Google plans to kill support for third-party cookies that track you all over the internet

Google said Tuesday it plans to end support for third-party cookies, which fuel much of the digital advertising ecosystem, in its Chrome browser within two years. Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, with about 69% of global market share as of September 2019, according to Statista. The company also plans an update in February that will require websites to label third-party cookies that can be used on other sites. Apple has made similar moves, with an anti-tracking tool called Int


Google said Tuesday it plans to end support for third-party cookies, which fuel much of the digital advertising ecosystem, in its Chrome browser within two years.
Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, with about 69% of global market share as of September 2019, according to Statista.
The company also plans an update in February that will require websites to label third-party cookies that can be used on other sites.
Apple has made similar moves, with an anti-tracking tool called Int
Google plans to kill support for third-party cookies that track you all over the internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: megan graham, harsh sinha, chief technology officer at transferwise
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thirdparty, track, support, browser, privacy, information, plans, users, user, google, cookies, internet, chrome, web, kill, tracking


Google plans to kill support for third-party cookies that track you all over the internet

Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome and Apps at Google Inc., gestures as he speaks during the company’s Android One smartphone launch event in New Delhi, India, on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014.

Google said Tuesday it plans to end support for third-party cookies, which fuel much of the digital advertising ecosystem, in its Chrome browser within two years.

Justin Schuh, director of Chrome engineering, in a blog post Tuesday said Google will phase out support for third-party cookies in Chrome once it has figured out how to address the “needs of users, publishers, and advertisers” and it has developed tools to “mitigate workarounds.”

The changes, amid regulatory conversations and other moves in the digital world toward more privacy features, will affect how some advertising players reach consumers online. But they could also stoke further antitrust scrutiny. A Deutsche Bank analyst said in a note last year that Google could “inflame already high antitrust concerns if it does something in Chrome” because it would squeeze out Google’s digital ad competitors. Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world, with about 69% of global market share as of September 2019, according to Statista.

Google’s announcement comes one day before Microsoft is set to start rolling out Edge, a new web browser using Google’s Chrome web browsing engine, which will have “tracking prevention” enabled by default.

Google has been making changes to limit the use of cookies, including a change announced in May that gave users more information about how they were being tracked across the web. The company also plans an update in February that will require websites to label third-party cookies that can be used on other sites.

Apple has made similar moves, with an anti-tracking tool called Intelligent Tracking Prevention for its Safari browser, and Mozilla’s Firefox also rolled out a version that blocked third-party tracking cookies by default.

Publishers such as Vox Media have already responded to these changes by rolling out first-party data plays to give advertisers a direct relationship when they’re no longer able to use as much third-party data to target audiences.

Schuh discussed the company’s “Privacy Sandbox” initiative to develop standards that would let online advertising continue in a more privacy-conscious way. In August, Schuh introduced the initiative, saying it would be a solution that protects user privacy while helping content “remain freely available on the web.”

“Some ideas include new approaches to ensure that ads continue to be relevant for users, but user data shared with websites and advertisers would be minimized by anonymously aggregating user information, and keeping much more user information on-device only,” he wrote. “Our goal is to create a set of standards that is more consistent with users’ expectations of privacy.”

Disclosure: CNBC parent NBCUniversal is an investor in Vox Media.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: megan graham, harsh sinha, chief technology officer at transferwise
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thirdparty, track, support, browser, privacy, information, plans, users, user, google, cookies, internet, chrome, web, kill, tracking


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India’s top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted

India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August. The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time. “Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the rul


India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August.
The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time.
“Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the rul
India’s top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, shutdown, court, connections, mobile, indefinite, kashmir, unwarranted, indias, internet, withdrew, weeks


India's top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India.

India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August.

The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time.

“Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the ruling.

As a security measure to prevent the spread of dissent in Kashmir, the government snapped all public telecommunications connections including mobile phones and internet, arguing it was essential to maintain calm.

Although some mobile phone connections have since been restored, the internet shutdown is still in place in parts of the Himalayan region, which is also claimed by Pakistan.

The loss of internet has been severely disrupted the lives of around seven million people in the Kashmir valley, impacting everything from college admissions to businesses filing tax returns.

“The court also said the freedom of press is impacted by the shutdown,” Vrinda Grover, an advocate representing petitioners, which include journalists and civil society members.

“It is an abuse of power.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, shutdown, court, connections, mobile, indefinite, kashmir, unwarranted, indias, internet, withdrew, weeks


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Verizon gets rid of contracts for internet and TV

A woman looks at her phone in front of a Verizon Fios sign in Times Square in New York March 11, 2016. Verizon is changing how it sells cable and internet by getting rid of annual contracts and letting customers pay by the month for the cable and internet plans they want, the company announced Thursday. Under the new pricing tiers, customers mix and match internet and TV plans. There are three internet plans that range from $39.99 per month to $79.99 per month, depending on the speeds available


A woman looks at her phone in front of a Verizon Fios sign in Times Square in New York March 11, 2016.
Verizon is changing how it sells cable and internet by getting rid of annual contracts and letting customers pay by the month for the cable and internet plans they want, the company announced Thursday.
Under the new pricing tiers, customers mix and match internet and TV plans.
There are three internet plans that range from $39.99 per month to $79.99 per month, depending on the speeds available
Verizon gets rid of contracts for internet and TV Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cable, plans, dont, contracts, internet, sign, gets, customers, fios, services, verizon, rid, month


Verizon gets rid of contracts for internet and TV

A woman looks at her phone in front of a Verizon Fios sign in Times Square in New York March 11, 2016.

Verizon is changing how it sells cable and internet by getting rid of annual contracts and letting customers pay by the month for the cable and internet plans they want, the company announced Thursday. Previously, customers could buy internet or cable separately but were often kept inside a contract to get the best prices. After the contract expired, prices often increased.

Under the new pricing tiers, customers mix and match internet and TV plans.

There are three internet plans that range from $39.99 per month to $79.99 per month, depending on the speeds available where you live. Three cable TV plans range from $50 per month to $90 per month and vary on how many channels you want.

Under the most expensive cable-TV plan, Fios customers get access to more than 425 channels. Verizon is also offering YouTube TV as an option, which costs $49.99 per month after a one-month free trial and offers more than 70 channels.

The changes are an attempt to prevent customers from moving away from traditional cable-TV and turning to cheaper streaming services that don’t lock consumers into contracts.

Verizon still charges customers for things they don’t have to pay for with streaming services, though, like a monthly cable box rentals that start at $12 per month per box and are required if you sign up for one of the Fios TV services. Customers who sign up for YouTube TV don’t have those fees, however.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: elly cosgrove
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cable, plans, dont, contracts, internet, sign, gets, customers, fios, services, verizon, rid, month


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Buy Facebook and Google, but hold off on Amazon, Bernstein says

At a Whole Foods Market grocery store in San Ramon, California, signage advertises new discounts for Amazon Prime members. Facebook and Google are among the best bets among internet stocks, but slowing retail growth and regulatory issues should make investors cautious about Amazon, investment firm Bernstein said in note Thursday. Bernstein initiated coverage of Facebook, Uber, Snap, and Google’s parent company Alphabet with outperform ratings in its new note looking at internet stocks. Twitter w


At a Whole Foods Market grocery store in San Ramon, California, signage advertises new discounts for Amazon Prime members.
Facebook and Google are among the best bets among internet stocks, but slowing retail growth and regulatory issues should make investors cautious about Amazon, investment firm Bernstein said in note Thursday.
Bernstein initiated coverage of Facebook, Uber, Snap, and Google’s parent company Alphabet with outperform ratings in its new note looking at internet stocks.
Twitter w
Buy Facebook and Google, but hold off on Amazon, Bernstein says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ratings, buy, underperform, google, amazon, hold, rating, market, facebook, internet, thursdaybernstein, bernstein, note, uber


Buy Facebook and Google, but hold off on Amazon, Bernstein says

At a Whole Foods Market grocery store in San Ramon, California, signage advertises new discounts for Amazon Prime members.

Facebook and Google are among the best bets among internet stocks, but slowing retail growth and regulatory issues should make investors cautious about Amazon, investment firm Bernstein said in note Thursday.

Bernstein initiated coverage of Facebook, Uber, Snap, and Google’s parent company Alphabet with outperform ratings in its new note looking at internet stocks.

Twitter was the only stock to get an underperform rating, while Amazon, Lyft and Pinterest received a rating of market perform.

This makes Bernstein one of the few firms that is not bullish on Amazon. The tech giant had buy or overweight ratings from 96% of its analysts before this initiation, according to FactSet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ratings, buy, underperform, google, amazon, hold, rating, market, facebook, internet, thursdaybernstein, bernstein, note, uber


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Government-led internet shutdowns cost the global economy $8 billion in 2019, research says

Deliberate internet shutdowns cost the global economy more than $8 billion last year, according to a new report. Research published Tuesday by internet research firm Top10VPN analyzed the economic impact of internet shutdowns around the world throughout 2019. An internet shutdown is an intentional disruption of the internet or digital communications, which makes those services inaccessible by a specific population. Top10VPN traced 18,225 hours of internet shutdowns around the world in 2019, whic


Deliberate internet shutdowns cost the global economy more than $8 billion last year, according to a new report.
Research published Tuesday by internet research firm Top10VPN analyzed the economic impact of internet shutdowns around the world throughout 2019.
An internet shutdown is an intentional disruption of the internet or digital communications, which makes those services inaccessible by a specific population.
Top10VPN traced 18,225 hours of internet shutdowns around the world in 2019, whic
Government-led internet shutdowns cost the global economy $8 billion in 2019, research says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, impact, research, 2019, internet, governmentled, economic, shutdown, flow, economy, cost, billion, blackouts, shutdowns, total


Government-led internet shutdowns cost the global economy $8 billion in 2019, research says

Deliberate internet shutdowns cost the global economy more than $8 billion last year, according to a new report.

Research published Tuesday by internet research firm Top10VPN analyzed the economic impact of internet shutdowns around the world throughout 2019. The cost of internet blackouts were calculated on Netblocks’ and the Internet Society’s cost of shutdown tool, which uses indicators from the World Bank, International Telecommunication Union, Eurostat and U.S. Census Bureau.

An internet shutdown is an intentional disruption of the internet or digital communications, which makes those services inaccessible by a specific population. Campaign group Access Now says shutdowns are often carried out by governments or authorities “to exert control over the flow of information.”

Top10VPN traced 18,225 hours of internet shutdowns around the world in 2019, which carried a total economic cost of $8.05 billion.

Researchers noted that there were more shutdowns in 2019 than ever before, with the total cost surging 235% from 2016.

Last year saw 122 major incidents — meaning there were 122 national or region-wide blackouts — as well as more than 90 smaller blackouts in India and partial restrictions elsewhere.

The analysis found that shutdowns most often occurred in response to protests or civil unrest as “authoritarian regimes looked to restrict the flow of information and maintain their grip on power.”

In terms of individual regions, the Middle East and North Africa took the biggest economic hit from internet shutdowns in 2019, with costs exceeding $3 billion.

Sub-Saharan Africa followed suit, with costs of almost $2.2 billion, while Asia — the region with the most documented shutdown hours at 9,677 — had a blackout cost of $1.7 billion.

Iraq was the country with the highest total shutdown cost, with the country’s economy reportedly losing $2.3 billion through internet blackouts in 2019. According to the research, Iraq suffered 263 hours of deliberate connectivity disruptions last year, impacting almost 19 million internet users.

Network data from Netblocks in November showed that the Iraqi government severely restricted web access amid protests in the country.

Sudan had the second highest costs at $1.8 billion.

India was the third worst-hit economy, with Top10VPN tracking more than 100 “highly targeted” shutdowns in the country last year.

Those blackouts included a shutdown in the Kashmir region, which has been ongoing since August when the Indian government revoked a special status granting the state of Jammu and Kashmir autonomy over its own laws. The report noted there was “no end to restrictions in sight” for the region.

Researchers estimated a total loss of $1.3 billion for India as a result of internet shutdowns, but said they expected the actual figure to be even higher.

Iran suffered an internet blackout spanning several days in November, with the government restricting citizens’ access to the web amid widespread protests over fuel price hikes.

Speaking to CNBC via email, Samuel Woodhams, one of the report’s authors, explained that there were several ways in which internet shutdowns led to economic losses.

“From communicating with suppliers to engaging with new and existing customers, internet shutdowns negatively impact almost every aspect of a business’s operations,” he said.

Woodhams added that the “informal economy” was also hampered by blackouts, as digital transactions and the flow of capital enabled by social media platforms was brought to a halt, noting that frequent shutdowns also undermined investor confidence.

“Internet shutdowns (also) negatively impact businesses located outside of the affected country by preventing international companies from interacting with their business partners and potential customers,” he told CNBC.

Despite the negative economic impact, Woodhams did not expect to see a decline in the number of deliberate blackouts this year.

“Authoritarian-leaning regimes appear intent on flouting human rights and disregarding economic costs in the vain attempt of controlling the flow of information during periods of unrest and protest,” he said. “With that in mind, it is likely that internet shutdowns will continue to rise in frequency in 2020.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, impact, research, 2019, internet, governmentled, economic, shutdown, flow, economy, cost, billion, blackouts, shutdowns, total


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Internet nonprofit leaders fight deal to sell control of .org domain

A group of prominent internet pioneers is mobilizing to block the $1.1 billion sale of control of the .org internet domain, arguing that the takeover of .org by a newly formed private company would hurt the millions of nonprofits that rely on it. Registrations for websites ending in .org have long been overseen by the U.S. nonprofit Internet Society, which unexpectedly announced in November that it was selling control to a year-old company called Ethos Capital. Spokespeople for the Internet Soci


A group of prominent internet pioneers is mobilizing to block the $1.1 billion sale of control of the .org internet domain, arguing that the takeover of .org by a newly formed private company would hurt the millions of nonprofits that rely on it.
Registrations for websites ending in .org have long been overseen by the U.S. nonprofit Internet Society, which unexpectedly announced in November that it was selling control to a year-old company called Ethos Capital.
Spokespeople for the Internet Soci
Internet nonprofit leaders fight deal to sell control of .org domain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: joseph menn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, domain, deal, cooperative, wikipedia, fight, sale, internet, ethos, leaders, control, nonprofit, icann, society, org, sell


Internet nonprofit leaders fight deal to sell control of .org domain

A screen shows a rolling feed of new ‘Generic Top-Level Domain Names (gTLDs) which have been applied for during a press conference hosted by ICANN in central London, on June 13, 2012.

A group of prominent internet pioneers is mobilizing to block the $1.1 billion sale of control of the .org internet domain, arguing that the takeover of .org by a newly formed private company would hurt the millions of nonprofits that rely on it.

Registrations for websites ending in .org have long been overseen by the U.S. nonprofit Internet Society, which unexpectedly announced in November that it was selling control to a year-old company called Ethos Capital. The firm counts a recent former head of ICANN, the internet’s governing authority, as one of its advisers.

In a move to press the U.S.-based ICANN to block the sale, prominent internet executives told Reuters they have created a nonprofit cooperative they are offering as an alternative owner of .org.

“There needs to be a place on the internet that represents the public interest, where educational sites, humanitarian sites, and organizations like Wikipedia can provide a broader public benefit,” said Katherine Maher, the CEO of Wikipedia parent Wikimedia Foundation, who signed on to be a director of the new nonprofit. The crowd-sourced research tool Wikipedia is the most visited of the 10 million .org sites registered worldwide.

Spokespeople for the Internet Society and Ethos said both would say more about their agreed deal soon.

“The Internet Society’s central focus is not on domain name operations,” the Internet Society said in a statement on Tuesday. “We need to focus on the goals we have – to make the Internet available to the people who don’t have it, and to make sure the Internet is defended against its attackers.”

It has previously said that Ethos would keep the same management team, consult with nonprofits, and offer more services.

Hundreds of nonprofits have already objected to the transaction, worried that Ethos will raise registration and renewal prices, cut back on infrastructure and security spending, or make deals to sell sensitive data or allow censorship or surveillance.

Some said they see ICANN’s response to the deal as a critical test of its sole authority over a rapidly expanding domain name system already dominated by private industry and subject to government pressures.

“What offended me about the Ethos Capital deal and the way it unfolded is that it seems to have completely betrayed this concept of stewardship,” said Andrew McLaughlin, who oversaw the transfer of internet governance from the U.S. Commerce Department to ICANN, completed in 2016.

Maher and others said the idea of the new cooperative is not to offer a competing financial bid for .org, which brings in roughly $100 million in revenue from domain sales. Instead, they hope that the unusual new entity, formally a California Consumer Cooperative Corporation, can manage the domain for security and stability and make sure it does not become a tool for censorship.

The advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which previously organized a protest over the .org sale that drew in organizations including the YMCA of the United States, Greenpeace, and Consumer Reports, is also supporting the cooperative.

“It’s highly inappropriate for it to be turned over to a commercial venture at all, much less one that’s going to need to recover $1 billion,” said EFF Executive Director Cindy Cohn.

The initial seven directors of the cooperative include former founding ICANN President Michael Roberts, MacArthur Foundation philanthropist Jeff Ubois and Bill Woodcock, whose Packet Clearing House now runs the technical aspects of the .org system under contract.

The new group has briefed members of the U.S. Congress and hopes to prompt the Internet Society to reconsider the sale. But its best shot at stopping the pending sale lies with ICANN, which can veto any change in ownership out of concern for the security, reliability or stability of the .org domain.

ICANN has 30 days from Dec. 30 to approve the Ethos sale, reject it, or ask more questions, said ICANN Senior Vice President Cyrus Namazi. He said ICANN had not solicited public input on the deal but would consult with its board before making a final decision.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: joseph menn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, domain, deal, cooperative, wikipedia, fight, sale, internet, ethos, leaders, control, nonprofit, icann, society, org, sell


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Wall Street analysts expect a big 2020 from these internet stocks including Facebook, and Amazon

2019 was a great year for internet stocks and many Wall Street analysts expect the good times to continue in 2020. The S&P 500 finished 2019 up 28.9% in large part because of the so-called FAANG stocks, which include top internet names like Facebook and Amazon. Analysts told clients this week there’s more to come from those companies as well as some others including Shopify, Zillow, Alphabet, Netflix, and Alibaba. Regulatory scrutiny continues to be a hot topic for internet stocks like Alphabet


2019 was a great year for internet stocks and many Wall Street analysts expect the good times to continue in 2020.
The S&P 500 finished 2019 up 28.9% in large part because of the so-called FAANG stocks, which include top internet names like Facebook and Amazon.
Analysts told clients this week there’s more to come from those companies as well as some others including Shopify, Zillow, Alphabet, Netflix, and Alibaba.
Regulatory scrutiny continues to be a hot topic for internet stocks like Alphabet
Wall Street analysts expect a big 2020 from these internet stocks including Facebook, and Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-04  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, stocks, wall, analysts, analyst, internet, facebook, street, netflix, expect, ended, big, alphabet, amazon, firm, including


Wall Street analysts expect a big 2020 from these internet stocks including Facebook, and Amazon

Mark Zuckerberg, founder and chief executive officer of Facebook Inc., smiles during a news conference at the company’s headquarters in Palo Alto, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010.

2019 was a great year for internet stocks and many Wall Street analysts expect the good times to continue in 2020.

The S&P 500 finished 2019 up 28.9% in large part because of the so-called FAANG stocks, which include top internet names like Facebook and Amazon. Facebook ended the year up 56.6% while Amazon jumped 23%.

Analysts told clients this week there’s more to come from those companies as well as some others including Shopify, Zillow, Alphabet, Netflix, and Alibaba.

After yet another record setting holiday season, Amazon continues to be one stock all investors must own according to Argus.

“Third-party sellers posted record-breaking results, as worldwide unit sales grew at a double-digit pace from the prior year and surpassed a billion items sold,” analyst Jim Kelleher said.

Early data shows the “Amazon ecosystem displayed strength across numerous metrics,” he said.

The firm also said the stock’s valuation was attractive now after what it said was “relative underperformance” in 2019.

“We believe that AMZN warrants long-term accumulation in most equity accounts,” he said.

2019 may come to be known as the year that the streaming wars began with the debut of Disney+ and Apple TV+ but don’t give up on Netflix just yet RBC says.

The firm released its “Internet Surprises for 2020” this week and said that while the competition for viewers is real it believes Netflix could actually see subscriber additions “accelerate,” this year.

“In the U.S., Netflix in 2020 will be comping against a material price increase and a dramatic slowdown in its marketing spend, and Netflix should benefit from an accelerating decline in Linear Paid TV Subs,” analyst Mark Mahaney said.

“This would indeed be a surprise,” he said.

Shares of Netflix ended 2019 up 21%.

Regulatory scrutiny continues to be a hot topic for internet stocks like Alphabet especially with the 2020 election season underway.

But one analyst urged clients to stand strong and said all the talk is bluster.

“Although we expect the anti-trust rhetoric to reach deafening levels ahead of the U.S. Presidential election this year, we are not afraid of a potential breakup of Alphabet,” Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Co. analyst Brian White said.

Besides, the firm said Alphabet may actually be worth more in a break-up.

“In our view, investors would likely value the sum of Alphabet’s businesses at a higher level than the company as a single, standalone business,” the analyst said.

“”We continue to believe Alphabet is undervalued for its growth prospects, leadership position in digital advertising and cash-rich balance sheet,” he said.

Shares of the company ended 2019 up 28%.

Here’s what else analysts are saying about internet stocks in 2020:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-04  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2020, stocks, wall, analysts, analyst, internet, facebook, street, netflix, expect, ended, big, alphabet, amazon, firm, including


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Here are JP Morgan’s top internet picks for 2020

Politics will be a big theme for tech stocks in 2020, according to J.P. Morgan, as the U.S. presidential race puts a focus on regulatory issues while also serving as a catalyst for advertising revenues. Here are a few of the firm’s top picks for the space in 2020, including a few companies that had disappointing public debuts in 2019.


Politics will be a big theme for tech stocks in 2020, according to J.P. Morgan, as the U.S. presidential race puts a focus on regulatory issues while also serving as a catalyst for advertising revenues.
Here are a few of the firm’s top picks for the space in 2020, including a few companies that had disappointing public debuts in 2019.
Here are JP Morgan’s top internet picks for 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, serving, race, puts, internet, theme, stocks, revenueshere, picks, space, 2020, tech, morgans


Here are JP Morgan's top internet picks for 2020

Politics will be a big theme for tech stocks in 2020, according to J.P. Morgan, as the U.S. presidential race puts a focus on regulatory issues while also serving as a catalyst for advertising revenues.

Here are a few of the firm’s top picks for the space in 2020, including a few companies that had disappointing public debuts in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulatory, serving, race, puts, internet, theme, stocks, revenueshere, picks, space, 2020, tech, morgans


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Apple is reportedly entering the satellite business, taking on SpaceX and Amazon

The technology could enable Apple to circumvent a traditional wireless network and improve functions like location tracking. Apple would be the latest entrant into an increasingly crowded, high-stakes market that includes SpaceX and Amazon. In 2015, Facebook decided against spending up to $1 billion on a satellite that would provide internet to underserved regions in Africa and other continents. Microsoft founder Bill Gates in the late ’90s helped fund Teledesic, in an effort to build low-Earth


The technology could enable Apple to circumvent a traditional wireless network and improve functions like location tracking.
Apple would be the latest entrant into an increasingly crowded, high-stakes market that includes SpaceX and Amazon.
In 2015, Facebook decided against spending up to $1 billion on a satellite that would provide internet to underserved regions in Africa and other continents.
Microsoft founder Bill Gates in the late ’90s helped fund Teledesic, in an effort to build low-Earth
Apple is reportedly entering the satellite business, taking on SpaceX and Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, network, report, satellite, business, wireless, internet, reportedly, apple, satellites, entering, taking, spacex, amazon, provide, build


Apple is reportedly entering the satellite business, taking on SpaceX and Amazon

Apple has been secretly staffing a team to find new ways to beam data directly between its devices and satellites.

The team now has about a dozen engineers from the aerospace, satellite and antenna design industries, according to Bloomberg News, citing people familiar with the matter. The project is in its early stages, the report said, but Apple CEO Tim Cook has expressed interest in the work.

Representatives from Apple were not immediately available for comment.

It remains unclear if Apple plans to build its own satellites or if it will use existing satellites. Apple’s interest is likely to transport data directly to devices, reducing the dependence on wireless carriers. The technology could enable Apple to circumvent a traditional wireless network and improve functions like location tracking.

As part of the staffing effort, Apple has hired Michael Trela and John Fenwick, former head of satellite engineering at Google and former head of spacecraft operations at Google, respectively, according to their LinkedIn profiles. Apple has also hired Matt Ettus, the Bloomberg report said, who founded Ettus Research, which sells wireless networking equipment.

Apple would be the latest entrant into an increasingly crowded, high-stakes market that includes SpaceX and Amazon.

Earlier this year, CNBC reported on Amazon’s Project Kuiper, the e-commerce giant’s plans to build a network of 3,236 satellites in an attempt to provide global internet access. Amazon announced this week that it would build its R&D headquarters for Project Kuiper in Redmond, Washington, not far from Amazon’s home base in Seattle. And last year, Elon Musk’s SpaceX launched the first two satellites of its “Starlink” network. The network is expected to be operational once at least 800 satellites are deployed.

In 2015, Facebook decided against spending up to $1 billion on a satellite that would provide internet to underserved regions in Africa and other continents. Instead, Facebook opted to lease broadband onboard Spacecom’s Amos-6 satellite, which was destroyed when a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded during fueling before launch in 2016.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates in the late ’90s helped fund Teledesic, in an effort to build low-Earth satellites to provide internet service. Yet Teledesic closed in 2002, after racking up more than $9 billion in costs.

The space industry is estimated to expand rapidly over the next three decades, with the satellite internet sector anticipated to expand at an exponential rate.

— CNBC’s Michael Sheetz contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, network, report, satellite, business, wireless, internet, reportedly, apple, satellites, entering, taking, spacex, amazon, provide, build


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How Bill Gates described the internet to David Letterman in 1995: ‘It’s wild what’s going on’

During the interview, Gates struggled to convince Letterman of the usefulness of the internet. “Late Show with David Letterman” clip courtesy of David Letterman”What the hell is [the internet] exactly?” Gates said unlike with radio, the internet would allow users to watch a baseball game whenever they wanted instead of live. “It’s too bad there is no money in [computers and the internet],” he told his billionaire guest. Don’t miss:In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies


During the interview, Gates struggled to convince Letterman of the usefulness of the internet.
“Late Show with David Letterman” clip courtesy of David Letterman”What the hell is [the internet] exactly?”
Gates said unlike with radio, the internet would allow users to watch a baseball game whenever they wanted instead of live.
“It’s too bad there is no money in [computers and the internet],” he told his billionaire guest.
Don’t miss:In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies
How Bill Gates described the internet to David Letterman in 1995: ‘It’s wild what’s going on’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, bill, users, going, described, david, 1995, web, internet, wild, told, whats, computers, gates, letterman


How Bill Gates described the internet to David Letterman in 1995: 'It's wild what's going on'

During the interview, Gates struggled to convince Letterman of the usefulness of the internet. A clip is embedded below.

That November, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, then 39 and the world’s richest person with a net worth of $12.9 billion, went on CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” to promote his book “The Road Ahead ” as well as Microsoft’s first online tool, the then-newly launched Internet Explorer , which helped computer users access the internet.

In 1995, the internet was still in its infancy. Websites mostly looked like word docs with a grey or white background , and according to a Pew Research Center poll that June, only 14% of Americans reported using the web. (Today only 10% don’t use the internet.)

“Late Show with David Letterman” clip courtesy of David Letterman

“What the hell is [the internet] exactly?” Letterman asks Gates.

“A place where people can publish information. They can have their own homepage, companies are there, the latest information,” Gates says.

“It’s wild what’s going on.”

Letterman wasn’t sold.

“I heard you could watch a live baseball game on the internet and I was like, does radio ring a bell?” Letterman says.

Gates said unlike with radio, the internet would allow users to watch a baseball game whenever they wanted instead of live.

“[Do] tape recorders ring a bell?” Letterman asks.

Gates, who dropped out of Harvard at the age of 19 to start Microsoft in 1975, also told Letterman “you can find other people who have the same usual interests as you do,” by searching the web.

In addition to working to make computers a useful tool for connecting and for education, Gates predicted the advent of artificial intelligence; he told Letterman there might be a way to make computers think on their own.

At the time, however, Gates was not sure how that would work.

“That turns out to be a very tough problem,” Gates says. “In fact, there has been almost no progress made on it, so no one knows what that will happen. Some people think it will never happen.”

Gates called the idea of an intelligent computer a very “scary thought.” (Twenty-four years later, Gates still has a similar view: In March, Gates called A.I. both “promising and dangerous.”)

So what were Letterman’s final thoughts on the web? “It’s too bad there is no money in [computers and the internet],” he told his billionaire guest.

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

Don’t miss:

In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies and fake news on the internet

Why Bill Gates says his 20-year-old self would be ‘so disgusted’ with him today


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, bill, users, going, described, david, 1995, web, internet, wild, told, whats, computers, gates, letterman


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