US job openings decline for second straight month

Boeing plane deliveries down 72% in AugustBoeing Co handed over around a quarter as many planes in August as it did a year ago, pushing total deliveries so far this year down more than 40%, as the worldwide grounding…Airlinesread more


Boeing plane deliveries down 72% in AugustBoeing Co handed over around a quarter as many planes in August as it did a year ago, pushing total deliveries so far this year down more than 40%, as the worldwide grounding…Airlinesread more
US job openings decline for second straight month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, handed, planes, worldwide, plane, openings, far, job, second, deliveries, pushing, total, straight, month, decline, groundingairlinesread, quarter


US job openings decline for second straight month

Boeing plane deliveries down 72% in August

Boeing Co handed over around a quarter as many planes in August as it did a year ago, pushing total deliveries so far this year down more than 40%, as the worldwide grounding…

Airlines

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, handed, planes, worldwide, plane, openings, far, job, second, deliveries, pushing, total, straight, month, decline, groundingairlinesread, quarter


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Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities

Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit. Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists. Outside of tech, the company ha


Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit. Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists. Outside of tech, the company ha
Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, tech, company, job, fulfillment, cities, 30000, data, workers, day, jobs, hiring, amazon


Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities

Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit.

Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists.

Both part- and full-time jobs are up for grabs and will work out of the company’s headquarters, tech hubs, data centers and fulfillment centers. Pay starts at the company’s minimum wage of $15 per hour.

Attendees are encouraged to apply for a job directly with Amazon or participate in information sessions about starting a business with the company as an online seller, delivery service partner, self-published author and more. Job-seekers can also get interviewing and resume advice.

New company hires will also be a part of its Upskilling 2025 initiative, a $700 million investment in skills training programs for up to 100,000 employees. Some of the company’s fastest-growing tech jobs in the past five years include data scientist, solutions architect, network development engineer and web development engineer. Outside of tech, the company has significantly scaled its contingent of data mapping specialists, fulfillment center workers, program managers and marketers.

Full-time employees can expect health care benefits from their first day, 401(k) match and up to 20 weeks of paid parental leave.

“Amazon has created more than 300,000 new jobs in the U.S. over the last decade – and we’re proud to continue investing and creating opportunities for people across the country,” said founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said in a statement. “These are jobs with highly competitive compensation and full-benefits from day one, as well as training opportunities to gain new skills in high-demand fields such as robotics and machine learning.”

The company is also gearing up for the holiday season by hiring tens of thousands of part-time, seasonal roles across the country.

Those interested snagging a job with Amazon can register for the Career Day and search for openings online.

In the past, Amazon recruiters have told CNBC Make It that those looking to land a job at the company should study the e-commerce behemoth’s 14 leadership principles and be able to clearly explain why they’d be a great fit for the job.

“We’re really looking for reasons to say ‘yes,’ not to say ‘no,'” said Sean Kelley, Amazon Worldwide Operations Talent Acquisition Director, in 2018.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Shaq: As soon as I started investing like Jeff Bezos, ‘I probably quadrupled what I’m worth’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, tech, company, job, fulfillment, cities, 30000, data, workers, day, jobs, hiring, amazon


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This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how

If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create


If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create
This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, holtom, algorithm, quitheres, create, better, going, leaving, data, employers, predict, job, employees


This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here's how

Workers are quitting their jobs at record rates, thanks to a tight labor market and high confidence that moving on will also mean moving up, particularly in pay. Besides leaving in search of more money, recent job-quitters have also cited toxic work environments and limited room for growth as major reasons for putting in their notice. For employers, this kind of insight might only become clear during an employee’s exit interview, if at all. But with the help of artificial intelligence and machine learning, researchers have developed an algorithm that may be a better predictor of when a worker is at risk of quitting. That could be a good thing — for employers and employees alike. By understanding who’s at risk of leaving, companies may be able to pinpoint the main reasons why employees are seeking other opportunities. If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. The flip side, of course, is that employers have to put measures in place to improve employee satisfaction, whether that’s in the form of better compensation, workplace culture or career advancement. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive.

The quitting algorithm

In a recent article for Harvard Business Review, Professors Brooks Holtom of Georgetown University and David Allen of Texas Christian University describe the results of their latest research. Using big data and machine-learning algorithms, the two developed a real-time indicator to measure two main indicators that an employee is about to quit. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. This could be a change in leadership or major acquisition, for example, and was measured with events including news articles about a company, changes in stock value and legal action taken against the firm. Researchers also measured “job embeddedness,” or how deeply connected a worker felt to their organization, based on publicly available data like number of past jobs, employment anniversary and tenure, skills, education, gender and geography. When put to the test, the algorithm identified that those marked as “most likely” to be receptive to a new opportunity were, in fact, 63% more likely to be in a new job by the end of the three-month study period.

Your boss might be able to predict when you’re about to quit—and that could be a good thing

Knowing that HR can use this information to determine who’s a flight risk might feel like an overstep. There’s a financial benefit to re-engaging dissatisfied employees rather than having to hire someone new. By some estimates, the cost of replacing a highly skilled professional could be one to two times their salary, in terms of time and money spent recruiting, selecting and training a new hire, Holtom tells CNBC Make It. “There are hard costs, like training and selection, as well as soft costs, like reduced customer service or inability to deliver in the short-term when someone leaves,” he says.

Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully. Brooks Holtom Professor, Georgetown University

In a worst-case scenario, 50% of HR managers say they have open positions they can’t fill, and extended job vacancies are costing companies $800,000 annually, says Michelle Armer, Chief People Officer at CareerBuilder. But beyond a company’s desire to protect the bottom line, workers could stand to benefit from a more focused approach to employee engagement — so long as employers use machine learning results in a productive way. “The very best organizations develop a listening culture,” Holtom says. “They want to hear from their employees what’s going well, what’s not going well, and they want to do all that they can to improve conditions for their employees that are cost-effective. AI is complemented by a thoughtful dialogue and one-on-ones or other types of engagement with employees. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. Collecting and analyzing these data points can yield better results than gathering answers from what can be time-consuming company-wide surveys. With surveys, for example, it’s possible companies aren’t asking the right questions, or employees who do opt in to provide feedback aren’t being as candid as they could be. By using available data, “The potential benefit to employees is that, over time, sophisticated managers and employers learn more about what their people really value — not just say they value — and are able to create a more positive and perhaps more personalized work environment,” Allen says. Of course, there are downsides to letting machines predict employee engagement. “My major concerns are around privacy boundaries,” Holtom says. In the study, researchers worked with a talent intelligence firm to gather only publicly available data, including social media feeds. “At some level, that might start to become invasive. Pulling information from Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook — information that people post publicly whether it’s controlled or password protected or not — there’s risk for employees.” Algorithms could become outdated, be applied out of context or rely on attributes such as protected class characteristics, Allen adds, which could create a host of other issues.

The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create better experiences for both employers and job seekers. Michelle Armer Chief People Officer at CareerBuilder

AI in hiring and retention is here to stay

It’s crucial to take privacy concerns into consideration, especially as information-gathering in hiring and retention becomes more commonplace. “The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create better experiences for both employers and job seekers,” Armer says, adding that CareerBuilder itself uses AI, semantic search and machine learning to help job seekers create their resumes, match job seekers with open roles and aid other elements of the search and hiring process. In other words, the researchers’ quitting algorithm is just one example of how companies are investing to leverage technology and change the way they source and hire — hopefully, in a more efficient and constructive way that stands to benefit all involved parties. “The genie is out of the bottle, and I think this is the direction most organizations are going to head,” Holtom says. “They’re going to collect more data and they’re going to analyze it more thoughtfully, more carefully, to increase the odds that they can attract and keep good people.” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: 75% of Americans agree: If bosses want happier employees, start by saying ‘thank you’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, holtom, algorithm, quitheres, create, better, going, leaving, data, employers, predict, job, employees


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Use ‘outside skills’ from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here’s how

A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstr


A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstr
Use ‘outside skills’ from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, outside, hustle, sabatier, job, pivot, heres, say, youre, work, help, experts, skills, resume, website


Use 'outside skills' from your side hustle to help you at work, experts say — here's how

A side hustle can help you acquire new skills that can bolster your resume, helping you make the case for a raise or putting you in the running for a new job. It’s likely that you had to do some ground work before launching your side hustle, says Grant Sabatier, creator of Millennial Money, an online personal finance community, and that you had to work hard to become successful. Maybe you had to learn to build a website, or get better at copy writing, or figure out a digital and social media marketing strategy. That experience can benefit you at your day job, says Sabatier: “It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills.” Here’s how experts say your side hustle can help you at work.

How to get a raise or promotion

“Not everything is quantifiable, but if you can bring those outside skills inside the office and demonstrate how you’re adding value, you’d be a good candidate for a bonus, raise, or making a pivot within your company,” says Sabatier. For example, if you learned how to build a website for your side gig and your employer is looking to launch a new website, you can raise your hand and offer expertise “using the skills you developed outside your full-time job,” he adds. Now let’s say you enjoy working on web development more than your current role. You’d be in a good position to ask for a raise, Sabatier points out, or to pivot within your company if you demonstrate success outside your role.

It’s a powerful combination: Make extra money doing something you enjoy and building new skills. Grant Sabatier creator of Millennial Money

How to find a new career

If you’re interested in finding a new job or even pivoting careers, it will take more than a run-of-the-mill resume to stand out to a potential employer, says Claire Bissot, managing director at CBIZ HR Services. Let’s say you’re applying for your dream job, but you only have four of the seven skills listed on the job description. Taking on a side hustle might be a way to develop those missing skills, and in turn strengthen your resume, making yourself a more attractive candidate. Bissot says that prospective employers are looking for examples of resilience, motivation, self awareness, personal development, and other soft skills as well. Because side hustlers, by nature, have an entrepreneurial mindset and have proven their ability to execute their ideas, they tend to possess these kinds of traits. Bissot recommends highlighting projects that have challenged you to grow as an individual, regardless of your material success. In fact, talking about any failures you’ve experienced with your side hustle, and how you’ve recovered and learned from them, can reveal your potential as an employee. “Your strengths are your strengths, and yes, they grow over time, but I want to know your weaknesses and if there is an opportunity there to make [them] into a strength,” she says. “More often than not, we learn from our failures more significantly than we do from our successes.” More from Grow: How 3 indie filmmakers achieved their dreams without going broke

Take 3 steps to successfully pivot your career

Cardi B explains how to practice self-care even if you’re ‘broke’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
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Why you don’t need a high-paying job to become a millionaire, according to Chris Hogan

Chris Hogan knows what it takes to become a millionaire. You need to have a high-paying jobOne of the most common professions of the millionaires Hogan interviewed was school teacher. “Getting out of debt, retaining more of your income and investing consistently,” will put you on the path to becoming a millionaire,” Hogan says. The secret to becoming a millionaire is actually quite boring: consistently invest in low-cost index funds in retirement accounts for many years. While many people are lo


Chris Hogan knows what it takes to become a millionaire. You need to have a high-paying jobOne of the most common professions of the millionaires Hogan interviewed was school teacher. “Getting out of debt, retaining more of your income and investing consistently,” will put you on the path to becoming a millionaire,” Hogan says. The secret to becoming a millionaire is actually quite boring: consistently invest in low-cost index funds in retirement accounts for many years. While many people are lo
Why you don’t need a high-paying job to become a millionaire, according to Chris Hogan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consistently, job, highpaying, according, need, wealth, millionaires, worth, teachers, hogan, chris, dont, retirement, takes, millionaire, invest


Why you don't need a high-paying job to become a millionaire, according to Chris Hogan

Chris Hogan knows what it takes to become a millionaire. The personal finance expert and host of “The Chris Hogan Show” recently sat down with CNBC Make It to talk about what he learned about building wealth while researching and writing his book, “Everyday Millionaires: How Ordinary People Built Extraordinary Wealth―and How You Can Too.” For the book, published earlier this year, Hogan and the Dave Ramsey research team (Hogan works for Ramsey Solutions) interviewed over 10,000 millionaires, defined as those with a net worth of at least $1 million, in the U.S. about their spending and savings habits over the course of seven months. They found the “number-one contributing factor to millionaires’ high net worth” is investing in a retirement plan, like a 401(k), but that myths surrounding wealth accumulation can keep people from attaining it. Here are four myths he says aspiring millionaires can learn from.

1. You need to have a high-paying job

One of the most common professions of the millionaires Hogan interviewed was school teacher. While this might seem surprising, given the relatively low earnings of teachers nationwide compared to similarly educated professions, they are able to invest in 403(b) accounts, which are similar to 401(k)s, to save for retirement. Teachers, just like with anyone else with access to a employer-sponsored retirement plan, who invest consistently over time benefit from compounding interest. “Getting out of debt, retaining more of your income and investing consistently,” will put you on the path to becoming a millionaire,” Hogan says.

2. You have to make risky investments

You can ignore cryptocurrencies and exciting “new fads,” Hogan says. The secret to becoming a millionaire is actually quite boring: consistently invest in low-cost index funds in retirement accounts for many years. That last part is key. While many people are looking to get rich quick, building real wealth takes time — decades, in fact. Hogan found that the average millionaire reached the $1 million mark for the first time at 49.

3. You need a fancy degree

4. You have to inherit wealth


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consistently, job, highpaying, according, need, wealth, millionaires, worth, teachers, hogan, chris, dont, retirement, takes, millionaire, invest


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Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000

Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday. The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working


Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday. The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working
Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: jeff cox, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payrolls, working, workers, unemployment, underemployed, growth, job, expectations, increased, increase, increasing, short, wall, rise, 130000, falls, rate


Job growth falls short of expectations as August payrolls rise just 130,000

Job growth continued at a tepid pace in August, with nonfarm payrolls increasing by just 130,000 thanks in large part to the temporary hiring of Census workers, the Labor Department reported Friday.

The increase fell short of Wall Street estimates for 150,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 3.7%, as expected. An alternative measure of the jobless rate, which includes discouraged and underemployed workers, increased to 7.2% from 7% in July, due mainly to a 397,000 increase in those working part-time for economic reasons.

Wage growth remained solid, with average hourly earnings increasing by 0.4% for the month and 3.2% over the year; both numbers were one-tenth of a percentage point better than expected.

Labor force participation also increased, rising to 63.2% and tying its highest level since August 2013. The total number of Americans considered employed surged by 590,000 to a record 157.9 million, according to the household survey, which is conducted separately from the headline establishment count.

The difference between the two surveys inspired some optimism.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: jeff cox, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, payrolls, working, workers, unemployment, underemployed, growth, job, expectations, increased, increase, increasing, short, wall, rise, 130000, falls, rate


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Treasury yields slip after job gains fall short, wages climb

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note ticked lower to 1.55% following its 10-basis-point climb in the prior session. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the labor market to add 150,000 jobs following a gain of 164,000 in July. “The idea that the labor market is tight is well-documented and well-understood,” said Jon Hill, a rates strategist at BMO Capital Markets. “You see an upside surprise in average hourly earnings,” but Wall Street remains unconvinced that those gains necessar


The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note ticked lower to 1.55% following its 10-basis-point climb in the prior session. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the labor market to add 150,000 jobs following a gain of 164,000 in July. “The idea that the labor market is tight is well-documented and well-understood,” said Jon Hill, a rates strategist at BMO Capital Markets. “You see an upside surprise in average hourly earnings,” but Wall Street remains unconvinced that those gains necessar
Treasury yields slip after job gains fall short, wages climb Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, trade, slip, fall, market, short, job, gains, treasury, wages, climb, ministry, labor, yields, federal, jobs, yield


Treasury yields slip after job gains fall short, wages climb

U.S. government debt yields erased an early rise on Friday after the Labor Department said employers added fewer jobs than expected in August, though wage gains kept rates from falling further.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note ticked lower to 1.55% following its 10-basis-point climb in the prior session. The yield on the 30-year Treasury bond slipped to 2.02% and the 2-year yield hovered at 1.53% after posting its largest one-day jump since February 2015 in the prior session. Yields rise as prices fall.

U.S. employers added a weaker-than-anticipated 130,000 jobs in August, the government said in its regular update situation. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected the labor market to add 150,000 jobs following a gain of 164,000 in July. The unemployment rate held steady at 3.7%.

Average hourly earnings — a statistic often used by economists as a leading inflation indicator — rose more than expected between August and July, as a 0.4% gain topped expectations of a 0.3% increase. The print brings wages gains up to 3.2% over the year.

“The idea that the labor market is tight is well-documented and well-understood,” said Jon Hill, a rates strategist at BMO Capital Markets. “You see an upside surprise in average hourly earnings,” but Wall Street remains unconvinced that those gains necessarily portend broader inflation gains.

“In general, this doesn’t really change much: The Fed was never really cutting because of the labor market,” he added, referring to expectations that the Federal Reserve will cut the overnight lending rate by another 25 basis points when it meets later this month.

Fed officials have on multiple occasions noted a slowdown in economic growth overseas as well as heighten trade-related uncertainty when justifying reductions to the federal funds rate.

The employment statistics adds to the fierce debate on Wall Street over whether the U.S. is headed for economic slowdown. Investors fled risk assets in favor of safe havens during August as a combination of soured trade relations with China and an inverted yield curve suggested to some that GDP growth could be nearing contraction.

The New York Federal Reserve puts the chance of a recession at 39% in the next 12 months, the highest level since the Great Recession that ended in mid-2009. The 10-year Treasury note yield fell more than 50 basis points last month amid the flight to safer assets including government debt and precious metals. A basis point is one hundredth of one percent.

More recent trade headlines, however, have reversed a fraction of the August bid for Treasurys.

The U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October, according to a translation of a report from the Chinese Commerce Ministry released earlier this week. The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial progress in calming their multiyear trade war.

China’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday that Liu He, the country’s top trade negotiator, spoke by phone with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They agreed to meet in early October for another round of negotiations, according to the Chinese Commerce Ministry. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.”

—CNBC’s Sam Meredith contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, trade, slip, fall, market, short, job, gains, treasury, wages, climb, ministry, labor, yields, federal, jobs, yield


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The most important thing to do if you are worried about a recession

But the most important task, experts say, is to increase your savings rate as much as you can. But with a potential recession and the instability it brings, it’s even more important to cut back on whatever expenses you can. A recession can lead to a job loss or reduced income, general economic instability and limited opportunities for job change or salary growth. To start, financial advisors recommend putting away three to six months’ worth of living expenses for an emergency fund. Not six month


But the most important task, experts say, is to increase your savings rate as much as you can. But with a potential recession and the instability it brings, it’s even more important to cut back on whatever expenses you can. A recession can lead to a job loss or reduced income, general economic instability and limited opportunities for job change or salary growth. To start, financial advisors recommend putting away three to six months’ worth of living expenses for an emergency fund. Not six month
The most important thing to do if you are worried about a recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, worried, expenses, savings, job, recession, emergency, financial, economic, money, millennials, important, months


The most important thing to do if you are worried about a recession

There are countless financial tasks to prioritize, if you’re able, before an economic downturn: Pay off high interest debt, put major purchases on hold and review your investment allocation. But the most important task, experts say, is to increase your savings rate as much as you can. Having a sizable emergency fund is one of the most commonly given bits of personal finance advice. But with a potential recession and the instability it brings, it’s even more important to cut back on whatever expenses you can. A recession can lead to a job loss or reduced income, general economic instability and limited opportunities for job change or salary growth. But fixed expenses — rent, student loans, groceries and credit card payments — don’t pause if you lose your job or have your hours cut, which makes having a robust savings account a top financial priority. “In the event a recession happens and your company downsizes, the emergency reserve can bridge the gap during your unemployment and ensure that you are not using credit cards or your retirement account to fund your living expenses,” Matthew Schwartz, a Minnesota-based certified financial planner, tells CNBC Make It. This is even more pressing for millennials. “As they pitch toward middle age, [millennials] are failing to make it to the middle class, and are likely to be the first generation in modern economic history to end up worse off than their parents,” writes Annie Lowry, a staff writer at The Atlantic. “The next downturn might make sure of it, stalling their careers and sucking away their wages right as the millennials enter their prime earning years.” In fact, middle class life is now 30% more expensive than it was 20 years ago, according to Alissa Quart, author of “Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America,” while the cost of housing in big cities has quadrupled and the price of college has doubled. To compound that, salaries have stagnated and cover far less than they did just a few decades ago. All of this can make covering day-to-day expenses difficult. That’s why building savings habits into your life is one of the best ways to ensure stability in a rocky economic environment.

How to build your savings

The first step to start saving is to examine how you currently spend your money. One way to do this is to record each purchase you make for a few months, either by keeping track in a notebook, an Excel sheet or an app like Mint or Personal Capital, certified financial planner Carolyn McClanahan told CNBC Make It. Once you can actually see all of your expenses in one place, you can determine where to make cuts. You can also implement the 50/30/20 budget, popularized by Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, which suggests the following: 50% of your income should go toward “must haves” (monthly bills like housing, transportation, etc.), 30% toward “wants” (discretionary spending) and 20% toward savings. Once you have your spending under control, determine a specific savings goal to work toward. To start, financial advisors recommend putting away three to six months’ worth of living expenses for an emergency fund. But if a possible recession is stressing you out, aim for more than that. As Suze Orman, financial expert and best-selling author of “Women and Money,” said in 2017, the Great Recession was a major wake-up call that three to six months’ worth of funds isn’t always enough if the worst happens. “You need as much money in the bank that makes you feel secure,” Orman said. “Don’t go fooling yourself, ‘It’s okay, I can charge on a credit card, I can do this.’ You should have at least eight months. Not six months, not three months, I’d like to see you have eight months to one year.” Schwartz agrees, advising people to consider how long it typically takes a job seeker — in their own industry, specifically — to find a new job, or what would happen if you are self-employed and suddenly find yourself with fewer clients. “Some people simply feel more comfortable with more than six months in cash,” he says. “Ultimately, it is about sleeping well at night knowing that an emergency expense will not derail your long term plans.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, worried, expenses, savings, job, recession, emergency, financial, economic, money, millennials, important, months


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India’s 25 best start-ups to work for, according to LinkedIn

In fact, for the second year running, OYO Hotels and Homes ranks as the best start-up to work for in India. The six-year-old company places top among LinkedIn’s hottest Indian start-ups to work for in 2019. It is joined in the top 25 by start-ups covering a range of industries, from healthcare to e-learning, but all with the country’s thriving tech scene at their cores. They were then ranked based on LinkedIn user feedback across four pillars: Employment growth; engagement with employees; job in


In fact, for the second year running, OYO Hotels and Homes ranks as the best start-up to work for in India. The six-year-old company places top among LinkedIn’s hottest Indian start-ups to work for in 2019. It is joined in the top 25 by start-ups covering a range of industries, from healthcare to e-learning, but all with the country’s thriving tech scene at their cores. They were then ranked based on LinkedIn user feedback across four pillars: Employment growth; engagement with employees; job in
India’s 25 best start-ups to work for, according to LinkedIn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homes, younger, employees, work, linkedin, hotels, indias, according, startups, best, list, job, oyo


India's 25 best start-ups to work for, according to LinkedIn

India’s largest hospitality chain OYO not only does a good job of making guests feel at home in its global network of hotels and homes, it also manages to extend that feeling to its staff.

In fact, for the second year running, OYO Hotels and Homes ranks as the best start-up to work for in India.

The six-year-old company places top among LinkedIn’s hottest Indian start-ups to work for in 2019. It is joined in the top 25 by start-ups covering a range of industries, from healthcare to e-learning, but all with the country’s thriving tech scene at their cores.

To be considered for this year’s list, companies had to be privately-held, be seven years or younger, and have 50 or more employees. They were then ranked based on LinkedIn user feedback across four pillars: Employment growth; engagement with employees; job interest; and ability to attract top talent from leading employers.

CNBC Make It takes a look at the full list of 25 most attractive start-ups in India right now.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homes, younger, employees, work, linkedin, hotels, indias, according, startups, best, list, job, oyo


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Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here’s why

Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect. “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.” It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” h


Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect. “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.” It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” h
Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, wont, work, book, washeres, warren, zoe, took, buffett, told, career, youll, working, job, salary, fortune


Before Warren Buffett made his fortune, he took a job without asking what the salary was—here's why

Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett believes in working with people you respect.

“Try to work for whomever you admire most,” the investing legend told author Gillian Zoe Segal in an interview for her 2015 book, “Getting There: A Book of Mentors.” “It won’t necessarily be the job that you’ll have 10 years later, but you’ll have the opportunity to pick up so much as you go along.”

It’s advice that served him well: When he was starting his career, well before he made his billions, Buffett took a job with his mentor and hero, Benjamin Graham, without even asking about the salary. “I found that out at the end of the month when I got my paycheck,” he told Segal.

The decision paid off, career-wise. Buffett, who was one of Graham’s students at Columbia Business School, says that his former professor largely shaped his career and investment philosophy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asking, wont, work, book, washeres, warren, zoe, took, buffett, told, career, youll, working, job, salary, fortune


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