being exposed to inappropriate content relating to suicide and self harm. These changes include “sensitivity screens,” which will blur out images of cutting until the viewer opts in. Images that depict self-harm will also no longer appear in search, hashtag or account recommendations. In an op-ed in The Telegraph, Mosseri revealed that he was inspired to make


The head of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, announced on Tuesday that company is implementing changes that it hopes will stop younger users from being exposed to inappropriate content relating to suicide and self harm. These changes include “sensitivity screens,” which will blur out images of cutting until the viewer opts in. Images that depict self-harm will also no longer appear in search, hashtag or account recommendations. In an op-ed in The Telegraph, Mosseri revealed that he was inspired to make
Instagram rolls out sensitivity screens in the wake of teen suicide Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: katie brigham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suicide, inspired, hancock, facebook, tragedy, screens, teen, rolls, wake, changes, sensitivity, self, stop, mosseri, images, instagram


Instagram rolls out sensitivity screens in the wake of teen suicide

The head of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, announced on Tuesday that company is implementing changes that it hopes will stop younger users from being exposed to inappropriate content relating to suicide and self harm.

These changes include “sensitivity screens,” which will blur out images of cutting until the viewer opts in. Images that depict self-harm will also no longer appear in search, hashtag or account recommendations.

In an op-ed in The Telegraph, Mosseri revealed that he was inspired to make these changes in the wake of the 2017 suicide of British 14-year-old Molly Russell, who followed multiple self harm and suicide accounts.

Instagram parent company Facebook has also been under government pressure. In January, UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock demanded that tech giants like Facebook, Twitter and Google do a better job of protecting children from harmful content or face more forceful legislation.

In his letter, Hancock said, “I was inspired by the bravery of Molly’s father, who spoke out about the role of social media in this tragedy – and moved by the sense that there is much more we all need to do to stop a tragedy like this from happening again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: katie brigham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suicide, inspired, hancock, facebook, tragedy, screens, teen, rolls, wake, changes, sensitivity, self, stop, mosseri, images, instagram


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Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change

When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation. Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on


When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation. Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on
Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jillian donfro, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, medical, disability, googles, accommodation, workplace, push, walkouts, inspired, internal, google, company, fitzpatrick, change, process


Google walkouts inspired push for disability accommodation change

When Google changed the wording of its internal process for granting disability accommodation late last week, employee Cathy Fitzpatrick took it as proof that you can effect change by speaking out.

In the past year, the tech industry generally and Google employees in particular have shown an unusually high level of labor organizing, with employees sounding off about multiple workplace issues, including diversity and controversial company business contracts. Google made changes to its sexual harassment and misconduct policies after employees staged massive walkouts earlier this month (though the company ignored several of the organizers’ demands like adding an employee representative to Alphabet’s board).

Fitzpatrick’s complaint had to do with Google’s policy around providing special accommodation for employees with disabilities, like providing workspace adjustments for someone with an injury or tailored communication resources for an autistic person. She says Google’s policy appeared to require employees with disabilities to provide medical documentation before it would discuss accommodation.

She says that an anonymous internal mailing list for employees experiencing mental illness was rife with complaints about Google’s process, and that one co-worker waited seven months to request accommodation because the documentation requirement was intimidating.

Fitzpatrick first brought up her issues with the process internally about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t budge. So Fitzpatrick posted a long thread on Twitter laying out why she thought the process violated state and federal law.

Google softened its language about the process on its internal site soon after Fitzpatrick complained publicly. Instead of beginning with “Discuss your workplace barriers with your medical provider,” the revised site begins with “Where appropriate, we may ask you to provide information about your condition from a third party (e.g., your medical provider)….”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jillian donfro, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, medical, disability, googles, accommodation, workplace, push, walkouts, inspired, internal, google, company, fitzpatrick, change, process


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24-year-old NYSE equity trader Lauren Simmons’ career inspired a film

Equity trader Lauren Simmons has signed a deal with production company AGC Studios to turn the inspiring story of her journey to becoming the youngest full-time female trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange into a film. In June, CNBC Make It explored Simmons’ journey in a widely-circulated profile and video. Simmons moved to New York after graduating from college in December 2016 with an initial plan for a career in medicine. She passed, becoming the youngest, and at the time, only,


Equity trader Lauren Simmons has signed a deal with production company AGC Studios to turn the inspiring story of her journey to becoming the youngest full-time female trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange into a film. In June, CNBC Make It explored Simmons’ journey in a widely-circulated profile and video. Simmons moved to New York after graduating from college in December 2016 with an initial plan for a career in medicine. She passed, becoming the youngest, and at the time, only,
24-year-old NYSE equity trader Lauren Simmons’ career inspired a film Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equity, floor, kiersey, journey, youngest, simmons, fulltime, studios, inspired, york, career, film, production, 24yearold, trader, lauren, nyse


24-year-old NYSE equity trader Lauren Simmons' career inspired a film

Equity trader Lauren Simmons has signed a deal with production company AGC Studios to turn the inspiring story of her journey to becoming the youngest full-time female trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange into a film.

Actress Kiersey Clemons will produce the film and also play Simmons on the big screen.

In June, CNBC Make It explored Simmons’ journey in a widely-circulated profile and video. Simmons moved to New York after graduating from college in December 2016 with an initial plan for a career in medicine. A love of math drove her to pursue finance instead, and she landed a job at Rosenblatt Securities after applying through LinkedIn. She had one month to study for and take the Series 19, the exam all floor brokers must pass to earn their badge. She passed, becoming the youngest, and at the time, only, full-time female trader at the NYSE.

She says that in June, multiple production studios reaching out to her to discuss developing a biopic.

“I ultimately decided [on] AGC because of Kiersey,” says Simmons. “I got to meet Kiersey and felt she resembled me a lot. She has such a beautiful personality and she genuinely wanted to share my story. Out of everyone that I met, I knew that she would do it very [honestly], and not make it into a story that isn’t true.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, equity, floor, kiersey, journey, youngest, simmons, fulltime, studios, inspired, york, career, film, production, 24yearold, trader, lauren, nyse


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Photos: Inside Florida mega-mansion inspired by Versailles

The owner of the estate spared no expense and spent five years building the one-of-a-kind, Neoclassical castle. And now that his architectural masterpiece is complete, he’s decided to auction off the property to the highest bidder on Nov. 15 — with no reserve. The mansion is in Hillsboro Beach, half way between Miami and Palm Beach. It sits on a strip of land with the Intracoastal Waterway in front and the Atlantic out back. If I had a 220-foot yacht this would be the perfect place for it.


The owner of the estate spared no expense and spent five years building the one-of-a-kind, Neoclassical castle. And now that his architectural masterpiece is complete, he’s decided to auction off the property to the highest bidder on Nov. 15 — with no reserve. The mansion is in Hillsboro Beach, half way between Miami and Palm Beach. It sits on a strip of land with the Intracoastal Waterway in front and the Atlantic out back. If I had a 220-foot yacht this would be the perfect place for it.
Photos: Inside Florida mega-mansion inspired by Versailles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: jessica joseph, concierge auctions, source, concierge auction
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, mansion, way, place, waterway, walk, beach, florida, withstand, megamansion, inspired, system, york, photos, versailles, yacht


Photos: Inside Florida mega-mansion inspired by Versailles

It’s something I get to experience as a producer for CNBC’s “Secret Lives of the Super Rich” — there are no precious metals adorning my studio apartment in New York City, so it’s a sight to behold.

The owner of the estate spared no expense and spent five years building the one-of-a-kind, Neoclassical castle. And now that his architectural masterpiece is complete, he’s decided to auction off the property to the highest bidder on Nov. 15 — with no reserve.

So this is my last chance to see the place.

The mansion is in Hillsboro Beach, half way between Miami and Palm Beach. It sits on a strip of land with the Intracoastal Waterway in front and the Atlantic out back. If I had a 220-foot yacht this would be the perfect place for it.

It’s a beautiful day in South Florida (though the mansion is built to withstand a Category 5 Hurricane, with a backup generator system that could keep the place running smoothly for 10 days), and as I walk up the raised circular limestone driveway, I feel the sun and ocean breeze on my face. A 29-foot-high fountain rises up from the courtyard below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: jessica joseph, concierge auctions, source, concierge auction
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inside, mansion, way, place, waterway, walk, beach, florida, withstand, megamansion, inspired, system, york, photos, versailles, yacht


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