Alibaba Chairman Daniel Zhang does this one thing each year to measure his success

CEO of Alibaba Group Daniel Zhang Yong delivers speech at Hangzhou International Expo Centre on May 31, 2018 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. Daniel Zhang had his work cut out for him taking over from Jack Ma as chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. The point of this process, Zhang said, is to focus on new opportunities, and not necessarily the immediate performance. Maybe they will become a main business for Alibaba,” Zhang said in the interview. Zhang, who’s been CEO since 2015


CEO of Alibaba Group Daniel Zhang Yong delivers speech at Hangzhou International Expo Centre on May 31, 2018 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. Daniel Zhang had his work cut out for him taking over from Jack Ma as chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. The point of this process, Zhang said, is to focus on new opportunities, and not necessarily the immediate performance. Maybe they will become a main business for Alibaba,” Zhang said in the interview. Zhang, who’s been CEO since 2015
Alibaba Chairman Daniel Zhang does this one thing each year to measure his success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zhang, ideas, measure, deliver, jack, daniel, alibaba, stores, thing, tough, hangzhou, does, success, sales, chairman


Alibaba Chairman Daniel Zhang does this one thing each year to measure his success

CEO of Alibaba Group Daniel Zhang Yong delivers speech at Hangzhou International Expo Centre on May 31, 2018 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China.

Daniel Zhang had his work cut out for him taking over from Jack Ma as chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba. He recently revealed one of his top strategies for keeping the company at the top of its game.

In a September interview with McKinsey Quarterly, Zhang said he does a self-evaluation every Chinese New Year to assess the number of ideas and businesses he initiated in the past year. The point of this process, Zhang said, is to focus on new opportunities, and not necessarily the immediate performance.

“Today they may be new ideas — very tiny, very small — but they may become much bigger in the future. Maybe they will become a main business for Alibaba,” Zhang said in the interview.

His inspiration for some of these ideas come from customer pain points. That’s how Zhang hatched the idea for Alibaba’s Freshippo retail stores. He said traditional e-commerce companies couldn’t deliver fresh produce to customers on demand.

“It’s not like you can deliver fresh fish to a customer’s home while she is still in the office,” Zhang said.

Freshippo’s physical grocery stores were developed to address that. After shoppers visit the high-tech store, their grocery lists are saved in the Freshippo app. In the future, they can have the same items delivered to their homes instead, as fast as 30 minutes.

While Zhang says he gives Alibaba employees the opportunity to test new ideas, he’s “very tough” once a decision has been made, and wants his teams to deliver concrete results.

“While I speak softly, I always make the tough decisions,” he said.

Zhang, who’s been CEO since 2015, stepped up to the chairman role after co-founder Jack Ma retired last month.

Their leadership styles seem in contrast as Ma is typically cast as the eccentric visionary, while Zhang is seen as being more calm and collected.

But despite those personality differences, Zhang is also credited with some of Alibaba’s major hits like the “11:11 Global Shopping Festival,” a 24-hour sales promotion. Last year, sales on that day hit a record high of $30.8 billion.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zhang, ideas, measure, deliver, jack, daniel, alibaba, stores, thing, tough, hangzhou, does, success, sales, chairman


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Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or


Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or
Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Do you know who this man is?

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo.

The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. The selections included high-profile founders such as Elon Musk, co-founder of Telsa, as well as Google co-founder Sergey Brin and Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick.

A whopping 77% of people said they didn’t know Dorsey, while 7% guessed incorrectly. This question yielded the most amount of “unsure” responses in the entire survey.

When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or higher were able to clock Dorsey in the photo. Age was another factor that influenced their awareness: 20% of those ages 18 to 29 answered correctly, compared to only 7% of people ages 65 and up.

The photo in question was from Dorsey’s April 2019 TED Talk. In it, he’s wearing a black beanie, and has a long beard.

Dorsey was the only tech leader respondents were asked to identify. But those surveyed also lacked knowledge about other prominent social media platforms. Only 29% of Americans knew that messaging app WhatsApp and Instagram are owned by Facebook, for example.

The rest of the survey contained more general questions about internet use. For example, the survey asked people how “private browsing” works, what “net neutrality” means and what two-factor authentication looks like on a web page.

Younger adults (defined as 18 to 29) answered more questions correctly than those in the 65-plus group, suggesting that they might be more internet literate.

These findings are part of a larger Pew Research Center survey called the American Trends Panel.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


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The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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Stocks could tumble 15% by early next year, investor Jack Ablin warns

Ablin, who has $5.4 billion in assets under management, warns the market is vulnerable to a significant correction by early next year. After dropping as much as 335 points, the index closed up 122 points and reversed a two-day losing streak. “The economic condition here at home isn’t really too conducive for risk-taking,” he said. Despite the rough start and his pullback concerns, Ablin isn’t preparing to stay conservative. “That would allow us to take some of the dry powder that we’ve put aside


Ablin, who has $5.4 billion in assets under management, warns the market is vulnerable to a significant correction by early next year. After dropping as much as 335 points, the index closed up 122 points and reversed a two-day losing streak. “The economic condition here at home isn’t really too conducive for risk-taking,” he said. Despite the rough start and his pullback concerns, Ablin isn’t preparing to stay conservative. “That would allow us to take some of the dry powder that we’ve put aside
Stocks could tumble 15% by early next year, investor Jack Ablin warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risks, tumble, market, ablin, jack, isnt, investor, warns, points, investment, index, yeari, really, stocks, early, assets


Stocks could tumble 15% by early next year, investor Jack Ablin warns

Cresset Capital’s Jack Ablin believes investors with an appetite for big risks could get burned.

Ablin, who has $5.4 billion in assets under management, warns the market is vulnerable to a significant correction by early next year.

“I believe we’re entering a cyclical downturn,” the firm’s chief investment officer told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Thursday. “The market could respond downward 10 to 15%.”

The Dow battled back from negative territory on Thursday. After dropping as much as 335 points, the index closed up 122 points and reversed a two-day losing streak. However, just three days into the fourth quarter, the index is still down more than 700 points and is 4.4% off its record high.

To protect his portfolio from wild market swings, Ablin has moved away from his typical investment strategy. Instead of depending completely on stocks for gains, he shifted 30% of his assets to private equity and cash in August.

“The economic condition here at home isn’t really too conducive for risk-taking,” he said. “The manufacturing ISM came in lousy. We saw nonmanufacturing slightly better, but still disappointing.”

He’s also worried about headline risks surrounding the U.S.-China trade war, efforts to impeach President Donald Trump, and the 2020 election.

“As a data guy, it’s really hard to navigate the headlines,” he said.

Despite the rough start and his pullback concerns, Ablin isn’t preparing to stay conservative. He’s looking to eventually take advantage of market trouble.

“That would allow us to take some of the dry powder that we’ve put aside over the last several months and redeploy it back into the market,” Ablin said.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: stephanie landsman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, risks, tumble, market, ablin, jack, isnt, investor, warns, points, investment, index, yeari, really, stocks, early, assets


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Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump’s account

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’


Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’
Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump’s account Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consider, dorsey, ceo, trump, harris, trumps, kamala, accounts, president, letter, twitter, suspending, tweets, jack, tech, asks


Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump's account

2020 Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019.

Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy.

In a letter to Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, the senator from California pointed to a series of tweets from the president referring to the whistleblower who filed a complaint about Trump’s July 25 call with the president of Ukraine. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower.

Harris also pointed to Trump’s tweet that “a Civil War” could break out if Democrats successfully remove the president from office. She said the tweet suggests “that violence could be incited should Congress issue formal articles of impeachment against him.”

“Time to do something about this,” Harris tweeted to Dorsey. She included Trump’s tweet calling the impeachment inquiry a “COUP.”

Twitter said it plans to respond to the letter.

A White House spokesperson told CNBC in an emailed statement, “It is not surprising that Kamala Harris, someone who believes in bigger government and more regulation, would like to silence her political opponents. In fact, it’s rather authoritarian of her. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’s unprecedented accomplishments should be praised, not criticized.”

Harris’ letter touches on a longstanding issue for Twitter in how it deals with accounts from world leaders who violate its policies. In June, Twitter announced that it would flag, but not remove, abusive tweets from world leaders. In what amounted to a compromise, Twitter said it would put a disclaimer on such tweets and make it harder for them to spread. Still, Twitter said it would keep the messages on the platform in case they would be in the public interest to access.

In a New York Times op-ed, technology contributor Kara Swisher wrote that Trump has been able to get away with tweets like the “Civil War” one because “the tweet’s message was implicit rather than explicit.”

“The company’s weak response shows how utterly incapable it is in dealing with these thorny issues,” Swisher wrote.

On Wednesday, fellow Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, a senator from Massachusetts, took a different stand from Harris. Asked by a reporter if Trump should be banned from Twitter, Warren simply said “no.”

The company has taken an especially cautious approach to monitoring speech as conservative lawmakers have repeatedly accused Twitter and other tech companies of political bias.

Twitter is immune from liability from Trump and others’ tweets due to a law known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Under the highly contested law, internet platforms are not legally responsible for the speech of their users. Several lawmakers have argued that the law, which originally aided the growth and innovation of nascent tech companies, is no longer appropriate for today’s tech giants.

But Twitter has taken steps to remove accounts of prominent nonworld leaders who have violated its rules. Twitter announced last year, for example, that it would permanently ban right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his company, InfoWars, from the platform after claiming the accounts had violated its abusive behavior policy. Harris referenced this ban and the suspension of “[d]isgraced hedge fund manager” Martin Shkreli and actor James Woods for past violations on the platform.

“I believe the President’s recent tweets rise to the level that Twitter should consider suspending his account,” Harris wrote. “Others have had their accounts suspended for less offensive behavior. And when this kind of abuse is being spewed from the most powerful office in the United States, the stakes are too high to do nothing.”

Download Kamala Harris’ letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey or read the full letter below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consider, dorsey, ceo, trump, harris, trumps, kamala, accounts, president, letter, twitter, suspending, tweets, jack, tech, asks


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Jack Ma told Arianna Huffington to leave the business she founded — here’s what happened next

When Arianna Huffington spoke at a women’s conference hosted by Alibaba and its co-founder Jack Ma, she wasn’t expecting career advice from Ma himself. “‘If I were you, I would leave The Huffington Post and start a company based on the views that you expressed in your speech and in your book.’ And he actually said that stress is becoming a bigger and bigger crisis everywhere,” Huffington told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.” I really thought (The Huffington Post) was going to be my last act. Huffington


When Arianna Huffington spoke at a women’s conference hosted by Alibaba and its co-founder Jack Ma, she wasn’t expecting career advice from Ma himself. “‘If I were you, I would leave The Huffington Post and start a company based on the views that you expressed in your speech and in your book.’ And he actually said that stress is becoming a bigger and bigger crisis everywhere,” Huffington told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.” I really thought (The Huffington Post) was going to be my last act. Huffington
Jack Ma told Arianna Huffington to leave the business she founded — here’s what happened next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, happened, business, post, wellbeing, thrive, thought, huffington, sleep, really, leave, heres, jack, arianna, stress, founded


Jack Ma told Arianna Huffington to leave the business she founded — here's what happened next

Arianna Huffington speaks onstage in “Digital Detox” on day 2 of POPSUGAR Play/Ground on June 10, 2018 in New York City.

When Arianna Huffington spoke at a women’s conference hosted by Alibaba and its co-founder Jack Ma, she wasn’t expecting career advice from Ma himself.

It was 2015, and Huffington had been running news website The Huffington Post for a decade and had published her 14th book “Thrive,” about stress and wellbeing, the year before.

Huffington recalls a conversation with Ma at a dinner after the event where he made a suggestion. “‘If I were you, I would leave The Huffington Post and start a company based on the views that you expressed in your speech and in your book.’ And he actually said that stress is becoming a bigger and bigger crisis everywhere,” Huffington told CNBC’s “The Brave Ones.”

“And then he ended…by saying: ‘And if you decide to do that, I’ll invest in it.’ And at the time, I really thought he was crazy. I really thought (The Huffington Post) was going to be my last act. I loved it like a third child.”

Huffington had noticed that content about sleep and work performance, as well as articles about stress and screen reduction time, did well online. “Increasingly, all these subjects began to bring us more traffic than our coverage of politics. So, I could see that the world was hungry for this conversation,” she said.

In 2016, Huffington stepped down as editor-in-chief of her online publication and launched Thrive Global, a media company and consultancy that helps corporations with their employees’ overall wellbeing, and Ma and Alibaba co-founder Joseph Tsai invested an undisclosed amount.

Thrive has since worked with companies such as Accenture, JPMorgan and SAP, and it has published articles by the likes of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, who wrote about sleep, and pop star Selena Gomez, who discussed digital detoxing.

“These role models give permission to people to make these changes in their lives without feeling that if they take their foot off the accelerator for 10 minutes to meditate or to go for a walking meeting they are somehow going to fall behind,” Huffington told “The Brave Ones.”

Huffington sold The Huffington Post to AOL for $315 million in 2011. AOL became part of Verizon in 2015.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, happened, business, post, wellbeing, thrive, thought, huffington, sleep, really, leave, heres, jack, arianna, stress, founded


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Gap has a new plan to grow its Athleta, Janie and Jack businesses overseas

Gap opened its first Gap franchise store in Singapore in 2006. Gap said on Thursday, as part of a meeting it was holding with its management team and Wall Street, that it will begin franchising the Athleta and Janie and Jack brands internationally. It said it ultimately hopes to find partners to help it open freestanding Athleta and Janie and Jack franchise stores overseas. The growth of Gap’s franchise business has accelerated more recently, as the company says there has been more momentum for


Gap opened its first Gap franchise store in Singapore in 2006. Gap said on Thursday, as part of a meeting it was holding with its management team and Wall Street, that it will begin franchising the Athleta and Janie and Jack brands internationally. It said it ultimately hopes to find partners to help it open freestanding Athleta and Janie and Jack franchise stores overseas. The growth of Gap’s franchise business has accelerated more recently, as the company says there has been more momentum for
Gap has a new plan to grow its Athleta, Janie and Jack businesses overseas Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athleta, partners, plan, franchise, grow, stores, overseas, brands, business, jack, janie, sales, company, businesses, gap


Gap has a new plan to grow its Athleta, Janie and Jack businesses overseas

Gap Inc. has new plans to grow its Athleta and Janie and Jack businesses outside the U.S.

And it will do so by using its franchise business, which allows Gap to license its brand names to outside partners, who then are able to operate stores for the company in regions — such as Central America and the Caribbean — where Gap doesn’t already have a strong footing. Or where it doesn’t understand all the nuances of different corporate cultures.

“We’ve come to realize there is local expertise that frankly we don’t have,” Roy Hunt, the senior vice president of Gap Inc.’s global franchise and strategic alliances division, told CNBC in a recent interview. “But we go through a lot of different steps to make sure we have the right partners. … For the most part, we are very selective.”

Gap has already been licensing the rights to its namesake Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy brands in nearly 40 countries, amounting to it having more than 500 franchisee-operated locations around the globe. The franchise model is very common in the fast-food industry — for example, with McDonald’s and Subway. It’s what has allowed a lot of these chains to grow so rapidly.

Gap opened its first Gap franchise store in Singapore in 2006.

Gap said on Thursday, as part of a meeting it was holding with its management team and Wall Street, that it will begin franchising the Athleta and Janie and Jack brands internationally. It said it will start by looking for partners to help it open stores within other stores and build out websites globally. It said it ultimately hopes to find partners to help it open freestanding Athleta and Janie and Jack franchise stores overseas.

“Given the premium, gift-worthy children’s looks of Janie & Jack and the versatile, sustainable women’s performance apparel of Athleta, we feel the two brands will resonate with customers in new and existing markets internationally,” Hunt said in a statement about the announcement.

The growth of Gap’s franchise business has accelerated more recently, as the company says there has been more momentum for some of its brands overseas. It says it’s opened 100 franchise locations outside of the U.S. within the last three years. Within the U.S., all stores are still owned and operated by the company.

The company also says that a substantial driver of sales overseas stems from Gap’s logo-plastered products, which account for nearly 30% of total sales in the franchise division each year. During the busy holiday season, Gap said some international markets bring in more than 40% of total sales from Gap-logo product.

According to Hunt, there’s still a huge opportunity for Gap to grow its franchise business in markets such as Europe, Asia and Central America. “If you think about it, the primary benefit we have in doing this is we are not investing our own capital … the partner is investing capital to build out the business,” he said.

The announcement from Gap Inc. comes as the company is in the midst of splitting into two publicly traded businesses, one for Old Navy by itself, and another for Gap’s other brands, including athletic apparel brands Athleta and Hill City. Then, Gap acquired children’s clothing retailer Janie and Jack’s intellectual property, its website, customer data and other assets for $35 million, when the brand’s previous parent company Gymboree filed for bankruptcy earlier this year.

The company has been struggling in the U.S., as its apparel brands face heated competition from the likes of fast-fashion retailers Zara and H&M. Gap Inc. sales overall fell 2% in the latest quarter.

It has said that as it shutters some of its underperforming Gap and Banana Republic locations, which have been weighing on the overall business, it plans to open more Athleta and Old Navy stores.

The company as of Aug. 3 had 3,356 company-operated stores and 521 franchise locations globally.

Gap Inc. shares are down more than 25% this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athleta, partners, plan, franchise, grow, stores, overseas, brands, business, jack, janie, sales, company, businesses, gap


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See Jack Ma go back to the apartment where he started Alibaba in 1999

Ma and his 17 fellow co-founders started Alibaba out of the small, six-room apartment where he lived with his wife in Hangzhou, China in 1999. Tuesday, Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba, both celebrates his 55th birthday and steps down from his position as executive chairman of the Chinese e-commerce juggernaut. His first internet search was for “beer,” Ma told Charlie Rose in 2015. It’s easy to spell,” Ma told Rose.) “At that time, we were ranking like 1 [million] or 2 million,” Ma said in the Ali


Ma and his 17 fellow co-founders started Alibaba out of the small, six-room apartment where he lived with his wife in Hangzhou, China in 1999. Tuesday, Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba, both celebrates his 55th birthday and steps down from his position as executive chairman of the Chinese e-commerce juggernaut. His first internet search was for “beer,” Ma told Charlie Rose in 2015. It’s easy to spell,” Ma told Rose.) “At that time, we were ranking like 1 [million] or 2 million,” Ma said in the Ali
See Jack Ma go back to the apartment where he started Alibaba in 1999 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, jack, video, matter, 1999, started, going, apartment, remember, work, probably, alibaba


See Jack Ma go back to the apartment where he started Alibaba in 1999

“We’re going to eat here. We’re going to sleep here. We’re going to work day and night here. We will probably achieve something, or probably, we’ll have to go out looking for jobs together.”

“I remember exactly the first day we came back, we take all the luggage here, and I told everybody: This is the place we’re going to work for a year probably,” Ma said in the video.

Ma still has the apartment and he recently returned to reminisce. Monday, Alibaba Group tweeted a video of how it all went down.

Ma and his 17 fellow co-founders started Alibaba out of the small, six-room apartment where he lived with his wife in Hangzhou, China in 1999.

Tuesday, Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba, both celebrates his 55th birthday and steps down from his position as executive chairman of the Chinese e-commerce juggernaut.

Ma had the idea to start a tech company after his first trip to the United States in 1995. During the trip, a friend showed him the internet, which he had not encountered before in China.

His first internet search was for “beer,” Ma told Charlie Rose in 2015. (“I don’t know. It’s easy to spell,” Ma told Rose.) Ma then searched the word “China,” but he said there was “no data about China.”

“So I talked to my friend: Why not I make something about China? So we made a small very ugly looking page called ‘China.'”

It planted the seed for Alibaba, which started out as an “e-marketplace for information,” according to Ma.

By the time they began working on the company out of the Hangzhou apartment in 1999, Ma and his team had the goal of becoming one of the top 10 websites in the world, he said.

“At that time, we were ranking like 1 [million] or 2 million,” Ma said in the Alibaba Group video from the apartment.

Ma had no business or technical experience, and growing the business wasn’t always easy. But says Ma in the video, without those “tough days, we can never be [here] today.”

Today, Alibaba has a market capitalization of about $456 billion.

Now, as a market leader, Ma says “the thing that I want this company [to] never forget is the dream, because we are at today’s size. A lot of companies, I learned why they fail, because they want [the] next quarter. They want revenue. They want profit. They always forget about dreams,” he says in the video.

“It’s the dreams that keep us working hard. It’s the dreams that keep us never afraid of the mistakes, the setbacks we have. I hope 60 years later, 80 years later, people still remember this apartment. We should never lose the dream we had from the … the apartment.”

Many great companies, including Amazon, Apple and Google, also began in garages. And Ma hopes Alibaba never loses sight of its garage culture, regardless of how large it gets. In fact, CNBC reported in 2014 that Ma sends his most-talented employees there to work with the hope that the experience inspires them to create more great products.

“No matter how big Alibaba is, no matter where Alibaba will be, no matter what industry we are in, we always remember this ‘Hupan’ culture, this garage culture,” Ma says in the video.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, jack, video, matter, 1999, started, going, apartment, remember, work, probably, alibaba


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Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is ‘not functional as a currency’ right now

Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday. “What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said. Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500,


Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday. “What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said. Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500,
Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is ‘not functional as a currency’ right now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, usable, traded, jack, right, digital, troughs, dorsey, bitcoin, volatile, functional, trading, currency


Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is 'not functional as a currency' right now

Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. But he also says it is not ready to be a currency.

“It’s not functional as a currency. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday.

“What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said.

Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500, and in January 2019, it traded below $3,350.

Still, Dorsey is a supporter of both bitcoin and the broader idea of an Internet-based currency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, usable, traded, jack, right, digital, troughs, dorsey, bitcoin, volatile, functional, trading, currency


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Elon Musk and Jack Ma agree: The biggest problem the world will face is population collapse

When it comes to the future of humanity, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Alibaba founder Jack Ma disagree on whether people should be scared by the potential of artificial intelligence. But the two billionaire businessmen do agree on the biggest problem the world will face in the future: not enough people. “Assuming there is a benevolent future with AI, I think the biggest problem the world will face in 20 years is population collapse.” The current global fertility rate is 2.5, but is expected to fall t


When it comes to the future of humanity, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Alibaba founder Jack Ma disagree on whether people should be scared by the potential of artificial intelligence. But the two billionaire businessmen do agree on the biggest problem the world will face in the future: not enough people. “Assuming there is a benevolent future with AI, I think the biggest problem the world will face in 20 years is population collapse.” The current global fertility rate is 2.5, but is expected to fall t
Elon Musk and Jack Ma agree: The biggest problem the world will face is population collapse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, population, fertility, collapse, ma, jack, global, think, world, face, elon, musk, china, problem, agree, rate, biggest


Elon Musk and Jack Ma agree: The biggest problem the world will face is population collapse

When it comes to the future of humanity, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Alibaba founder Jack Ma disagree on whether people should be scared by the potential of artificial intelligence. Ma is optimistic about AI, while Musk is more apocalyptic. But the two billionaire businessmen do agree on the biggest problem the world will face in the future: not enough people.

“Most people think we have too many people on the planet, but actually, this is an outdated view,” Musk said while on stage with Ma at at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai on Wednesday. “Assuming there is a benevolent future with AI, I think the biggest problem the world will face in 20 years is population collapse.”

“The biggest issue in 20 years will be population collapse. Not explosion. Collapse.”

“I absolutely agree with that,” Ma said. “The population problem is going to be facing huge challenge. 1.4 billion people in China sounds a lot, but I think next 20 years, we will see this thing will bring big trouble to China. And … the speed of population decrease is going to speed up. You called it a ‘collapse,'” he said to Musk. “I agree with you.”

“Yeah, accelerating collapse,” Musk said.

Fears of overpopulation due to immigration are short-sighted, according to Musk. “The common rebuttal is like, ‘Well what about immigration?’ I’m like, ‘From where?'”

Musk and Ma may be aggressive with their time frame, but by 2070, the global fertility rate is expected to fall below the global replacement fertility rate — that’s the average number of children each woman needs to give birth to for the population to replace itself from one generation to the next — according to a recent analysis of United Nations global population data from the Pew Research Center. The current global replacement rate is 2.1 births. The current global fertility rate is 2.5, but is expected to fall to 1.9 by 2100.

Fertility rates vary widely, but Africa is the only global region expected to have “strong population growth” through 2100. Populations in Europe and Latin America are projected to be declining by 2010. Asia’s population is projected to increase though 2055 and then begin to decline, according to Pew.

For some regions, especially in poor countries, rising fertility rates cause a burden on the already stressed social infrastructure systems. But in countries like China, a slowing population is cause for concern.

For example, due to decades of birth restrictions in China (from the ’70s until 2015 Chinese couples were required to have only one child), ever increasing economic opportunities for women and increasing longevity, China now has a lopsided population — there are not enough young workers to support the growing population of older people.

In January, a group of local academics, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, issued a warning to government leaders about the potential threat of population decline, the New York Times reported.

“What are the socio-economic consequences of long-term sustained negative population growth? From a theoretical point of view, the long-term population decline, especially with the aging of the aging, is bound to bring very unfavorable social and economic consequences,” the report, translated into English, says.

See also:

Elon Musk, Bill Gates and Warren Buffett agree: Now is the best time to be alive

Jeff Bezos’ job listing for Amazon’s first hire: You have to exceed what ‘most competent people think possible’

Elon Musk backs presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who advocates giving Americans $1,000 a month


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-30  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, population, fertility, collapse, ma, jack, global, think, world, face, elon, musk, china, problem, agree, rate, biggest


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