‘Obsession,’ ‘dangerous,’ ‘basement bunker’: GOP impeachment report rips Democrats’ inquiry

Representative Devin Nunes, a Republican from California and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks during an impeachment inquiry hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. House Republicans argue in a 123-page minority report that Democrats have failed to establish any impeachable offenses by President Donald Trump, according to a copy of the report reviewed by NBC News. “The Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Ad


Representative Devin Nunes, a Republican from California and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks during an impeachment inquiry hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019.
House Republicans argue in a 123-page minority report that Democrats have failed to establish any impeachable offenses by President Donald Trump, according to a copy of the report reviewed by NBC News.
“The Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Ad
‘Obsession,’ ‘dangerous,’ ‘basement bunker’: GOP impeachment report rips Democrats’ inquiry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: alex moe, haley talbot, thomas franck, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rips, ukraine, report, gop, committee, president, basement, democrats, intelligence, impeachment, dangerous, obsession, house, bunker, evidence, inquiry


'Obsession,' 'dangerous,' 'basement bunker': GOP impeachment report rips Democrats' inquiry

Representative Devin Nunes, a Republican from California and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks during an impeachment inquiry hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019.

House Republicans argue in a 123-page minority report that Democrats have failed to establish any impeachable offenses by President Donald Trump, according to a copy of the report reviewed by NBC News.

The GOP lawmakers did not find any wrongdoing by the president and concluded that there was no quid pro quo for aid to Ukraine.

“The Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, is merely the outgrowth of their obsession with re-litigating the results of the 2016 presidential election,” the Republican staff of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees wrote.

“Despite their best efforts, the evidence gathered during the Democrats’ partisan and one-sided impeachment inquiry does not support that President Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate his political rival to benefit the President in the 2020 presidential election.

“The evidence does not establish any impeachable offense,” the report concludes.

Democrats on the committees will be putting out their own lengthy report on the last few weeks of hearings, and it is expected to reach very different conclusions. The Democratic report will be voted upon on Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee begins its impeachment hearings on Wednesday. The report will be released to the public Tuesday, Schiff said.

Schiff, who said in a statement earlier Monday that the GOP report was “intended for an audience of one,” said Monday night on MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show” that “our work goes on.” He said that the committee was “continuing to issue subpoenas” and that it would file a supplemental report if necessary.

Schiff said that the evidence outlines “in considerable detail” a scheme to further Trump’s interests even well before the State Department recalled Marie Yovanovitch as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine in May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: alex moe, haley talbot, thomas franck, fred imbert
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House Democrats’ impeachment report accuses Trump of obstruction, other misconduct

Democrats on Tuesday publicly released a new report accusing President Donald Trump of soliciting Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election for his benefit and obstructing the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. “In pressuring President Zelensky to carry out his demand, President Trump withheld a White House meeting desperately sought by the Ukrainian President, and critical U.S. military assistance to fight Russian aggression in eastern Ukraine,” the report says. The report, wr


Democrats on Tuesday publicly released a new report accusing President Donald Trump of soliciting Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election for his benefit and obstructing the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives.
“In pressuring President Zelensky to carry out his demand, President Trump withheld a White House meeting desperately sought by the Ukrainian President, and critical U.S. military assistance to fight Russian aggression in eastern Ukraine,” the report says.
The report, wr
House Democrats’ impeachment report accuses Trump of obstruction, other misconduct Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accuses, obstruction, report, ukrainian, schiff, probe, trump, misconduct, impeachment, ukraine, house, president, democrats, intelligence


House Democrats' impeachment report accuses Trump of obstruction, other misconduct

Democrats on Tuesday publicly released a new report accusing President Donald Trump of soliciting Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election for his benefit and obstructing the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives.

The 300-page report alleges a quid pro quo scheme in which Trump “conditioned official acts on a public announcement by the new Ukrainian President, Volodymyr Zelensky, of politically-motivated investigations” into former Vice President Joe Biden — a top Democratic presidential candidate — and his son Hunter.

“In pressuring President Zelensky to carry out his demand, President Trump withheld a White House meeting desperately sought by the Ukrainian President, and critical U.S. military assistance to fight Russian aggression in eastern Ukraine,” the report says.

Click here to read the report.

The report, written by the Democratic members of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees, came on the eve of the next phase of the impeachment probe, where the House Judiciary Committee is expected to draft formal articles of impeachment against Trump.

The Democrat-led Intelligence panel plans to vote tuesday night to formally issue the report, which was technically in draft form at the time of its initial release.

The report is the most substantial document to date laying out the president’s alleged scheme at the center of the impeachment inquiry. But it arrives a day after a dueling report released by House Republicans, who assert that Democrats are merely attempting to tank Trump’s re-election chances and “undo the will of the American people.”

In a statement, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said that Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and other Democrats “utterly failed to produce any evidence of wrongdoing by President Trump. This report reflects nothing more than their frustrations.”

“Chairman Schiff’s report reads like the ramblings of a basement blogger straining to prove something when there is evidence of nothing,” Grisham said.

The impeachment probe began in earnest in September on the heels of reporting on a bombshell whistleblower complaint that raised alarms about a July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelenskiy.

But that call “was neither the start nor the end of President Trump’s efforts to bend U.S. foreign policy for his personal gain,” Schiff wrote in the preface of the report.

“Rather, it was a dramatic crescendo within a months-long campaign driven by President Trump in which senior U.S. officials, including the vice president, the secretary of state, the acting chief of staff, the secretary of energy, and others were either knowledgeable of or active participants in an effort to extract from a foreign nation the personal political benefits sought by the president,” Schiff wrote.

A memorandum of that call, released a day after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the impeachment probe, shows Trump asking Zelenskiy to “look into”the Bidens and Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company where Hunter served as a board member while his father was vice president.

Trump and his allies have alleged that Joe Biden, as Barack Obama’s veep, called for the firing of a Ukrainian prosecutor general in order to protect his son. But those allegations are unsubstantiated, and Joe Biden’s calls for Ukraine to fire that prosecutor were echoed by many other western nations at the time.

Trump also asked Zelenskiy to “do us a favor though” and also investigate a debunked conspiracy theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election — rather than Russia, which is blamed for election meddling by virtually all U.S. intelligence officials.

“This is the result of a president who believes he is beyond indictment, beyond impeachment, beyond any form of accountability and indeed above the law,” Schiff said in a press event later Tuesday. “And that is a very dangerous thing for this country, to have an unethical president who believes they are above the law.”

During this call, hundreds of millions of dollars in crucial military aid to Ukraine had been withheld by the Trump administration. Multiple witnesses in the probe testified that they were told by acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney that Trump asked for that money to be frozen.

Mulvaney has refused to comply with a House subpoena for his testimony as part of the impeachment inquiry. Numerous other officials have been directed by the White House not to comply with the probe, and the State Department and other agencies are refusing to hand over documents requested by the investigators.

These obstacles to the investigation are all included in the report under a broad heading alleging that Trump “Obstructed the Impeachment Inquiry by Instructing Witnesses and Agencies to Ignore Subpoenas for Documents and Testimony.”

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accuses, obstruction, report, ukrainian, schiff, probe, trump, misconduct, impeachment, ukraine, house, president, democrats, intelligence


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House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstruction

House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstructionThe House Intelligence Committee has released its impeachment inquiry report. CNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on the 200 page document.


House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstructionThe House Intelligence Committee has released its impeachment inquiry report.
CNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on the 200 page document.
House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstruction Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accuses, obstruction, report, releases, inquiry, reports, trump, impeachment, house, committee, ylan, intelligence


House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstruction

House Intelligence Committee releases impeachment inquiry report, accuses Trump of obstruction

The House Intelligence Committee has released its impeachment inquiry report. CNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on the 200 page document.


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House Intelligence Committee to vote on impeachment report

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., joined by other House Democrats, speaks during a press conference after the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday Nov. 13, 2019. The House Intelligence Committee will vote Tuesday on Chairman Adam Schiff’s impeachment report, which will make a case for the congressional removal of President Donald Trump. The vote, likely to break along party lines, is a for


House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., joined by other House Democrats, speaks during a press conference after the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday Nov. 13, 2019.
The House Intelligence Committee will vote Tuesday on Chairman Adam Schiff’s impeachment report, which will make a case for the congressional removal of President Donald Trump.
The vote, likely to break along party lines, is a for
House Intelligence Committee to vote on impeachment report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-01  Authors: alex moe, dennis romero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, president, report, vote, inquiry, schiffs, trump, committee, impeachment, intelligence


House Intelligence Committee to vote on impeachment report

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., joined by other House Democrats, speaks during a press conference after the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday Nov. 13, 2019.

The House Intelligence Committee will vote Tuesday on Chairman Adam Schiff’s impeachment report, which will make a case for the congressional removal of President Donald Trump.

The vote, likely to break along party lines, is a formality allowing the Democrat-controlled body to pass the impeachment inquiry on to the Judiciary Committee, which is scheduled to begin its proceedings Wednesday.

The impeachment inquiry is focused on Trump’s request last summer that Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy launch investigations into debunked claims the nation interfered in the 2016 U.S. election and that former Vice President Joe Biden, a Trump political rival, shut down an investigation into a Ukrainian energy firm where his son worked.

Intelligence Committee members will be able to view a draft of Schiff’s report beginning late Monday, NBC News has learned.

The vote is scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday after Congress returns from its Thanksgiving break. If Intelligence Committee members vote to adopt the report by Schiff, D-California, it will be forwarded to the Judiciary Committee.

Trump has claimed Democrats are conducting the inquiry without due process, but earlier this week Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-New York, invited Trump and his legal representatives to participate in the next wave of hearings.

Nadler said in a letter that Trump “has a choice to make: he can take this opportunity to be represented in the impeachment hearings, or he can stop complaining about the process.”

Trump criticized the proceedings in a Saturday night tweet and noted he would be in London on Wednesday.

“I will be representing our Country in London at NATO, while the Democrats are holding the most ridiculous Impeachment hearings in history,” he tweeted. “Read the Transcripts, NOTHING was done or said wrong! The Radical Left is undercutting our Country. Hearings scheduled on same dates as NATO!”

In a subsequent letter to Trump, asking if his lawyers would attend proceedings, Nadler quoted a draft of Schiff’s report as describing “a months-long effort in which President Trump again sought foreign interference in our elections for his personal and political benefit at the expense of our national interest.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-01  Authors: alex moe, dennis romero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, president, report, vote, inquiry, schiffs, trump, committee, impeachment, intelligence


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House Judiciary Committee invites Trump to its first impeachment hearing on Dec. 4

Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019. The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday announced it will hold a Dec. 4 hearing on the constitutional basis for impeachment, bringing the Democrat-led chamber one step closer to its final vote on whether to impeach the president. “The impeachment inquiry is e


Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019.
The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday announced it will hold a Dec. 4 hearing on the constitutional basis for impeachment, bringing the Democrat-led chamber one step closer to its final vote on whether to impeach the president.
“The impeachment inquiry is e
House Judiciary Committee invites Trump to its first impeachment hearing on Dec. 4 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, judiciary, president, invites, house, dec, committee, nadler, intelligence, trump, panel, inquiry, hearing, impeachment


House Judiciary Committee invites Trump to its first impeachment hearing on Dec. 4

Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019.

The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday announced it will hold a Dec. 4 hearing on the constitutional basis for impeachment, bringing the Democrat-led chamber one step closer to its final vote on whether to impeach the president.

The new schedule in the impeachment inquiry shows the Intelligence Committee, which spent weeks interviewing witnesses in public and behind closed doors, passing the torch to the Judiciary panel, which in the past has been responsible for recommending articles of impeachment to the full House.

“The impeachment inquiry is entering into a new phase,” Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

“Our first task is to explore the framework put in place to respond to serious allegations of impeachable misconduct like those against President Trump,” Nadler said.

In a letter to the president, Nadler asked if Trump or his counsel “plan to attend the hearing or make a request to question the witness panel” and gave them a deadline of Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. to respond.

“I remain committed to ensuring a fair and informative process,” Nadler said. “While we invite you to this hearing, we remind you that if you continue to refuse to make witnesses and documents available to the committees of jurisdiction, under H. Res. 660, ‘the chair shall have the discretion to impose appropriate remedies.'”

As part of that resolution — which passed in the House last month on mostly partisan lines — the Intelligence Committee must write up a report of its findings and recommendations and pass it on to the Judiciary Committee. It was unclear whether that report would be produced before the Dec. 4 hearing.

Trump and his allies have railed against the proceedings in the Intelligence panel, led by Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., as biased and unfair, in part because Trump was not permitted to participate in them, either directly or through his counsel.

“At base, the president has a choice to make,” Nadler’s statement said. “He can take this opportunity to be represented in the impeachment hearings, or he can stop complaining about the process.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Former CIA officer sentenced to 19 years for conspiring with Chinese spies

The former CIA officer who pleaded guilty to an espionage conspiracy with China could be facing more than two decades in prison. Lee is the third former U.S. intelligence officer to be convicted in less than a year of conspiring with the Chinese to give them national defense information. A former CIA case officer was sentenced Friday to 19 years in prison for conspiring to provide American intelligence secrets to the Chinese government, in an espionage case that some current and former officials


The former CIA officer who pleaded guilty to an espionage conspiracy with China could be facing more than two decades in prison.
Lee is the third former U.S. intelligence officer to be convicted in less than a year of conspiring with the Chinese to give them national defense information.
A former CIA case officer was sentenced Friday to 19 years in prison for conspiring to provide American intelligence secrets to the Chinese government, in an espionage case that some current and former officials
Former CIA officer sentenced to 19 years for conspiring with Chinese spies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: pete williams, tom winter, ken dilanian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, intelligence, spies, macmahon, chinese, sentenced, cia, lee, officer, secrets, conspiring, told, case, national


Former CIA officer sentenced to 19 years for conspiring with Chinese spies

This undated file photo provided by the Alexandria Sheriff’s Office shows Jerry Chun Shing Lee. The former CIA officer who pleaded guilty to an espionage conspiracy with China could be facing more than two decades in prison. Fifty-five-year-old Lee is scheduled for sentencing Friday, Nov. 22, 2019, in federal court in Alexandria, Va.

Although the extent of his cooperation with the Chinese is apparently unknown, the case illustrates how aggressively China works to get its hands on U.S. secrets. Lee is the third former U.S. intelligence officer to be convicted in less than a year of conspiring with the Chinese to give them national defense information.

But many aspects of the case remain a mystery. Lee was never charged with actually giving any secrets to the Chinese. While the Justice Department told a federal judge “it is all but certain” he did so, his lawyer said, “the government has offered only conjecture as a basis for these claims.”

Jerry Chun Shing Lee, 55, served 13 years as a Central Intelligence Agency case officer in several locations overseas, including China, where prosecutors said he had firsthand knowledge of some of the agency’s most sensitive secrets, including the names of covert CIA officers and clandestine human sources in China.

A former CIA case officer was sentenced Friday to 19 years in prison for conspiring to provide American intelligence secrets to the Chinese government, in an espionage case that some current and former officials say dealt a devastating blow to U.S. intelligence operations.

Lee pleaded guilty in May to a single of charge of conspiracy to provide national defense information to a foreign government. He was arrested nearly two years ago after FBI agents searched his hotel room and found notebooks and a thumb drive containing names and phone numbers of covert CIA employees and informants, details of a sensitive CIA operation, and information about covert facilities.

Lee admitted that in 2010 he met in Shenzhen with two Chinese intelligence officers who offered to pay him and “take care of him for life” if he would provide secrets he learned as a CIA officer. Over the coming months, he said, the Chinese gave him at least 21 separate requests for intelligence secrets.

A month after that meeting, Lee deposited $17,000 in cash into his bank account, even though he was operating a failing consulting business at the time. Federal prosecutors told Federal District Court Judge T.S. Ellis that the Chinese gave him a total of $840,000, but Lee’s defense lawyer, Edward MacMahon, said the government has never actually linked the deposits to Chinese intelligence officers.

“It’s speculation that this money was for the crown jewels of American intelligence,” MacMahon told the judge.

Prosecutor Neil Hammerstrom conceded hat the intelligence community can never be certain of exactly how much he disclosed — saying only that “it is all but certain” he did pass along sensitive secrets that endangered the lives of intelligence sources and severely hampered the CIA’s intelligence-gathering abilities in China.

“Had the government ever possessed proof that Mr. Lee gave any classified information to the Chinese, it certainly would have charged him with the actual transmission of national defense information,” he said in court filings. But Lee never made any such admission. MacMahon said the government told Lee’s lawyers that the intelligence community never did a damage assessment.

“The government has posited no direct evidence that Mr. Lee actually caused any harm to the United States,” MacMahon said.

But Ellis concluded that it was “more likely than not that at least some portion of the money came from the Chinese, so he must have given them something of value.”

Some current and former U.S. intelligence officials said Lee’s agreement to cooperate with the Chinese in 2010 came at the same time the CIA’s covert communication system was compromised. For that reason, they say, it’s impossible to know whether Lee or the system failure caused the most damage.

Even so, Frank Figliuzzi, a former FBI counterintelligence official and NBC News national security contributor, said Lee’s efforts represented “a horrific loss for the intelligence community, and it’s not a loss than can be recovered from easily.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: pete williams, tom winter, ken dilanian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, intelligence, spies, macmahon, chinese, sentenced, cia, lee, officer, secrets, conspiring, told, case, national


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A.I. use is still rising globally, but most firms’ tech isn’t yet close to ‘real’ intelligence

A fridge’s artificial intelligence (AI) digests the user’s words, running them through machine-learning software, which gets smarter every time you talk to it, said Dorando Doo, senior vice president at iFlytek, a Chinese AI firm. But current AI tech is used in more pedestrian ways, with the lion’s share in customer service, sales processes, and threat detection, according to research firm IDC. In China, 14% of firms have embraced AI tech, an IBM executive said this week. Even with some uncertai


A fridge’s artificial intelligence (AI) digests the user’s words, running them through machine-learning software, which gets smarter every time you talk to it, said Dorando Doo, senior vice president at iFlytek, a Chinese AI firm.
But current AI tech is used in more pedestrian ways, with the lion’s share in customer service, sales processes, and threat detection, according to research firm IDC.
In China, 14% of firms have embraced AI tech, an IBM executive said this week.
Even with some uncertai
A.I. use is still rising globally, but most firms’ tech isn’t yet close to ‘real’ intelligence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: kevin shalvey, sam shead
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, close, rising, learning, tech, real, software, firm, isnt, firms, intelligence, technology, globally, used, billion


A.I. use is still rising globally, but most firms' tech isn't yet close to 'real' intelligence

Guests have their faces scanned at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai in August, 2019. Hector Retamal | AFP | Getty Images

Every time someone asks a smart fridge to remind them to pick up milk, they’re helping lay the groundwork for what’s expected to be a $100 billion world-changing industry. A fridge’s artificial intelligence (AI) digests the user’s words, running them through machine-learning software, which gets smarter every time you talk to it, said Dorando Doo, senior vice president at iFlytek, a Chinese AI firm. As the fridge’s software gets smarter, it’ll help inform a wide range of other AI systems. “That learning capability can be applied to various industries, such as education or health care,” she said at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China, this week. AI is being hailed as a revolutionary technology, which could eventually improve everything from banking to transportation. It promises software that, once deployed, can continue learning and evolving, perhaps solving complex problems outside the scope of human abilities. But current AI tech is used in more pedestrian ways, with the lion’s share in customer service, sales processes, and threat detection, according to research firm IDC. Worldwide, some 14% of companies have already deployed some form of it in their processes or products, up from 4% a year ago, according to Gartner. In China, 14% of firms have embraced AI tech, an IBM executive said this week.

From buzzword to billions

Businesses are expected to spend as much as $97.9 billion annually on AI projects by 2023, up from just $37.5 billion this year, IDC forecasts. But there’s still some debate about what qualifies as true AI. When China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency last year announced that it had created the “world’s first” AI news anchor, some in the industry balked. The digital anchor was built to move and speak as a normal anchor would, but its underlying technology leaned closer to machine learning than true artificial intelligence. Perhaps the simplest definition of what constitutes AI came from one of the founders of the discipline, Stanford University Professor John McCarthy, who died in 2011. He defined AI as “using computers to understand human intelligence.” Even with some uncertainty about what fits into the AI discipline, businesses around the world are touting their AI software. At China’s largest entertainment streaming site, iQiyi, for example, it’s being used to restore old movies. A two-hour film restoration used to take some 20 days, even with 10 people working on it, said Wang Xuepu, vice president at iQiyi. “But with this new technology, we only need 12 hours to realize this,” he told CNBC’s Qian Chen in Mandarin during a fireside chat on Tuesday. Everything from video recommendations to package deliveries are now being optimized by AI software, said Song Zhang, managing director of ThoughtWorks China, a tech consulting firm. The next logical step would be to use such software to solve important social problems, like matching rural patients with doctors in cities, he added. “We don’t have to focus too much on the word ‘AI,'” he said in Mandarin. “We need to be more solution-focused.”

Not yet ‘real’ intelligence


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: kevin shalvey, sam shead
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Sony establishes A.I. arm that will focus on gaming and food

Sony Corporation has set up Sony AI, an organization that will undertake research and development into artificial intelligence. In an announcement Wednesday, Sony said the new venture would have offices in Japan, the U.S. and Europe, initially launching projects in gaming, imaging and sensing and “gastronomy.” In April 2018, via its U.S. subsidiary the Sony Corporation of America, Sony struck an agreement with Carnegie Mellon University to work on artificial intelligence and robotics research. A


Sony Corporation has set up Sony AI, an organization that will undertake research and development into artificial intelligence.
In an announcement Wednesday, Sony said the new venture would have offices in Japan, the U.S. and Europe, initially launching projects in gaming, imaging and sensing and “gastronomy.”
In April 2018, via its U.S. subsidiary the Sony Corporation of America, Sony struck an agreement with Carnegie Mellon University to work on artificial intelligence and robotics research.
A
Sony establishes A.I. arm that will focus on gaming and food Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, research, preparation, food, arm, gaming, establishes, development, intelligence, sony, focus, artificial, projects


Sony establishes A.I. arm that will focus on gaming and food

Sony Corporation has set up Sony AI, an organization that will undertake research and development into artificial intelligence.

In an announcement Wednesday, Sony said the new venture would have offices in Japan, the U.S. and Europe, initially launching projects in gaming, imaging and sensing and “gastronomy.”

In its announcement, the tech giant said that the “adoption of new AI technologies developed through these flagship projects will be critical to further enhancing the value of Sony’s gaming and sensor businesses in coming years.”

It added that the research would be “pursued in close collaboration with the relevant Sony Group business units.”

The firm has already made moves into the “gastronomy” sector. In April 2018, via its U.S. subsidiary the Sony Corporation of America, Sony struck an agreement with Carnegie Mellon University to work on artificial intelligence and robotics research.

At the time, Sony said “initial research and development” would look into “optimizing food preparation, cooking and delivery.”

This area was chosen, Sony explained, because the technology needed for a robot to handle “the complex and varied task of food preparation” could in turn be applied to a wider range of skills and industries.

The topic of AI generates a great deal of discussion and debate. There is undoubted potential. The European Commission, for example, has said that AI can “bring solutions to many societal challenges” such as treating diseases and “minimizing the environmental impact of farming.”

The Commission does note, though, that ethical, legal and socio-economic impacts “have to be carefully addressed.”

Others have been more forthright in their views. In 2014, the late scientist Stephen Hawking told the BBC that the “development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: anmar frangoul
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Artificial intelligence is ‘enhancing’ healthcare: Doctor

Artificial intelligence is ‘enhancing’ healthcare: Doctor1 Hour AgoChun Yuan Chiang of IHDpay Group says artificial intelligence cannot completely replace the “high-touch” nature of medical care. However, technology can be helpful in diagnosis or in situations where patients have long, complicated medical histories, he says. Chiang was speaking on a panel with Jai Verma of Cigna International and Dai Ying of GE Healthcare.


Artificial intelligence is ‘enhancing’ healthcare: Doctor1 Hour AgoChun Yuan Chiang of IHDpay Group says artificial intelligence cannot completely replace the “high-touch” nature of medical care.
However, technology can be helpful in diagnosis or in situations where patients have long, complicated medical histories, he says.
Chiang was speaking on a panel with Jai Verma of Cigna International and Dai Ying of GE Healthcare.
Artificial intelligence is ‘enhancing’ healthcare: Doctor Cached Page below :
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Artificial intelligence is 'enhancing' healthcare: Doctor

Artificial intelligence is ‘enhancing’ healthcare: Doctor

1 Hour Ago

Chun Yuan Chiang of IHDpay Group says artificial intelligence cannot completely replace the “high-touch” nature of medical care. However, technology can be helpful in diagnosis or in situations where patients have long, complicated medical histories, he says. Chiang was speaking on a panel with Jai Verma of Cigna International and Dai Ying of GE Healthcare.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, medical, ying, chiang, verma, doctor, yuan, healthcare, speaking, intelligence, artificial, enhancing, technology


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Public fears about artificial intelligence are ‘not the fault of A.I.’ itself, tech exec says

The technology industry and policymakers need to address public concerns about artificial intelligence (AI) which are “not the fault of AI” itself, a tech executive said Tuesday. “It is the fault of developers, so we need to solve this problem,” said Song Zhang, managing director for China at global software consultancy, ThoughtWorks. “The first phase is everyone finds it refreshing, they like something new, they want to give it a try,” said Luo. Panelists at the session acknowledged the potenti


The technology industry and policymakers need to address public concerns about artificial intelligence (AI) which are “not the fault of AI” itself, a tech executive said Tuesday.
“It is the fault of developers, so we need to solve this problem,” said Song Zhang, managing director for China at global software consultancy, ThoughtWorks.
“The first phase is everyone finds it refreshing, they like something new, they want to give it a try,” said Luo.
Panelists at the session acknowledged the potenti
Public fears about artificial intelligence are ‘not the fault of A.I.’ itself, tech exec says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: huileng tan, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fault, technology, zhang, luo, doo, phase, fears, guangzhou, west, public, nansha, exec, artificial, intelligence, tech


Public fears about artificial intelligence are 'not the fault of A.I.' itself, tech exec says

Rong Luo, CFO of TAL Education Group, Doranda Doo, SVP of iFLYTEK Co. Ltd. and Song Zhang, Managing Director of Thoughtworks China on Day 2 of CNBC East Tech West at LN Garden Hotel Nansha Guangzhou on November 19, 2019 in Nansha, Guangzhou, China.

The technology industry and policymakers need to address public concerns about artificial intelligence (AI) which are “not the fault of AI” itself, a tech executive said Tuesday.

“It is the fault of developers, so we need to solve this problem,” said Song Zhang, managing director for China at global software consultancy, ThoughtWorks.

Consumer worries relating to AI include concerns about personal privacy and how the systems may get out of control, said Zhang during a panel discussion discussing the “Future of AI” at CNBC’s East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China.

It is the duty of the tech industry and policymakers to focus on, discuss and solve such problems, said Zhang in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation. Indeed, while consumers are curious about AI when they first come into contact with the technology, their mindset changes over time, said Rong Luo, chief financial officer of TAL Education Group.

“The first phase is everyone finds it refreshing, they like something new, they want to give it a try,” said Luo.

But “in phase two, people start to care a lot about their privacy, their security,” Luo added.

And finally, after “one to two years of adjustments, we (have) now entered phase three, we have a more objective view of the technology. We do not put (it) on the pedestal nor do we demonize it,” said Luo.

Panelists at the session acknowledged the potential of AI in various fields such as language translation and education.

“Technology is here to assist them, empower them. We want to free them from those repetitive and meaningless work (tasks) so they have more energy and time for other more creative jobs,” said Doranda Doo, senior vice president of Chinese artificial intelligence firm iFlytek.

“So I think what’s the most powerful is not AI itself, but people who are empowered by AI,” Doo said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-19  Authors: huileng tan, kevin shalvey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fault, technology, zhang, luo, doo, phase, fears, guangzhou, west, public, nansha, exec, artificial, intelligence, tech


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