BP’s CEO chides AOC and Bernie Sanders for their ‘completely unrealistic’ Green New Deal ideas

Outgoing BP chief Bob Dudley on Wednesday criticized sweeping climate proposals from Sen. Bernie Sanders, a top-tier 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a champion of the far-left. “They have a completely unrealistic idea of the complexity of the global energy system,” Dudley told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Nearly a year ago, Ocasio-Cortez, with Sen. Ed Markey, released the Green New Deal, an ambitious plan to r


Outgoing BP chief Bob Dudley on Wednesday criticized sweeping climate proposals from Sen. Bernie Sanders, a top-tier 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a champion of the far-left.
“They have a completely unrealistic idea of the complexity of the global energy system,” Dudley told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
Nearly a year ago, Ocasio-Cortez, with Sen. Ed Markey, released the Green New Deal, an ambitious plan to r
BP’s CEO chides AOC and Bernie Sanders for their ‘completely unrealistic’ Green New Deal ideas Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, cnbcs, deal, ocasiocortez, bernie, dudley, sanders, reduce, emissions, green, gas, unrealistic, chides, bps, energy, fink, completely, ideas, ceo


BP's CEO chides AOC and Bernie Sanders for their 'completely unrealistic' Green New Deal ideas

Outgoing BP chief Bob Dudley on Wednesday criticized sweeping climate proposals from Sen. Bernie Sanders, a top-tier 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a champion of the far-left.

“They have a completely unrealistic idea of the complexity of the global energy system,” Dudley told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “It’s very complex.”

Nearly a year ago, Ocasio-Cortez, with Sen. Ed Markey, released the Green New Deal, an ambitious plan to remake the U.S. economy and drastically reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Sanders, who endorsed the proposal, later released his own detailed plan, building on the Green New Deal and calling for the U.S. to move to renewable energy across the economy by 2050.

The offices of Ocasio-Cortez and Sanders did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.

Dudley on Wednesday did not entirely shoot down the need for energy transition. He stressed that “we must reduce carbon emissions” and that “renewables need to grow.”

But he said there’s other factors to be considered. “The world needs all forms of energy,” he explained. “Less emissions, but all forms of energy.”

Industry executives have been focused on sustainability issues this week in Davos and around the global. The theme at this year’s annual WEF in the Swiss Alps is “stakeholders for a cohesive and sustainable world.”

Days before the forum opened, BlackRock chief Larry Fink called on industry leaders to prepare for a longterm climate crisis that will reshape finance.

Fink, whose BlackRock surpassed $7 trillion in assets under management, used his annual letter to the world’s biggest companies to sound the alarm. “Climate change has become a defining factor in companies’ long-term prospects. … But awareness is rapidly changing, and I believe we are on the edge of a fundamental reshaping of finance.”

BlackRock will put “sustainability at the center of our investment approach,” he wrote — from portfolio construction to launching new investment products that screen fossil fuels.

Dudley said he spoke with Fink on Tuesday. Fink explained, according to Dudley, the letter was not a call to “get out of hydrocarbons.” Dudley said Fink “made that clear.”

In November, Dudley told CNBC there was a lack of realism from environmentalists and lawmakers who want the energy industry to immediately stop carbon-emitting activity.

“There’s just a lot of people, very well-meaning people, who want to believe that there is a simple solution,” Dudley said at the Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition & Conference.

He said that natural gas, which emits roughly half of the carbon as coal to produce the same level of energy, needed to be a big part of the energy transition story. He said fast-developing technology to monitor gas leakage, such as satellite imagery and drone inspection, would soon help to reduce waste further.

Dudley will be stepping down on Feb. 4 as CEO and from the board. He’s the company’s longest-serving CEO, with nearly a decade at the helm. He will retire at the end of March.

— CNBC’s David Reid contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, cnbcs, deal, ocasiocortez, bernie, dudley, sanders, reduce, emissions, green, gas, unrealistic, chides, bps, energy, fink, completely, ideas, ceo


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Trump: It ‘wouldn’t be too frightening’ if Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg ran for president

President Donald Trump told CNBC on Wednesday he wouldn’t be against Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg running for the White House. That wouldn’t be too frightening, I don’t think,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen in an interview from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “But he does have that monster behind him,” Trump said, referring to Facebook, which is facing multiple antitrust probes from federal and state investigators. “I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do,”


President Donald Trump told CNBC on Wednesday he wouldn’t be against Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg running for the White House.
That wouldn’t be too frightening, I don’t think,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen in an interview from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
“But he does have that monster behind him,” Trump said, referring to Facebook, which is facing multiple antitrust probes from federal and state investigators.
“I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do,”
Trump: It ‘wouldn’t be too frightening’ if Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg ran for president Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ran, wouldnt, hes, ads, trump, presidential, facebooks, facebook, frightening, president, told, going, mark, zuckerberg


Trump: It 'wouldn't be too frightening' if Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg ran for president

President Donald Trump told CNBC on Wednesday he wouldn’t be against Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg running for the White House.

“I heard he was going to run for president. That wouldn’t be too frightening, I don’t think,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen in an interview from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“But he does have that monster behind him,” Trump said, referring to Facebook, which is facing multiple antitrust probes from federal and state investigators.

Speculation swirled in 2017 that Zuckerberg, co-founder of the social network, was interested in making a bid for office after he hired Democratic pollster Joel Benenson for his philanthropic project. Benenson advised former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in her 2016 presidential campaign. Additionally, Zuckerberg embarked on a listening tour across the U.S., and hired Charles Ommanney, a photographer for both the George W. Bush and Obama presidential campaigns.

Zuckerberg, however, has denied he wants to run for president.

Just months ahead of the 2020 presidential election, Facebook has gotten flak refusing to remove or fact-check ads from political candidates even when the ads contain false information. Facebook has argued that fact-checking political ads could interfere with free speech in politics, though other tech companies, such as Twitter and Spotify, have taken strict stances.

“I’d rather him just do whatever he’s going to do,” Trump told CNBC on Wednesday. “He’s done a hell of a job, and he’s going to do what he has to do.”

Facebook has been working to regain users’ trust after the 2018 Cambridge Analytica data misuse scandal, which happened on the heels of the disclosure that Russian operatives used Facebook to try to influence the 2016 presidential election. The company soon after began cracking down on “coordinated inauthentic behavior,” but some still fear the platform will be vulnerable to similar tactics in November.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ran, wouldnt, hes, ads, trump, presidential, facebooks, facebook, frightening, president, told, going, mark, zuckerberg


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Blackstone’s Steve Schwarzman sees ‘much fewer things’ to buy because assets are so expensive

Steve Schwarzman, billionaire co-founder of private equity powerhouse Blackstone, told CNBC on Tuesday he sees fewer buying opportunities because markets and assets have become so expensive. Schwarzman said the moves were partly justified by expectations for further economic growth as interest rates remain low. General Atlantic CEO Bill Ford, appearing on CNBC shortly after Schwarzman, agreed that valuations are getting lofty. In 2019, General Atlantic invested $4.5 billion in 31 new companies.


Steve Schwarzman, billionaire co-founder of private equity powerhouse Blackstone, told CNBC on Tuesday he sees fewer buying opportunities because markets and assets have become so expensive.
Schwarzman said the moves were partly justified by expectations for further economic growth as interest rates remain low.
General Atlantic CEO Bill Ford, appearing on CNBC shortly after Schwarzman, agreed that valuations are getting lofty.
In 2019, General Atlantic invested $4.5 billion in 31 new companies.

Blackstone’s Steve Schwarzman sees ‘much fewer things’ to buy because assets are so expensive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, private, sees, buy, markets, company, steve, assets, equity, things, fewer, expensive, atlantic, general, economic, blackstones, schwarzman, valuations


Blackstone's Steve Schwarzman sees 'much fewer things' to buy because assets are so expensive

Steve Schwarzman, billionaire co-founder of private equity powerhouse Blackstone, told CNBC on Tuesday he sees fewer buying opportunities because markets and assets have become so expensive.

“All markets have gone up pretty dramatically,” the Blackstone chairman and CEO said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Schwarzman said the moves were partly justified by expectations for further economic growth as interest rates remain low. But that’s led to higher purchase prices of assets.

“Everything is up. You have to see something reasonably remarkable in terms of your ability to improve the operations of a company,” he said.

General Atlantic CEO Bill Ford, appearing on CNBC shortly after Schwarzman, agreed that valuations are getting lofty. “The only way you can justify these valuations is company quality and company growth.”

In 2019, General Atlantic invested $4.5 billion in 31 new companies. General Atlantic is a private equity firm with about $35 billion in assets under management.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, private, sees, buy, markets, company, steve, assets, equity, things, fewer, expensive, atlantic, general, economic, blackstones, schwarzman, valuations


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Carlyle’s David Rubenstein: Trump ‘policies seem to be working’ to boost the US economy

Policies implemented under the Trump administration seem to be boosting the U.S. economy, private equity billionaire David Rubenstein said on CNBC on Tuesday. “Some of these policies seem to be working,” The Carlyle Group co-founder told “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, without getting specific. “There’s some bragging about the economy, but the economy is in really good shape,” said Rubenstein, whose Carlyle has $222 billion of assets under management. Rubenstein


Policies implemented under the Trump administration seem to be boosting the U.S. economy, private equity billionaire David Rubenstein said on CNBC on Tuesday.
“Some of these policies seem to be working,” The Carlyle Group co-founder told “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, without getting specific.
“There’s some bragging about the economy, but the economy is in really good shape,” said Rubenstein, whose Carlyle has $222 billion of assets under management.
Rubenstein
Carlyle’s David Rubenstein: Trump ‘policies seem to be working’ to boost the US economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carlyles, rubenstein, working, trump, economy, economic, social, washington, trade, policies, told, squawk, david, shape, boost


Carlyle's David Rubenstein: Trump 'policies seem to be working' to boost the US economy

Policies implemented under the Trump administration seem to be boosting the U.S. economy, private equity billionaire David Rubenstein said on CNBC on Tuesday.

“Some of these policies seem to be working,” The Carlyle Group co-founder told “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, without getting specific.

Rubenstein was addressing questions about the optimism from White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow, who told “Squawk Box” earlier from Davos that he expects U.S. economic growth to top 3% this year.

“There’s some bragging about the economy, but the economy is in really good shape,” said Rubenstein, whose Carlyle has $222 billion of assets under management. “Who would have predicted a year ago that we’d be here today?”

Rubenstein pointed to signs of a stronger economy ahead, including low unemployment, historically low interest rates and continued optimism around U.S.-China trade relations. He added that concerns about a global economic recession, which were building last year before the “phase one” trade deal between Washington and Beijing, are dissipating.

The economy is in “reasonably good shape,” Rubenstein said. But he argued that it could “always be better, could always be fairer.”

As areas of improvement, he started by pointing out that the federal budget deficit could be lower. Recent figures showed the U.S. government was on track for its first fiscal year shortfall of over $1 trillion in about seven years. He also cited income inequality, lack of social mobility and concerns about whether entitlements like Medicare and Social Security will be there for futures generations.

Rubenstein, a major philanthropist, is one of the signatories to the Giving Pledge, which was created by Bill Gates and his wife Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett to get the ultra-wealthy to give away more than half of their fortunes to charity. Rubenstein, for example, matched federal funding of $7.5 million to expedite the renovation of the Washington Monument after damage from a rare D.C.-area quake in August 2011.

Earlier in his career, Rubenstein donated to both Democratic and Republican candidates and causes. But he has not made a political contribution in more than a decade.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, carlyles, rubenstein, working, trump, economy, economic, social, washington, trade, policies, told, squawk, david, shape, boost


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Peter Navarro puts Amazon and eBay on notice: The China trade deal cracks down on counterfeits

China agreed to consider revoking operating licences if e-commerce platforms repeatedly sell counterfeit goods. The U.S. agreed to discuss further measures to combat online sales of counterfeit goods. “We don’t love regulations in this administration, but what we do love is corporations accepting their appropriate responsibility,” Navarro said in Thursday’s “Squawk Box” interview. Amazon specifically has faced increased criticism over the amount of counterfeit goods on its platform despite its “


China agreed to consider revoking operating licences if e-commerce platforms repeatedly sell counterfeit goods.
The U.S. agreed to discuss further measures to combat online sales of counterfeit goods.
“We don’t love regulations in this administration, but what we do love is corporations accepting their appropriate responsibility,” Navarro said in Thursday’s “Squawk Box” interview.
Amazon specifically has faced increased criticism over the amount of counterfeit goods on its platform despite its “
Peter Navarro puts Amazon and eBay on notice: The China trade deal cracks down on counterfeits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cracks, platforms, notice, youre, peter, counterfeit, goods, counterfeits, ebay, china, trade, navarro, trump, responsibility, shopify, deal, told, puts


Peter Navarro puts Amazon and eBay on notice: The China trade deal cracks down on counterfeits

E-commerce companies need to do a better job at regulating counterfeit items across their platforms because the “phase one” U.S.-China trade includes tough intellectual property protections, Peter Navarro told CNBC on Thursday.

“The Amazons and the Alibabas, Shopify, they have been facilitators of the Chinese counterfeiting. So, if we’re going to enforce this deal, it’s going to be a big part of that is scrutinizing this,” the White House trade advisor warned.

U.S. and Chinese officials on Wednesday signed their first-step trade agreement, which includes calls for both sides to work to “combat the prevalence of counterfeit or pirated goods” by taking “effective action” when online platforms fail to prevent intellectual property infringement.

China agreed to consider revoking operating licences if e-commerce platforms repeatedly sell counterfeit goods. The U.S. agreed to discuss further measures to combat online sales of counterfeit goods.

“We don’t love regulations in this administration, but what we do love is corporations accepting their appropriate responsibility,” Navarro said in Thursday’s “Squawk Box” interview. “Right now it’s skewed. If you’re an intellectual property rights holder, whether you’re Michael Kors or Louis Vuitton or Pfizer selling prescription drugs, the onus is really on your company to police the internet, where a lot of this counterfeiting occurs. That’s not right.”

“Amazon, Alibaba, Shopify, JD.com, Walmart.com, all of these companies have a responsibility to police the problem,” Navarro added.

Amazon, Walmart and Shopify were not immediately available to respond to Navarro’s comments.

The Trump administration has voiced concern over fake items sold in online marketplaces in the past. In April, President Donald Trump ordered a crackdown on counterfeit items on e-commerce sites, saying the value of global trade in pirated and counterfeit goods is half a trillion dollars per year At the time, Trump warned the companies if they failed to clean it up, “the government will.”

Amazon specifically has faced increased criticism over the amount of counterfeit goods on its platform despite its “zero tolerance” policy for the products. A few weeks ago, Amazon said it will ramp up counterfeit reporting to authorities to further crackdown on the fake items.

“I’ve told Amazon, I’ve told eBay, I’ve told all these platforms we had here at the White House, it’s like, look, this is harming your consumers. It’s harming your business model. You’re making a bunch of money off these folks selling this counterfeit stuff, but you’re not accepting your full responsibility,” Navarro said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cracks, platforms, notice, youre, peter, counterfeit, goods, counterfeits, ebay, china, trade, navarro, trump, responsibility, shopify, deal, told, puts


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Blackstone’s Byron Wien sees 3 things keeping the stock market rally going in 2020

The S&P 500 at 3,500 would be 6.6% higher than Tuesday’s close. In his “Ten Surprises,” Wien wrote that volatility will increase and there will be “several market corrections greater than 5% throughout the year.” On “Squawk on the Street,” shortly before the U.S.-China signing of their initial trade deal, Wien said, “The phase one deal is without question a positive.” However, he said he does not expect a “phase two” deal before this year’s November presidential election. So far, about 30 compan


The S&P 500 at 3,500 would be 6.6% higher than Tuesday’s close.
In his “Ten Surprises,” Wien wrote that volatility will increase and there will be “several market corrections greater than 5% throughout the year.”
On “Squawk on the Street,” shortly before the U.S.-China signing of their initial trade deal, Wien said, “The phase one deal is without question a positive.”
However, he said he does not expect a “phase two” deal before this year’s November presidential election.
So far, about 30 compan
Blackstone’s Byron Wien sees 3 things keeping the stock market rally going in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wien, week, surprises, market, byron, keeping, blackstones, trade, going, phase, companies, stock, deal, things, 500, rally, sees


Blackstone's Byron Wien sees 3 things keeping the stock market rally going in 2020

Blackstone Vice Chairman Byron Wien told CNBC on Wednesday that he believes the stock market will continue to rally this year with the support of three things — the “phase one” China trade deal, easing of U.S.-Iran hostilities and expectations for stronger corporate earnings.

The longtime market strategist said he’s sticking to his 3,500 year-end target for the S&P 500 that he put on his annual list of “Ten Surprises for 2020,” which was released last week. The S&P 500 at 3,500 would be 6.6% higher than Tuesday’s close.

In his “Ten Surprises,” Wien wrote that volatility will increase and there will be “several market corrections greater than 5% throughout the year.”

On “Squawk on the Street,” shortly before the U.S.-China signing of their initial trade deal, Wien said, “The phase one deal is without question a positive.”

However, he said he does not expect a “phase two” deal before this year’s November presidential election.

In the first-step agreement between the world’s two largest economies, China promises to purchase some $200 billion of American goods over two years and to make changes to its intellectual property and technology rules.

A deescalation of tensions between the U.S. and Iran is a second positive for Wall Street, Wien said. On Jan. 8, President Donald Trump’s statement that Iran “appears to be standing down,” after it had fired missiles at bases in Iraq housing U.S. troops, sent stocks higher. Tehran was retaliating for the U.S. killing of the top Iranian general at the Baghdad airport on Jan. 3.

As the third thing that traders are watching, Wien predicts that earnings being on track, or coming in better than expected, would boost the market.

So far, about 30 companies in the S&P 500 have released their quarterly results. And of those companies, 82% have posted better-than-expected profits, according to FactSet data. Among the companies beating profit estimates this week were J.P. Morgan Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America.

— CNBC’s Fred Imbert and Pippa Stevens contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wien, week, surprises, market, byron, keeping, blackstones, trade, going, phase, companies, stock, deal, things, 500, rally, sees


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Twitter co-founder and early Beyond Meat investor raises third fund

Ev Williams’ Obvious Ventures announced Tuesday that it raised $271,828,182 for its third fund, bringing its total size to about $585 million. The post referred to the company’s early investment in the alternative meat start-up Beyond Meat, which went public in 2019. “That’s been a fantastic return for us and a fantastic proof point for the work we do,” James Joaquin, Obvious co-founder, told “Squawk Box.” “We don’t think of ourselves as impact investors,” Williams, a Twitter co-founder, said. F


Ev Williams’ Obvious Ventures announced Tuesday that it raised $271,828,182 for its third fund, bringing its total size to about $585 million.
The post referred to the company’s early investment in the alternative meat start-up Beyond Meat, which went public in 2019.
“That’s been a fantastic return for us and a fantastic proof point for the work we do,” James Joaquin, Obvious co-founder, told “Squawk Box.”
“We don’t think of ourselves as impact investors,” Williams, a Twitter co-founder, said.
F
Twitter co-founder and early Beyond Meat investor raises third fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, positive, raised, fund, twitter, cofounder, early, public, world, meat, investor, company, williams, raises, joaquin, think, obvious


Twitter co-founder and early Beyond Meat investor raises third fund

Ev Williams’ Obvious Ventures announced Tuesday that it raised $271,828,182 for its third fund, bringing its total size to about $585 million.

“As we enter our seventh year as a firm, we’ve grown a diverse portfolio of companies that are disrupting huge industries in world positive ways,” the company said in a Medium post.

The post referred to the company’s early investment in the alternative meat start-up Beyond Meat, which went public in 2019. At the time of its initial public offering, the company owned a 9% stake.

“That’s been a fantastic return for us and a fantastic proof point for the work we do,” James Joaquin, Obvious co-founder, told “Squawk Box.”

Obvious focuses its backings on “world positive startups,” including electric bus company Proterra, supplements company Olly, Diamond Foundry, which is developing diamonds in labs instead of mines, sustainable energy company Enbala, plant-based food company Miyoko’s Kitchen and AI-centered Recursion Pharmaceutical.

“We don’t think of ourselves as impact investors,” Williams, a Twitter co-founder, said. “We think of ourselves as financial investors who are choosing things that are addressing major problems. If you figure out how to do that profitably, it’s going to be a huge business.”

Since its 2014 inception, Williams and Joaquin have consistently nodded toward numbers in its fundraising rounds. For its first venture capital fund, Obvious raised $123,456,789. In 2017, it disclosed that it raised $191,919,191, a palindrome. Its latest fund of $271,828,182 is a nod to the mathematical constant Euler’s number, known as “e.”

“This is a tradition for us,” Joaquin said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, positive, raised, fund, twitter, cofounder, early, public, world, meat, investor, company, williams, raises, joaquin, think, obvious


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Google to acquire Irish retail tech start-up Pointy

Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the Google I/O keynote session at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California on May 7, 2019. Alphabet’s Google on Tuesday said it plans to acquire Pointy, an Irish retail start-up that helps traditional brick and mortar retailers list inventory online, for an undisclosed amount. “Over the past several years we’ve developed a very close partnership with Google,” Pointy founders Marks Cummins and Charles Bibby said in a release. “It became clear that


Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the Google I/O keynote session at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California on May 7, 2019.
Alphabet’s Google on Tuesday said it plans to acquire Pointy, an Irish retail start-up that helps traditional brick and mortar retailers list inventory online, for an undisclosed amount.
“Over the past several years we’ve developed a very close partnership with Google,” Pointy founders Marks Cummins and Charles Bibby said in a release.
“It became clear that
Google to acquire Irish retail tech start-up Pointy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pointy, founders, retail, local, store, tech, inventory, close, google, online, irish, acquire, startup, retailers


Google to acquire Irish retail tech start-up Pointy

Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the Google I/O keynote session at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California on May 7, 2019.

Alphabet’s Google on Tuesday said it plans to acquire Pointy, an Irish retail start-up that helps traditional brick and mortar retailers list inventory online, for an undisclosed amount.

The deal is expected to close in the coming weeks, Google said in a press release.

Retailers use Pointy’s software to automatically track store inventory. That information is then displayed on Google’s “see what’s in store” section, and on a Pointy page, so customers can find specific items that are in-stock near them.

“Over the past several years we’ve developed a very close partnership with Google,” Pointy founders Marks Cummins and Charles Bibby said in a release. “It became clear that we shared the same vision of how technology can improve local retail businesses.”

Pointy has raised $19 million so far in venture capital, the company disclosed in July 2018.

“By joining forces, we will be able to help people discover local stores and products on a much larger scale,” the Pointy founders wrote. “We think this is the right way to accomplish what we set out to do – to bring the world’s retailers online and give them the tools they need to thrive.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pointy, founders, retail, local, store, tech, inventory, close, google, online, irish, acquire, startup, retailers


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GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — ‘she just hates Trump’

GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games. “She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added. Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month. The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoi


GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games.
“She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”
“Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added.
Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month.
The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoi
GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — ‘she just hates Trump’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trying, pelosi, senate, president, control, hates, gop, blasts, house, senator, scott, trump, important, playing, impeachment, trial, month


GOP senator blasts Pelosi for trying to control the impeachment trial — 'she just hates Trump'

GOP Sen. Rick Scott on Monday railed against what he calls the impeachment “circus” surrounding President Donald Trump, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of playing games.

“She just hates Trump,” Scott said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “She said it was so important to get it done in December and didn’t have time to have witnesses come, and now she wants to tell us how to do the trial in the Senate.”

“Clearly what Pelosi has done is a circus, it’s a sham,” the Florida Republican added. “We should be doing things that are important, but we’re playing this game.”

A spokesperson for Pelosi did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Scott was referring to the speaker’s delay in sending to the Senate the two articles of impeachment passed by the House last month. She’s expected to send them this week.

The California Democrat’s delay was part of a strategy aimed at trying to force concessions out of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, including the ability to call witnesses.

McConnell, however, shut down that idea last week, telling reporters that he had enough votes to start the trial without a commitment to hear from additional witnesses.

“It’s frustrating to me,” Scott, a key ally of Trump, added. “The Democrats didn’t prove anything but that he is innocent.”

Trump was charged last month with abuse of power for asking Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden while withholding aid as leverage, and with obstruction of Congress for stonewalling the House investigation.

The president has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing and is backed by Senate Republicans, who are unlikely to vote to remove the GOP president.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trying, pelosi, senate, president, control, hates, gop, blasts, house, senator, scott, trump, important, playing, impeachment, trial, month


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Ex-NTSB official: Shocking Boeing 737 Max messages ‘paints a bad light’ but no new safety risks

“It paints a very bad light on Boeing, especially in the wake of two 737 Max accidents,” said Greg Feith, formerly with the National Transportation Safety Board. Over 100 pages of internal messages released by Boeing showed employees bragging about pressuring regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training. The FAA, for its part, said the newly-released documents don’t present any safety risks that weren’t already known. I think overall yes,


“It paints a very bad light on Boeing, especially in the wake of two 737 Max accidents,” said Greg Feith, formerly with the National Transportation Safety Board.
Over 100 pages of internal messages released by Boeing showed employees bragging about pressuring regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training.
The FAA, for its part, said the newly-released documents don’t present any safety risks that weren’t already known.
I think overall yes,
Ex-NTSB official: Shocking Boeing 737 Max messages ‘paints a bad light’ but no new safety risks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exntsb, public, messages, regulators, feith, paints, max, faa, light, risks, emails, employees, boeing, shocking, internal, safety, official


Ex-NTSB official: Shocking Boeing 737 Max messages 'paints a bad light' but no new safety risks

A trove of documents released by Boeing Thursday, which showed employees boasting about bullying regulators and customers, are more “troubling” to the public than U.S. regulators, a former air safety investigator told CNBC on Friday.

“It paints a very bad light on Boeing, especially in the wake of two 737 Max accidents,” said Greg Feith, formerly with the National Transportation Safety Board. “It’s really important that the FAA, having looked at these emails … didn’t see any safety-related risk that they didn’t already know about.”

Over 100 pages of internal messages released by Boeing showed employees bragging about pressuring regulators to approve the now-grounded 737 Max without requiring pilots to undergo simulator training.

The emails, shared with the Federal Aviation Administration and lawmakers, “are incredibly damning,” said Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., chairman of the House Transportation Committee, which is investigating the Max. “They paint a deeply disturbing picture of the lengths Boeing was apparently willing to go to in order to evade scrutiny from regulators, flight crews, and the flying public, even as its own employees were sounding alarms internally.”

The FAA, for its part, said the newly-released documents don’t present any safety risks that weren’t already known.

And Feith stressed that the emails should be kept in context.

“It’s troubling from the perspective of the public, seeing the types of internal communications between the employees. I think overall yes, it paints a very bad light on Boeing, especially in the wake of two 737 Max accidents,” he said on “Squawk Box.” But Feith said the emails don’t necessarily show any new safety issues that would worry regulators. “It’s really important that the FAA, having looked at these emails, saw some cultural issues, the fact that there is internal bantering, but they didn’t see any safety related risk that they didn’t already know about.”

Boeing had told regulators to remove simulator training from requirements before the FAA approved the jets, which became Boeing’s best-selling aircraft, in 2017, partly due to easily transitioning pilots from older models to the Max.

Though on Tuesday, Boeing reversed its stance and said it would recommend simulator training for pilots before the 737 Max can return to service.

The announcement comes ahead of Monday’s arrival of Boeing’s new CEO, David Calhoun. CNBC reported in December that Calhoun’s goals include improving transparency with its airline customers and regulators.

To that point, Feith said that Calhoun should bring on an internal and external group of auditors to probe the company.

“And compare and find out if, in fact, these organizational issues did have a very detrimental effect on safety,” Feith said. “Now, while the general public may perceive that, when you look at how long we’ve been certifying airplanes in the United States and how long Boeing’s been certifying these airplanes, I really have a hard time believing that with all of these comments and these emails that Boeing would turn out an unsafe airplane.”

-CNBC’s Leslie Josephs contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, exntsb, public, messages, regulators, feith, paints, max, faa, light, risks, emails, employees, boeing, shocking, internal, safety, official


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