This major tax deadline is today. What you need to know

FatCamera | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July


FatCamera | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: darla mercado
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This major tax deadline is today. What you need to know

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If you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. While those filers had to pay their projected taxes by April 15, they had to until Oct. 15 to complete and submit their returns. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. Even with the extra time, accountants are still contending with last-minute filers and additional complexity from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which went into effect in 2018.

“We are getting through extension season — a nightmare,” said Dan Herron, CPA and principal of Elemental Wealth Advisors in San Luis Obispo, California. “We have a long way to go in terms of understanding tax reform.” Changes stemming from the new tax code include the elimination of personal exemptions and the near-doubling of the standard deduction. Certain itemized deductions are now subject to new limitations, as well. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. Here’s what taxpayers should know if they’re about to hit that extension deadline.

A new tax break

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There are several reasons why filers sought more time. For instance, investors in partnerships awaited Schedule K-1 forms from those businesses. These documents spell out the investor’s share of income from the partnership, and they often don’t arrive until late spring. In addition, small-business owners — including the people who owned those partnerships — were trying to determine whether they qualified for the new 20% qualified business income deduction. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July 25, the IRS found. The rules around the so-called QBI deduction were still in flux for most of 2018 and part of 2019. This was a case where it was better to wait for certainty, accountants said. “While we have an idea on a client’s situation as to whether they’re a trade or business, we were waiting until later for additional guidance,” said Chris Hesse, CPA and chair of the American Institute of CPAs’ tax executive committee. “We think your risk goes down if we wait as long as possible to file,” he said.

Next year’s blueprint


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: darla mercado
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The clock is ticking for taxpayers who filed for an extension

Julie Thurston | Getty ImagesIt’s cram time for entrepreneurs and other taxpayers with complicated income tax returns. That’s because the Oct. 15 deadline for taxpayers who filed for an extension with the IRS is right around the corner. Though these same taxpayers were able to get more time to work on their 2018 tax returns, they still needed to pay any taxes owed by April 15. It was the first time taxpayers submitted returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. For starters, investors in partnershi


Julie Thurston | Getty ImagesIt’s cram time for entrepreneurs and other taxpayers with complicated income tax returns. That’s because the Oct. 15 deadline for taxpayers who filed for an extension with the IRS is right around the corner. Though these same taxpayers were able to get more time to work on their 2018 tax returns, they still needed to pay any taxes owed by April 15. It was the first time taxpayers submitted returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. For starters, investors in partnershi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: darla mercado
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The clock is ticking for taxpayers who filed for an extension

Julie Thurston | Getty Images

It’s cram time for entrepreneurs and other taxpayers with complicated income tax returns. That’s because the Oct. 15 deadline for taxpayers who filed for an extension with the IRS is right around the corner. Though these same taxpayers were able to get more time to work on their 2018 tax returns, they still needed to pay any taxes owed by April 15. If you’re on track to miss the Oct. 15 deadline, prepare to pay a 5% “failure to file” penalty, so try not to wait until the last minute.

“You would think most people going out to Oct. 15 would be better prepared, but no — they still get it in very close to the deadline,” said David Oransky, a CPA with Laminar Wealth in Chesterfield, Missouri. The 2018 tax season was a complicated one for accountants and filers. It was the first time taxpayers submitted returns under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The new law nearly doubled the standard deduction, eliminated personal exemptions and put new limits on certain itemized deductions. A new 20% tax break for entrepreneurs — the qualified business income deduction — also came with its share of complexities, which led accountants to encourage those filers to ask for more time. Here’s what taxpayers should know if they’re about to hit that extension deadline.

Why the delay

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Accountants pointed to a handful of factors around why filers are submitting late returns. For starters, investors in partnerships need to obtain Schedule K-1 from those businesses in order to file their own personal tax returns. These forms detail the investor’s share of income from the partnership — and they often don’t show up until late spring. Further, small-business owners — including the owners of those partnerships themselves — were eager to see if they were eligible for the new 20% qualified business income deduction. The regulations underlying this new deduction were in flux for most of 2018 and part of 2019.

The IRS proposed new guidance on this tax break in January 2019 and finalized a safe harbor for real estate owners in September. It was ultimately a better idea to wait for clarity, rather than rush the returns to the IRS in April, accountants said. “While we have an idea on a client’s situation as to whether they’re a trade or business, we were waiting until later for additional guidance,” said Chris Hesse, CPA and chair of the American Institute of CPAs’ tax executive committee. “We think your risk goes down if we wait as long as possible to file,” he said.

Planning takeaways

Hero Images | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-28  Authors: darla mercado
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The IRS will waive this 2018 tax penalty for more than 400,000 filers

If you faced a surprise penalty for coming up short on your 2018 taxes, the IRS might be giving you some relief. On Wednesday, the IRS said it would automatically waive the tax underpayment penalty for more than 400,000 taxpayers who have already submitted their 2018 federal income tax return and failed to claim a special penalty waiver this spring. The waiver is only of the penalty; if you owed taxes, you must pay them. Normally, you must pay at least 90% of the income taxes you owe for a given


If you faced a surprise penalty for coming up short on your 2018 taxes, the IRS might be giving you some relief. On Wednesday, the IRS said it would automatically waive the tax underpayment penalty for more than 400,000 taxpayers who have already submitted their 2018 federal income tax return and failed to claim a special penalty waiver this spring. The waiver is only of the penalty; if you owed taxes, you must pay them. Normally, you must pay at least 90% of the income taxes you owe for a given
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The IRS will waive this 2018 tax penalty for more than 400,000 filers

If you faced a surprise penalty for coming up short on your 2018 taxes, the IRS might be giving you some relief.

On Wednesday, the IRS said it would automatically waive the tax underpayment penalty for more than 400,000 taxpayers who have already submitted their 2018 federal income tax return and failed to claim a special penalty waiver this spring.

The waiver is only of the penalty; if you owed taxes, you must pay them.

Normally, you must pay at least 90% of the income taxes you owe for a given year, or 100% of the tax liability from the prior year before you actually file, to avoid an underpayment penalty on your tax return. The threshold is 110% if your adjusted gross income on that year’s return exceeded $150,000.

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act overhauled the tax code, slashing individual income tax rates, eliminating personal exemptions and roughly doubling the standard deduction. As a result, not all taxpayers were properly withheld for 2018.

To help taxpayers contend with these changes amid the 2018 filing season, the IRS lowered its 90% threshold to 85% in January and to 80% in March.

This change was only applicable for the 2018 tax year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: darla mercado
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If you owe the IRS back taxes, you may lose your passport

The IRS is finally ready to make good on threats to strip U.S. passports from Americans who owe more than $52,000 in overdue taxes. The tax collector and the State Department are escalating enforcement of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. Now, the IRS will actively begin referring unresolved cases to the State Department for potential revocation, IRS spokeswoman Cecilia Barreda told CNBC. The State Department denies passport applications or revokes existing passports based


The IRS is finally ready to make good on threats to strip U.S. passports from Americans who owe more than $52,000 in overdue taxes. The tax collector and the State Department are escalating enforcement of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. Now, the IRS will actively begin referring unresolved cases to the State Department for potential revocation, IRS spokeswoman Cecilia Barreda told CNBC. The State Department denies passport applications or revokes existing passports based
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If you owe the IRS back taxes, you may lose your passport

The IRS is finally ready to make good on threats to strip U.S. passports from Americans who owe more than $52,000 in overdue taxes.

The tax collector and the State Department are escalating enforcement of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. This law enables them to deny passport applications or revoke existing passports due to outstanding debts.

The enforcement effort, which began in February 2018 for debts of $51,000 and higher, has thus far covered applications for new or renewed passports. (The higher threshold of $52,000 for 2019 reflects an annual adjustment for inflation, although the IRS could not confirm.)

Now, the IRS will actively begin referring unresolved cases to the State Department for potential revocation, IRS spokeswoman Cecilia Barreda told CNBC.

The State Department denies passport applications or revokes existing passports based on the information it receives from the IRS. The $52,000 must qualify as legally enforceable federal tax debt, including interest and penalties, according to the IRS.

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The agency issued a press release earlier this week reminding delinquent taxpayers of the law’s provisions.

“Our goal was to remind people that this program has been in operation but additionally that it is our intention to begin referring cases to the U.S. Department of State for passport revocation,” Barreda said.

The government agency has notified more than 400,000 taxpayers that their passports are at risk since the program began, according to Barreda.

As a result of these notices, the IRS has received $11.5 million as of the end of June 2018 from 220 individuals. About 1,400 more people had entered into payment agreements as of that date, according to a July 13, 2018, report by CNBC. More recent figures were not available from the IRS.

Taxpayers at risk of having their passport revoked will also receive a letter informing them of the impending referral to the State Department.

“They will receive [the letter] before the IRS refers a case for revocation,” said Barreda. “If there’s a message here, it’s that taxpayers who have a tax debt are encouraged to contact the IRS promptly to resolve their tax debt and avoid the possible revocation of their passport.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: lorie konish kenneth kiesnoski, lorie konish, kenneth kiesnoski
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The IRS revamps its ‘postcard-sized’ tax return, drafts a new one for 2019

That postcard-sized tax return is about to get a little longer. The Internal Revenue Service has posted a draft of a new individual income tax return for 2019, updating the shortened form it had rolled out just last year. This is the second overhaul of the 1040 form since a revamp of the tax code went into effect at the beginning of 2018. Following the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the Treasury and IRS released the new “postcard” version, replacing forms 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ. Though the form itself w


That postcard-sized tax return is about to get a little longer. The Internal Revenue Service has posted a draft of a new individual income tax return for 2019, updating the shortened form it had rolled out just last year. This is the second overhaul of the 1040 form since a revamp of the tax code went into effect at the beginning of 2018. Following the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the Treasury and IRS released the new “postcard” version, replacing forms 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ. Though the form itself w
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The IRS revamps its 'postcard-sized' tax return, drafts a new one for 2019

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) holds up an example of the ‘postcard-sized’ form he wants people to use when filing their taxes during a markup session of the proposed GOP tax reform legislation in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill November 6, 2017 in Washington, DC.

That postcard-sized tax return is about to get a little longer.

The Internal Revenue Service has posted a draft of a new individual income tax return for 2019, updating the shortened form it had rolled out just last year.

This is the second overhaul of the 1040 form since a revamp of the tax code went into effect at the beginning of 2018.

Following the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the Treasury and IRS released the new “postcard” version, replacing forms 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ.

Though the form itself wasn’t quite postcard-sized, it was indeed shorter. But this didn’t necessarily reduce paperwork.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: darla mercado
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The IRS is warning thousands of cryptocurrency holders to pay their taxes

“The IRS is expanding our efforts involving virtual currency, including increased use of data analytics.” Based on guidance issued in 2014, the IRS treats all virtual currencies — including bitcoin, ethereum and XRP — as property under U.S. tax law. And similar to stockholders, digital currency holders are required to report capital gains and losses from cryptocurrency trades. Most trades count as short-term capital gains, which can be taxed at as high as 39% depending on income bracket. The cry


“The IRS is expanding our efforts involving virtual currency, including increased use of data analytics.” Based on guidance issued in 2014, the IRS treats all virtual currencies — including bitcoin, ethereum and XRP — as property under U.S. tax law. And similar to stockholders, digital currency holders are required to report capital gains and losses from cryptocurrency trades. Most trades count as short-term capital gains, which can be taxed at as high as 39% depending on income bracket. The cry
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virtual, warning, letters, bitcoin, taxes, cryptocurrency, thousands, holders, gains, capital, currency, pay, digital, irs, tax


The IRS is warning thousands of cryptocurrency holders to pay their taxes

If you own bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, you might want to check your mailbox.

The Internal Revenue Service is in the process of sending letters to U.S. citizens who own virtual currency and potentially failed to pay the necessary taxes and to those who improperly reported taxes on digital assets last year, the agency announced Friday.

“Taxpayers should take these letters very seriously by reviewing their tax filings and when appropriate, amend past returns and pay back taxes, interest and penalties,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said in a news release. “The IRS is expanding our efforts involving virtual currency, including increased use of data analytics.”

The agency said it started sending out letters last week that by the end of August will reach 10,000 taxpayers. The list of names was obtained through “various ongoing IRS compliance efforts.” In some cases, the IRS said taxpayers could be subject to criminal prosecution.

Last year, popular trading platform Coinbase alerted 13,000 customers that it was complying with a court order to provide the IRS with information on accounts worth at least $20,000 from the years 2013 to 2015. The IRS did not say whether its mailing list was a result of the Coinbase disclosures.

Based on guidance issued in 2014, the IRS treats all virtual currencies — including bitcoin, ethereum and XRP — as property under U.S. tax law. That means that like real estate, the sale or exchange of tokens for other goods is a taxable event. And similar to stockholders, digital currency holders are required to report capital gains and losses from cryptocurrency trades.

Most trades count as short-term capital gains, which can be taxed at as high as 39% depending on income bracket. Those who hold bitcoin for more than a year and then sell it, however, are only liable for a long-term capital gains tax, which is levied at a significantly lower rate of 15% to 23.8%.

Rep. Warren Davidson, R-Ohio, a member of the House Financial Services Committee, is one of the relatively few lawmakers pushing for blockchain legislation that includes changes in the tax code. He and his co-sponsors introduced a bill earlier this year to exempt cryptocurrencies from federal securities laws that apply to traditional equities. The cryptocurrency tax issue has gained more attention recently in light of Facebook’s proposed digital currency Libra.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: kate rooney
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The IRS is going after some cryptocurrency holders for back taxes

If you’ve been trading or mining cryptocurrency, the Internal Revenue Service is about to come knocking. The IRS on Friday announced that it’s sending letters to more than 10,000 taxpayers with virtual currency transactions who have potentially failed to report income and pay taxes owed. Filers who did not properly report their crypto transactions to the IRS can also expect a letter. “Taxpayers should take these letters very seriously by reviewing their tax filings and when appropriate, amend pa


If you’ve been trading or mining cryptocurrency, the Internal Revenue Service is about to come knocking. The IRS on Friday announced that it’s sending letters to more than 10,000 taxpayers with virtual currency transactions who have potentially failed to report income and pay taxes owed. Filers who did not properly report their crypto transactions to the IRS can also expect a letter. “Taxpayers should take these letters very seriously by reviewing their tax filings and when appropriate, amend pa
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, tax, irs, taxes, cryptocurrency, holders, transactions, youve, virtual, letters, report, pay


The IRS is going after some cryptocurrency holders for back taxes

If you’ve been trading or mining cryptocurrency, the Internal Revenue Service is about to come knocking.

The IRS on Friday announced that it’s sending letters to more than 10,000 taxpayers with virtual currency transactions who have potentially failed to report income and pay taxes owed.

Filers who did not properly report their crypto transactions to the IRS can also expect a letter.

“Taxpayers should take these letters very seriously by reviewing their tax filings and when appropriate, amend past returns and pay back taxes, interest and penalties,” said IRS commissioner Charles Rettig in a statement.

Here’s the lowdown on the tax implications of cryptocurrency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: darla mercado
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Blue states file suit against IRS over rules on SALT workarounds

Lucas Jackson | ReutersNew Jersey is suing the Internal Revenue Service, challenging new rules that would block states’ attempts to get around a new $10,000 cap for state and local tax deductions. The state’s governor, Democrat Phil Murphy, announced the lawsuit on Wednesday morning, naming Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin among the defendants. “It was a complete and total utter politicization of the federal tax code,” he said. This way, the taxpayers could write off the payment as a charitable


Lucas Jackson | ReutersNew Jersey is suing the Internal Revenue Service, challenging new rules that would block states’ attempts to get around a new $10,000 cap for state and local tax deductions. The state’s governor, Democrat Phil Murphy, announced the lawsuit on Wednesday morning, naming Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin among the defendants. “It was a complete and total utter politicization of the federal tax code,” he said. This way, the taxpayers could write off the payment as a charitable
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Blue states file suit against IRS over rules on SALT workarounds

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy speaks after taking the oath of office in Trenton, New Jersey, January 16, 2018. Lucas Jackson | Reuters

New Jersey is suing the Internal Revenue Service, challenging new rules that would block states’ attempts to get around a new $10,000 cap for state and local tax deductions. The state’s governor, Democrat Phil Murphy, announced the lawsuit on Wednesday morning, naming Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin among the defendants. “As I said when the IRS rule was finalized in June, it was nothing more than a gut punch to the middle-class New Jersey families who know that the Trump tax plan is a complete sham,” Murphy said at a press conference in South Orange, New Jersey. “It was a complete and total utter politicization of the federal tax code,” he said. New York and Connecticut have also joined the suit, which was filed in the Southern District of New York.

This same court is hearing another lawsuit filed last year by these three states, plus Maryland, against Mnuchin and the Treasury, challenging the $10,000 SALT cap itself. When the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 imposed a $10,000 limit on deductions for state and local income, sales and property tax that itemizers could claim on their federal returns, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut responded with a workaround. The three states passed legislation that would permit municipalities to establish charitable funds to pay for local services and offer property tax credits to incentivize homeowners to give. This way, the taxpayers could write off the payment as a charitable deduction on their federal tax returns. In June the IRS and Treasury blocked this strategy, saying that the receipt of a state or local tax credit in return for making this contribution would be a “quid pro quo.” Separately, the village of Scarsdale, New York, has also filed suit against the tax agency and Mnuchin, pushing back against the new rules.

Quid pro quo

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) headquarters in Washington, D.C. Janhvi Bhojwani | CNBC

The new rules from the IRS would reduce the amount of the federal deduction a taxpayer can claim for a charitable contribution to one of these funds. For example, if you received an 85% state tax credit for donating to a state fund, you would only be able to claim 15% of your contribution on your federal tax return. In effect, it would greatly reduce the amount residents in high-tax states can claim. Consider that, in 2016, New Yorkers writing off state and local taxes took an average SALT deduction of $21,779, according to the Tax Policy Center. Meanwhile, in New Jersey and Connecticut the average deductions were $18,092 and $19,563, respectively.

Preexisting programs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: darla mercado, annie nova
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