Boris Johnson’s big win reveals three key lessons for Trump and Democrats in 2020

But some of the key factors that made this the biggest election win for any party in the U.K. since 2001 are also at play on our political scene. 1) Your candidate matters more than the issuesBritons are still debating the exact reasons why the Labour Party posted its worst election results in decades. You don’t need to look any further than the top of the Labour Party to see one big reason their opponents did so well. Meanwhile, Corbyn also personally fumbled on the Brexit issue. If the Democra


But some of the key factors that made this the biggest election win for any party in the U.K. since 2001 are also at play on our political scene.
1) Your candidate matters more than the issuesBritons are still debating the exact reasons why the Labour Party posted its worst election results in decades.
You don’t need to look any further than the top of the Labour Party to see one big reason their opponents did so well.
Meanwhile, Corbyn also personally fumbled on the Brexit issue.
If the Democra
Boris Johnson’s big win reveals three key lessons for Trump and Democrats in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, johnsons, party, message, win, 2020, labour, brexit, big, reveals, issue, boris, president, democrats, election, lessons, key, trump


Boris Johnson's big win reveals three key lessons for Trump and Democrats in 2020

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson reacts as he is greeted by staff, arriving back at Downing Street, after meeting Queen Elizabeth and accepting her invitation to form a new government, in London, Britain December 13, 2019.

Now that Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his Conservative Party have won an historic victory in the U.K. elections, many are wondering what lessons this very clear outcome may have for our upcoming 2020 elections in the U.S.

The answer is: plenty.

It’s not that the Conservative victory in Britain means conservatives or the Republican Party will sweep to similar win here in the States. It’s not as simple as that. But some of the key factors that made this the biggest election win for any party in the U.K. since 2001 are also at play on our political scene. Both major U.S. parties and all the key candidates should take notice.

1) Your candidate matters more than the issues

Britons are still debating the exact reasons why the Labour Party posted its worst election results in decades. Some say the ongoing Brexit drama was the culprit because the issue crossed traditional party lines. A lot of Labour leaders say this was a much tougher election for them to win with what they’re downplaying as a “Brexit distraction.”

But that excuse is off-target. You don’t need to look any further than the top of the Labour Party to see one big reason their opponents did so well. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has always struggled with high disapproval rates in the polls, and his personal conduct became more and more of an issue in the election in its final weeks. That was most clearly evident as new allegations of Corbyn’s alleged coddling of antisemitism in the Labour Party began to grab as many front pages in the British tabloids as stories about Brexit. This culminated with the Chief Rabbi of Great Britain’s blockbuster editorial in the Times of London stating that Corbyn was unfit to lead the nation. When the rabbi’s message was essentially backed up by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the issue stayed front-and-center until the voting began.

Meanwhile, Corbyn also personally fumbled on the Brexit issue. He began giving murky answers on whether he supported it or not, finally just repeating a promise to hold a second national referendum in the near future. Even in a parliamentary system like the U.K. where voters are supposed to vote for and focus on parties and not individual candidates, Corbyn’s personal negatives were just too hard to overcome.

The lesson for the U.S. political stage is that the actual top candidate for your party matters greatly. If the Democrats seek to win back the White House simply with an anti-Trump message, it’s not likely to work. They will need a presidential nominee who generates decent positive poll numbers on his or her own.

For the Trump team, this too is informative. It may seem like it will be impossible to change President Trump’s personal conduct and public habits that irk so many independent and moderate voters. But there will definitely be gains to be made by getting him to tone down the taunting and constant angry responses to seemingly every public figure who criticizes and attacks him.

2) Don’t mess with the power of the voters

Labour took a hit in the polls from a segment of the population who were turned off by the party’s push to ignore the results of the 2016 Brexit referendum. Most of the pushback obviously came from those who voted to leave the E.U. But there were also many “remainers” who were shocked by the blatant disregard for a close, but very clear referendum result. Conservatives made an issue of purging party members who were blocking Brexit and Labour did not.

The Democrats ought to take heed of this development as they continue their impeachment process against President Trump even as the voters are poised to make what should be the definitive referendum on the president’s tenure. Journalist Michael Tracey summed up the ominous message this has for American Democrats nicely in one tweet:

It’s probably too late for the House Democrats to shift gears and focus on a bruising censure of President Trump rather than banking on removing from office. But if President Trump’s resilience on the polls and stronger fundraising in response to the impeachment process continues through Election Day, the Democrats won’t be able to say this British election result didn’t warn them.

3) Conservatives can win over the working class

For decades, the only religious or social issues ever gave Conservatives in Britain and Republicans in the U.S. a chance to gain working class votes. But the Conservative Party’s decision to support Brexit helped it crack through in several U.K. constituencies that had been held by Labour for more than a lifetime. Some Conservatives are now claiming that they are the party of the working class. That’s probably the hardest pill of all for Labour leaders to swallow right now.

Similarly, in the U.S. in 2016, then-candidate Trump won over many working class districts with an economic message on trade and immigration that clearly strayed from the establishment Republican Party. His message has clearly proven that the GOP doesn’t need to rely on wedge issues like abortion to attract voters who aren’t swayed by tax and regulation cut promises. If there was any chance that the Trump campaign would forget that lesson, that’s even less likely after the Tory win in Britain. President Trump’s continuing strength in the polls of blue collar states like Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin show his campaign still maintains this key priority.

It’s important to remember that the British election results are more instructive than they are predictive for the U.S. But at this point it looks like the Trump campaign and the Republicans are poised to learn more from those instructions than the Democrats.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, johnsons, party, message, win, 2020, labour, brexit, big, reveals, issue, boris, president, democrats, election, lessons, key, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Bannon praises ‘liberal’ Cramer for supporting Trump on China trade. Cramer says thanks

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Thursday thanked former Trump advisor Steve Bannon for praising his recent remarks that the U.S. economy is strong enough for the president to walk away from China trade talks. Bannon, an ex-White House chief strategist and the former head of far-right Breitbart News, said in a “Squawk Box” interview, “I like quoting a liberal Democrat, some guy named Jim Cramer.” “So I thank Steve Bannon for recognizing that this is a position that is not a left or right issue. It’s an issu


CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Thursday thanked former Trump advisor Steve Bannon for praising his recent remarks that the U.S. economy is strong enough for the president to walk away from China trade talks.
Bannon, an ex-White House chief strategist and the former head of far-right Breitbart News, said in a “Squawk Box” interview, “I like quoting a liberal Democrat, some guy named Jim Cramer.”
“So I thank Steve Bannon for recognizing that this is a position that is not a left or right issue.
It’s an issu
Bannon praises ‘liberal’ Cramer for supporting Trump on China trade. Cramer says thanks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thanks, trade, right, supporting, squawk, president, trump, position, china, bannon, walk, praises, cramer, liberal, away, issue, jobs


Bannon praises 'liberal' Cramer for supporting Trump on China trade. Cramer says thanks

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Thursday thanked former Trump advisor Steve Bannon for praising his recent remarks that the U.S. economy is strong enough for the president to walk away from China trade talks.

Bannon, an ex-White House chief strategist and the former head of far-right Breitbart News, said in a “Squawk Box” interview, “I like quoting a liberal Democrat, some guy named Jim Cramer.”

Later in the show, Cramer said he has, indeed, been a liberal Democrat “historically,” but argued that’s not inconsistent with his current support for President Donald Trump’s hard line on China. “My position has been one that is easily articulated from the left side for about 40 years.”

“What really matters here to me is trying to bring jobs back. I never thought that was a right-wing issue. So it was a left-wing issue that the right has kind of grudgingly adopted because the right wants profits for companies,” the “Mad Money” host said. “So I thank Steve Bannon for recognizing that this is a position that is not a left or right issue. It’s an issue about bringing jobs back and taking jobs away from those who took them away from us and debased our American workers.”

Earlier, while Bannon was being interviewed, Cramer tweeted his thanks to Bannon “for acknowledging my ‘walk away’ position on China.”

Cramer’s and Bannon’s remarks on “Squawk Box” on Thursday morning were made before the president tweeted, just after the open on Wall Street, that both Washington and Beijing want a trade agreement and they’re getting “VERY close to a BIG DEAL.”

Trump’s optimism came ahead of an expected Thursday meeting with his top economic advisors on whether to delay the administration’s next round of tariffs on Chinese imports. The duties are set to take effect Sunday.

Reacting to the possibility of a deal, CNBC’s Carl Quintanilla asked Cramer, on “Squawk on the Street,” whether he would be disappointed if an agreement is reached. Cramer said: “Kind of. Yeah. When are you going to take them on?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thanks, trade, right, supporting, squawk, president, trump, position, china, bannon, walk, praises, cramer, liberal, away, issue, jobs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

North Korea’s nuclear issue is ‘unresolvable’: Control Risks

North Korea’s nuclear issue is ‘unresolvable’: Control RisksDane Chamorro of Control Risks says North Korea will not give up its nuclear weapons because that’s their “last guarantee of survival.”


North Korea’s nuclear issue is ‘unresolvable’: Control RisksDane Chamorro of Control Risks says North Korea will not give up its nuclear weapons because that’s their “last guarantee of survival.”
North Korea’s nuclear issue is ‘unresolvable’: Control Risks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unresolvable, survival, control, thats, weapons, koreas, risks, risksdane, nuclear, issue, north


North Korea's nuclear issue is 'unresolvable': Control Risks

North Korea’s nuclear issue is ‘unresolvable’: Control Risks

Dane Chamorro of Control Risks says North Korea will not give up its nuclear weapons because that’s their “last guarantee of survival.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unresolvable, survival, control, thats, weapons, koreas, risks, risksdane, nuclear, issue, north


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

China’s military might has now become a top issue for NATO

But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China. However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.” According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018. Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO


But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China.
However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China.
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.”
According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018.
Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO
China’s military might has now become a top issue for NATO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt david reid, holly ellyatt, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, stoltenberg, budget, chinas, china, power, nato, world, military, told, issue


China's military might has now become a top issue for NATO

The Beijing corps of the Chinese People’s Armed Police takes an oath during a ceremony on January 2, 2018, in Beijing, China, as annual military training activities begin. Zhao Shiwei | VCG | Getty Images

NATO, the 29-member military alliance, was set up 70 years ago to counter the threat posed by the-then Soviet Union. But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China. As heads of state and government gather in the U.K. Tuesday for a two-day meeting of the alliance, shifting geopolitical relationships and emerging challenges will be in focus for the fractious group. Previous meetings have been dominated by the alliance’s old foe Russia, following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.” “What we see is that the rising power of China is shifting the global balance of power and the rises of China — the economic rise, the military rise — provides some opportunities but also some serious challenges,” Stoltenberg told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in London. “We have to address the fact that China is coming closer to us, investing heavily in infrastructure. We see them in Africa, we see them in the Arctic, we see them in cyber space and China now has the second-largest defense budget in the world,” he said.

According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018. In March, China set its 2019 defense spending at 7.5% higher than a year ago, raising spending to 1.19 trillion yuan ($177.61 billion), according to known figures (some believe the actual figure could be higher). Still, it lags a long way behind the U.S. In April, the U.S. Defense Department asked Congress for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, an increase of $33 billion or about 5% over what Congress enacted for fiscal 2019. The U.S. and NATO, are watching China closely. Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO allies stand together, we are strong and we are safe … We are by far the strongest military power in the world.” Sino-U.S. tensions are of course already high as a trade dispute between the nations, which has led to billions of dollars’ worth of import tariffs on each others’ goods, remains unresolved. U.S. Permanent Representative to NATO, Ambassador Kay Bailey Hutchison, told CNBC Monday that the rest of the world had let China get by with not meeting World Trade Organization (WTO) standards, but that it was now time to bring China “into the rules-based order.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt david reid, holly ellyatt, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, stoltenberg, budget, chinas, china, power, nato, world, military, told, issue


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jim Cramer: China trade is a ‘much smaller issue’ on the market than most people realize

Jim Cramer: China trade is a ‘much smaller issue’ on the market than most people realizeTrade fears “will eventually create fabulous discounts” in the stock market, but “we’re not totally there yet,” the “Mad Money” host says.


Jim Cramer: China trade is a ‘much smaller issue’ on the market than most people realizeTrade fears “will eventually create fabulous discounts” in the stock market, but “we’re not totally there yet,” the “Mad Money” host says.
Jim Cramer: China trade is a ‘much smaller issue’ on the market than most people realize Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, realizetrade, trade, stock, mad, market, totally, cramer, jim, issue, china, smaller, realize, money


Jim Cramer: China trade is a 'much smaller issue' on the market than most people realize

Jim Cramer: China trade is a ‘much smaller issue’ on the market than most people realize

Trade fears “will eventually create fabulous discounts” in the stock market, but “we’re not totally there yet,” the “Mad Money” host says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, realizetrade, trade, stock, mad, market, totally, cramer, jim, issue, china, smaller, realize, money


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S. In September


US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018.
Defense spending, againSpending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading.
Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again.
The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.
In September
Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


Russia is not the only pressing issue that NATO has to deal with

US president Donald Trump is seen during his press conference at the 2018 NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium on July 12, 2018. NurPhoto | NurPhoto | Getty Images

As heads of state and government meet in the U.K. this week for the 70th anniversary of the military alliance NATO, discussions are likely to focus on shifting geopolitical relations and military threats, that thorny issue of defense spending and, crucially, the alliance’s future. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said earlier this year that the summit on Dec. 3 and 4 will give members the opportunity to address “current and emerging security challenges and how NATO continues to invest and adapt to ensure it will remain a pillar of stability in the years ahead.” The summit on the outskirts of London comes at a tricky time for NATO with unsettled relationships countering older insecurities like its relations with Russia. Furthermore, the commitment of its most powerful member, the U.S., to the alliance is now more uncertain than ever. “Rarely has NATO not been under verbal siege over these past few months,” Judy Dempsey, a non-resident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe, said in an editorial piece on Tuesday last week. “The fact that that this meeting will not be called a summit shows how NATO’s seventieth birthday is not being celebrated with great fanfare but instead with a degree of self-doubt, if not anxiety.” That anxiety comes after a tough few years for the alliance, especially when it comes to the issue of who pays the most. NATO agreed at a summit in Wales in 2014 to reverse the trend of declining defense budgets and to raise them over the coming decade, a move that was designed to “further strengthen the transatlantic bond.” Then, members agreed to spend a minimum of 2% of their GDP (gross domestic product) on defense. At last year’s summit in Brussels, President Donald Trump chided other members of the group for not meeting spending targets agreed at the NATO summit in 2014. Experts note that discussions at this NATO “Leaders Meeting,” as it’s being called, will be informed as much by issues not on the formal agenda as those that are. “Member states will be keen to bring their political differences back behind closed doors, whilst emphasizing the military coherence and credibility of their alliance,” Sarah Raine, consulting senior fellow for geopolitics and strategy at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), told CNBC. “The degree to which Europe should do more not just for itself, but also by itself, remains highly contentious. Assessment of the scope of NATO’s engagement on China’s challenge, including the U.S. push to include the issue of 5G within these discussions, risk further highlighting these sensitivities,” she said.

Defense spending, again

Spending is likely to be a key issue again this week with the latest figures not making for comfortable reading. NATO estimates for 2019, released in June, show that only the U.S., U.K., Greece, Estonia, Romania, Poland and Latvia have met or surpassed that target. The highest defense spend was made by the U.S., at 3.4% of its GDP, while the lowest spend was by Luxembourg which only spent 0.55%. Given the slow progress made by members, Trump is likely to be heavily critical again. Germany has been singled out for especially harsh treatment because of its budget surplus. The European nation only spent an estimated 1.36% of its GDP on defense spending in 2019, setting up another potential clash with the U.S.

US commitment to NATO

Defense spending, or the lack thereof, has created so much ire in Trump that there are reports that he frequently discussed pulling the U.S. out of the alliance, even with Congressional support. In July, he also likened countries not meeting the defense spend target, like Germany, to delinquents. “We’re the schmucks that are paying for the whole thing,” Trump said at a rally in July. “Frankly, many countries owe us a tremendous amount of money for many years back, where they’re delinquent, as far as I’m concerned, because the United States has had to pay for them,” singling out Germany as “the number one” culprit.

Perhaps the only thing Trump has in common with his predecessor Barack Obama was their shared dismay at the perception that the U.S. bears the brunt of NATO spending. Obama called out “free riders” in NATO that benefit from U.S. military support without contributing enough to defense themselves.

Europe’s commitment to NATO

Ironically, questions over members’ commitment to NATO could come from closer to home (it’s headquartered in Brussels) with increasing talk in Europe about strengthening the EU’s cooperation and coordination on defense. French President Emmanuel Macron has caused a stir ahead of this week’s NATO meeting after he said in early November that “what we are currently experiencing is the brain death of Nato.” Speaking to The Economist magazine, Macron cited the U.S. failure to consult NATO before pulling out of Syria as a reason for his comment, and also questioned NATO’s validity. He argued that Europe should focus on its own defense alliance, although German Chancellor Angela Merkel believes the continent is too weak “for now” to defend itself. Speaking to lawmakers last week, Merkel said that “we rely on this trans-Atlantic alliance, and that is why it is right for us to work for this alliance and take on more responsibility.” IISS’s Raine told CNBC that the short-term priority for the alliance “must be to get NATO’s public messaging back on track.” “That includes the presentation of an alliance that is militarily more capable than ever before, and that is adapting to the evolving security threats its members face, not at the expense of its traditional focus but in addition to it,” she said. The NATO secretary general will be hoping for summit headlines that focus attention away from the state of NATO’s brain, Raine said, “and towards admiration for NATO’s muscles, by highlighting the range and depth of NATO’s operational commitments and capabilities.”

The ‘R’-word

NATO was set up in 1949 as a military alliance between 10 European countries, the U.S. and Canada “to promote cooperation among its members and to guard their freedom,” the alliance says, “within the context of countering the threat posed at the time by the Soviet Union.” Seventy years on, and after several decades of relatively good relations and cooperation, NATO’s relations with Russia are tense. This comes after Moscow’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and its role in a pro-Russian uprising in eastern Ukraine. NATO says that the channels of communication remain open with Russia but that “Russia’s destabilizing actions and policies go beyond Ukraine” citing its “provocative military activities near NATO’s borders stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea.” It has also cited its “irresponsible and aggressive nuclear rhetoric,” its support for the regime in Syria as well as the U.K. nerve agent attack which it said was “a clear breach of international norms.” NATO has said it supported the U.S.’ decision to withdraw from the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in response to “Russia’s material breach.” On Russia’s part, perhaps the most controversial NATO decision has been the decision to deploy NATO missile defense systems in Romania and Poland (although completion of this Aegis Ashore — a land-based missile defense system — site is delayed to 2020). Along with the deployment of thousands of NATO troops to the Baltic nations and Poland in the last few years, these developments appear to have served only to exacerbate tensions with Russia. Russia has widely criticized the deployment of missile defense shields in its former backyard. The prospect of Ukraine and Georgia, both of which used to be part of the former USSR, joining NATO (and even potentially the European Union) is also an unsavory prospect for Moscow. In September 2019, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said that “NATO approaching our borders is a threat to Russia.” That view was echoed by Russian President Vladimir Putin this month, when he told Russia’s Security Council that he was “seriously concerned about the NATO infrastructure approaching our borders, as well as the attempts to militarize outer space.”

The future?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, members, russia, summit, natos, trump, issue, defense, deal, pressing, alliance, spending, nato, military


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

President Trump’s approval rating among business owners hits all-time high: Survey

Sixty percent of small business owners approve of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as president, the highest approval rating number since CNBC and SurveyMonkey began its quarterly Small Business Survey in 2017. Small business owners typically are a conservative-leaning group. Forty percent of small business owners disapprove of his performance, 34% strongly. The fourth-quarter CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey was conducted Nov. 12–18, 2019, among a national sample of 2,081 self-id


Sixty percent of small business owners approve of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as president, the highest approval rating number since CNBC and SurveyMonkey began its quarterly Small Business Survey in 2017.
Small business owners typically are a conservative-leaning group.
Forty percent of small business owners disapprove of his performance, 34% strongly.
The fourth-quarter CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey was conducted Nov. 12–18, 2019, among a national sample of 2,081 self-id
President Trump’s approval rating among business owners hits all-time high: Survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: david spiegel, laura wronski, senior research scientist, senior research scientist at surveymonkey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disapprove, high, approve, rating, business, alltime, issue, approval, president, owners, small, say, hits, trump, trade, trumps, survey


President Trump's approval rating among business owners hits all-time high: Survey

Sixty percent of small business owners approve of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as president, the highest approval rating number since CNBC and SurveyMonkey began its quarterly Small Business Survey in 2017.

Small business owners typically are a conservative-leaning group. Approval of Trump never has been below 51% in the almost three-year history of the survey. Support for Trump rose to 60% from 57% in the third quarter 2019.

Of the 60% who approve of the president’s performance, 39% strongly approve. Forty percent of small business owners disapprove of his performance, 34% strongly. Ninety-three percent of Republican business owners approve of Trump, while 86% of Democrats disapprove. Among Independents, 37% approve while 62% disapprove.

The fourth-quarter CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey was conducted Nov. 12–18, 2019, among a national sample of 2,081 self-identified small business owners ages 18 and up.

The climb in support for Trump corresponds with a climb in the CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Confidence Index in Q4, which was driven in part by a more optimistic outlook on trade. Twenty-four percent of small business owners expect trade to have a positive effect on their businesses over the next year, up from 16% in Q3. Thirty-five percent of those who approve of Trump expect trade to have a positive effect on their businesses in the next year.

Trump supporters are also more likely to say that impeachment of the president will have a material impact on their business.

“Republicans are more likely than Democrats to anticipate consequences for their businesses as a result of the impeachment,” says SurveyMonkey Senior Research Scientist Laura Wronski. “Whether it’s because they view it as a political distraction that prevents people from working on real policy changes or because they’re taking it a step further and they’re concerned about Trump leaving office, we can’t say that much from these data.”

Seventy percent of those who disapprove of Trump say impeachment is unlikely to impact their business.

Trump supporters also are much more likely to say “Jobs and the Economy” is the issue that matters most to them, with 39% of them saying it is their top issue, versus 15% of those who disapprove of the president.

Among those who disapprove of Trump, 25% say health care is their most important issue, and another 25% say the environment. The environment is the most important issue for just 4% of Trump supporters.

See full results of the fourth quarter CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey. The survey is conducted quarterly using SurveyMonkey’s online platform and based on its survey methodology.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: david spiegel, laura wronski, senior research scientist, senior research scientist at surveymonkey
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disapprove, high, approve, rating, business, alltime, issue, approval, president, owners, small, say, hits, trump, trade, trumps, survey


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker saysBritish lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.


There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker saysBritish lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.
There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, absolutely, uks, lawmaker, issue, brexit, umunna, saysbritish, escape, playing


There's absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

There’s absolutely no escape from the Brexit issue, UK lawmaker says

British lawmaker Chuka Umunna discusses how Brexit is playing into the U.K.’s election debate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, absolutely, uks, lawmaker, issue, brexit, umunna, saysbritish, escape, playing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Dexcom glitch kept parents of children with diabetes in the dark over their conditions this weekend

Dexcom’s continuous blood sugar monitors are designed to make it easier for patients with diabetes to get frequent readings without the finger prick system. But since Saturday, a glitch in Dexcom’s technology has kept patients and parents of kids with diabetes from getting regular updates, leaving them unaware of potentially dangerous problems. However, we have determined that a server overload occurred due to an unexpected system issue that generated a massive backlog, which our system was unab


Dexcom’s continuous blood sugar monitors are designed to make it easier for patients with diabetes to get frequent readings without the finger prick system.
But since Saturday, a glitch in Dexcom’s technology has kept patients and parents of kids with diabetes from getting regular updates, leaving them unaware of potentially dangerous problems.
However, we have determined that a server overload occurred due to an unexpected system issue that generated a massive backlog, which our system was unab
Dexcom glitch kept parents of children with diabetes in the dark over their conditions this weekend Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insulin, conditions, dexcoms, sugar, children, dark, kept, parents, dexcom, issue, weekend, system, patients, blood, diabetes, levels, glitch, updates


Dexcom glitch kept parents of children with diabetes in the dark over their conditions this weekend

Dexcom’s continuous blood sugar monitors are designed to make it easier for patients with diabetes to get frequent readings without the finger prick system. The company’s device can be worn as a patch and has a tiny sensor that is inserted under the skin.

But since Saturday, a glitch in Dexcom’s technology has kept patients and parents of kids with diabetes from getting regular updates, leaving them unaware of potentially dangerous problems. And as of Monday, service was still intermittent.

Dexcom said the bug was specifically related to its Follow feature that allows for remote monitoring on Apple and Android devices as well as Dexcom’s own hardware. In an email to CNBC on Monday, the company said that on Saturday morning it became aware of the issue, which could cause followers not to receive continuous glucose monitoring alerts. The service hasn’t been fully restored but has seen “significant improvement” in performance, wrote Dexcom, which blamed the problem on a server malfunction.

“We are still investigating official root cause,” the company said. “We did not release any updates or changes to cause this issue, further complicating our investigation. However, we have determined that a server overload occurred due to an unexpected system issue that generated a massive backlog, which our system was unable to sufficiently handle.”

Dexcom said it’s working with “our partners at Microsoft to address the problem,” and recommended that customers follow updates on its Facebook page.

Carrie Diulus, a surgeon with type 1 diabetes who uses Dexcom’s blood sugar monitor, said she didn’t get notified on her app that there was an issue for 40 hours, which is a big concern given how much trust she puts in the company to help keep her safe.

“They have access to all of our cell phones,” she said. “I get that tech fails happen, but they need a better system to manage this.”

Type 1 diabetes affects more than 1.2 million Americans. It impairs the body’s ability to produce the hormone insulin, which normally comes from the pancreas. Patients use trackers to monitor their blood sugar levels so they know what their body needs, whether it’s more sugar or an insulin injection.

Dexcom, whose products cost more than what rivals charge, is known for its continuous and minimally invasive glucose monitors and for its remote tracking systems.

Chris Wilson, who has type 1 diabetes, said the Dexcom outage extended to patients who rely on the data to power systems known as an “artificial pancreas” that they’ve set up to automatically adjust insulin levels based on the readings.

Over the holiday weekend, many parents took to social media to describe the anxiety they experienced from the glitch that kept them from getting alerted overnight if their child’s blood sugar levels dropped too low.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insulin, conditions, dexcoms, sugar, children, dark, kept, parents, dexcom, issue, weekend, system, patients, blood, diabetes, levels, glitch, updates


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The Dallas Fed president believes ballooning debt could suddenly become a big issue for economy

Dallas Federal Reserve President Robert Kaplan is worried about ballooning levels of corporate debt and laid out a scenario where it could suddenly become a big problem for the economy. “We’re got a record level of corporate and to be specific BBB debt has tripled over the last 10 years,” he said on “Squawk Box.” Total corporate debt has swelled from about $5 trillion in 2007 as the Great Recession was just beginning to $9.5 trillion halfway through 2019, quietly surging 90%, according to Securi


Dallas Federal Reserve President Robert Kaplan is worried about ballooning levels of corporate debt and laid out a scenario where it could suddenly become a big problem for the economy.
“We’re got a record level of corporate and to be specific BBB debt has tripled over the last 10 years,” he said on “Squawk Box.”
Total corporate debt has swelled from about $5 trillion in 2007 as the Great Recession was just beginning to $9.5 trillion halfway through 2019, quietly surging 90%, according to Securi
The Dallas Fed president believes ballooning debt could suddenly become a big issue for economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suddenly, company, ballooning, dallas, believes, big, rates, trillion, economy, bonds, widening, corporate, worried, debt, kaplan, credit, president, fed, issue


The Dallas Fed president believes ballooning debt could suddenly become a big issue for economy

Dallas Federal Reserve President Robert Kaplan is worried about ballooning levels of corporate debt and laid out a scenario where it could suddenly become a big problem for the economy.

“The thing I am worried about is if you get two or three BBB-credit downgrades to BB or B, that could lead to a rapid widening in credit spreads, which could then lead to a rapid tightening in financial conditions,” Kaplan said in a Tuesday interview with CNBC’s Steve Liesman.

“We’re got a record level of corporate and to be specific BBB debt has tripled over the last 10 years,” he said on “Squawk Box.” “Leveraged loans as well as BB- and B-debt have grown dramatically.”

Total corporate debt has swelled from about $5 trillion in 2007 as the Great Recession was just beginning to $9.5 trillion halfway through 2019, quietly surging 90%, according to Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association data.

Investors have pointed to historically low interest rates both as the reason for the high levels of debt and justification for not panicking about its size just yet. The Fed has cut the overnight lending rate three times in 2020, most recently at its October meeting when it reduced the federal funds rate to a range between 1.5% and 1.75%.

But a sudden slide from low investment grade such a BBB-rated debt to junk quality could trigger concern over the credit markets and spark a widening in spreads. Investors usually see such divergence as a bad sign as higher-quality bonds, which have less chance of default offer lower interest rates while lower-quality bonds need to offer higher rates to entice investors.

General Electric has long been eyed as the largest company at risk of triggered such a domino effect, though company officials insist they are doing everything they can to prevent a credit downgrade.

Still, should a company that big slide, it could remold the high-yield market as investors would be counted on to snap up those bonds, but require even higher yields.

“The problem with ’08-’09 was that the lenders were over-leveraged. Right now, we have an issue where the borrowers are highly leveraged,” Kaplan added. “My concern is if you have a downturn where we grow more slowly it means that this amount of debt could be an amplifier.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-26  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suddenly, company, ballooning, dallas, believes, big, rates, trillion, economy, bonds, widening, corporate, worried, debt, kaplan, credit, president, fed, issue


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post