YouTube’s bet against big cable announces nationwide expansion

Google’s TV streaming service for cord cutters, YouTube TV, is expanding nationwide. YouTube TV includes livestreaming from more than 60 networks like CNN, ABC and Fox, including local affiliate coverage, premium networks, like Starz, for an additional monthly charge and unlimited cloud DVR recording. BTIG analyst Rich Greenfield said YouTube TV stands out from livestreaming alternatives like Sling, DirecTV Now, and Hulu + Live TV in part because of its automatic customization. “It understands w


Google’s TV streaming service for cord cutters, YouTube TV, is expanding nationwide. YouTube TV includes livestreaming from more than 60 networks like CNN, ABC and Fox, including local affiliate coverage, premium networks, like Starz, for an additional monthly charge and unlimited cloud DVR recording. BTIG analyst Rich Greenfield said YouTube TV stands out from livestreaming alternatives like Sling, DirecTV Now, and Hulu + Live TV in part because of its automatic customization. “It understands w
YouTube’s bet against big cable announces nationwide expansion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: jillian donfro, cnbc, todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tv, youtube, bet, service, subscriber, services, live, watch, youtubes, expansion, subscribers, announces, big, cable, streaming, nationwide


YouTube's bet against big cable announces nationwide expansion

Google’s TV streaming service for cord cutters, YouTube TV, is expanding nationwide.

As more people ditch their costly cable subscriptions (or never sign up at all), YouTube is one of many companies trying to lure consumers with an online selection of channels and content that is less vast, but cheaper, than what typical cable TV offers.

The $40-a-month service will soon be available in 95 new U.S. markets, to cover a total of 195 regions, or 98 percent of U.S. households, the company said in a blog post Wednesday morning.

YouTube TV includes livestreaming from more than 60 networks like CNN, ABC and Fox, including local affiliate coverage, premium networks, like Starz, for an additional monthly charge and unlimited cloud DVR recording. YouTube has previously highlighted the availability of live sporting events as part of its bid against other services, and Wednesday’s expansion announcement plays up how customers can use it to watch the “Big Game.”

While Google has not disclosed subscriber numbers for YouTube TV since it launched in early 2017, the service reportedly increased from around 300,000 paying subscribers in January 2018 to 800,000 in July. It raised prices from $35 to $40 a month in February last year.

BTIG analyst Rich Greenfield said YouTube TV stands out from livestreaming alternatives like Sling, DirecTV Now, and Hulu + Live TV in part because of its automatic customization.

“It knows when I wake up Sunday morning to show me that SNL was recorded last night, instead of what’s on live first,” he said. “It understands what I want to watch when I want to watch it, and that intelligence layer sets it apart from the other streaming services.”

While cable companies are feeling the effects of the surge of new competing services — the industry lost more than a million subscribers in the third quarter of last year — new entrants are learning the tough economics of streaming.

Disney is already losing more than $1 billion in streaming through ESPN+ and its stake in Hulu, and YouTube TV is reportedly losing money on every subscriber. Still, the onslaught of news and new services continues: Viacom just agreed to acquire streaming service Pluto TV for $340 million, and NBC announced last week that it plans to launch a new service in 2020.

Disclosure: Comcast, which owns CNBC parent NBCUniversal, is a co-owner of Hulu.

WATCH: NBCUniversal to launch streaming service in 2020


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: jillian donfro, cnbc, todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tv, youtube, bet, service, subscriber, services, live, watch, youtubes, expansion, subscribers, announces, big, cable, streaming, nationwide


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Google raises prices on its competitor to Microsoft Office for the first time in a decade

Google is raising prices for the basic and business versions of its G Suite productivity apps, like Gmail and Docs, for the first time. The 20 percent price increase comes soon after the appointment of Thomas Kurian, a former Oracle executive, as the head of Google’s Cloud division. Pricing for Google’s Enterprise Edition will remain the same and Google will continue to offer free accounts for non-business users. In a blog post introducing the new pricing Google says that over the last ten years


Google is raising prices for the basic and business versions of its G Suite productivity apps, like Gmail and Docs, for the first time. The 20 percent price increase comes soon after the appointment of Thomas Kurian, a former Oracle executive, as the head of Google’s Cloud division. Pricing for Google’s Enterprise Edition will remain the same and Google will continue to offer free accounts for non-business users. In a blog post introducing the new pricing Google says that over the last ten years
Google raises prices on its competitor to Microsoft Office for the first time in a decade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: jillian donfro, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, pricing, business, decade, edition, competitor, googles, cloud, google, microsoft, office, raises, revenue, price, suite


Google raises prices on its competitor to Microsoft Office for the first time in a decade

Google is raising prices for the basic and business versions of its G Suite productivity apps, like Gmail and Docs, for the first time.

The 20 percent price increase comes soon after the appointment of Thomas Kurian, a former Oracle executive, as the head of Google’s Cloud division. While the news that Kurian would replace former CEO Diane Greene was announced last November, he only formally took on the role this year.

The price bumps — from $5 to $6 per user / month for G Suite’s Basic Edition plan and from $10 to $12 per user / month for its Business Edition tier — will take effect on April 2 and bring Google’s product costs closer to those of rival suite Microsoft Office 365. (The features of the various pricing tiers from Google and Microsoft aren’t directly comparable. The differences between Google’s basic and business tiers involve storage space, among other features.) Pricing for Google’s Enterprise Edition will remain the same and Google will continue to offer free accounts for non-business users.

In a blog post introducing the new pricing Google says that over the last ten years, G Suite has grown to provide more products.

“The one thing that hasn’t changed over this time is price,” the post says.

While Google doesn’t break out its cloud market share or how much the business makes, it said in February 2018 that the cloud unit overall had passed $1 billion in revenue per quarter. Even with that disclosure, it’s unclear how much revenue is coming from G Suite versus Google’s Cloud Platform. Google’s public cloud marketshare is widely seen as lagging behind both Amazon and Microsoft’s.

In Alphabet’s Q3 earnings, it reported $4.64 billion in its “other revenues” category, which includes its cloud business as well as app store revenue and hardware sales. It will next report earnings on February 4.

Google says that the price changes will not impact current contracts or renewals made before April 2.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-16  Authors: jillian donfro, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, pricing, business, decade, edition, competitor, googles, cloud, google, microsoft, office, raises, revenue, price, suite


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Alphabet’s board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs

“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.” And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws reg


“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.” And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws reg
Alphabet’s board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jillian donfro, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images, michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, misconduct, allegedly, role, harassment, conduct, san, execs, covering, alphabets, severance, sued, reads, sexual, senior, google, suit, employees, board


Alphabet's board sued for role in allegedly covering up sexual misconduct by senior execs

The new lawsuit, filed in California’s San Mateo County, asserts claims for breach of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, unjust enrichment, and waste of corporate assets. The attorneys say the lawsuit is the result of “an extensive original investigation into non-public evidence” and produced copies of internal Google minutes from board of directors meetings.

“The Directors’ wrongful conduct allowed the illegal conduct to proliferate and continue,” the suit reads. “As such, members of Alphabet’s Board were knowing and direct enablers of the sexual harassment and discrimination.”

The suit also accuses board members of employing contradictory standards:

“If you were a high‐level male executive at Google responsible for generating millions of dollars in revenue, Google would let you engage in sexual harassment. And if you get caught, Google would keep it quiet, let you resign, and pay you millions of dollars in severance,” the suit reads. “On the other hand, if you were a low‐level employee at Google and were accused of sexual harassment or discrimination, you would be fired for cause with no severance benefits. In this way, Alphabet and the Board were able to maintain optics and superficial compliance with its code of conduct, internal rules, and laws regarding sexual harassment. By appearing to take decisive action against a significant number of low‐level employees, and by concealing the blatant and widespread sexual harassment by senior Google executives, the Board avoided a much bigger scandal.”

In late October, Google CEO Sundar Pichai told employees that Google had fired 48 employees for sexual misconduct over the past two years.

The shareholder plaintiff, James Martin, has held Alphabet stock since October 2009.

Soon after the original complaint, another similar suit was filed in San Mateo County on behalf of two additional stockholders, which also alleges that the board breached its fiduciary duty and had a “culture of concealment” around sexual misconduct, as well as a bug in the Google Plus social network.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

You can read the suit in full here:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-10  Authors: jillian donfro, jerome favre, bloomberg, getty images, michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, misconduct, allegedly, role, harassment, conduct, san, execs, covering, alphabets, severance, sued, reads, sexual, senior, google, suit, employees, board


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Tips for how to use your phone less stop checking your phone so much

Phones can act as digital drugs that we use to seek pleasure, or to avoid discomfort and pain, Pierce said. Along with that analysis, Pierce recommended creating a list of all the ways that you like using your phone, and all the usage behaviors that make you feel bad. Along with a personal analysis, new tools released in the last year will let you gawk in horror at concrete data about your phone usage, too. Apple, Google, and Facebook now all have tools to show you how, and for how long, you use


Phones can act as digital drugs that we use to seek pleasure, or to avoid discomfort and pain, Pierce said. Along with that analysis, Pierce recommended creating a list of all the ways that you like using your phone, and all the usage behaviors that make you feel bad. Along with a personal analysis, new tools released in the last year will let you gawk in horror at concrete data about your phone usage, too. Apple, Google, and Facebook now all have tools to show you how, and for how long, you use
Tips for how to use your phone less stop checking your phone so much Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: jillian donfro, peopleimages, getty images, thinkstock, istock, hero images, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spend, phone, youre, user, usage, stop, ways, personal, checking, tools, pierce, digital, tips


Tips for how to use your phone less stop checking your phone so much

Phones can act as digital drugs that we use to seek pleasure, or to avoid discomfort and pain, Pierce said. Being aware of your own motives — as well as how tech products have been intentionally engineered to siphon as much of your attention as possible — may make a trivial observation (such as frittering away 10 minutes on Instagram) take on a new weight (like endlessly scrolling to avoid a hard task).

Along with that analysis, Pierce recommended creating a list of all the ways that you like using your phone, and all the usage behaviors that make you feel bad.

David Greenfield, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and founder of the Center for Internet and Technology Addiction, advises that you start with an intense digital cleanse — try not to check social media for a whole day, for example — and then compare your typical experiences and emotions with those you felt during decreased usage.

“The first step of the resolution is to prove to yourself that what you’re resolving is necessary,” he added.

Yes, there have been studies showing that social media can be bad for your mental health, and exploring how your phone affects your memory or attention span in deleterious ways, but ultimately it won’t be the science that curbs your usage. Your phone habits are so deeply personal and entwined with your life that how you actually feel is a better motivator for change than the latest research, Pierce stated.

Along with a personal analysis, new tools released in the last year will let you gawk in horror at concrete data about your phone usage, too. Apple, Google, and Facebook now all have tools to show you how, and for how long, you use your phone or individual apps.

If you’re an iPhone user, check out Screen Time to understand how hours you spend on your device every day and week, with a break down of the amount of time you spend in individual apps. Google’s Digital Wellbeing tools can show you the same kind of data, but many are currently only available for Pixel and Android One phones. If you’re an Android user without access, you can use download an app that tracks your smartphone habits, like QualityTime or Moment, to track usage.

Facebook and Instagram both have dashboards in their settings to show you your personal activity and set usage goals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: jillian donfro, peopleimages, getty images, thinkstock, istock, hero images, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spend, phone, youre, user, usage, stop, ways, personal, checking, tools, pierce, digital, tips


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Google Hardware revenue profit potential: RBC analyst Mark Mahaney

While Google’s parent company Alphabet is still undeniably an advertising company, Google’s hardware business is finally shaping up, according to RBC. RBC said Google’s recent hardware successes, including the growing popularity of smart speakers and rave reviews for its expensive Pixel phones, will lead to increasing revenues and profit. RBC also estimates that about 43 million Google Home devices are now installed in the U.S. and 9 million internationally. “Hardware remains a small, but import


While Google’s parent company Alphabet is still undeniably an advertising company, Google’s hardware business is finally shaping up, according to RBC. RBC said Google’s recent hardware successes, including the growing popularity of smart speakers and rave reviews for its expensive Pixel phones, will lead to increasing revenues and profit. RBC also estimates that about 43 million Google Home devices are now installed in the U.S. and 9 million internationally. “Hardware remains a small, but import
Google Hardware revenue profit potential: RBC analyst Mark Mahaney Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jillian donfro, michael short, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hardware, potential, mahaney, google, analyst, smart, speakers, googles, rbc, mark, billion, profit, revenue


Google Hardware revenue profit potential: RBC analyst Mark Mahaney

While Google’s parent company Alphabet is still undeniably an advertising company, Google’s hardware business is finally shaping up, according to RBC.

The company’s line of products, which includes its Home smart speakers, Chromecast streaming devices, Nest cameras and thermostats and line of Pixel smartphones, have “gained critical success and are starting to gain material commercial traction,” RBC analyst Mark Mahaney wrote in a note to clients Thursday evening.

In earnings reports, Alphabet lumps hardware sales into an “other revenues” category that includes its cloud business and app store sales, instead of parsing out how much any of those individual categories book. In Q3, the entire category contributed about 14 percent of Alphabet’s total revenue, while advertising accounted for 85.8 percent.

RBC said Google’s recent hardware successes, including the growing popularity of smart speakers and rave reviews for its expensive Pixel phones, will lead to increasing revenues and profit. RBC projects that in 2018, the hardware segment will generate a combined $8.8 billion (or 6 percent of gross revenue) and a profit of $3 billion (or 4 percent of gross profits). By 2021, it says, that will rise to $19.6 billion (or 8 percent of gross revenue) and a profit of $6.1 billion (5 percent of profits).

RBC also estimates that about 43 million Google Home devices are now installed in the U.S. and 9 million internationally.

While Google hasn’t previously had breakout hardware success (and in contrast, has had some dazzling failures, including its Glass facial computer), the category is increasingly becoming a fundamental part of its future, RBC says.

“Hardware remains a small, but important part of Google given its potential as a key growth avenue and strategic hedge for the company,” Mahaney said.

While Mahaney sees revenue and profits growing, the real value of Google’s hardware is that it provides a platform for it to develop and deploy its artificial intelligence chops and gives it more ways to serve ads. Morgan Stanley analysts have actually recommended that Google should give its Home Mini devices away for free in order to defend its retail ads turf.

Here’s how RBC predicts the revenue breakdown between Google’s device lines. Unsurprisingly, the Home smart speakers are predicted to reel in the most revenue:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jillian donfro, michael short, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hardware, potential, mahaney, google, analyst, smart, speakers, googles, rbc, mark, billion, profit, revenue


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A boy called Google and a girl named Vista: Why parents name their kids after tech

Oliver Kai, now 13 with floppy brown hair and braces, is sweet but totally uninterested in telling a journalist more than 7,000 miles away about what it’s like to be named after one of the most powerful of companies in the world. “Sometimes people call me the smart guy,” he said. “He is a smart guy!” Kai will occasionally tease his son — calling him Google, or Oliver Google — but overall he seems to be more bashful about the name than his son is. For several years, he kept a blog about his son,


Oliver Kai, now 13 with floppy brown hair and braces, is sweet but totally uninterested in telling a journalist more than 7,000 miles away about what it’s like to be named after one of the most powerful of companies in the world. “Sometimes people call me the smart guy,” he said. “He is a smart guy!” Kai will occasionally tease his son — calling him Google, or Oliver Google — but overall he seems to be more bashful about the name than his son is. For several years, he kept a blog about his son,
A boy called Google and a girl named Vista: Why parents name their kids after tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jillian donfro, photo courtesy of the kai family, photo courtesy of vardit adler, bil simser, flickr creative commons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, boy, vista, guy, google, called, kai, parents, work, son, named, tech, kids, special, worldi, accepting, oliver, girl


A boy called Google and a girl named Vista: Why parents name their kids after tech

Oliver Kai, now 13 with floppy brown hair and braces, is sweet but totally uninterested in telling a journalist more than 7,000 miles away about what it’s like to be named after one of the most powerful of companies in the world.

“I am sometimes shy about it,” he said simply. “People ask me why my name is like this, and I tell them.”

Because it’s not his first name, it’s not something that his peers needle him over very often, and when it does come up, the remarks aren’t exactly scathing.

“Sometimes people call me the smart guy,” he said. “Like Google, like I know everything.”

“He is a smart guy!” his dad exclaimed proudly. “He has a special character.”

Kai will occasionally tease his son — calling him Google, or Oliver Google — but overall he seems to be more bashful about the name than his son is.

“He knows that I use Google a lot in my work, and I still do — he goes from accepting it to not accepting it,” the father said. “I don’t want him to feel like it was something for a PR purpose. It really was something else.”

While the name was certainly inspired by the search engine, Kai and his wife had also read an old English children’s book about an imaginary creature called Google, and felt that naming their son after a big number — a googol — would represent how many friends he would make in his life.

“It was something special and unique,” he said. “It also made a buzz.”

For several years, he kept a blog about his son, which is still viewable via the Internet Archive.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: jillian donfro, photo courtesy of the kai family, photo courtesy of vardit adler, bil simser, flickr creative commons
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, boy, vista, guy, google, called, kai, parents, work, son, named, tech, kids, special, worldi, accepting, oliver, girl


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Google CEO Sundar Pichai had a tough and terrible year — but it was still better than Facebook’s

While Google and Pichai’s responses may not have pleased everyone, at least they look good in comparison to its Silicon Valley rival. “Google did better than Facebook this year,” says Pivotal analyst Brian Weiser. “Many of the same issues that Facebook faced are issues for Google as well, but the primary distinction is that Google is a better-run company so it just didn’t have the same level of focus.” Threading that needle requires the kind of deft touch — tactfulness, if you will — that Pichai


While Google and Pichai’s responses may not have pleased everyone, at least they look good in comparison to its Silicon Valley rival. “Google did better than Facebook this year,” says Pivotal analyst Brian Weiser. “Many of the same issues that Facebook faced are issues for Google as well, but the primary distinction is that Google is a better-run company so it just didn’t have the same level of focus.” Threading that needle requires the kind of deft touch — tactfulness, if you will — that Pichai
Google CEO Sundar Pichai had a tough and terrible year — but it was still better than Facebook’s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, aly song, yuri gripas, michael short
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sundar, pichais, google, facebook, googles, tactfulness, issues, better, ceo, terrible, facebooks, valley, tough, shareholders, pichai, employees


Google CEO Sundar Pichai had a tough and terrible year — but it was still better than Facebook's

While Google and Pichai’s responses may not have pleased everyone, at least they look good in comparison to its Silicon Valley rival.

“Google did better than Facebook this year,” says Pivotal analyst Brian Weiser. “Many of the same issues that Facebook faced are issues for Google as well, but the primary distinction is that Google is a better-run company so it just didn’t have the same level of focus.”

That sentiment hasn’t been lost on employees. One worker on the advertising side told CNBC that their manager jokes that any time it seems like an issue could blow up, Facebook does something worse.

Pichai’s demeanor has helped.

“I think he brings emotional intelligence to a Valley that has very little of it,” says Eric Schiffer, chairman of consulting firm Reputation Management.

“Employees that I talk to also have empathy for the position that he’s in, which is having to be a coalition-builder between employees and shareholders, whose interests don’t align in all cases and at times have harrowingly different priorities.”

Google’s renewed interest in China is an example. Pichai has described it as too big a market to ignore, but its plans for censored search there counter the company’s previous decision to withdraw from the country, which was couched in moral terms. Threading that needle requires the kind of deft touch — tactfulness, if you will — that Pichai has made his signature.

However, this tactfulness could also be seen as wishy-washiness. As one former Google executive summed it up, Pichai is well-balanced leader who likes to find compromises. But that can mean that instead of solving problems quickly and decisively, he and the rest of Google’s leadership are letting them build and fester.

While Google hasslipped in the rankings of desirable places to work, all its missteps and scandals haven’t caused a blip in its financials. Powering the Internet’s most extensive and essential network of advertising platforms pays off: Alphabet earned $9.2 billion in profits last quarter, up 37 percent from a year ago.

As Google’s strained year winds down, it seems like Pichai’s biggest challenges for next year, too, will not be making shareholders happy, but appeasing users, regulators, and employees.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images, aly song, yuri gripas, michael short
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sundar, pichais, google, facebook, googles, tactfulness, issues, better, ceo, terrible, facebooks, valley, tough, shareholders, pichai, employees


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YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams

YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos. YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content.


YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos. YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content.
YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-13  Authors: jillian donfro, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conspiracy, million, 16, view, content, videos, violence, youtube, channels, spam, removed, report, quarter, scams


YouTube removed 1.6 million channels last quarter, mostly for being spam or scams

Google’s battle against inappropriate content on its video platform rages on.

YouTube removed 7.85 million videos and 1.67 million channels between July and September, according to its latest YouTube Community Guidelines enforcement report. This is the fourth such report YouTube has published, but the first that includes information about removing channels, versus just individual videos.

YouTube will delete a channel entirely if it receives three strikes within three months or commits a single egregious violation, like child sexual exploitation. The most high-profile removal of the year came in August, when YouTube deleted the channel of right-wing conspiracy theorist and InfoWars radio host Alex Jones.

YouTube says that most of the videos it removed — 79.6 percent — violated its policies on spam, misleading content or scams, while 12.6 percent were removed for nudity or sexual content. Only about 1 percent of channels were removed for promotion of violence, violent extremism, harassment or hateful or abusive content, although videos of that nature have attracted the most scrutiny in the past year.

The site has been the recent the subject of several investigations showing how it highlights extreme content, like conspiracy theories or hyperpartisan points of view, over more measured videos. Google CEO Sundar Pichai was grilled during his congressional testimony earlier this week about a specific a conspiracy theory about Hillary Clinton and other politicians and celebrities drinking children’s blood.

Pichai said that YouTube is “constantly undertaking efforts to deal with misinformation,” but that there was “more work to be done.”

The crux of the issue is that while YouTube’s “Community Guidelines” include removing videos that “incite harm or violence,” it does not remove videos simply for containing falsehoods. Although conspiracies, like the infamous #Pizzagate theory that led to shooting in a Washington, D.C., pizza shop, may ultimately inspire acts of violence, the videos don’t explicitly do so, which means that YouTube generally won’t remove them. In the past year, YouTube has made efforts to surface more authoritative content and has started linking videos that promote conspiracy theories to “fact-based” sites like Wikipedia pages. Late last year, Google vowed to have 10,000 people focused on content violations by the end of 2018, and a spokesperson tells CNBC that it’s on target to hit that goal.

YouTube said that 80 percent of the videos it removed in the third quarter were first detected by machines and that of those, 74.5 percent never received a single view.

For the first time, YouTube also broke out the number of violative comments it removed: 224 million in the third quarter.

You can view the full report here.

WATCH: Google’s Larry Page has backed two flying-car start-ups — here’s a look inside one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-13  Authors: jillian donfro, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conspiracy, million, 16, view, content, videos, violence, youtube, channels, spam, removed, report, quarter, scams


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Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy

One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) “Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.” At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data. One of the explicit focuses of the hearin


One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) “Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.” At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data. One of the explicit focuses of the hearin
Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, china, bias, pichai, congress, plans, testifies, search, privacy, results, sundar, hearing, google, data, googles


Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy

It’s Sundar Pichai’s turn in the congressional hot seat.

Google’s CEO is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday where lawmakers are grilling him on a wide range of issues, including potential political bias on its platforms, its plans for a censored search app in China and its privacy practices.

This is the first time Pichai has appeared before Congress since Google declined to send him or Alphabet CEO Larry Page to a hearing on foreign election meddling earlier this year. That slight sparked anger among senators who portrayed Google as trying to skirt scrutiny.

The hearing culminates a tough year for big tech companies, as lawmakers and the public have become increasingly skeptical about Silicon Valley’s effects on democracy, misinformation and privacy. Tuesday’s proceedings have tested the soft-spoken executive’s ability to remain cool and confident while defending Google in the face intense questioning.

In their opening remarks, Representatives Kevin MCCarthy (R-Ca.) and Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) outlined how they hoped the hearing would focus on Google’s bias against conservative content, handling of misinformation and hate speech, data privacy, and plans for a censored search app in China.

In response, Pichai’s prepared remarks emphasized Google’s patriotism and focus on user privacy.

One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) who expressed concern that Google would aid in the oppression of Chinese people “looking for a lifeline of freedom and democracy.”

“Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.”

Pichai’s has said in the past that Google is “not close” to launching a censored search result in China, though Tuesday’s comments appear to further distance the company from those efforts. The Intercept reported in September that at one point Google employees working on the “Project Dragonfly” efforts were told to get it in “launch-ready state” to roll out upon approval from Beijing officials.

Pichai would not, however, go so far as to commit not to launch “a tool for surveillance and censorship in China,” as he was asked to do by Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI).

“We always think it’s in our duty to explore possibilities to give users access to information,” Pichai said.

A handful of representatives also asked Pichai about how transparent (or not) Google is when it comes to its data collection practices. The company came under fire earlier this year after The Associated Press revealed that contrary to what a user might reasonably assume, pausing “Location History” tracking on a Google account didn’t actually stop the search giant from storing time-stamped location data. Google ended up clarifying the language of its policy.

At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data.

“We always think that there is more to do,” Pichai said. “It’s an ongoing area of effort.”

In response to a later question about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that came into effect in the European Union earlier this year, Pichai said that there was “some value for companies to have consistent global regulation,” and highlighted how Google published its own framework to guide data privacy legislation earlier this year.

One of the explicit focuses of the hearing was whether or not Google’s search results were biased against conservative points of view. Multiple representatives posed questions on this topic, to which Pichai repeatedly responded that Google’s search algorithms did not favor any particular ideology, but instead surfaced the most relevant results, which could be affected by the time of a users’ search, as well as their geography.

One particularly fiery take against that line of questioning came from Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Ca.) who said that the queries on conservative bias “wasted time” given that private, profit-seeking companies like Google are protected by the First Amendment. Even if Google was biased, he said, that would be its right. However, he also used sample Google searches to show that Google would turn up positive search results about Republicans and negative search results about Democrats.

“If you want positive searches, do positive things,” Lieu said. “If you get bad press, don’t blame Google. Consider blaming yourself.”

Lieu has made similar points at past hearings that included Facebook, Twitter, and Alphabet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, china, bias, pichai, congress, plans, testifies, search, privacy, results, sundar, hearing, google, data, googles


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Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed


Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there. “As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. Today, Google is more than a search engine. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed
Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


Google gears up for congressional hearing with patriotic prepared remarks

CEO Sundar Pichai put an emphasis on Google’s patriotism in his prepared remarks for a congressional hearing on Tuesday where he’ll likely face questions about a purported bias against conservative content on search and YouTube.

“Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots,” he wrote.

Tuesday’s hearing will focus on potential political bias on Google’s platforms, as well as the company’s data filtering practices, with House Majority leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Ca.) highlighting claims that Google’s business practices “may have been affected by political bias” in a statement.

Google has staunchly denied these accusations when they’ve come up in the past, and did so again in Pichai’s remarks.

“I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way,” Pichai writes. “To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests.”

By underscoring Google’s patriotism Pichai’s comments may also attempt to address criticism around the company’s decision earlier this year not to renew a Pentagon contract for analyzing drone videos using artificial intelligence. Critics have contrasted this move with how Google has worked with China on controversial plans to launch a censored search engine there.

After The Intercept first reported details about Google’s censored search plans, human rights groups, lawmakers, and Google’s own employees all blasted the company, arguing that by cooperating with the Chinese government, it would have violated principles of free expression and users’ privacy rights, among other issues.

The censored search app, which Google has said it is “not close” to launching, would have debatably violated a set of artificial intelligence ethics that the company posted following employee blowback to its dropped Department of Defense contract. The document stipulated that Google would work with the government and military on cybersecurity and training, but not on weapons or surveillance that violates “internationally accepted norms.”

Pichai never directly mentions either controversy, but his prepared comments dance around both.

“As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users,” he wrote. “I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure.”

Here are Pichai’s full remarks:

Chairman Goodlatte, Ranking Member Nadler, distinguished members of the Committee: Thank you for the opportunity to be here today. I joined Google 15 years ago and have been privileged to serve as CEO for the past three years—though my love for information and technology began long before that. It’s been 25 years since I made the US my home. Growing up in India, I have distinct memories of when my family got its first phone and our first television. Each new technology made a profound difference in our lives. Getting the phone meant that I could call ahead to the hospital to check that the blood results were in before I traveled 2 hours by bus to get them. The television, well, it only had one channel, but I couldn’t have been more thrilled by its arrival! Those experiences made me a technology optimist, and I remain one today. Not only because I believe in technology, but because I believe in people and their ability to use technology to improve their lives. I’m incredibly proud of what Google does to empower people around the world, especially here in the US. I’d like to take a moment to share a bit of background on that. 20 years ago, two students—one from Michigan and one from Maryland—came together at Stanford with a big idea: to provide users with access to the world’s information. That mission still drives everything we do, whether that’s saving you a few minutes on your morning commute or helping doctors detect disease and save lives. Today, Google is more than a search engine. We are a global company that is committed to 1 building products for everyone. That means working with many industries, from education and healthcare to manufacturing and entertainment. Even as we expand into new markets we never forget our American roots. It’s no coincidence that a company dedicated to the free flow of information was founded right here in the US. As an American company, we cherish the values and freedoms that have allowed us to grow and serve so many users. I am proud to say we do work, and we will continue to work, with the government to keep our country safe and secure. Over the years our footprint has expanded far beyond California to states such as Texas, Virginia, Oklahoma and Alabama. Today in the US, we’re growing faster outside of the Bay Area than within it. I’ve had the opportunity to travel across the country and see all the places that are powering our digital economy—from Clarksville, to Pittsburgh, to San Diego, where we recently launched a partnership with the USO to help veterans and military families. Along the way, I’ve met many people who depend on Google to learn new skills, find jobs, or build new businesses. Over the past year, we have supported more than 1.5 million American businesses. Over the past three, we have made direct contributions of $150 billion to the US economy, added more than 24,000 employees, and paid over $43 billion to US partners across Search, YouTube, and Android. These investments strengthen our communities and support thousands of American jobs. They also allow us to provide great services to our users to help them through the day. It’s an honor to play this role in people’s lives, and it’s one we know comes with great responsibility. Protecting the privacy and security of our users has long been an essential part of our mission. We have invested an enormous amount of work over the years to bring choice, transparency, and control to our users. These values are built into every product we make. We recognize the important role of governments, including this Committee, in setting rules for the development and use of technology. To that end, we support federal privacy legislation and proposed a legislative framework for privacy earlier this year. Users also look to us to provide accurate, trusted information. We work hard to ensure the integrity of our products, and we’ve put a number of checks and balances in place to ensure they continue to live up to our standards. I lead this company without political bias and work to ensure that our products continue to operate that way. To do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests. We are a company that provides platforms for diverse perspectives and opinions—and we have no shortage of them among our own employees. Some of our Googlers are former servicemen and women who have risked much in defense of our country. Some are civil libertarians who fiercely defend freedom of expression. Some are parents who worry about the role technology plays in our households. Some—like me—are immigrants to this country, profoundly grateful for the freedoms and opportunities it offers. Some of us are many of these things. Let me close by saying that leading Google has been the greatest professional honor of my life. It’s a challenging moment for our industry, but I’m privileged to be here today. I greatly appreciate you letting me share the story of Google and our work to build products worthy of the trust users place in us. Thank you for your attention. I look forward to answering your questions.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, remarks, google, technology, search, american, today, congressional, work, hearing, company, patriotic, prepared, gears, users, googles


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