8 winter side hustles that can help you earn extra cash

Whether you’re shopping for holiday gifts, or gearing up to take a trip in the new year, it can be difficult to factor all your year-end expenses into your regular monthly budget. From housesitting to personal shopping, certain gigs are easier to start up or have the potential to earn more during the winter. Airbnb hosts, for example, earn an average of $924 per month, according to Travel + Leisure. Most housesitters charge $25-$45 per day, according to Housesitter.com. TutoringLast year, Care.c


Whether you’re shopping for holiday gifts, or gearing up to take a trip in the new year, it can be difficult to factor all your year-end expenses into your regular monthly budget.
From housesitting to personal shopping, certain gigs are easier to start up or have the potential to earn more during the winter.
Airbnb hosts, for example, earn an average of $924 per month, according to Travel + Leisure.
Most housesitters charge $25-$45 per day, according to Housesitter.com.
TutoringLast year, Care.c
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: ivana pino
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8 winter side hustles that can help you earn extra cash

During the winter months, you might find that you’re spending more. Whether you’re shopping for holiday gifts, or gearing up to take a trip in the new year, it can be difficult to factor all your year-end expenses into your regular monthly budget. To give yourself some financial breathing room, consider a side hustle you can take on this season. From housesitting to personal shopping, certain gigs are easier to start up or have the potential to earn more during the winter. Here are eight that can help you boost your income.

1. Rent your space

If you’ve decided to travel for the holidays and your home will be empty, consider renting it out on a short-term listing site. Airbnb hosts, for example, earn an average of $924 per month, according to Travel + Leisure. The exact amount varies depending on factors like the size of your space, number of nights you rent it out, your location, and the kinds of amenities available to your guests. You’ll also need to make sure laws in your area allow for short-term rentals.

2. Housesit

HouseSitter.com and Care.com both list openings for housesitting jobs. Often, the work is minimal, with tasks like collecting the owner’s mail, watering their plants, or doing some light cleaning while they’re away. Most housesitters charge $25-$45 per day, according to Housesitter.com. This number can fluctuate depending on your area.

Video by David Fang

3. Clear snow

In most states, homeowners are responsible for clearing the snow in their driveway and on the sidewalk in front of their home. Not doing so could result in a ticket: In New York City, the fine is up to $350. As a snow shoveler, you can earn anywhere from $30 to $100 per driveway or walkway, according to Sidehustle.com. All you need to get started is a shovel, which costs as little as $10 from The Home Depot. “When I was still in college, I shoveled driveways for about $100 per day,” says Daniella Flores, the blogger behind i like to dabble. “It’s pretty easy to do it in your neighborhood, just tell a couple of neighbors, or post it on the Nextdoor neighborhood app as a way to spread the word.”

4. Help with resumes

When I was still in college, I shoveled driveways for about $100 per day. Daniella Flores Blogger, i like to dabble

5. Become a personal shopper

The holiday season is prime time for retailers. Shoppers everywhere are on the hunt for the perfect gift for their loved ones and the best end-of-year deals. If you love shopping, do it for others who find it a chore. Personal shoppers earn anywhere from $10-$16 per hour, according to Payscale. Skilled at gift wrapping? That’s a related service that could help you pull in additional cash.

6. Tutoring

Last year, Care.com estimated that college-age job seekers could earn as much as $1,470 with 80 hours of tutoring over their winter break. Sites like Chegg pay online tutors $20 per hour to help students across a wide array of different subjects including algebra, astronomy, literature, law, and more. If you’re studying a foreign language, or a STEM-related subject, you may be able to charge more depending on the tutoring platform.

7. Help others get a ride

If you have your own vehicle, consider becoming a driver with a ride-share company like Uber or Lyft. Winter weather can mean more demand for drivers to deliver food or pick up passengers. How much you can earn will depend on how long the ride is, the distance traveled, and whether or not it’s a peak time. Al Castillo, a full-time ride-share driver in New York City, told CNBC earlier this year that he makes up to $540 per day.

8. Sell last season’s clothes


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: ivana pino
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3 tricks to help you avoid overspending this holiday season

When you’re shopping this holiday season, it can be tempting to splurge on gifts, or even throw a few items in the cart for yourself. But if you don’t want to start the new year by paying off this year’s holiday gifts, think twice about your purchases. Americans racked up more than $1,000 in holiday debt each, on average, at the end of 2018, according to MagnifyMoney’s annual post-holiday debt survey. On top of that, 28% of shoppers went into the holiday season still paying off debt from 2017. T


When you’re shopping this holiday season, it can be tempting to splurge on gifts, or even throw a few items in the cart for yourself.
But if you don’t want to start the new year by paying off this year’s holiday gifts, think twice about your purchases.
Americans racked up more than $1,000 in holiday debt each, on average, at the end of 2018, according to MagnifyMoney’s annual post-holiday debt survey.
On top of that, 28% of shoppers went into the holiday season still paying off debt from 2017.
T
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3 tricks to help you avoid overspending this holiday season

When you’re shopping this holiday season, it can be tempting to splurge on gifts, or even throw a few items in the cart for yourself. But if you don’t want to start the new year by paying off this year’s holiday gifts, think twice about your purchases. Americans racked up more than $1,000 in holiday debt each, on average, at the end of 2018, according to MagnifyMoney’s annual post-holiday debt survey. On top of that, 28% of shoppers went into the holiday season still paying off debt from 2017. Curbing your spending isn’t easy. Buying can trigger the release of chemicals in your brain that make you feel good, Ed Coambs, licensed marriage and family therapist at Carolinas Couples Counseling in Matthews, North Carolina, told Grow earlier this year. But there are simple mental tricks you can use to avoid overspending. Here are a few hacks to help you make smarter spending choices.

Take your time

During the holiday season, there’s a sense of urgency to purchase items that are on sale, or to lock in the perfect gift for a special friend or family member. But don’t confuse snapping up a deal with acting on impulse. The average U.S. consumer spends $5,400 each year on impulse buys, in part because of the feel-good chemicals that are released when you make a purchase. The workaround? Sleep on it. Instead of making a buy immediately, make a note of the item you want to purchase, and then leave the store or keep it in your online shopping cart with a plan to return in 72 hours if the item is really worth your while. Taking this extra time will eliminate the high that comes along with spending money and help you make clearer decisions about your purchases. Read more: A simple mental trick you can use to save money during the holidays

Make holiday purchases in cash

Paying with plastic makes spending simpler and more automatic. When spending becomes less conscious, though, you can end up accruing debt. To avoid the temptation of seasonal promotions from your favorite retailers, try using cash this holiday season. The physical exchange of handing over your hard-earned money for an item at the store feels more “painful,” experts say, so you’re more likely to think twice about doing it. If you receive your salary as a direct deposit, withdraw your earnings and divvy up the cash into spending categories that cover all of your fixed and variable expenses such as rent, utilities, groceries, entertainment, holiday gifts, and more. Once you’ve spent the designated amount within each category, you’re done spending in that category until the next pay period. Carrying a set amount of cash means you’re less likely to talk yourself into spending a few more dollars in any given category because that extra money won’t be readily available. Read more: How going cash-only helped this 23-year-old pay off $20,000 in debt in one year

Carry larger bills


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: ivana pino, brooke frizzell
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4 easy side hustles you can start right now—using just your smartphone

There are a number of flexible side jobs, however, that you can start immediately with a laptop or your smartphone. “If you’re looking for a side hustle, you need money. You don’t need to spend money to make money,” says Kathy Kristof, cofounder and editor at SideHusl.com. Shop for groceriesWith apps like Instacart and Shipt, you can earn money by shopping for other people’s food and household essentials as a personal grocery shopper. You don’t need to spend money to make money.


There are a number of flexible side jobs, however, that you can start immediately with a laptop or your smartphone.
“If you’re looking for a side hustle, you need money.
You don’t need to spend money to make money,” says Kathy Kristof, cofounder and editor at SideHusl.com.
Shop for groceriesWith apps like Instacart and Shipt, you can earn money by shopping for other people’s food and household essentials as a personal grocery shopper.
You don’t need to spend money to make money.
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4 easy side hustles you can start right now—using just your smartphone

Starting a side hustle can be costly. There are a number of flexible side jobs, however, that you can start immediately with a laptop or your smartphone. “If you’re looking for a side hustle, you need money. You don’t need to spend money to make money,” says Kathy Kristof, cofounder and editor at SideHusl.com. “When you go to work, somebody should be paying you.” Here are four side hustles that let you get started with little more than your smartphone.

1. Walk dogs

2. Shop for groceries

With apps like Instacart and Shipt, you can earn money by shopping for other people’s food and household essentials as a personal grocery shopper. Plus, you have the flexibility to shop only when it’s convenient for you. Here’s how it works: You receive shopping opportunities via your smartphone app. If you accept an assignment, you then pick up all of the items ordered by the customer at your local grocery story and deliver them to the client’s home. A personal shopper for Instacart can earn an average hourly rate of $14, according to Glassdoor. Earlier this year, the company increased its minimum per-job payment from $3 to $5 to $10, depending on the assignment. Shoppers can earn tips in addition to those payments.

3. Sell stock photography

For your next money-making opportunity, look no further than your phone’s photo gallery. Sites like Shutterstock and Etsy offer users the option to sell their images online, often to businesses that use stock photography to make their websites look more inviting. If you’re attempting to earn some extra income through your images, make sure you’re aware of what types perform well online. Most sites will use generic, high-quality images that are aesthetically pleasing and clearly communicate some kind of message or symbolism that aligns with their brand. After you upload an image, you could earn anywhere from $0.25 to $2.85 per image download. Shutterstock reports that their users can earn up to $120 per download on popular images that gain a lot of traction on their site.

If you’re looking for a side hustle, you need money. You don’t need to spend money to make money. When you go to work, somebody should be paying you. Kathy Kristof cof-ounder and editor at SideHusl.com

4. Rent out useful items you already own


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: ivana pino
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4 easy ways you can cut back on household expenses to save $100 each month

If you’re looking for ways to end up with more money at the end of each month, you may want to start with examining what you’re spending at home. However, you can use simple, painless strategies to cut back on your household expenses — and end up ahead. That translates to almost $200 per year in energy costs if you’re drying at home, or more than $1,000 annually if you frequent the laundromat, according to the Spruce. While air drying does take a little longer, you can expect to save on more tha


If you’re looking for ways to end up with more money at the end of each month, you may want to start with examining what you’re spending at home.
However, you can use simple, painless strategies to cut back on your household expenses — and end up ahead.
That translates to almost $200 per year in energy costs if you’re drying at home, or more than $1,000 annually if you frequent the laundromat, according to the Spruce.
While air drying does take a little longer, you can expect to save on more tha
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4 easy ways you can cut back on household expenses to save $100 each month

If you’re looking for ways to end up with more money at the end of each month, you may want to start with examining what you’re spending at home. Each time you leave one of your appliances plugged in, you’re spending money. Dryers, for example, can cost you a few hundred dollars per year in energy usage costs, according to OasisEnergy.com, and household cleaners can cost up to 30 cents per ounce, or almost $5 per bottle for a product you’ll run through pretty quickly. However, you can use simple, painless strategies to cut back on your household expenses — and end up ahead. Here are a few expert tips:

1. Skip the dryer

On average, families in the U.S. do about 8-10 loads of laundry per week. That translates to almost $200 per year in energy costs if you’re drying at home, or more than $1,000 annually if you frequent the laundromat, according to the Spruce. One way to cut out this cost all together is to invest in a drying rack, which costs as little as $10. Lisa Sharp, a lifestyle blogger at Retrohousewifegoesgreen.com, has used clotheslines on and off her whole life. For the last three years, she’s used one consistently, and the difference in her energy costs is noticeable, she says: “When it’s been a rainy month, I noticed energy costs are a bit higher since I end up using the dryer a lot more.” While air drying does take a little longer, you can expect to save on more than just energy costs. Line drying eliminates any chances of shrinking or damaging your delicate clothing, so you’ll make fewer trips to the mall to replace your favorite blouse or button-down. Estimated monthly savings: $20-$80 Read more: One simple laundry hack could save you hundreds of dollars each year

2. Switch to DIY household cleaning products

One way you might literally be pouring money down the drain is using store-bought cleaning products. In 2018, the average U.S. household spent $184 on laundry and cleaning supplies annually, according to Statista. But you can easily make your own cleaners that are just as effective, for a fraction of the cost. Start by checking your pantry for ingredients. You’ll probably find that you already have everything you need for your own DIY cleaners. You can use products like basic white vinegar, baking soda, rubbing alcohol, Castile soap, hydrogen peroxide, and essential oils to make all purpose cleaners and air fresheners that are kid, pet, and budget friendly for less than a penny per ounce. Estimated monthly savings: $15 Read more: How much money you can save by making your own cleaning products

3. Unplug your appliances and electronics

You may not think twice about leaving your appliances plugged in after using them, but this could cost you an extra $25 to $30 per month on your electric bill just in energy costs, according to The Spruce. Even if you remember to turn off your TV or curling iron, it still consumes energy when it’s plugged in. Consider purchasing a power strip, which can cost as little as $2. That way, you only have one switch you need to remember to turn off. You’ll save yourself the hassle of crawling behind your TV to unplug it, and you’ll save money on your monthly bill. Estimated monthly savings: $25-30 Read more: Most of us are overpaying for utilities (here’s how to stop)

4. Buy in bulk


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: ivana pino
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How a different kind of fast can help you build wealth in 2020

If you’re hoping to come up with extra cash to put toward a big goal, there’s no need to go cold turkey on spending. Take inspiration from a health trend and try an intermittent fast — for your finances. You might be surprised at what you’re spending your money on and how small purchases add up. Once you know what you’re spending a lot of your money on, you can decide what to cut out for your fast. But doing so temporarily can help you figure out how much of those expenses are true wants versus


If you’re hoping to come up with extra cash to put toward a big goal, there’s no need to go cold turkey on spending.
Take inspiration from a health trend and try an intermittent fast — for your finances.
You might be surprised at what you’re spending your money on and how small purchases add up.
Once you know what you’re spending a lot of your money on, you can decide what to cut out for your fast.
But doing so temporarily can help you figure out how much of those expenses are true wants versus
How a different kind of fast can help you build wealth in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, capalad, things, help, try, work, temporarily, different, 2020, youre, money, turkey, build, spending, wealth, kind, fast


How a different kind of fast can help you build wealth in 2020

If you’re hoping to come up with extra cash to put toward a big goal, there’s no need to go cold turkey on spending. Take inspiration from a health trend and try an intermittent fast — for your finances. Temporarily cutting optional expenses like dining out or your morning coffee can help you see which indulgences you really miss and want to factor back into your budget, and which ones you don’t mind letting go. “Think about what your intention for doing this is,” says Pamela Capalad, a certified financial planner and founder of Brunch and Budget in New York City. “We can all do anything for a short amount of time, but if you understand the reason behind why you are choosing to go on this financial fast and know what you hope to uncover, that will help you get through it.” Here’s how to get started.

1. Make a list of your discretionary expenses

Start by taking a close look at your more expensive indulgences by combing through your recent bank statements. You might be surprised at what you’re spending your money on and how small purchases add up. More than a quarter of Americans (28%) point to takeout and food delivery as a monthly expense on which they routinely spend more than $200, according to a July CNBC Invest in You survey of over 2,800 American adults. Others reported spending that much on alcohol (10%), tobacco (8%), live entertainment and sporting events (7%), takeout coffee (5%), gambling (4%), and ride-sharing services (3%). Once you know what you’re spending a lot of your money on, you can decide what to cut out for your fast.

Video by Courtney Stith

2. Prioritize your ‘wants’

Going cold turkey and cutting out every single purchase that brings you joy isn’t necessarily a long-term solution. “If you deprive yourself completely in all areas, you’re destined to fail,” Chris Browning of Popcorn Finance told Grow earlier this year. But doing so temporarily can help you figure out how much of those expenses are true wants versus habits or impulse buys you could easily scale back. “We do spend a lot of money on things that don’t necessarily align with our values, but we do it out of convenience, peer pressure, or exhaustion,” says Capalad. For example, in the CNBC survey, more people said they would willingly give up restaurant food than streaming television or an Amazon Prime membership. “The thing to keep in mind is that we have a finite amount of willpower. If we try and deny ourselves the things we enjoy just because someone said we should or shouldn’t keep buying it, it won’t work,” says Capalad. “To some, a latte is a waste of money, but maybe to you, you need it to get through the work day and be more productive.”

3. Set a resolution


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27  Authors: ivana pino
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3 simple ways to cut travel costs this holiday season

If you plan to fly this holiday season, airfare isn’t the only significant expense to factor into your travel budget. “The biggest takeaway for travelers is to not take the flight or hotel rate at face value,” says Melanie Lieberman, travel editor at The Points Guy. The airport’s parking rates are pricey, too: They range from $18-$39 per day. Use a fare estimator to calculate how much a ride-share to the airport would cost. This will help you save on the cost of checking your bag, and you’ll be


If you plan to fly this holiday season, airfare isn’t the only significant expense to factor into your travel budget.
“The biggest takeaway for travelers is to not take the flight or hotel rate at face value,” says Melanie Lieberman, travel editor at The Points Guy.
The airport’s parking rates are pricey, too: They range from $18-$39 per day.
Use a fare estimator to calculate how much a ride-share to the airport would cost.
This will help you save on the cost of checking your bag, and you’ll be
3 simple ways to cut travel costs this holiday season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: ivana pino
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3 simple ways to cut travel costs this holiday season

If you plan to fly this holiday season, airfare isn’t the only significant expense to factor into your travel budget. While you may have paid close attention to the price of your ticket and even scored a good deal, added costs like baggage carts, parking, and meals at the airport can add to your final tab — and in some cases offset your overall savings, especially if the airport you’re departing from is among the nation’s most expensive. “The biggest takeaway for travelers is to not take the flight or hotel rate at face value,” says Melanie Lieberman, travel editor at The Points Guy. “This is especially important for travelers who might be looking to save money by flying with a low-cost carrier, or save money by flying out of the first airport that popped up, or even the closest airport.” Even if you have no control over the airport you fly out of for the holidays, you can consider what kinds of costs might pop up before you take off. Here’s how to plan ahead and save money in the long run.

Think about how you’ll get to and from the airport

If you’re planning on taking a car to the airport, make sure to look up your airport’s hourly or daily parking rates, or the cost of a ride, so that you can calculate how much you’ll pay over the course of your trip. “For travelers who don’t live close to the airport they’re flying out of, taking a trip might require them to take an Uber to the airport and back home on the way back, and this could negate the savings of a cheaper flight deal,” says Lieberman. Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), in Newark, New Jersey, is the most expensive airport in the nation, based on the cost of domestic airfare, parking, baggage carts, transportation to the nearest city center, refreshments, and lounge access, according to a 2019 guide on the most affordable and the most expensive airports put together by The Points Guy. Newark, which serves the greater New York City area, is at the top of the list in part because it can cost upwards of $100 for an Uber or Lyft ride from there to Manhattan. The airport’s parking rates are pricey, too: They range from $18-$39 per day. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at McCarran International Airport (LAS) in Las Vegas, Nevada, the daily maximum for long-term parking is only $16. Use a fare estimator to calculate how much a ride-share to the airport would cost. In some cases, it may be cheaper than driving and paying for parking. Do some research beforehand to see what kinds of other transportation options are available, too. Airports like Orlando International Airport (MCO) provide round-trip shuttle services for under $50, or travelers can take public transportation from several transportation hubs located around the Orlando area, which costs less than $4 per person.

Pack light

Between having to pay to check bags and for any carts you might need to lug your bags around the airport, baggage fees can bump up your overall travel costs. At LaGuardia Airport (LGA) in New York City, Smarte Carte rentals cost $6.39, and you’ll likely pay around $20-$25 for each checked bag, though this will depend on your airline and the weight of your luggage. Your best money-saving strategy in this department is to pack light, when possible, and adhere to the rules for carry-on luggage. This will help you save on the cost of checking your bag, and you’ll be able to carry your luggage yourself. “If you have a family, you might need a Smarte Carte,” says Lieberman. “It doesn’t hurt to stop before you book anything and just say, ‘OK, what are all the things that I’m going to need to budget for on this trip, and is this total cost something I’m comfortable with?'”

Pack snacks or scope out deals on airport dining


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-23  Authors: ivana pino
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A simple mental trick you can use to save money during the holidays

One way to save this season is by taking a step back and implementing the 72-hour rule before making a purchase. In practice, though, it can be difficult, especially when you’re shopping for the people you love. “When you’re thinking about purchasing during the holiday season, there’s a lot at stake for people in terms of their relationships. Why it worksCoambs says these last-minute impulse purchases are fueled by strategic marketing tactics and even your brain chemistry. When you’re thinking a


One way to save this season is by taking a step back and implementing the 72-hour rule before making a purchase.
In practice, though, it can be difficult, especially when you’re shopping for the people you love.
“When you’re thinking about purchasing during the holiday season, there’s a lot at stake for people in terms of their relationships.
Why it worksCoambs says these last-minute impulse purchases are fueled by strategic marketing tactics and even your brain chemistry.
When you’re thinking a
A simple mental trick you can use to save money during the holidays Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, mental, holidays, shopping, trick, simple, purchases, right, purchasing, youre, season, save, impulse, theres, coambs, purchase


A simple mental trick you can use to save money during the holidays

During the holidays, the expectation to spend a lot on gifts combined with the pressure to find the perfect present for everyone on your list means you might find that you’re more prone to impulse shopping. The average U.S. consumer already spends $5,400 each year on impulse buys. But the spirit of giving doesn’t mean you have to splurge. One way to save this season is by taking a step back and implementing the 72-hour rule before making a purchase. Ed Coambs, licensed marriage and family therapist at Carolinas Couples Counseling in Matthews, North Carolina, says that if you can become more self-aware about your spending habits, you’re better positioned to cut down on impulsive purchases. Here’s how the 72-hour rule can make a huge difference to your mindset — and your budget.

The strategy

When you find yourself eyeing a sweater at the store or a pair of sneakers that are just out of your budget, don’t immediately get in line. Put the item back after making a note of it, including size, color, and where you can find it. Plan to return in three days if you’re sure it’s the right buy. Giving yourself time to think over your purchases is a good way to cut back on impulse spending. In practice, though, it can be difficult, especially when you’re shopping for the people you love.

“When you’re thinking about purchasing during the holiday season, there’s a lot at stake for people in terms of their relationships. So there’s the psychological process of, ‘I want to stay connected with this person, or family member, I’m worried that if I don’t do the purchase correctly, then I’ll experience relational disconnection,'” says Coambs. Still, slowing down and developing awareness about why you’re feeling the urge to buy can help you make sure you’re buying the right gifts for the right reasons.

Why it works

Coambs says these last-minute impulse purchases are fueled by strategic marketing tactics and even your brain chemistry. “Dopamine is one of the neurochemicals that is a feel-good chemical, and oxytocin, known as the love hormone, is another feel-good hormonal chemical that can be released in the process of purchasing,” says Coambs. Taking the time to mull over a purchase stops the release of those neurochemicals and can help you make a more informed decision about your purchases. Giving is about the thought behind the gift, after all, rather than the satisfaction of the splurge. Even your developmental history plays a role: Coambs suggests that impulsive shopping can stem from negative childhood experiences that make it harder to self-regulate and make decisions in line with your best interests.

When you’re thinking about purchasing during the holiday season, there’s a lot at stake for people in terms of their relationships. Ed Coambs marriage and family therapist


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A step-by-step guide to filling out a money order

In the age of Venmo, Zelle, and PayPal, you may think money orders are going the way of the telegram. But even with an almost 3% drop from the previous year, 83 million money orders were processed by the Federal Reserve in 2018. Issuers will typically charge purchasers between $1 and $10, according to U.S. Bank, and cap the amount you can send per money order at around $1,000. In order to make sure your payment is processed and goes to the right recipient, it’s crucial to fill out the money orde


In the age of Venmo, Zelle, and PayPal, you may think money orders are going the way of the telegram.
But even with an almost 3% drop from the previous year, 83 million money orders were processed by the Federal Reserve in 2018.
Issuers will typically charge purchasers between $1 and $10, according to U.S. Bank, and cap the amount you can send per money order at around $1,000.
In order to make sure your payment is processed and goes to the right recipient, it’s crucial to fill out the money orde
A step-by-step guide to filling out a money order Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, order, orders, guide, payment, processed, stores, zelle, money, credit, checks, issuer, filling, stepbystep


A step-by-step guide to filling out a money order

In the age of Venmo, Zelle, and PayPal, you may think money orders are going the way of the telegram. But even with an almost 3% drop from the previous year, 83 million money orders were processed by the Federal Reserve in 2018.

A money order is a payment for a specific amount that the payer, or the purchaser, is required to pay upfront in cash or credit. Money orders, which are paper forms like traditional checks, are considered safer than checks because they’re prepaid, so there’s a safeguard against the payment bouncing.

They can be purchased from banks, credit unions, financial services companies such as Western Union, and the U.S. Postal Service, as well as some gas stations, convenience stores, grocery stores, drugstores, and big-box stores such as Walmart. Issuers will typically charge purchasers between $1 and $10, according to U.S. Bank, and cap the amount you can send per money order at around $1,000.

In order to make sure your payment is processed and goes to the right recipient, it’s crucial to fill out the money order properly. Formats may vary slightly from issuer to issuer; still, this step-by-step guide can see you through.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, order, orders, guide, payment, processed, stores, zelle, money, credit, checks, issuer, filling, stepbystep


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Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy

You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51. Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most. If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons. Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your pu


You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51.
Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most.
If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons.
Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your pu
Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: ivana pino, brooke frizzell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, application, strategy, score, money, ibotta, paribus, scan, store, smartphone, groceries, savings, shopping, credit, major, easy, item


Score major savings on groceries with an easy smartphone strategy

You can score major savings on grocery items you already purchase regularly using your smartphone, thanks to shopping applications like Ibotta, Paribus, and Checkout 51. Ibotta, for example, works by picking up your location and displaying current offers in your area or at the retailers you shop at the most. You can filter by store and location or search for a specific items. If you’re shopping in-store, scan a product’s bar code to see any available store-specific deals or manufacturer’s coupons. Add the item to your cart on the application, then scan and upload your receipt to the application to verify your purchase and begin earning your money back. For instance, the app offers $2 back on a 6- or 12-pack of Quilted Northern Ultra Soft & Strong toilet paper, which ranges from $6.48 to $12.24. Other apps like Paribus save you money by keeping track of your purchases via your email inbox. The app scans for receipts in your email and negotiates with online retailers to refund the difference if there is a price drop in an item you bought shortly after you make a purchase.

Once you reach $20 worth of refunds in your Ibotta account, you can withdraw your money from the application and deposit the funds into your PayPal or Venmo account, or redeem the rewards for gift cards. With Paribus, you are credited funds directly onto the original form of payment or provided the equivalent amount in store credit. “The credits add up really fast,” says Grant Sabatier of millennialmoney.com, who says he has saved about $700 on groceries in the last year, “Oftentimes you’re saving between 50 cents and $3 [on each item], so after one or two trips, you’re able to get that credit, and you get credit for inviting your friends.”

Perks and drawbacks of shopping apps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: ivana pino, brooke frizzell
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, application, strategy, score, money, ibotta, paribus, scan, store, smartphone, groceries, savings, shopping, credit, major, easy, item


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What it means to refinance your student loans⁠ — and when it makes sense

If you’re considering refinancing your student loans, here’s more information about how the process works, as well as some pros and cons. How refinancing worksIf you have multiple student loans, refinancing allows you to replace one or more of your federal and/or private loans into a single new private loan with one set of terms. The average fixed interest rate on private student loans is about 9.94%, based on a recent survey from Debt.org. Refinancing makes more sense for private student loansT


If you’re considering refinancing your student loans, here’s more information about how the process works, as well as some pros and cons.
How refinancing worksIf you have multiple student loans, refinancing allows you to replace one or more of your federal and/or private loans into a single new private loan with one set of terms.
The average fixed interest rate on private student loans is about 9.94%, based on a recent survey from Debt.org.
Refinancing makes more sense for private student loansT
What it means to refinance your student loans⁠ — and when it makes sense Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, refinance, refinancing, makes, student, rates, payment, means, loans, loan, private, interest, rate, federal, sense


What it means to refinance your student loans⁠ — and when it makes sense

College graduates who are figuring out how to best manage student debt may be weighing the costs of refinancing their loans, and with good reason. Refinancing lets you combine some or all of your existing federal or private student loans into one new, private loan — ideally one with a lower interest rate, helping you reduce your monthly payment. And now that the Federal Reserve has cut interest rates three times in 2019, most recently in October, rates on many private student loans are lower, too. Refinancing could result in substantial savings. If you’re considering refinancing your student loans, here’s more information about how the process works, as well as some pros and cons.

How refinancing works

If you have multiple student loans, refinancing allows you to replace one or more of your federal and/or private loans into a single new private loan with one set of terms. This could mean a lower interest rate and a shorter repayment period ⁠— which will usually save you money over time. Banks and credit unions may offer refinancing options, as do online lenders like SoFi, CommonBond, and Sallie Mae. New loans may have a fixed rate or one that’s variable. It’s smart to shop around and see what rates and terms you may be eligible for, and how much you could save.

Video by Stephen Parkhurst Say you owe $30,000 in student loan debt. The average fixed interest rate on private student loans is about 9.94%, based on a recent survey from Debt.org. At that rate you would pay almost $17,500 in interest over the course of a standard 10-year repayment period, with a monthly payment of $395. Some of the best rates on a private loan are currently about 5.22%. Refinancing to a loan at that low rate would decrease your monthly payment to $321 and save you roughly $8,900 over life of the loan.

Refinancing makes more sense for private student loans

The higher your current interest rates, the more you stand to save from refinancing. Borrowers with private loans are more likely to fit the bill. Generally, average interest rates for federal loans range from 4% to 7%, whereas interests rates for private loans can climb as high as almost 15%, according to Debt.org. Be aware, though, that refinancing can strip federal student loan borrowers of protections and benefits, including forbearance, deferment, income-driven repayment plans, and public loan service forgiveness plans.

Video by Ian Wolsten Betsy Mayotte, president and founder of The Institute of Student Loan Advisors, generally recommends staying away from refinancing federal student loans: She says it isn’t worth losing those critical protections. If you can’t afford federal loan payments, which offer a wider array of low payment plans than private loans, she points out, you might still struggle to make a payment if you refinance. “I can probably count on one hand the number of [federal student loan] borrowers where I thought it might be a good idea for them to refinance,” says Mayotte.

You may need to meet specific requirements to qualify

When evaluating your application, lenders try to determine how likely you are to pay your loan back. For example, Earnest, a common lender, requires a minimum credit score of 650, and looks at other factors like your debt-to-income ratio. This can be especially tricky for new grads who have less of an established credit history, which could mean that you would need a cosigner. “Lenders are looking for the cream of the crop, people who have very high credit scores, in the 700s for sure, as well as people who have a couple of years of on-time payment history under their belt,” says Mayotte.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: ivana pino
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, refinance, refinancing, makes, student, rates, payment, means, loans, loan, private, interest, rate, federal, sense


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