This Japanese secret to a longer and happier life is gaining attention from millions around the world

In Japan, the secret to living a longer, happier and more fulfilled life can be summed up in one word: Ikigai. In Japanese, iki means “to live” and gai means “reason” — in other words, your reason to live. The ikigai way of life is especially prominent Okinawa, in a group of islands south of mainland Japan. “In America, we divide our adult life into two categories: Our work life and our retirement life,” he says. The joy of small things Finding joy in the small things — the morning air, a cup of


In Japan, the secret to living a longer, happier and more fulfilled life can be summed up in one word: Ikigai. In Japanese, iki means “to live” and gai means “reason” — in other words, your reason to live. The ikigai way of life is especially prominent Okinawa, in a group of islands south of mainland Japan. “In America, we divide our adult life into two categories: Our work life and our retirement life,” he says. The joy of small things Finding joy in the small things — the morning air, a cup of
This Japanese secret to a longer and happier life is gaining attention from millions around the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: ken mogi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gaining, sense, world, attention, happier, reason, morning, secret, happy, things, japanese, longer, small, way, life, millions, live, ikigai


This Japanese secret to a longer and happier life is gaining attention from millions around the world

In Japan, the secret to living a longer, happier and more fulfilled life can be summed up in one word: Ikigai. In Japanese, iki means “to live” and gai means “reason” — in other words, your reason to live. This ideology dates to the Heian period (A.D. 794 to 1185), but only in the past decade has it gained attention from millions around the world. The ikigai way of life is especially prominent Okinawa, in a group of islands south of mainland Japan. (It has also been nicknamed the “Land of Immortals” because it has among the longest lifespans and highest rates of centenarians in the world.)

‘The reason for which you wake up in the morning’

In a 2009 TED talk called “How to Live to Be 100+,” award-winning journalist Dan Buettner explores the lifestyle traits of five places in the world where people live the longest. Of all the “blue zones,” as Buettner defines them, Okinawans have the highest life expectancy. (The video has since been viewed close to four million times.) “In America, we divide our adult life into two categories: Our work life and our retirement life,” he says. “In Okinawa, there isn’t even a word for retirement. Instead there’s simply ‘ikigai,’ which essentially means ‘the reason for which you wake up in the morning.'” Buettner cites the ikigai of several Okinawans: For a 101-year-old fisherman, it was catching fish for his family three times a week; for a 102-year-old woman, it was holding her tiny great-great-great-granddaughter (which she said was “like leaping into heaven”); for a 102-year-old karate master, it was teaching martial arts.

Woven together, these simple life values give clues as to what constitutes the very essence of ikigai: A sense of purpose, meaning and motivation in life.

The health benefits of ikigai

For years, researchers have tried to find the reasons behind a long and healthy life. While the answer is likely a mix of good genes, diet and exercise, studies have suggested that finding meaning in life is also a key component. In a 2008 study from Tohoku University, researchers analyzed data from more than 50,000 participants (ages 40 to 79) and found that those who reported having ikigai in their lives had reduced risks of cardiovascular diseases and lower mortality rates. Put another way, 95% of respondents who had ikigai were still alive seven years after the initial survey compared to the 83% who didn’t. It’s impossible to tell whether ikigai guarantees longevity in life through this single study, but the findings suggest that having a sense of purpose can encourage one to build a happy and active life.

Finding your inner ikigai

There’s no single way to find your ikigai, but you can start by asking a few simple questions: What makes you happy? What are you good at? What (and who) do you value? What motivates you to get up in the morning? Finding your ikigai will take time. The secret, I often tell people, is to learn the five core pillars of ikigai (which I discuss in my book, “Awakening Your Ikigai”). By applying these pillars to your life, you can allow your inner ikigai to flourish. 1. Starting small Starting small and executing every step with care is the very ethos of this pillar — and it applies to everything you do in life. Artisanal farmers, for example, devote all their time and effort into creating the best and tastiest produce. They get the soil right. They prune and water their produce with care. Their sense of starting small propels them to go incredible lengths. 2. Releasing yourself When you release yourself, you’re able to let go of your obsessions and see things that matter to you in a more clear and positive light. Practicing self-acceptance is vital to this pillar — and yet, it’s also one of the most difficult tasks we face in our lives. But if you can overcome this obstacle and be happy with who you are, it can be an incredibly rewarding experience. 3. Harmony and sustainability You can’t achieve your goals if you’re constantly fighting with the people around you. Cultivating — and maintaining — a sense of community will provide you with a strong support system to carry you through life’s most challenging moments. 4. The joy of small things Finding joy in the small things — the morning air, a cup of coffee or the ray of sunshine — should be part of what motivates you to get up each morning. In high school, I would take the same 6:20 a.m. train to class every day. The sight the same familiar faces enjoying a game of shogi (Japanese chess) always gave me immense joy. 5. Being in the here and now This pillar is perhaps the most profound. To be in the here and now, it’s important to focus on the present and practice mindfulness every day. Many sumo wrestlers testify that being in the here and now is absolutely necessary in preparing for and fighting in a bout. They claim that immersing themselves in the present helps sustain their state of mind for optimum performance. Ken Mogi is a neuroscientist, best-selling author and lecturer based in Tokyo, Japan. He has published more than 30 papers on cognitive neuroscience. Ken’s books on popular science and secrets to longevity have sold nearly one million copies. “Awakening Your Inner Ikigai” is his first book in English. Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: This 30-year Harvard study found the 5 simple habits that may prolong your life by a decade or more

Billionaire Jeff Bezos: To live a happy life with no regrets by age 80, ask yourself these 12 questions


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: ken mogi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gaining, sense, world, attention, happier, reason, morning, secret, happy, things, japanese, longer, small, way, life, millions, live, ikigai


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I tried a top-grade $240 Olive Wagyu steak to see if it’s worth the money

Olive Wagyu is a brand of Wagyu that comes from cattle raised on a small Japanese island called Shodoshima that is famous for its olive oil industry. Masaki Ishii created Olive Wagyu by using the by-product of olive oil production as feed for his cows. Putting Olive Wagyu to the testSimon Kim, the owner of Manhattan’s Michelin-starred Wagyu beef mecca Cote, where I took the steak to be cooked for the taste test, had only heard about Olive Wagyu. From left: American Wagyu, A5 Kobe Wagyu and A5 Ol


Olive Wagyu is a brand of Wagyu that comes from cattle raised on a small Japanese island called Shodoshima that is famous for its olive oil industry. Masaki Ishii created Olive Wagyu by using the by-product of olive oil production as feed for his cows. Putting Olive Wagyu to the testSimon Kim, the owner of Manhattan’s Michelin-starred Wagyu beef mecca Cote, where I took the steak to be cooked for the taste test, had only heard about Olive Wagyu. From left: American Wagyu, A5 Kobe Wagyu and A5 Ol
I tried a top-grade $240 Olive Wagyu steak to see if it’s worth the money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: nate skid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 240, wagyu, meat, steak, olive, a5, worth, tried, money, topgrade, crowd, heitzeberg, japanese, beef, fat


I tried a top-grade $240 Olive Wagyu steak to see if it's worth the money

As a former food writer, I’ve eaten a lot of expensive steak. But from the moment I unboxed an A5 Olive Wagyu — a top quality, hard-to-get steak from Japanese cows that are fed toasted olive peels — it was obvious that it stood apart from all the others. Crowd Cow, an online meat distribution company and the first to import Olive Wagyu to the U.S., sent a 16-ounce, $240 rib eye (in about three pounds of dry ice) so I could put a Wagyu Olympic-winning steak to the test. But more on that later.

Olive Wagyu is considered one of the rarest steaks in the world. Nate Skid | CNBC

A cut above

“Wagyu” literally translates to “Japanese cow.” There are some 300 brands of Wagyu including Miyozaki, Kagoshima and the most famous of them all, Kobe. And then there’s Olive Wagyu. Olive Wagyu is a brand of Wagyu that comes from cattle raised on a small Japanese island called Shodoshima that is famous for its olive oil industry. In 2006, cattle farmer Masaki Ishii wanted to find a way to use the by-product of olive oil production as feed for his cows, according to Joe Heitzeberg, founder of Crowd Cow.

Masaki Ishii created Olive Wagyu by using the by-product of olive oil production as feed for his cows. Joe Heitzeberg | Crowd Cow

“He went to olive oil makers, took the olive peels and toasted them so they became sweeter and mixed it with rice straw, barley, grains, and the cows loved it,” Heitzeberg said. “He shared the recipe with other farmers in the area and they all bought in and started doing it.” Because of the cows’ diet, Olive Wagyu is highly marbled with fat that’s a light yellow color, and it produces a flavor profile so unique that the meat beat out 182 others for the Best Fat Quality category at the 2017 Wagyu Olympics, a six-day contest that takes place every five years. Beef producers from all over Japan enter their finest cuts.

Olive Wagyu’s fat content comes in at 62.5 percent and won the Best Fat Quality category at the 2017 Wagyu Olympics. Beatriz Bajuelos | CNBC

Because of its origin, Olive Wagyu is also extremely scarce. Heitzeberg says last year about 2,200 head of Olive Wagyu were harvested with a tiny fraction of that being exported. Now there are 70 producers raising Olive Wagyu, the largest having just 300 head of cattle. Heitzeberg says Ishii currently has just 12. “Even in Japan, if you go to a Tokyo restaurant for high-end steaks, there is coin toss chance they’ve even heard about it,” Heitzeberg tells CNBC Make It. “It’s on the cutting edge of beef geekery.” George Owen, executive director of the American Wagyu Association hasn’t even tasted it. “Not on my budget. I can’t afford that stuff,” he tells CNBC MakeIt. He has a point. When available, Crowd Cow sells a 16-ounce A5 Olive Wagyu rib-eye steak on it’s website for $240, and Heitzeberg says if Olive Wagyu were on a restaurant menu, a 16-ounce rib-eye would cost about the same as a top-grade Wagyu, or about $480. However Olive Wagyu is nearly impossible to source on a consistent basis, so it is not really sold at restaurants, he says.

Heitzeberg says last year about 2,200 head of Olive Wagyu were harvested. Joe Heitzeberg | Crowd Cow

“It’s basically not available anywhere because of it’s limited quantity,” he says. Heitzeberg who is fluent in Japanese, says it took him two years of relationship-building to even be able to import the meat through Crowd Cow.

Putting Olive Wagyu to the test

Simon Kim, the owner of Manhattan’s Michelin-starred Wagyu beef mecca Cote, where I took the steak to be cooked for the taste test, had only heard about Olive Wagyu. “I’m always looking for new beef to bring to the restaurant,” Kim said as he looked over the inch-thick chunk of meat. “The marbling is beyond sick and visually it’s stunning.”

Something called oleic acid is part of what gives steak its umami flavor and its texture. It’s found in both olive oil and beef fat, so Olive Wagyu has higher than usual oleic acid fat content of 62.5% — the high percentage is reportedly what makes Olive Wagyu tastier and more tender than other cuts of equally expensive beef. For the taste test, Crowd Cow and Cote provided three cuts of 16-ounce rib eye steaks: American Wagyu (one side of its lineage is full-bred Japanese cow); A5 Japanese Wagyu (Japanese beef is rated from 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest quality, and “A” corresponds to the amount of edible meat on the animal); and A5 Olive Wagyu. Cote’s executive chef, David Shim, cut each of the steaks into one-inch squares then Kim sprinkled them with sea salt and cooked them over an open flame to a perfect medium rare.

From left: American Wagyu, A5 Kobe Wagyu and A5 Olive Wagyu Nate Skid | CNBC

First up was the American Wagyu, which costs $85 at Cote or about $5 per ounce. Online meat retailer Snake River Farms sells an 8-ounce American Wagyu rib-eye steak for $41. The meat sizzled as Kim laid it on the grill and carefully turned it to ensure a nice char on each side. The American Wagyu was leaner than the others, so the texture was chewier than I’d want in a steak with Wagyu lineage. It wasn’t much different than other rib-eye steaks you can get at most decent steakhouses.

The American Wagyu was leaner than the others, so the texture was chewier than I’d want in a steak with Wagyu lineage. Beatrize Bajuelos | CNBC

The A5 Wagyu, which costs $30 per ounce at Cote, or the equivalent of just over $14 an ounce on Crowd Cow, had incredible fat marbling; I watched it melt out of the steak as it cooked on the grill. It made the meat melt-in-your-mouth tender and incredibly juicy and buttery. The open flame created wonderful crust giving the exterior a nice crunch. But the meat was so rich, I actually couldn’t handle eating more than two bites.

A5 Kobe costs $30 per ounce at Cote. Beatrize Bajuelos | CNBC

Then the Olive Wagyu: The steak, which would cost about $30 an ounce at a restaurant or about $15 an ounce on Crowd Cow, was soft like the A5 Wagyu and incredibly tender — reminiscent of foie Gras. But the flavor profile was notably different. The fat seemed to melt in my mouth, which was was deeply satisfying and full of that elusive umami flavor, and it had hints of olive oil (thanks to the cow’s diet). It also left a peppery note in the back of my throat. The aftertaste lingered well beyond each bite. But again, it was so rich I can’t imagine eating an entire steak.

The Olive Wagyu was incredibly tender — reminiscent of foie Gras. Beatrize Bajuelos | CNBC

Kim, who also tried all three steaks, was impressed by the Olive Wagyu. It’s “very much like beef chocolate,” he said through a wide grin, referring to the way the meat melted in his mouth. “You don’t’ even have to chew. The flavor just continuously goes.” The fat “tastes like gold,” he says. But to me, spending hundreds of dollars on an A5 Olive Wagyu is not worth it, at least not if you want to eat more than a couple of ounces. The fat-laden meat is just so rich, it’s best served in bite-sized portions. It’s more of an experience than a meal, but perhaps that’s the point. Don’t Miss: How ‘Salt Bae’ turned a sprinkle of salt into worldwide fame

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: nate skid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 240, wagyu, meat, steak, olive, a5, worth, tried, money, topgrade, crowd, heitzeberg, japanese, beef, fat


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Toyota says Trump’s latest tariff threat shows Japanese investments in US ‘not welcomed’

The Japan automaker’s comments Friday come after the White House said U.S.Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will “address the threatened impairment” of national security from auto imports. “Our operations and employees contribute significantly to the American way of life, the U.S. economy and are not a national security threat,” Toyota said in a statement. EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom also denounced Trump’s comments, saying “we completely reject the notion” that Europe’s car expo


The Japan automaker’s comments Friday come after the White House said U.S.Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will “address the threatened impairment” of national security from auto imports. “Our operations and employees contribute significantly to the American way of life, the U.S. economy and are not a national security threat,” Toyota said in a statement. EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom also denounced Trump’s comments, saying “we completely reject the notion” that Europe’s car expo
Toyota says Trump’s latest tariff threat shows Japanese investments in US ‘not welcomed’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, investments, national, white, welcomed, latest, toyota, security, trade, vehicle, threat, parts, american, shows, trumps, tariff, japan


Toyota says Trump's latest tariff threat shows Japanese investments in US 'not welcomed'

Toyota Motor said President Donald Trump’s latest move in the administration’s international trade war was a “major setback” for American consumers, shows the company’s investments in the U.S. are “not welcomed” and that contributions from its American employees are “not valued.”

Trump issued a new directive Friday giving Japan and the European Union six months to renegotiate their trade deals with the U.S. so that the “American automobile industry, its workforce, and American innovation” are protected.

The Japan automaker’s comments Friday come after the White House said U.S.Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will “address the threatened impairment” of national security from auto imports.

“Our operations and employees contribute significantly to the American way of life, the U.S. economy and are not a national security threat,” Toyota said in a statement.

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom also denounced Trump’s comments, saying “we completely reject the notion” that Europe’s car exports are a national security threat.

Toyota said it has been “deeply engrained” in the U.S. for more than 60 years and has invested over $60 billion in the country, employing more than 475,000 Americans.

Toyota added that “history has shown” that limiting imports of vehicles and parts is “counterproductive in creating jobs, stimulating the economy and influencing consumer buying habits.” The automaker said auto tariffs would reduce consumer choice and even impact American automakers because vehicle parts used for manufacturing in the U.S. come from various countries.

“If import quotas are imposed, the biggest losers will be consumers who will pay more and have fewer vehicle choices,” Toyota said.

The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Read Toyota’s full statement:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, investments, national, white, welcomed, latest, toyota, security, trade, vehicle, threat, parts, american, shows, trumps, tariff, japan


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Yen stronger against dollar, volatility bets jump on tariff threats

The U.S. dollar weakened against the Japanese yen on Tuesday as foreign exchange traders sought out safe-haven assets and placed bets on increasing currency volatility after President Donald Trump threatened to impose additional tariffs on Chinese goods. The demand for yen bolstered the volatility index measuring moves in and out of the Japanese currency. The Chicago Board Options Exchange’s Japanese Yen Volatility Index was last up 12.67%. The British Pound Volatility Index was last up 3.52%. T


The U.S. dollar weakened against the Japanese yen on Tuesday as foreign exchange traders sought out safe-haven assets and placed bets on increasing currency volatility after President Donald Trump threatened to impose additional tariffs on Chinese goods. The demand for yen bolstered the volatility index measuring moves in and out of the Japanese currency. The Chicago Board Options Exchange’s Japanese Yen Volatility Index was last up 12.67%. The British Pound Volatility Index was last up 3.52%. T
Yen stronger against dollar, volatility bets jump on tariff threats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dollar, investors, jump, higher, index, volatility, exchange, stronger, chinese, yen, bets, foreign, threats, tariff, japanese


Yen stronger against dollar, volatility bets jump on tariff threats

The U.S. dollar weakened against the Japanese yen on Tuesday as foreign exchange traders sought out safe-haven assets and placed bets on increasing currency volatility after President Donald Trump threatened to impose additional tariffs on Chinese goods.

The yen was trading at its strongest since March 28, last at half a percent better on the day at 110.20 per dollar. The Swiss franc and longer-dated Treasury bond prices were also buoyed as investors moved into high-quality assets.

“The primary story continues to be the U.S.-China trade agreement. Everyone is focused on that,” said Thierry Wizman, global interest rates and currencies strategist at Macquarie Group.

The demand for yen bolstered the volatility index measuring moves in and out of the Japanese currency. The Chicago Board Options Exchange’s Japanese Yen Volatility Index was last up 12.67%.

The price on other currency-related volatility products also rose. The euro index was up 4.75% on Tuesday and up 11.17% from Friday. The British Pound Volatility Index was last up 3.52%.

“Given investors have been selling volatility since January, they have probably sold more than they wanted and are now scrambling in the opposite direction,” said Wizman.

Traders are “trying to cover their short volatility plays, trying to protect themselves with some optionality, sending foreign exchange vols higher and obviously sending the dollar higher against some of the key pairs,” he added.

Trump tweeted on Sunday that he would raise tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods to 25% from 10% by the end of the week and would “soon” target the remaining Chinese imports with tariffs.

But top Chinese negotiator Vice Premier Liu He will head to Washington this week for talks, and some investors have interpreted Trump’s threat as a negotiating tactic.

Although volatility indexes were higher, most moves in currencies were muted. After a bout of nerves Monday immediately following Trump’s comments, foreign exchange traders expressed no fresh panic on Tuesday at the prospect of a breakdown in negotiations between China and the United States.

“As long as the talks continue, the market will remain relaxed … that there will be a deal after all,” said Esther Reichelt, currency analyst at Commerzbank.

The offshore yuan on Monday had been on course for its worst daily drop in 10 months, briefly touching a four-month low of 6.8218, but it later recovered some of those losses while remaining under pressure. It was last down 0.43% at 6.801 yuan per dollar.

The dollar index was 0.08% higher, last at 97.60, with the dollar 0.10% stronger against the euro at $1.118 .


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dollar, investors, jump, higher, index, volatility, exchange, stronger, chinese, yen, bets, foreign, threats, tariff, japanese


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Why the Japanese don’t buy American cars

But industry observers chalk the admittedly glaring disparity up to the unique characteristics of the Japanese auto market: American firms don’t really make cars that suit Japanese tastes, Americans have not invested in a dealership presence in the country, and many Japanese consumers have a persistent, if outdated, idea that American vehicles are unreliable and inefficient. Roughly 40 percent of the cars sold in Japan are a special class of extra small cars call Kei cars. Although U.S. autos ar


But industry observers chalk the admittedly glaring disparity up to the unique characteristics of the Japanese auto market: American firms don’t really make cars that suit Japanese tastes, Americans have not invested in a dealership presence in the country, and many Japanese consumers have a persistent, if outdated, idea that American vehicles are unreliable and inefficient. Roughly 40 percent of the cars sold in Japan are a special class of extra small cars call Kei cars. Although U.S. autos ar
Why the Japanese don’t buy American cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, japanese, jeep, cars, small, market, dont, american, sold, vehicles, brands, buy


Why the Japanese don't buy American cars

You stand very little chance of seeing an American car on a Japanese road, but if you do, there is a good chance it is a Jeep Wrangler.

While Japanese brands fill U.S. roads and parking lots, American automakers have all but given up on selling cars in Japan — despite the fact that it remains the world’s third-largest car market.

President Donald Trump has called it unfair, as has the American Automotive Policy Council, which represents the three big U.S. auto manufacturers: General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler.

But industry observers chalk the admittedly glaring disparity up to the unique characteristics of the Japanese auto market: American firms don’t really make cars that suit Japanese tastes, Americans have not invested in a dealership presence in the country, and many Japanese consumers have a persistent, if outdated, idea that American vehicles are unreliable and inefficient.

Roughly 40 percent of the cars sold in Japan are a special class of extra small cars call Kei cars. Nearly all of those are sold by Japanese brands, such as Suzuki and Daihatsu. Japan is a crowded country, and drivers like the convenience and efficiency of small vehicles that are easy to maneuver on narrow streets or fit into tight parking spaces.

“In Japan, there is a different market and different consumer,” said Kristin Dziczek, vice president of industry, labor & economics at the Center for Automotive Research. Although U.S. autos aren’t taxed going into Japan, American cars aren’t made for Japanese consumers. “We are giving them our off-cast, things we make for the North American consumer that we hope we can then sell in other markets.”

Japanese automakers are so adept at serving their home turf that about 95 percent of the cars on Japanese roads are Japanese makes. Imports make up the balance, and most of those are European luxury vehicles or sports cars.

Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Volkswagen, including Audi, all sell tens of thousands of cars in Japan each year. While that is still a pretty small number compared with the overall local market and other major markets, it isn’t nothing, said Tokyo-based CLSA analyst Christopher Richter.

American carmakers “don’t really try,” Richter said. Ford left Japan entirely in 2017. GM sold only about 700 cars there in 2018.

The trouble for American brands is that it is tough to compete against comparable Japanese vehicles without differentiating themselves in some way, he said.

That is perhaps what accounts for the popularity of Fiat Chrysler’s Jeep brand. Almost invariably, the Jeeps that Richter sees in Japan are Wranglers, which is the model perhaps most emblematic of the brand and the rugged, outdoor American lifestyle it symbolizes. The Jeep brand has a strikingly strong image abroad, said Rebecca Lindland, an independent auto analyst.

“If you think about some of the most powerful, well respected, and well-liked brands in that world, I would say Jeep is a dark horse in that race,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, japanese, jeep, cars, small, market, dont, american, sold, vehicles, brands, buy


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Canon shares fall on report that company plans to cut earnings guidance

Shares of Canon fell 2.5% on Wednesday on a Nikkei report that said the company is expected to downgrade its earnings guidance for 2019. Nikkei reported that Canon’s operating profit is likely to fall short of the current forecast by about $447 million as consumers opt for smartphone cameras over digital cameras. The report found that Canon’s operating profit is anticipated to fall 20% to slightly above $2.4 billion, compared with the projected $2.9 billion. The Japanese company’s sales for 2019


Shares of Canon fell 2.5% on Wednesday on a Nikkei report that said the company is expected to downgrade its earnings guidance for 2019. Nikkei reported that Canon’s operating profit is likely to fall short of the current forecast by about $447 million as consumers opt for smartphone cameras over digital cameras. The report found that Canon’s operating profit is anticipated to fall 20% to slightly above $2.4 billion, compared with the projected $2.9 billion. The Japanese company’s sales for 2019
Canon shares fall on report that company plans to cut earnings guidance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: matt lavietes, brian ach, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, canon, plans, earnings, sales, operating, expected, nikkei, profit, company, smartphone, japanese, cut, guidance, shares, fall


Canon shares fall on report that company plans to cut earnings guidance

Shares of Canon fell 2.5% on Wednesday on a Nikkei report that said the company is expected to downgrade its earnings guidance for 2019.

Nikkei reported that Canon’s operating profit is likely to fall short of the current forecast by about $447 million as consumers opt for smartphone cameras over digital cameras.

The report found that Canon’s operating profit is anticipated to fall 20% to slightly above $2.4 billion, compared with the projected $2.9 billion. The Japanese company’s sales for 2019 are also not expected to reach the standing projection of $34.8 billion.

Canon did not immediately respond to a request for comment from CNBC.

Canon’s digital camera sales are shrinking in China in particular, Nikkei said, adding that a slowdown in chipmaking equipment orders is also expected to hurt earnings as demand for smartphone semiconductors declines.

The Japanese company will announce its first-quarter results on April 24.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: matt lavietes, brian ach, getty images
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Tennis number one Naomi Osaka joins Serena Williams at Nike

Tennis world number one Naomi Osaka has agreed a deal with sportswear giant Nike. The Japanese star, who had previously been tied to rival Adidas, will first wear Nike gear at the Stuttgart Grand Prix, which begins on April 22. “I’m proud to become a member of the Nike family and excited about getting involved in all of the opportunities Nike has to offer,” said Osaka in the statement on Nike’s website. When she overcame Serena Williams in the U.S. Open final at Flushing Meadow in September, Osa


Tennis world number one Naomi Osaka has agreed a deal with sportswear giant Nike. The Japanese star, who had previously been tied to rival Adidas, will first wear Nike gear at the Stuttgart Grand Prix, which begins on April 22. “I’m proud to become a member of the Nike family and excited about getting involved in all of the opportunities Nike has to offer,” said Osaka in the statement on Nike’s website. When she overcame Serena Williams in the U.S. Open final at Flushing Meadow in September, Osa
Tennis number one Naomi Osaka joins Serena Williams at Nike Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: adam reed, sean m haffey, getty images, tim clayton corbis via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, joins, williams, tennis, number, grand, win, osaka, open, writing, serena, slam, naomi, nike, titles


Tennis number one Naomi Osaka joins Serena Williams at Nike

Tennis world number one Naomi Osaka has agreed a deal with sportswear giant Nike.

Osaka has been on an incredible run of form in the past year, which has seen her win her first and second Grand Slam titles back-to-back at last year’s U.S. Open and more recently at the Australian Open in January.

The Japanese star, who had previously been tied to rival Adidas, will first wear Nike gear at the Stuttgart Grand Prix, which begins on April 22.

“I’m proud to become a member of the Nike family and excited about getting involved in all of the opportunities Nike has to offer,” said Osaka in the statement on Nike’s website.

“Nike has a legendary track record of writing history and I look forward to being a part of those moments for many years to come.” the 21-year-old went on to say.

When she overcame Serena Williams in the U.S. Open final at Flushing Meadow in September, Osaka became the first Japanese player to win one of the four major tennis titles. She then backed that victory up by winning the first Grand Slam of 2019 as well, defeating Petra Kvitova in Melbourne.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: adam reed, sean m haffey, getty images, tim clayton corbis via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, joins, williams, tennis, number, grand, win, osaka, open, writing, serena, slam, naomi, nike, titles


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This Japanese longevity expert lived to 105 — here’s what he ate every day

Longevity expert Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara lived to be 105 years old. Hinohara, former chairman emeritus of Tokyo’s St. Luke’s International University and former honorary president of St. Luke’s International Hospital, was perhaps best known for his book, “Living Long, Living Good.” There was at least one routine he had, however — Hinohara generally ate the same thing every day. “Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy,” he told The Japan Times. “All people who live long — reg


Longevity expert Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara lived to be 105 years old. Hinohara, former chairman emeritus of Tokyo’s St. Luke’s International University and former honorary president of St. Luke’s International Hospital, was perhaps best known for his book, “Living Long, Living Good.” There was at least one routine he had, however — Hinohara generally ate the same thing every day. “Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy,” he told The Japan Times. “All people who live long — reg
This Japanese longevity expert lived to 105 — here’s what he ate every day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: catherine clifford, kyodo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, living, st, week, longevity, told, work, heres, 105, day, lived, ate, japan, hinohara, expert, long, thing


This Japanese longevity expert lived to 105 — here's what he ate every day

Longevity expert Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara lived to be 105 years old.

Hinohara, former chairman emeritus of Tokyo’s St. Luke’s International University and former honorary president of St. Luke’s International Hospital, was perhaps best known for his book, “Living Long, Living Good.”

But Hinohara’s own longevity wasn’t due to strict or rigid regimens.

“It’s best not to tire the body with too many rules such as lunchtime and bedtime,” Hinohara said in a 2009 interview with The Japan Times.

There was at least one routine he had, however — Hinohara generally ate the same thing every day.

For breakfast he drank coffee, a glass of milk and some orange juice with a tablespoon of olive oil in it. “Olive oil is great for the arteries and keeps my skin healthy,” he told The Japan Times.

His lunch was perhaps surprising, as it often consisted of milk and a few cookies or “nothing when I am too busy to eat.”

Dinner was “veggies, a bit of fish and rice, and twice a week 100 grams of lean meat,” Hinohara said.

The doctor believed keeping your weight in check is critical to living a long life.

“All people who live long — regardless of nationality, race or gender — share one thing in common: None are overweight,” Hinohara said.

Though Hinohara didn’t seem to eat much, he said he never got hungry because he was focused on his work, which also may have been a secret to his longevity.

“There is no need to ever retire, but if one must, it should be a lot later than 65,” Hinohara said.

First work for your family and to achieve your goals, “until one is 60 years old,” he said. Then “in our later years, we should strive to contribute to society.”

From the age of 65, Hinohara worked 18-hour days, seven days a week as a volunteer and “love[d] every minute of it,” he told The Japan Times in 2009. In fact, he volunteered until the last few months before his death on July 18, 2017, according to The New York Times.

See also:

Japanese doctor and longevity expert who lived until 105: Don’t retire

Iris Apfel: 10 life lessons from a 96-year-old who is probably cooler than you

95-year-old fashion icon Iris Apfel says hard work is her fountain of youth


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: catherine clifford, kyodo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japanese, living, st, week, longevity, told, work, heres, 105, day, lived, ate, japan, hinohara, expert, long, thing


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Meet the woman hoping to succeed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

Tomomi Inada wants to take on Japan’s political “boys club.” The former defense minister told CNBC she intends to run for the top post of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in 2021 in a bid to succeed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe who currently holds that position. Under current rules, Abe cannot seek a fourth consecutive term as president of the party, who has traditionally served as prime minister when the LDP controls parliament. The party has governed Japan for most of its post-World War II his


Tomomi Inada wants to take on Japan’s political “boys club.” The former defense minister told CNBC she intends to run for the top post of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in 2021 in a bid to succeed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe who currently holds that position. Under current rules, Abe cannot seek a fourth consecutive term as president of the party, who has traditionally served as prime minister when the LDP controls parliament. The party has governed Japan for most of its post-World War II his
Meet the woman hoping to succeed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: kelly olsen, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, -tomomi inada, member of parliament
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, told, wants, prime, minister, hoping, shinzo, party, woman, japans, run, succeed, president, abe, japanese


Meet the woman hoping to succeed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

Tomomi Inada wants to take on Japan’s political “boys club.”

The former defense minister told CNBC she intends to run for the top post of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in 2021 in a bid to succeed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe who currently holds that position. If successful, she could become Japan’s first female leader.

Under current rules, Abe cannot seek a fourth consecutive term as president of the party, who has traditionally served as prime minister when the LDP controls parliament. The party has governed Japan for most of its post-World War II history.

Inada — who is a staunch nationalist and close Abe confidante — wants to build on his achievements and pursue further reform, such as reining in the country’s massive debt, she told CNBC at the Credit Suisse Asian Investment Conference in Hong Kong last week.

“I’m aiming for it in two years,” the lawmaker said of her plan to run for party president at the next vote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-02  Authors: kelly olsen, akio kon, bloomberg, getty images, -tomomi inada, member of parliament
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meet, told, wants, prime, minister, hoping, shinzo, party, woman, japans, run, succeed, president, abe, japanese


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China’s yuan ‘may already be overvalued’ and is set to move lower, Nomura says

The Chinese yuan is probably already overvalued against the U.S. dollar and any efforts by President Donald Trump’s team to lock in that level as part of trade negotiations will likely backfire, according to Japanese financial firm Nomura. The yuan has long been a sticking point for the U.S., which, despite years of long-term appreciation in the currency, accuses Beijing of keeping it artificially undervalued to boost exports. “We believe (the) yuan may already be overvalued against (the dollar)


The Chinese yuan is probably already overvalued against the U.S. dollar and any efforts by President Donald Trump’s team to lock in that level as part of trade negotiations will likely backfire, according to Japanese financial firm Nomura. The yuan has long been a sticking point for the U.S., which, despite years of long-term appreciation in the currency, accuses Beijing of keeping it artificially undervalued to boost exports. “We believe (the) yuan may already be overvalued against (the dollar)
China’s yuan ‘may already be overvalued’ and is set to move lower, Nomura says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: kelly olsen, honglouwawa, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, nomura, dollar, trade, yuan, lower, set, chinas, growth, japanese, firm, overvalued, efforts


China's yuan 'may already be overvalued' and is set to move lower, Nomura says

The Chinese yuan is probably already overvalued against the U.S. dollar and any efforts by President Donald Trump’s team to lock in that level as part of trade negotiations will likely backfire, according to Japanese financial firm Nomura.

The yuan has long been a sticking point for the U.S., which, despite years of long-term appreciation in the currency, accuses Beijing of keeping it artificially undervalued to boost exports. Washington has reportedly pressed Chinese officials to maintain currency stability amid trade talks.

Despite that request, Nomura said the American side appears to have it all wrong.

“We believe (the) yuan may already be overvalued against (the dollar), and China’s latest round of monetary and credit easing may push (the yuan) further into overvalued territory,” Nomura said in a Monday note, referring to the country’s efforts to put a floor under slowing growth in the world’s second-largest economy.

In fact, attempts to stabilize the rate “could result in an increasingly overvalued yuan, slower export growth, elevated import growth and worsening current account deficits in China,” the Japanese firm said.

Nomura said it ultimately expects the yuan to move lower against the dollar “in the medium to long term,” though it did not suggest any levels or ranges.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: kelly olsen, honglouwawa, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, nomura, dollar, trade, yuan, lower, set, chinas, growth, japanese, firm, overvalued, efforts


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