At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed. Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A


In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape.
I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that.
I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said.
“And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.
Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected A
At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


At age 30, Jeff Bezos thought this would be his one big regret in life

In 1994, Jeff Bezos worked at hedge fund D. E. Shaw, tasked with researching potential business opportunities involving the then brand-new internet landscape. That’s when Bezos found a staggering statistic that sparked an idea to start his own business.

“I found this fact on a website that the web was growing at 2,300 percent per year,” Bezos told CNBC in a 2001 interview. “The idea that sort of entranced me was this idea of building a bookstore online.”

Of course, Amazon grew from an online bookseller to an e-commerce behemoth with a market cap of more than $920 billion.

But at age 30, when Bezos was deciding what to do about his idea — stick with his stable New York City job or give it up to start his own business — he tried to imagine what he would regret more, leaving Wall Street, or staying.

“I pictured myself 80 years old, thinking back on my life in a quiet moment of reflection,” he during a fireside chat in India on Wednesday. “Would I regret leaving this company in the middle of the year? And walking away from my annual bonus?

“All of those things that in the moment can be very confusing. I thought, ‘You know, when I’m 80, I’m not going to think about that. I’m not even going to remember it.'”

Bezos said he was “trying to figure out how to make this decision, because in the moment, personal life decisions, those choices, can be very challenging,” he said Wednesday.

“I wanted not to have regrets. I knew for a fact, I have this idea, and if I don’t try, I’m going to regret having never tried,” he said. “And I know also, if I try and fail, I’ll never regret having tried and failed.

“As soon as I thought about it that way, I knew I had to try.”

At the time it was a risky move, as the internet was not well known, despite its rapid rate of growth.

“Anything growing that fast, even if its baseline usage was tiny, it’s going to be big. I looked at that, and I was like ‘I should come up with a business idea on the internet and let the internet grow around this,'” he said during a September 2018 episode of “The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations.”

He added, “I picked books because books is super unusual in one respect, which is that there are more book items in the book category than there are items in any other category.”

Bezos took the leap of faith, quit his job and moved to the suburbs of Seattle, where he started working on Amazon in his garage.

His decision paid off – Amazon grew quickly, going public in 1997 with $16 million in revenue and 180,000 customers spanning more than 100 countries, according to its SEC filing.

Although he had a hunch regarding the growth of the internet, Bezos never expected Amazon to grow to the extent it has today.

“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years is way beyond my expectations. I was delivering the packages myself, we were selling books. I was hoping to build a company, but not the company you see today,” he said Wednesday.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, life, moment, thought, going, big, jeff, regret, bezos, idea, company, tried, internet, age


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn’t work out

Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York. He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon. Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion. “What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a firesid


Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York.
He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon.
Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion.
“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a firesid
Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn’t work out Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idea, bezos, amazon, work, business, company, went, way, software, jeff, didnt, according, job


Jeff Bezos says this is what he would have done if Amazon didn't work out

Twenty-six years ago, Jeff Bezos had an idea that inspired him to quit his stable job at a hedge fund in New York. He moved to the suburbs of Seattle to work out of his garage and build a business that would ultimately become Amazon.

Bezos launched the business as an online book seller in 1995, and today the e-commerce behemoth has a market capitalization of over $926 billion.

“What’s actually happened over the last 25 years [at Amazon] is way beyond my expectations,” Bezos said during a fireside chat in India on Wednesday. “I was hoping to build a company, but not a company like what you see today.”

So Bezos’ gamble paid off in a huge way, but if it hadn’t worked out? What would he have done?

“I would be an extremely happy software programmer somewhere,” Bezos said Wednesday.

(He would, however, be a lot less rich. Today, the average salary for a software programmer is around $92,000 per year, according to Glassdoor. Bezos’ current net worth is $116 billion, according to Forbes.)

“We all have passions, and you don’t get to choose them,” Bezos said at the 2016 Pathfinder Awards. His has always been computers, according to Wired.

In fact, a young Bezos set out pursue a career involving computers and automation. He graduated from Princeton University in 1986 with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science.

After graduation Bezos turned down job offers from a few technology companies, including Intel, Bell Labs and Anderson Consulting, and went to work “debugging code” at a telecommunications start-up called Fitel, according to Wired. After two years, Bezos left Fitel to be a software developer at Bankers Trust (which since has been acquired by Deutsche Bank).

From there, Bezos planned to leave the bank and commit to finding a job in tech, as he originally wanted, rather than continuing in financial services. But instead in 1990 he went to work for hedge fund D. E. Shaw after clicking with founder David Shaw, who was also a computer scientist.

There, Bezos was put in charge of researching potential business opportunities in what was a relatively new landscape: the internet. During a brainstorming session, Bezos came up with the idea to sell books on the internet.

Shaw actually discouraged him from leaving the company to pursue his own business, Bezos recalled on Wednesday.

“When I told my boss about this, he listened to me patiently and said, ‘it’s a great idea, but for somebody who did not have a job already,'” Bezos said.

But “I knew if I tried and failed, I would never regret it,” said Bezos.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idea, bezos, amazon, work, business, company, went, way, software, jeff, didnt, according, job


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos: Anyone who denies reality of climate change is ‘not being reasonable’

Denying climate change is dangerous and unreasonable in the year 2020, according to billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. “You can go back 10 years or 20 years and there were people who just did not acknowledge that climate change is real,” he said. Amazon’s climate pledge was announced after more than 4,500 employees urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change back in April. He added that he was using his own connections to work with CEOs around the world on climate change po


Denying climate change is dangerous and unreasonable in the year 2020, according to billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos.
“You can go back 10 years or 20 years and there were people who just did not acknowledge that climate change is real,” he said.
Amazon’s climate pledge was announced after more than 4,500 employees urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change back in April.
He added that he was using his own connections to work with CEOs around the world on climate change po
Jeff Bezos: Anyone who denies reality of climate change is ‘not being reasonable’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, world, climate, pledge, bezos, problem, denies, global, reality, jeff, reasonable, employees, big


Jeff Bezos: Anyone who denies reality of climate change is 'not being reasonable'

Denying climate change is dangerous and unreasonable in the year 2020, according to billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos.

Speaking at Amazon’s Smbhav summit for small and medium-sized enterprises in New Delhi, India, Bezos described climate change as a big problem and warned that Earth is “a finite planet.”

“You can go back 10 years or 20 years and there were people who just did not acknowledge that climate change is real,” he said. “Anybody today who is not acknowledging that climate change is real — that we humans are affecting this planet in a very significant and dangerous way — those people are not being reasonable.”

“This is a big problem and it’s going to take collective action all over the world if we are going to make progress on that problem,” he added.

Amazon unveiled its “climate pledge” last year, which aims to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement 10 years early, and commits the retailer to operate on 100% renewable electricity by 2030. Other climate initiatives the tech giant has committed to include being plastic-free in India by June and acquiring 100,000 electric delivery vehicles.

Under the Paris Agreement — a landmark deal adopted in 2015 — nations agreed to a framework to prevent global temperatures from rising by any more than 2 degrees Celsius, although the treaty aims to prevent global temperature rises exceeding 1.5 degrees Celsius. Targets and timeframes differ by country, and President Donald Trump has since announced his nation’s withdrawal from the agreement.

Amazon’s climate pledge was announced after more than 4,500 employees urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change back in April.

“When a large company like Amazon with 700,000 employees and a big global footprint does something like the climate pledge, it really can be a needle mover,” Bezos said on Wednesday. “Because it’s not just Amazon, it’s our supply chain. For us to meet that pledge, they have to meet that pledge.”

He added that he was using his own connections to work with CEOs around the world on climate change policies.

“We have sent robotic probes to every planet in the solar system — this is the good one,” he said. “There are no other good planets in this solar system. We have to take care of this one.”

Bezos, who also owns space exploration firm Blue Origin, predicted that in hundreds of years, humanity would move all polluting industries into space.

Despite Bezos’ public commitment to reducing the impact of climate change through his companies, reports emerged earlier this month claiming Amazon had threatened to fire employees who spoke out against the retailer’s environmental policies.

There could also be a business incentive for corporations to implement climate policies, according to BlackRock CEO Larry Fink.

In an annual letter to CEOs published Tuesday, Fink said climate change would soon trigger a significant reallocation of capital.

“Climate change has become a defining factor in companies’ long-term prospects,” he said. “But awareness is rapidly changing, and I believe we are on the edge of a fundamental reshaping of finance.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, world, climate, pledge, bezos, problem, denies, global, reality, jeff, reasonable, employees, big


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon pledges $1 billion to small businesses in India as Jeff Bezos is met with protests

CEO of Amazon Jeff Bezos (R) greets along with Amit Agarwal, senior vice president and country manager for Amazon India, during the Amazon’s annual Smbhav event in New Delhi on January 15, 2020. Bezos appeared on stage Wednesday at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi for a fireside chat alongside Amit Agarwal, who heads Amazon’s India operations. The company said there are more than 550,000 sellers on the Amazon India marketplace and more than 60,000 Indian manufacturers exporting their goods wor


CEO of Amazon Jeff Bezos (R) greets along with Amit Agarwal, senior vice president and country manager for Amazon India, during the Amazon’s annual Smbhav event in New Delhi on January 15, 2020.
Bezos appeared on stage Wednesday at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi for a fireside chat alongside Amit Agarwal, who heads Amazon’s India operations.
The company said there are more than 550,000 sellers on the Amazon India marketplace and more than 60,000 Indian manufacturers exporting their goods wor
Amazon pledges $1 billion to small businesses in India as Jeff Bezos is met with protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, traders, small, met, india, bezos, jeff, amazons, businesses, stage, billion, company, amazon, protests, pledges, smbhav


Amazon pledges $1 billion to small businesses in India as Jeff Bezos is met with protests

CEO of Amazon Jeff Bezos (R) greets along with Amit Agarwal, senior vice president and country manager for Amazon India, during the Amazon’s annual Smbhav event in New Delhi on January 15, 2020. – Bezos, whose worth has been estimated at more than $110 billion, is officially in India for a meeting of business leaders in New Delhi. (Photo by Sajjad HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo by SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP via Getty Images)

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced a $1 billion investment in India, as his company faces a fresh antitrust probe and waves of protests in the country.

Bezos appeared on stage Wednesday at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi for a fireside chat alongside Amit Agarwal, who heads Amazon’s India operations. He said the $1 billion investment will be used to digitize small and medium-sized businesses in the country and that Amazon hopes to export $10 billion worth of India-made goods around the world by 2025.

“I predict that the 21st century is going to be the Indian century,” Bezos said on stage, while wearing traditional Indian attire. “The dynamism, the energy…this country has something special. The most important alliance is going to be the alliance between India and the United States, the world’s oldest democracy and the world’s largest democracy.”

Bezos touched on other topics during the fireside chat, including climate change and the future of space exploration.

Smbhav is a two-day event held by Amazon that’s aimed at helping the company connect with millions of small and medium-sized businesses in the country. Amazon has already poured more than $5 billion in its India business. It went on a hiring spree in the country last year and announced a partnership with India’s Future Retail earlier this month.

The announcement builds on Amazon’s efforts to expand the marketplace in India. The company said there are more than 550,000 sellers on the Amazon India marketplace and more than 60,000 Indian manufacturers exporting their goods worldwide on Amazon.

Amazon’s investments in India haven’t always been met with enthusiasm. While Bezos appeared on stage, a group of small business owners criticized his trip, hosting protests across 300 cities in India. The Confederation of All India Traders, a group that represents 70 million traders and 40,000 trade associations, called Amazon “the worst enemy” of traders in the country and held signs saying “Jeff Bezos Go Back.”

The company also faces a fresh antitrust probe by India’s antitrust watchdog. The Competition Commission of India on Monday launched a probe into whether Amazon and Walmart’s Flipkart have violated competition laws by promoting “preferred sellers” on their platforms and offering deep discounts. Flipkart and Amazon both say they’re fully compliant with the country’s competition laws.

In addition to his appearance at Smbhav, Bezos has also sought a meeting with India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and celebrities from the Bollywood movie industry, according to Bloomberg. On Tuesday, Bezos also paid his respects to a memorial of Mahatma Gandhi in New Delhi.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, traders, small, met, india, bezos, jeff, amazons, businesses, stage, billion, company, amazon, protests, pledges, smbhav


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit1 Hour AgoAmazon CEO Jeff Bezos made the announcement at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi. Smbhav is a two-day event that Amazon holds to connect with small and medium-sized businesses. At the same time as the event, small business owners across 300 cities in India protested his trip to the country.


Amazon’s Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit1 Hour AgoAmazon CEO Jeff Bezos made the announcement at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi.
Smbhav is a two-day event that Amazon holds to connect with small and medium-sized businesses.
At the same time as the event, small business owners across 300 cities in India protested his trip to the country.
Amazon’s Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: sajjad hussain, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, smbhav, protest, small, investment, amazons, india, businesses, owners, visit, bezos, jeff, business, event


Amazon's Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos announces $1 billion investment into India businesses as business owners protest his visit

1 Hour Ago

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos made the announcement at Amazon’s Smbhav event in New Delhi. Smbhav is a two-day event that Amazon holds to connect with small and medium-sized businesses. At the same time as the event, small business owners across 300 cities in India protested his trip to the country.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: sajjad hussain, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billion, smbhav, protest, small, investment, amazons, india, businesses, owners, visit, bezos, jeff, business, event


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos heads to India as Amazon faces regulatory probes and waves of protests

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will face a wave of protests from small business owners when he travels to India this week. The CAIT claims Amazon is hurting small businesses by using heavy discounts to lure shoppers online and away from brick-and-mortar stores. “These preferred sellers are also alleged to be affiliated with or controlled by Flipkart/Amazon either directly or indirectly.” Amazon and Flipkart were forced to alter their operations in the country after India enacted new e-commerce rules in D


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will face a wave of protests from small business owners when he travels to India this week.
The CAIT claims Amazon is hurting small businesses by using heavy discounts to lure shoppers online and away from brick-and-mortar stores.
“These preferred sellers are also alleged to be affiliated with or controlled by Flipkart/Amazon either directly or indirectly.”
Amazon and Flipkart were forced to alter their operations in the country after India enacted new e-commerce rules in D
Jeff Bezos heads to India as Amazon faces regulatory probes and waves of protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waves, heads, probes, bezos, businesses, ecommerce, cait, faces, flipkart, small, jeff, sellers, protests, preferred, amazon, india, regulatory


Jeff Bezos heads to India as Amazon faces regulatory probes and waves of protests

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will face a wave of protests from small business owners when he travels to India this week.

Bezos will appear on stage Wednesday at Amazon’s Smbhav event for a fireside chat alongside Amit Agarwal, who heads Amazon’s India operations, according to Bloomberg. Smbhav is an annual event held by Amazon in New Delhi that’s aimed at helping the company connect with millions of small and medium-sized businesses in the country.

Bezos has also sought a meeting with India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and celebrities from the Bollywood movie industry, Bloomberg reported. An Amazon spokesperson declined to comment on the details of Bezos’ visit.

Not everyone is expected to welcome Bezos when he touches down in India. The Confederation of All India Traders (CAIT), a group that represents 70 million traders and 40,000 trade associations, is planning a “National Protest Day” on Wednesday. The group plans to host protests across 300 cities during Bezos’ visit.

The CAIT claims Amazon is hurting small businesses by using heavy discounts to lure shoppers online and away from brick-and-mortar stores.

“If they could not empower existing retailers on their portal, why they are looking for more retailers?” Praveen Khandewal, CAIT secretary general, and B.C. Bhartia Nagpur, CAIT national president, said in a statement. “Amazon is trying to create false propaganda that it is the true friend of traders, though it is the worst enemy.”

It comes as Amazon faces additional roadblocks that threaten to upend its goal of expanding in India. The Competition Commission of India (CCI) on Monday launched a probe into whether Amazon and Walmart’s Flipkart have violated competition laws by promoting “preferred sellers” on their platforms and offering deep discounts.

“Allegedly, there is an existence of various vertical arrangements between Flipkart with their preferred sellers on the platforms; and Amazon with their preferred sellers on the platforms, respectively which leads to a foreclosure of other nonpreferred sellers from the online marketplace,” the order states. “These preferred sellers are also alleged to be affiliated with or controlled by Flipkart/Amazon either directly or indirectly.”

A spokesperson from Amazon told CNBC in a statement: “We welcome the opportunity to address allegations made about Amazon; we are confident in our compliance, and will cooperate fully with CCI.”

A representative from Flipkart said the company is reviewing the CCI notice, but that it’s “fully compliant” with India’s competition laws.

“We take pride in democratizing e-commerce in India and giving market access to [hundreds of thousands] of [micro businesses], sellers, artisans and small businesses, making quality and affordable goods available to consumers through our transparent and efficient marketplace while creating lakhs of jobs,” the spokesperson said.

Amazon and Flipkart were forced to alter their operations in the country after India enacted new e-commerce rules in December 2018. The rules prevent foreign-owned e-commerce companies like Amazon from selling products through affiliated companies they own a significant stake in, or from offering special discounts and exclusive deals in the country. Amazon pulled an estimated 400,000 items from its shelves as a result of the new rules, while Flipkart removed thousands of products from its platform, according to The New York Times.

Amazon and Flipkart have become fierce rivals in India, which is poised to become one of the fastest growing e-commerce markets in the world. Amazon has poured more than $5 billion into its India business, went on a hiring spree in the country last year and announced a partnership with India’s Future Retail earlier this month. Walmart in 2018 paid $16 billion to acquire Flipkart.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waves, heads, probes, bezos, businesses, ecommerce, cait, faces, flipkart, small, jeff, sellers, protests, preferred, amazon, india, regulatory


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos says Amazon is donating $690,000 to Australian bush fire efforts

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, pictured on September 13, 2018. Bloomberg | Getty ImagesBillionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has announced his company will donate $690,000 donation to bush fire relief efforts in Australia. In an Instagram post on Sunday, Bezos pledged 1 million Australian dollars ($690,000) on behalf of the tech giant — an amount that has faced criticism by some on social media. “Amazon is donating 1 million AU dollars in needed provisions and services.” The figure was d


Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, pictured on September 13, 2018.
Bloomberg | Getty ImagesBillionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has announced his company will donate $690,000 donation to bush fire relief efforts in Australia.
In an Instagram post on Sunday, Bezos pledged 1 million Australian dollars ($690,000) on behalf of the tech giant — an amount that has faced criticism by some on social media.
“Amazon is donating 1 million AU dollars in needed provisions and services.”
The figure was d
Jeff Bezos says Amazon is donating $690,000 to Australian bush fire efforts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bush, efforts, worth, donating, dollars, australian, 690000, personal, million, founder, amazon, jeff, net, bezos


Jeff Bezos says Amazon is donating $690,000 to Australian bush fire efforts

Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, pictured on September 13, 2018. Bloomberg | Getty Images

Billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has announced his company will donate $690,000 donation to bush fire relief efforts in Australia. In an Instagram post on Sunday, Bezos pledged 1 million Australian dollars ($690,000) on behalf of the tech giant — an amount that has faced criticism by some on social media. “Our hearts go out to all Australians as they cope with these devastating bushfires,” Bezos said. “Amazon is donating 1 million AU dollars in needed provisions and services.”

The figure was derided by some online, with people comparing the sum with Bezos’ personal net worth. Bezos has a net worth of $116.7 billion, according to Forbes, and according to a 2019 Business Insider analysis was earning almost $9 million an hour in 2018. Amazon has a market capitalization of more than $930 billion. The conglomerate’s move to help tackle the bush fires was also compared to other high-profile contributions, with many pointing out that a string of celebrities with far less personal wealth than Bezos had donated more out of their own pockets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bush, efforts, worth, donating, dollars, australian, 690000, personal, million, founder, amazon, jeff, net, bezos


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India trade group plans protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos across 300 cities

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. Thousands of small-scale traders in India are planning to organize protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, who will visit the country next week for a company event and potential meetings with government officials. Details of Bezos’ visit, including his arrival date and the duration of his stay are not known. The Confederation of All India Tra


Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019.
Thousands of small-scale traders in India are planning to organize protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, who will visit the country next week for a company event and potential meetings with government officials.
Details of Bezos’ visit, including his arrival date and the duration of his stay are not known.
The Confederation of All India Tra
India trade group plans protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos across 300 cities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, protests, visit, plans, delhi, trade, cities, india, traders, retailers, group, online, amazon, jeff, bezos


India trade group plans protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos across 300 cities

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019.

Thousands of small-scale traders in India are planning to organize protests against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, who will visit the country next week for a company event and potential meetings with government officials.

Bezos will participate in an Amazon event in capital New Delhi aimed at connecting with small and medium-sized enterprises, three sources told Reuters.

He has also sought meetings with the prime minister and other government officials, with conversations expected to center around e-commerce, one of the sources familiar with the matter said.

Details of Bezos’ visit, including his arrival date and the duration of his stay are not known.

Amazon did not respond to a request to confirm the visit. The prime minister’s office also did not respond to requests for comment.

The Confederation of All India Traders (CAIT), a group representing roughly 70 million brick-and-mortar retailers, said it will protest across 300 cities during Bezos’ stay in the country.

CAIT has since 2015 waged a battle against online retailers Amazon and Walmart-controlled Flipkart, accusing them of deep discounts and flouting India’s foreign investment rules.

Both e-tailers have denied the allegations.

Amazon has previously said its platform provides business opportunities to thousands of small sellers, artisans, weavers and women entrepreneurs. But CAIT is not convinced.

“We plan to organize peaceful rallies against Jeff Bezos in all major cities such as Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata as well as smaller towns and cities,” Praveen Khandelwal, the group’s secretary general told Reuters.

“We expect to mobilize at least 100,000 traders in the protests.”

With its 1.3 billion population and the world’s second-biggest smartphone user base that relies on cheap data for social media and online shopping, India is a key market for U.S. retailers Amazon and Walmart to grow their business.

Discounts on their platforms have helped lure Indians to shop online for everything from groceries to large electronic devices, a phenomenon which traders say has unfairly hurt their business.

New Delhi introduced rules last year to protect nearly 130 million people dependent on small-scale retail — a key voter base — by deterring large online discounts.

The rules forced e-commerce firms to change their business structures, drawing criticism from the United States and straining the two countries’ trade ties.

The federal commerce ministry is reviewing complaints and evidence filed by CAIT against Flipkart and Amazon, Reuters reported previously.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, founder, protests, visit, plans, delhi, trade, cities, india, traders, retailers, group, online, amazon, jeff, bezos


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This employee’s suggestion to Jeff Bezos doubled Amazon’s productivity in its first month

There, he rented a house and started Amazon in his garage. During the first month of launching Amazon, Bezos and his employees would pack orders on their hands and knees on cement floors, when one of his 10 employees had an idea that ultimately “doubled” their productivity. And he looked at me like I was the dumbest guy he had ever seen in his life, and he said ‘Jeff, we should get packing tables.'” And the next day, as a result, Bezos said he bought packing tables and it “doubled [their] produc


There, he rented a house and started Amazon in his garage.
During the first month of launching Amazon, Bezos and his employees would pack orders on their hands and knees on cement floors, when one of his 10 employees had an idea that ultimately “doubled” their productivity.
And he looked at me like I was the dumbest guy he had ever seen in his life, and he said ‘Jeff, we should get packing tables.'”
And the next day, as a result, Bezos said he bought packing tables and it “doubled [their] produc
This employee’s suggestion to Jeff Bezos doubled Amazon’s productivity in its first month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productivity, month, packing, tables, shipping, bezos, suggestion, amazon, went, started, doubled, jeff, employees, idea, company, amazons


This employee's suggestion to Jeff Bezos doubled Amazon's productivity in its first month

In 1994, Jeff Bezos quit his job at a hedge fund in New York and moved to the Seattle suburbs. There, he rented a house and started Amazon in his garage.

A year later, Amazon’s site launched, and within one month, the company had sold books to people in all 50 U.S. states.

“In those days [in 1995], when I started the company back in that time, we were still a pretty small company by most standards, but we were growing fast, and it was very exciting,” Bezos said at the Bush Center’s Forum on Leadership in April 2018.

Despite that growth, there was room for improvement, Bezos said.

“We were so inefficient with our operations and logistics in those early days when there were just 10 of us.”

One of those inefficiencies was their method of packing orders.

During the first month of launching Amazon, Bezos and his employees would pack orders on their hands and knees on cement floors, when one of his 10 employees had an idea that ultimately “doubled” their productivity.

“I didn’t have packing tables,” he said at the 2018 Forum. “I said to one of the software engineers who was packing alongside me, ‘You know what we should do? We should get knee pads.’ And he looked at me like I was the dumbest guy he had ever seen in his life, and he said ‘Jeff, we should get packing tables.'”

Bezos, during a September 2018 episode of “The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations,” said getting packing tables was “the most brilliant idea” he had ever heard.

And the next day, as a result, Bezos said he bought packing tables and it “doubled [their] productivity.”

In 1997, Amazon went public, and the company’s employee base grew to 614, according to the company’s letter to shareholders. Today, Amazon reports having 750,000 full time employees (as of September 2019) and has a market capitalization of more than $946 billion.

Throughout Amazon’s history, there have been several notable times Bezos listened to his employees, even when their ideas seemed to be a bit “scary.”

Before the creation of Amazon Prime, Bezos and his employees were attempting to brainstorm a variation of a loyalty program, when a “kind of a junior software engineer came up with this idea, not as a loyalty program, but this idea that we could offer people kind of an all-you-can-eat buffet of fast, free shipping,” he recalled in 2018.

“The finance team went and modeled that idea, and the results were horrifying that we would offer unlimited shipping,” he said. “Shipping is expensive,” even though customers love it, he said.

After launching the endless free shipping, expenses were high, but it all worked out well in the end.

“All kinds of customers were coming, and they appreciated that service,” Bezos said, saying the junior engineer’s idea was “what led to Prime.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productivity, month, packing, tables, shipping, bezos, suggestion, amazon, went, started, doubled, jeff, employees, idea, company, amazons


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos and other highly successful people who sleep 7 to 8 hours a night

But when it comes to productivity, success and health, getting a solid night’s sleep is just as important. Tobias Lutke, founder and CEO of the e-commerce company Shopify, said in a tweet Thursday that he has to sleep a full night in order to be successful at work. “I need 8ish hours of sleep a night,” Lutke wrote. Indeed, it’s recommended that adults get seven or more hours of sleep a night, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Lutke’s tweet was in response to a debate on Twitte


But when it comes to productivity, success and health, getting a solid night’s sleep is just as important.
Tobias Lutke, founder and CEO of the e-commerce company Shopify, said in a tweet Thursday that he has to sleep a full night in order to be successful at work.
“I need 8ish hours of sleep a night,” Lutke wrote.
Indeed, it’s recommended that adults get seven or more hours of sleep a night, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Lutke’s tweet was in response to a debate on Twitte
Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos and other highly successful people who sleep 7 to 8 hours a night Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nights, bill, highly, ceo, company, founder, gates, jeff, sleep, night, successful, bezos, hours, work, lutke


Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos and other highly successful people who sleep 7 to 8 hours a night

Accomplished people from Apple CEO Tim Cook to singer Dolly Parton claim that waking up extremely early is the key to making the most out of a workday.

But when it comes to productivity, success and health, getting a solid night’s sleep is just as important.

Tobias Lutke, founder and CEO of the e-commerce company Shopify, said in a tweet Thursday that he has to sleep a full night in order to be successful at work.

“I need 8ish hours of sleep a night,” Lutke wrote. “Same with everybody else, whether we admit it or not.” Indeed, it’s recommended that adults get seven or more hours of sleep a night, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Lutke’s tweet was in response to a debate on Twitter about whether it’s necessary for employees to work nights and weekends.

Jason Fried, CEO and founder of Basecamp, said that requiring employees to work long hours is a sign that a company is “broken.” However, Ryan Selkis, CEO and co-founder of bitcoin company Messari, argued: “If you don’t work nights and weekends in your 20s, you’re not going to have a successful career. Sorry.”

However, plenty of people who have had successful careers also swear by sleep.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nights, bill, highly, ceo, company, founder, gates, jeff, sleep, night, successful, bezos, hours, work, lutke


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post