Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues

Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues6 Hours AgoSheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.


Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues6 Hours AgoSheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.
Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaking, tech, big, underlying, sheryl, doesnt, break, security, sandberg, address, facebook, spoke, issues, privacy, concerned


Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn't address big underlying issues

Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues

6 Hours Ago

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaking, tech, big, underlying, sheryl, doesnt, break, security, sandberg, address, facebook, spoke, issues, privacy, concerned


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Nike’s ‘inclusive’ image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say

Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. Taking a standThe controversy also raises


Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. Taking a standThe controversy also raises
Nike’s ‘inclusive’ image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, issues, women, risk, company, social, york, fails, nike, say, athletes, long, nikes, inclusive, brand, image, experts, maternity


Nike's 'inclusive' image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say

When Olympic athlete Alysia Montano took part in a race only one month away from having a baby, she became known as “the pregnant runner.” It was 2014 and she went on to win a national championship when her daughter was six months old, and another when she was 10 months old. But in an opinion piece and video published by the New York Times on Sunday, Montano said when she told one of her former sponsors, Nike, that she wanted to have a baby during her career, the sports giant told her it would pause her contract and stop paying her. This, she said, is at odds with commercials such as “Dream Crazier,” released by Nike in February, where Nike-sponsored tennis player Serena Williams is praised for “having a baby and then coming back for more,” and in which viewers are told: “Show them what crazy can do.”

Pregnant athlete Alysia Montano at the USA Field and Track Championship on June 26, 2014 in Sacramento, California Ezra Shaw | Getty Images

Nike has admitted that “a few” female athletes did previously have “performance-based reductions” in their fees, but last year it standardized its approach across all sports “so that no female athlete is penalized financially for pregnancy,” according to a statement emailed to CNBC. It said it is common industry practice for agreements to include performance-based payment reductions, but did not confirm to the Times if its change in approach is a contractual guarantee. Montano’s article has prompted much debate. Women’s rights campaigning organization Time’s Up tweeted that Nike “should be supporting safe and healthy pregnancies — not pushing people out or slashing benefits.” Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. “I think there is more of a debate about keeping a ranking than getting paid. I think the movement in women’s sport and focus on equality is absolutely great. But would we give a male athlete maternity leave? … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. “I own my own business and if I don’t work, I don’t get paid. I have to budget for babies and I have had three,” she added.

Taking a stand

The controversy also raises the question of whether brands should take a stand on social issues, as Nike has done in its advertising, or have their executives publicize opinions. “Consumers increasingly expect brands to have a voice in political and social conversations, and gender equality is among the top issues Americans want to see companies support,” according to Jeremy Robinson-Leon, president of New York based PR firm Group Gordon, in an email to CNBC. “However, the public won’t stand for lip service. When a company’s words and actions don’t add up, its reputation will inevitably take a hit.”

A Nike Ad featuring American football quarterback Colin Kaepernick is on diplay September 8, 2018 in New York City. Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images

Nike is not afraid of controversy: Shares in the company fell in September 2018 after it released an ad starring activist Colin Kaepernick. For Simeon Siegel, an analyst at Nomura Instinet, its willingness to make a stand has not dented long-term sales. “Nike has a long history of … controversy for good and bad … and that long history sits side by side with a long history of becoming the largest … apparel (and) footwear brand in the history of time,” he told CNBC by phone.

Ads vs reality

For Robinson-Leon, any company that pushes gender equality in its advertising but behaves differently in private risks its reputation. “Clearly, a brand like Nike that bills itself as a leader on social issues hurts its credibility by saying one thing publicly and doing another backstage. It’s illogical for the business and a disservice to the intended social impact. And, more broadly, it gives rise to an understandable cynicism on the part of the public that undermines the positive efforts of other responsible businesses,” Robinson-Leon said in an email to CNBC. Other companies have been tripped up by how their public behavior contrasts with their advertising — United Airlines’ “Fly the friendly skies” was mocked on social media after a man was forcibly removed from a flight in 2017. But almost a year later, parent company United Continental Holdings posted its fifth consecutive year of profits.

Nike and women

“Dream Crazier,” from February, and “Dream with Us,” released on Mother’s Day to promote Nike’s sponsorship of teams playing in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup, are part of the company’s strategy to grow its U.S. business by focusing on women. The debate over maternity pay is not likely to dent sales to women, according to Siegel. “The reality is Nike(‘s)… marketing and their messaging is also inclusive … I believe that as long as they are not putting their head in the sand we are unlikely to see a sales miss,” he told CNBC by phone.

Nike President and CEO Mark Parker speaks during the 2016 Nike New Innovations Debut at Skylight at Moynihan Station on March 16, 2016 in New York City. Mike Pont | WireImage | Getty Images

Siegel added that Nike has been fast to deal with problems as it became aware of them. A year ago, the company saw an exodus of executives amid accusations of harassment and discrimination, and an apology from CEO Mark Parker who said the company would change its culture. “Nike, generally speaking, over the past year has actually sought to get ahead of issues presumably as they became aware of them,” Siegel said. “Rather than being called into question and then fixing the business, Nike during the worst of it aired their own dirty laundry. It’s always fair to challenge why there was dirty laundry in the first place, but on a relative scale the fact that the company has moved fast to at least try to make change and correct is worthy of note,” he told CNBC by phone. “From an investing perspective right now, the company continues to grow healthfully which means from a consumer perspective people are still buying their products en masse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, issues, women, risk, company, social, york, fails, nike, say, athletes, long, nikes, inclusive, brand, image, experts, maternity


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Breaking up Facebook won’t solve core issues, says business professor

Breaking up Facebook won’t solve core issues, says business professor4 Hours AgoArun Sundararajan of NYU discusses whether Facebook and big data companies need to be broken up with CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team. Facebook’s co-founder wrote an op-ed for the New York Times, calling for the social media giant to be broken up.


Breaking up Facebook won’t solve core issues, says business professor4 Hours AgoArun Sundararajan of NYU discusses whether Facebook and big data companies need to be broken up with CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team. Facebook’s co-founder wrote an op-ed for the New York Times, calling for the social media giant to be broken up.
Breaking up Facebook won’t solve core issues, says business professor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, times, team, sundararajan, business, breaking, professor, york, solve, social, wrote, issues, wont, broken, core


Breaking up Facebook won't solve core issues, says business professor

Breaking up Facebook won’t solve core issues, says business professor

4 Hours Ago

Arun Sundararajan of NYU discusses whether Facebook and big data companies need to be broken up with CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team. Facebook’s co-founder wrote an op-ed for the New York Times, calling for the social media giant to be broken up.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, times, team, sundararajan, business, breaking, professor, york, solve, social, wrote, issues, wont, broken, core


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Temptation to ‘game the system’ could derail US-China trade deal, says former American official

A trade deal between the United States and China — which may be just around the corner — could be derailed by a “temptation to game the system,” a former U.S. diplomat and ambassador told CNBC on Friday. “There’s always a temptation for someone to game the system. No deal is comprehensive, always there’s some issue or group or segment that isn’t addressed. “So the scope for gamesmanship, I think, with some of these issues, and that’s going to be where the U.S. does have to discipline the system,


A trade deal between the United States and China — which may be just around the corner — could be derailed by a “temptation to game the system,” a former U.S. diplomat and ambassador told CNBC on Friday. “There’s always a temptation for someone to game the system. No deal is comprehensive, always there’s some issue or group or segment that isn’t addressed. “So the scope for gamesmanship, I think, with some of these issues, and that’s going to be where the U.S. does have to discipline the system,
Temptation to ‘game the system’ could derail US-China trade deal, says former American official Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay weizhen tan, shirley tay, weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, official, trade, thats, system, game, china, american, temptation, deal, theres, uschina, issues, derail, end, lavin, going


Temptation to 'game the system' could derail US-China trade deal, says former American official

A trade deal between the United States and China — which may be just around the corner — could be derailed by a “temptation to game the system,” a former U.S. diplomat and ambassador told CNBC on Friday. While there’s a “strong likelihood” that the two sides will be able to hammer out a deal, there are a few factors that could derail its prospects, said Frank Lavin, who formerly served as U.S. under secretary of commerce for international trade. “There’s always a temptation for someone to game the system. If you and I are in an agreement, and we’re there and we’re going to sign tomorrow, I always have an incentive to say, ‘Why don’t I just take my offer down one percent?’ And you’re already at the table, you’re already set for celebration, and let me just see if I can do this,” said Lavin, who is now chief executive of business consultancy Export Now. In particular, there’s potential for “gamesmanship” when it comes to trade concessions that will be “painful for China,” involving the trickier intellectual property issues, according to Lavin, who was also U.S. ambassador to Singapore.

No deal is comprehensive, always there’s some issue or group or segment that isn’t addressed. And so they are going to scream bloody murder. Frank Lavin Export Now CEO

“But on some of the IP issues — we’re going to end compulsory licensing, or end compulsory sharing of IP data — that’s a little harder to enforce, because what is compulsory? There might not be anything formally legal that requires it, but there might be incentives, or pressure, or say, you want to build a new plant in China, can we really go along with it?” he said. “So the scope for gamesmanship, I think, with some of these issues, and that’s going to be where the U.S. does have to discipline the system, and … police what’s going on,” Lavin added. And while some parts of the deal may require external enforcement, the elements of an agreement that are less painful for China are likely to see a “self-enforcing, self-discipline” type of system, Lavin said. “Because look, lower tariffs help China, they help the consumers, they temper inflation. So, that’s easy to live with, and it’s very visible, very transparent,” he said. China earlier this month announced it would lower tariffs on some imported consumer goods ranging from computers to furniture and bicycles.

President Donald Trump (L) shakes hand with China’s President Xi Jinping at the end of a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Fred Dufour | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay weizhen tan, shirley tay, weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, official, trade, thats, system, game, china, american, temptation, deal, theres, uschina, issues, derail, end, lavin, going


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New Zealand should always ‘speak its mind’ to China, former prime minister says

New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.” Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when


New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.” Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when
New Zealand should always ‘speak its mind’ to China, former prime minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speak, tech, country, mind, china, zealand, relationship, clark, raise, able, minister, transactional, issues, prime


New Zealand should always 'speak its mind' to China, former prime minister says

New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark.

Speaking to CNBC at the Asian Development Bank’s annual meeting in Fiji, Clark was reflecting on how New Zealand-China relations had become strained after Chinese tech giant Huawei was temporarily banned from participating in the country’s rollout of 5G — a new generation of mobile network that’s set to bring about a variety of tech innovations.

“Before the government of (current Prime Minister) Jacinda Ardern, the relationship had probably become rather too transactional, very focused on material benefit,” Clark said in a Friday interview with CNBC at the Asian Development Bank’s annual meeting in Fiji.

During her tenure leading the country, from 1999 to 2008, she said she was able to broach tough subjects with Beijing when visiting the country — her administration “always kept the space where we could raise issues of concern.”

“A small Western democracy has to be able to raise those issues, and of course the Chinese will respond, and there will be a robust response,” she told CNBC. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.”

Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when it needs to” — in the “China relationship story.”

“When (New Zealand) speaks, no one thinks: ‘Who are they speaking for?’ No. New Zealand speaks for itself,” Clark said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speak, tech, country, mind, china, zealand, relationship, clark, raise, able, minister, transactional, issues, prime


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Mark Zuckerberg’s joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference

Mark Zuckerberg’s joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference9 Hours AgoFacebook’s Mark Zuckerberg made a joke on privacy at the company’s F8 developer conference that did not land with the audience. The “Squawk on the Street” team discuss the comment and issues that the company is facing.


Mark Zuckerberg’s joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference9 Hours AgoFacebook’s Mark Zuckerberg made a joke on privacy at the company’s F8 developer conference that did not land with the audience. The “Squawk on the Street” team discuss the comment and issues that the company is facing.
Mark Zuckerberg’s joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, issues, zuckerberg, lands, joke, flat, conference, zuckerbergs, street, developer, mark, privacy, f8


Mark Zuckerberg's joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference

Mark Zuckerberg’s joke on privacy issues lands flat at F8 developer conference

9 Hours Ago

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg made a joke on privacy at the company’s F8 developer conference that did not land with the audience. The “Squawk on the Street” team discuss the comment and issues that the company is facing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: stephen lam
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, issues, zuckerberg, lands, joke, flat, conference, zuckerbergs, street, developer, mark, privacy, f8


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Dow falls more than 100 points as 3M suffers biggest drop in more than 30 years

“The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives.” Amazon and Starbucks were among the companies that reported after the bell Thursday, along with Dow member Intel. More than 170 S&P 500 companies have reported quarterly results so far, according to FactSet. “The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives. Earlier this week, the S&P 500 notched an a


“The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives.” Amazon and Starbucks were among the companies that reported after the bell Thursday, along with Dow member Intel. More than 170 S&P 500 companies have reported quarterly results so far, according to FactSet. “The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives. Earlier this week, the S&P 500 notched an a
Dow falls more than 100 points as 3M suffers biggest drop in more than 30 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: fred imbert, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, falls, drop, biggest, 3m, monetization, earnings, 30, reported, results, dow, issues, shaoul, points, proactively, sp, suffers, companies, michael, 100


Dow falls more than 100 points as 3M suffers biggest drop in more than 30 years

Facebook shares rose more than 5.5% after its first-quarter numbers showed promising growth in Stories and ads.

“We believe investors will continue to gain comfort with the incremental financial risk created by content and privacy concerns,” Guggenheim Partners analyst Michael Morris wrote in a note. “The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives.”

The analyst also raised his price target on Facebook to $220 per share from $200.

Microsoft, meanwhile, climbed more than 3% as its better-than-expected earnings were driven by a 41% surge in its commercial cloud revenue business. That growth was led by Azure, which saw sales skyrocket by 73%.

Amazon and Starbucks were among the companies that reported after the bell Thursday, along with Dow member Intel.

More than 170 S&P 500 companies have reported quarterly results so far, according to FactSet. Of those companies, 78% have posted better-than-expected earnings. “The company is proactively and definitively addressing these issues while expanding core monetization and new initiatives.

“With the earnings season approaching the halfway mark, the news has been good enough to keep bulls committed to their positions and there have been few examples of genuinely troubling news,” said Michael Shaoul, chairman and CEO of Marketfield Asset Management, in a note.

“The worst we could say is that investors are drawing in some cases on hope to a greater degree than normal, particularly in the key semiconductor sector where a strong second half rebound has been priced into many issuers, but this seems unlikely to be a factor over the near term,” Shaoul added.

Wall Street ended Wednesday’s session lower on the back of mixed corporate results. Earlier this week, the S&P 500 notched an all-time closing high and remains about half a percent below its intraday record.

—CNBC’s Silvia Amaro contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: fred imbert, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, falls, drop, biggest, 3m, monetization, earnings, 30, reported, results, dow, issues, shaoul, points, proactively, sp, suffers, companies, michael, 100


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Bad press about the Middle East won’t stop me investing there, BlackRock’s Fink says

“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said. Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a moderniz


“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said. Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a moderniz
Bad press about the Middle East won’t stop me investing there, BlackRock’s Fink says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, east, investing, issues, fink, press, wont, inclusion, stop, blackrocks, region, run, middle, media, role


Bad press about the Middle East won't stop me investing there, BlackRock's Fink says

BlackRock CEO: We will play a role in working with domestic investors in Middle East 53 Mins Ago | 03:29

Negative media reports about the Middle East and the ruling authorities in the region are not a reason to end investment plans, according to the CEO of BlackRock.

“The fact that there are issues in the press does not tell me I must run away from a place. In many cases it tells me I should run to and invest because what we are most frightened of are things that we don’t talk about,” BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during a panel session in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Wednesday.

Fink said he felt the power of the press was playing a good role in addressing issues in the Middle East and he was witnessing continued reform.

“Most issues that are being addressed in the media are (being) mitigated. And that is why long-term optimism is generally the right strategy for most investing over a long horizon,” Fink said.

Saudi Arabia has come in for renewed criticism after it introduced an antiterrorism law in November 2017 that laid out lengthy prison terms for offenses linked to political and religious speech.

Authorities there have reportedly used the legislation to jail prominent women’s rights activists, journalists, and other government critics.

Nonetheless, BlackRock’s Fink said changes he had witnessed in the kingdom over the past few years had been “pretty amazing” and that a modernization across the wider Middle East was in place.

“I see governments willing to move forward. I see governments in the region focusing on how to widen financial inclusion and increase social inclusion,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bad, east, investing, issues, fink, press, wont, inclusion, stop, blackrocks, region, run, middle, media, role


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Samsung postpones China launch event for its foldable phone amid reports of screen issues

Samsung is postponing its China launch event for its foldable smartphone just days after reports of defective screens on the nearly $2,000 device. The South Korean electronics giant had scheduled an event in Shanghai for April 24 to launch the Samsung Galaxy Fold. It’s unclear for when that event will be rescheduled or when the phone will be available in China. The screen on Samsung’s device can fold in half and open up again to give users a large display. In a statement following the reports of


Samsung is postponing its China launch event for its foldable smartphone just days after reports of defective screens on the nearly $2,000 device. The South Korean electronics giant had scheduled an event in Shanghai for April 24 to launch the Samsung Galaxy Fold. It’s unclear for when that event will be rescheduled or when the phone will be available in China. The screen on Samsung’s device can fold in half and open up again to give users a large display. In a statement following the reports of
Samsung postpones China launch event for its foldable phone amid reports of screen issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: arjun kharpal, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fold, screen, phone, launch, postpones, samsung, event, china, film, display, foldable, users, screens, reports, issues, statement


Samsung postpones China launch event for its foldable phone amid reports of screen issues

Samsung is postponing its China launch event for its foldable smartphone just days after reports of defective screens on the nearly $2,000 device.

The South Korean electronics giant had scheduled an event in Shanghai for April 24 to launch the Samsung Galaxy Fold. A spokesperson confirmed that had been canceled but had no official statement to give. It’s unclear for when that event will be rescheduled or when the phone will be available in China.

Samsung’s Galaxy Fold, unveiled in full in February, is slated to go on sale on April 26 in select markets including the U.S.

CNBC has asked Samsung to clarify whether the postponement of the China event will affect when the device goes on sale in other markets, but the company has yet to answer that query.

The screen on Samsung’s device can fold in half and open up again to give users a large display. However, journalists who reviewed the product over the past few weeks reported issues with the screen. Some of the reviewers removed a protective film which covered the screen, which appeared to result in some problems with the display. But CNBC’s Todd Haselton did not remove that film during his review and his screen ended up flickering and turning off and on at a rapid pace.

In a statement following the reports of damaged screens, Samsung advised users not to remove the protective film and said it was looking into the issue.

“We have received a few reports regarding the main display on the samples provided. We will thoroughly inspect these units in person to determine the cause of the matter,” the company said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: arjun kharpal, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fold, screen, phone, launch, postpones, samsung, event, china, film, display, foldable, users, screens, reports, issues, statement


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House Judiciary Committee issues subpoena to former White House counsel Don McGahn

White House counsel Don McGahn to depart in the fall 10:57 AM ET Wed, 29 Aug 2018 | 00:40The subpoena calls for McGahn to provide documents to the committee by May 7, and to testify May 21. The demand for documents and testimony drew backlash from the committee’s Republicans. “Don McGahn sat for more than 30 hours of interviews with the special counsel’s investigation, and the chairman has answered that with a stunning 36-item subpoena,” the Georgia Republican said. The subpoena comes as pressur


White House counsel Don McGahn to depart in the fall 10:57 AM ET Wed, 29 Aug 2018 | 00:40The subpoena calls for McGahn to provide documents to the committee by May 7, and to testify May 21. The demand for documents and testimony drew backlash from the committee’s Republicans. “Don McGahn sat for more than 30 hours of interviews with the special counsel’s investigation, and the chairman has answered that with a stunning 36-item subpoena,” the Georgia Republican said. The subpoena comes as pressur
House Judiciary Committee issues subpoena to former White House counsel Don McGahn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: tucker higgins, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoena, counsel, trump, investigation, mcgahn, judiciary, republican, don, impeachable, house, muellers, demand, committee, issues, documents, white, democrats


House Judiciary Committee issues subpoena to former White House counsel Don McGahn

White House counsel Don McGahn to depart in the fall 10:57 AM ET Wed, 29 Aug 2018 | 00:40

The subpoena calls for McGahn to provide documents to the committee by May 7, and to testify May 21. The documents requested cover a wide range of topics, including those related to the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between Trump campaign officials and a Russian lawyer, potential pardons for Trump associates and Mueller’s alleged conflicts of interest.

The demand for documents and testimony drew backlash from the committee’s Republicans.

“For the second time in four days, the chairman has issued a subpoena prematurely and contrary to his pledge not ‘to issue a subpoena every time we have a disagreement with the administration.'” Rep. Doug Collins, the top Republican on the committee, said in a statement.

“Don McGahn sat for more than 30 hours of interviews with the special counsel’s investigation, and the chairman has answered that with a stunning 36-item subpoena,” the Georgia Republican said. “Instead of looking at material that Attorney General Barr has already made available, Democrats prefer to demand additional materials they know are subject to constitutional and common-law privileges and cannot be produced.”

The subpoena comes as pressure mounts on Democrats to make a decision on impeachment.

“Some of this would be impeachable,” Nadler said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” referring to the findings of Mueller’s investigation. “Obstruction of justice, if proven, would be impeachable.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: tucker higgins, evan vucci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, subpoena, counsel, trump, investigation, mcgahn, judiciary, republican, don, impeachable, house, muellers, demand, committee, issues, documents, white, democrats


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