We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
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Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: ‘They’re stealing our game from us’

Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it. China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China. “We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is fo


Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it. China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China. “We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is fo
Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: ‘They’re stealing our game from us’ Cached Page below :
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Kyle Bass says trade deal with China must address IP theft: 'They're stealing our game from us'

Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass thinks any trade deal with China must include enforcement mechanisms against intellectual property theft for the U.S. to truly benefit from it.

“Over the last decade, they’ve stolen $2-to-$3 trillion in IP from us. The U.S.’ No. 1 asset, in my view, is our ingenuity, our intellectual property, our ability to innovate,” Bass told CNBC’s Brian Sullivan in a pre-taped interview that aired on “Worldwide Exchange.” “That’s our game and they’re stealing our game from us. It’s really important for this new agreement to be measurable and punishable.”

China and the U.S. are in the “final stages” of working out a trade deal, CNBC learned through sources. However, The New York Times reported Sunday that any deal would do little to address key structural changes in China that the U.S. has been seeking. These changes include a way to enforce intellectual property of U.S. products in China.

“We have a golden opportunity today for a global reset in our relationship with China,” Bass said. “Our real issue is forced technology transfers, it’s intellectual property theft, it’s subversive industrial policies that circumvent WTO rules. It’s basically the way the Chinese lie, cheat and steal their way through our economy.”

Investors across the globe have been cheering the apparent progress in trade talks between the two countries. The S&P 500 has risen more than 11 percent this year. In China, the Shanghai Composite has surged more than 20 percent, rebounding from a sharp sell-off in 2018.

But Bass is skeptical about the sharp run-up in Chinese equities. “Can the Chinese run up their stock market? Absolutely. Domestically, they control the price, they control the printing press, they control the police, they control the narrative,” he said. “The Chinese print more money than any other country has ever printed, in gross terms, in world history. Since 2001, they’ve printed roughly $30 billion worth of RMB.”

“Why would you invest in a country where there is no rule of law?” added Bass, claiming that Western investors would have no standing if a Chinese company were to go bankrupt. Chinese stocks should be considered tracking stocks not ownership in a piece of the company, he argued.

Bass also said “the ultimate arbiter” for China will be its foreign exchange reserves and how its currency performs against those around the world. This is because China makes it nearly impossible for investors to bet against the country’s domestic companies.

“The economics between our two nations are very, very different. At some point in time, the world is going to see the emperor has no clothes.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: fred imbert
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Amid US-China trade dispute, companies say there’s one area of change

While the U.S. and China are locked in a trade dispute over Beijing’s treatment of foreign firms, many foreign companies say there’s one area with some positive change: intellectual property. The American Chamber of Commerce in China said Tuesday that 59 percent of its members believe Beijing has improved its enforcement of intellectual property protection in the last five years. The survey of 314 member company representatives between Nov. 13 and Dec. 16 also found more members said enforcement


While the U.S. and China are locked in a trade dispute over Beijing’s treatment of foreign firms, many foreign companies say there’s one area with some positive change: intellectual property. The American Chamber of Commerce in China said Tuesday that 59 percent of its members believe Beijing has improved its enforcement of intellectual property protection in the last five years. The survey of 314 member company representatives between Nov. 13 and Dec. 16 also found more members said enforcement
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Amid US-China trade dispute, companies say there's one area of change

While the U.S. and China are locked in a trade dispute over Beijing’s treatment of foreign firms, many foreign companies say there’s one area with some positive change: intellectual property.

The American Chamber of Commerce in China said Tuesday that 59 percent of its members believe Beijing has improved its enforcement of intellectual property protection in the last five years. The survey of 314 member company representatives between Nov. 13 and Dec. 16 also found more members said enforcement in trademark and brand protection improved between 2016 and 2018.

“I think the statistics that we showed indicate that there’s a feeling there’s been a modest improvement in enforcement in the judicial system (on intellectual property rights),” Timothy Stratford, chairman of AmCham China, said during a press conference in Beijing on Tuesday.

While Beijing has generally acted far more slowly than foreign businesses would like, the improvement in sentiment and latest developments do indicate progress in the right direction. Late December last year, Beijing announced that China’s Supreme Court would begin hearing appeals on intellectual property rights cases from January. In the past, those cases were only handled by provincial-level high courts.


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Treasury yields fall amid US-China trade talks

“There’s obviously an incentive for both sides to reach a deal,” James Athey, senior investment manager at Aberdeen Standard Investments, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Friday. “The problem is that you’re now getting to the more difficult part of the negotiation, which is things like the IP (intellectual property) problem.” One of President Donald Trump’s biggest contentions with Beijing is the claim that the country has stolen intellectual property and trade secrets from American companies.


“There’s obviously an incentive for both sides to reach a deal,” James Athey, senior investment manager at Aberdeen Standard Investments, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Friday. “The problem is that you’re now getting to the more difficult part of the negotiation, which is things like the IP (intellectual property) problem.” One of President Donald Trump’s biggest contentions with Beijing is the claim that the country has stolen intellectual property and trade secrets from American companies.
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Treasury yields fall amid US-China trade talks

Market players continue to monitor the latest round of negotiations between Washington and Beijing. Optimism has risen over the chances of both countries securing a deal to end their protracted trade war, but some experts say the most difficult part is yet to come as high level talks continue into Friday.

“There’s obviously an incentive for both sides to reach a deal,” James Athey, senior investment manager at Aberdeen Standard Investments, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Friday.

“The problem is that you’re now getting to the more difficult part of the negotiation, which is things like the IP (intellectual property) problem.”

One of President Donald Trump’s biggest contentions with Beijing is the claim that the country has stolen intellectual property and trade secrets from American companies. Both nations are a week away from an early March deadline to secure a trade deal, however speculation has risen there may be an extension to that target.

Elsewhere, a flurry of speeches from Fed policymakers are due throughout the day, with New York Fed President John Williams, San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly, Philadelphia Fed Chairman Patrick Harker and St. Louis Fed President James Bullard expected to speak on the U.S. economy and monetary policy at separate events.

There are no auctions scheduled for Friday.


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Apple is the most sensitive to US-China trade war, strategist says

A trade war between the world’s two largest economies is likely to evolve into a dispute over intellectual property rights over the coming months, one analyst told CNBC Friday, with Apple set to bear the brunt of any further fallout. A long-running trade dispute between the U.S. and China has rattled financial markets in recent months, with a global stock market sell-off gathering pace in December amid escalating concerns of a possible economic slowdown. President Donald Trump and Chinese leader


A trade war between the world’s two largest economies is likely to evolve into a dispute over intellectual property rights over the coming months, one analyst told CNBC Friday, with Apple set to bear the brunt of any further fallout. A long-running trade dispute between the U.S. and China has rattled financial markets in recent months, with a global stock market sell-off gathering pace in December amid escalating concerns of a possible economic slowdown. President Donald Trump and Chinese leader
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Apple is the most sensitive to US-China trade war, strategist says

A trade war between the world’s two largest economies is likely to evolve into a dispute over intellectual property rights over the coming months, one analyst told CNBC Friday, with Apple set to bear the brunt of any further fallout.

A long-running trade dispute between the U.S. and China has rattled financial markets in recent months, with a global stock market sell-off gathering pace in December amid escalating concerns of a possible economic slowdown.

President Donald Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping declared a 90-day cease-fire at the start of the month, but external observers remain deeply skeptical about the chances of Washington and Beijing agreeing to a comprehensive trade pact in the proposed timeframe.

“There is a high probability that the debate about trade tariffs probably will calm down, but the debate about intellectual property rights (and) cybersecurity, probably will escalate,” Bob Parker, investment committee member at Quilvest Wealth Management, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Friday.

“I think that’s going to be the big issue for the first half of next year,” Parker said.


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US, China downplay major tech issues in temporary trade deal at G-20

Two contentious issues were notably downplayed in the deal between President Donald Trump and President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend: China’s alleged practice of forcing technology transfers and apparent theft of intellectual property from American companies. U.S. concerns over forced technology transfers in China, intellectual property violations and cyber-crime issues will likely become a central focus going forward, as trade negotiations between both countries continue, expe


Two contentious issues were notably downplayed in the deal between President Donald Trump and President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend: China’s alleged practice of forcing technology transfers and apparent theft of intellectual property from American companies. U.S. concerns over forced technology transfers in China, intellectual property violations and cyber-crime issues will likely become a central focus going forward, as trade negotiations between both countries continue, expe
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US, China downplay major tech issues in temporary trade deal at G-20

Two contentious issues were notably downplayed in the deal between President Donald Trump and President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend: China’s alleged practice of forcing technology transfers and apparent theft of intellectual property from American companies.

U.S. concerns over forced technology transfers in China, intellectual property violations and cyber-crime issues will likely become a central focus going forward, as trade negotiations between both countries continue, experts told CNBC on Monday. However, they added, a resolution may not be immediately forthcoming.

Over the weekend in Argentina, the United States and China agreed to put their bilateral trade war on hold for 90 days to negotiate lingering disagreements.

“It is interesting to note that IP/cyber was only mentioned in paragraph four of the White House statement, reflecting Trump’s focus on trade deficits,” Steven Okun, senior advisor at McLarty Associates told CNBC on Monday. “Still, this does not mean this is not core to the U.S. tariffs.”

The trade war is based on the investigations by the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) into China’s intellectual property practices, he said.


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East Tech West: Microsoft’s Alain Crozier on US tech firms in China

American technology companies that want to succeed in China need to take a long term view on the world’s second-largest economy, the chairman and chief executive officer of Microsoft Greater China Region said on Wednesday. That means companies should be prepared to invest in research and development over a period of time and help to grow the technology environment in China, Alain Crozier told CNBC during a fireside chat at the East Tech West conference held in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, C


American technology companies that want to succeed in China need to take a long term view on the world’s second-largest economy, the chairman and chief executive officer of Microsoft Greater China Region said on Wednesday. That means companies should be prepared to invest in research and development over a period of time and help to grow the technology environment in China, Alain Crozier told CNBC during a fireside chat at the East Tech West conference held in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, C
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East Tech West: Microsoft's Alain Crozier on US tech firms in China

American technology companies that want to succeed in China need to take a long term view on the world’s second-largest economy, the chairman and chief executive officer of Microsoft Greater China Region said on Wednesday.

That means companies should be prepared to invest in research and development over a period of time and help to grow the technology environment in China, Alain Crozier told CNBC during a fireside chat at the East Tech West conference held in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.

“You have to invest,” he said. “Investing means, at some point, some of your (intellectual property) is going to be developed here. So, you need to not have this fear that everything is going to the negative way. I think that’s a very important one.”

The United States has previously accused China of intellectual property theft.

“The second one is when you come, and you do business somewhere, you also have to contribute very heavily to the market you are in,” Crozier added. “And contribution is not just doing business.”


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When Trump and Xi meet, trade is the only bilateral deal they can talk about

Xi apparently seems ready to get the trade dispute out of the way. Trump kept it much simpler with tweets and soundbites, saying that trade discussions were “moving along nicely,” and that the Chinese were “ready to make a deal.” Breaking that deadlock during next Friday’s U.S.-China summit could involve the following steps. Second, Washington should address the structural and systemic trade complaints against China in World Trade Organization forums, in its own trade regulations and with strict


Xi apparently seems ready to get the trade dispute out of the way. Trump kept it much simpler with tweets and soundbites, saying that trade discussions were “moving along nicely,” and that the Chinese were “ready to make a deal.” Breaking that deadlock during next Friday’s U.S.-China summit could involve the following steps. Second, Washington should address the structural and systemic trade complaints against China in World Trade Organization forums, in its own trade regulations and with strict
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When Trump and Xi meet, trade is the only bilateral deal they can talk about

So, if there is any truth to Trump’s claim of friendship, he should be getting an advance hongbao from his Chinese pal during next Friday’s G-20 meeting in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Indeed, both leaders know that they have to swiftly move beyond the problems of bilateral trade and investments if they want to — as they must — come to terms with acute issues of war and peace between competitors whose nuclear triads are pointed at each other.

Xi apparently seems ready to get the trade dispute out of the way.

Here’s what he said after his telephone conversation with Trump at the beginning of this month: “The two countries’ trade teams should strengthen contact and conduct consultations on issues of concern to both sides, and promote a plan that both can accept to reach a consensus on the China-U.S. trade issue.”

Trump kept it much simpler with tweets and soundbites, saying that trade discussions were “moving along nicely,” and that the Chinese were “ready to make a deal.”

And then we heard a shocking news. The U.S. Trade Representative issued a report last Tuesday that “China has not fundamentally altered its unfair, unreasonable, and market-distorting practices,” and that “China had made clear it would not change its policies.”

The policy changes requested by the U.S. essentially concern (a) a reduction of the bilateral trade imbalance, (b) illegal acquisition of American intellectual property, and (c) the use of “foreign investment restrictions to require or pressure the transfer of technology from U.S. companies to Chinese entities.”

Breaking that deadlock during next Friday’s U.S.-China summit could involve the following steps.

First, China — with its systematic, excessive and growing trade surpluses — should act according to the rules of international trade adjustment to promptly and meaningfully narrow its trade gap with the U.S. Large volumes of U.S. farm and energy products are now ready to go to China.

Second, Washington should address the structural and systemic trade complaints against China in World Trade Organization forums, in its own trade regulations and with strictly reciprocal measures. That would cover the cases of intellectual property protection, forced technology transfers, illegal export subsidies, etc.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch, qilai shen, bloomberg, getty images, vcg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, xi, bilateral, intellectual, fridays, ready, technology, trade, meet, deal, issues, property, trump, china, chinese, talk, illegal


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China reportedly steps up efforts to steal Australian company secrets

China allegedly directed an increase in cyber attacks on Australian companies this year that breached a bilateral agreement between the two countries pledging not to steal each other’s commercial secrets, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Tuesday. An investigation by Australian broadcaster Nine News and Fairfax Media — which owns the Sydney Morning Herald — found that China’s Ministry of State Security was responsible for the so-called “Operation Cloud Hopper.” A senior Australian government so


China allegedly directed an increase in cyber attacks on Australian companies this year that breached a bilateral agreement between the two countries pledging not to steal each other’s commercial secrets, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Tuesday. An investigation by Australian broadcaster Nine News and Fairfax Media — which owns the Sydney Morning Herald — found that China’s Ministry of State Security was responsible for the so-called “Operation Cloud Hopper.” A senior Australian government so
China reportedly steps up efforts to steal Australian company secrets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, oliver nicolaas ponder, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morning, countries, chinas, australian, efforts, herald, property, company, china, steal, attacks, sydney, security, steps, ministry, reportedly, intellectual, secrets


China reportedly steps up efforts to steal Australian company secrets

China allegedly directed an increase in cyber attacks on Australian companies this year that breached a bilateral agreement between the two countries pledging not to steal each other’s commercial secrets, the Sydney Morning Herald reported Tuesday.

An investigation by Australian broadcaster Nine News and Fairfax Media — which owns the Sydney Morning Herald — found that China’s Ministry of State Security was responsible for the so-called “Operation Cloud Hopper.” It was a wave of attacks that were detected by Australia and its partners in the “Five Eyes” intelligence sharing alliance — which is made up of the U.S., U.K., New Zealand and Canada.

A senior Australian government source told the Sydney Morning Herald that China’s activity was a “constant, significant effort” to steal intellectual property. Others said local companies and universities were not doing enough to tighten their cybersecurity against such attacks, the newspaper reported.

Cybersecurity experts also told the newspaper they had noticed “a significant increase in attacks in the first six months of this year” and that the activity was “mainly from China.”

Relevant contact details for China’s Ministry of State Security were not immediately available.

China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang addressed the report during his regular press conference on Tuesday and said that cyber attacks are a common challenge faced by all countries.

“Relevant reports and accusations are fabricated without facts but with hidden motives,” he said. “They are unprofessional and irresponsible. They will only heighten tension and rivalry, instead of helping to protect the common security of cyberspace.”

The Sydney Morning Herald’s report came after recent remarks from U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, who accused Beijing of intellectual property theft during the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit.

Western countries have long accused China of stealing intellectual property as well as commercial and military secrets, which Beijing has denied. In recent years, China has stepped up efforts to create sophisticated home-grown technologies as it aims to catch up with other high-tech countries like the U.S. and Germany.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-21  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, oliver nicolaas ponder, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morning, countries, chinas, australian, efforts, herald, property, company, china, steal, attacks, sydney, security, steps, ministry, reportedly, intellectual, secrets


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China’s alleged tiny-chip spying on US tech giants was ‘pretty amateurish,’ says ex-Senate advisor

The method allegedly used by China to view the networks of some U.S. tech giants lacked complexity, according to Jamil Jaffer, a former senior advisor to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “They’re talking about putting a chip on a motherboard,” said Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute at George Mason University. “That’s actually a pretty amateurish way to conduct a hack.” In an interview Friday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” Jaffer said implanting a microchip would actually be quit


The method allegedly used by China to view the networks of some U.S. tech giants lacked complexity, according to Jamil Jaffer, a former senior advisor to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “They’re talking about putting a chip on a motherboard,” said Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute at George Mason University. “That’s actually a pretty amateurish way to conduct a hack.” In an interview Friday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” Jaffer said implanting a microchip would actually be quit
China’s alleged tiny-chip spying on US tech giants was ‘pretty amateurish,’ says ex-Senate advisor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jaffer, alleged, bloomberg, chinese, microchip, pretty, trade, china, tech, chinas, used, exsenate, advisor, property, tinychip, intellectual, amateurish, spying, giants


China's alleged tiny-chip spying on US tech giants was 'pretty amateurish,' says ex-Senate advisor

The method allegedly used by China to view the networks of some U.S. tech giants lacked complexity, according to Jamil Jaffer, a former senior advisor to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

“They’re talking about putting a chip on a motherboard,” said Jaffer, founder of the National Security Institute at George Mason University. “That’s actually a pretty amateurish way to conduct a hack.”

In a bombshell report Thursday, Bloomberg BusinessWeek said data center equipment run by Amazon Web Services and Apple may have been subject to surveillance from China via a microchip inserted during the manufacturing process of the hardware.

Apple and Amazon have strongly denied the report.

According to Bloomberg, the chips were used for gathering intellectual property and trade secrets from U.S. companies and may have been introduced by a Chinese server company called Super Micro.

In an interview Friday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” Jaffer said implanting a microchip would actually be quite unusual. Instead, the Chinese government could have manipulated software, which wouldn’t be as obvious, he said.

“It was an odd sort of effort by the Chinese, [which] we know are pretty sophisticated,” he said.

It’s normal for another country to want to enter or gain access to another government’s system, Jaffer said.

However, he added that the U.S. has gotten more aggressive with China over the years, causing China to narrow its cyber intrusions but “they are still conducting very focused efforts.”

China is also under intense scrutiny from President Donald Trump, who has been using accusations of intellectual property theft by the Chinese as a core argument for tough trade restrictions on Beijing.

CNBC reported Monday that the Pentagon, amid intensifying tensions with China, canceled Defense Secretary James Mattis’ visit to China that had been scheduled for later this month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-05  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jaffer, alleged, bloomberg, chinese, microchip, pretty, trade, china, tech, chinas, used, exsenate, advisor, property, tinychip, intellectual, amateurish, spying, giants


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