New college graduates enjoy the best job market in years with more offers and better salaries

Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world. Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped


Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year. In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world. Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jessica dickler, andrew sacks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, science, nace, market, enjoy, best, average, college, social, job, graduates, salaries, recent, better, students, grads, according, offers


New college graduates enjoy the best job market in years with more offers and better salaries

It’s a good time to be a graduate.

Those armed with a newly minted diploma will enter a job market with unemployment near the lowest level in 50 years and job prospects up significantly from just last year.

Employers plan to hire nearly 11% more graduates from the class of 2019 than they did from the class of 2018, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. This also marks the first time since 2011 that hiring projections are in the double digits, NACE said.

Improved job opportunities were spread across most industries, including accounting and professional services, NACE said, with wholesale trade as the only exception.

In addition, many job offers come with pay better than they did last year in nearly every degree category ranging from business to social sciences.

Once again, STEM degree holders are projected to earn the most overall as the demand for workers in science, technology, engineering and math occupations continues to increase, NACE said.

Engineering was the top paid major this year with an average starting salary of $69,188, followed by computer science and math. In 2018, grads earned an overall average of $51,022, NACE found.

However, the tighter labor market is giving recent grads more confidence to pursue a career that is not based on salary alone, according to a separate report by job site Indeed, allowing them to prioritize other interests rather than following a more conventional track.

That is steering some students away from traditional high-paying positions in business or finance in favor of careers in the arts and social service, said Nick Bunker, an economist with Indeed.

In fact, the occupation that garnered the most interest among grads this year was graphic designer, where the typical worker makes $48,700 per year, Bunker said.

But students leaving school are not free from financial burdens. Recent college graduates must also weigh massive student loan balances as they make their way in the real world.

Over the last decade, college loan balances in the U.S. have jumped to a record $1.5 trillion, according to the Federal Reserve. The average outstanding balance is about $30,000, according to the most recent data from the Institute for College Access & Success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: jessica dickler, andrew sacks, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, science, nace, market, enjoy, best, average, college, social, job, graduates, salaries, recent, better, students, grads, according, offers


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Warren Buffett and Bill Gates say this is the best business book ever

When you stop paying attention to the evolving changes of society and human needs, you fall behind and become vulnerable to competitors. While writing the story, Brooks said a marketing manager told him it was the customers who were at fault. Never underestimate the importance of company culture and values. This is a powerful lesson for anyone — whether you’re a founder, manager, employee or job seeker. Having good company culture will likely lead to higher productivity and motivation, fewer emp


When you stop paying attention to the evolving changes of society and human needs, you fall behind and become vulnerable to competitors. While writing the story, Brooks said a marketing manager told him it was the customers who were at fault. Never underestimate the importance of company culture and values. This is a powerful lesson for anyone — whether you’re a founder, manager, employee or job seeker. Having good company culture will likely lead to higher productivity and motivation, fewer emp
Warren Buffett and Bill Gates say this is the best business book ever Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: david neagle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gates, bill, manager, say, wilson, youre, book, business, marketing, job, learning, important, wouldnt, company, warren, culture, buffett, best


Warren Buffett and Bill Gates say this is the best business book ever

Here’s how to get a job at Goldman Sachs 9:32 AM ET Thu, 4 April 2019 | 04:32

Ford was dissatisfied with the poll results and ended up going its own way. Eager to create hype, it began marketing the car one year before it was even completed. And on launch day, the model was delivered with oil leaks and trunks that wouldn’t open. It was also mocked as being too expensive and using up too much gas.

When you stop paying attention to the evolving changes of society and human needs, you fall behind and become vulnerable to competitors.

2. Failure isn’t a bad thing — accept it, learn from it, and move on from it.

The big Edsel flop led to a $350 million loss. And yet, Ford’s executives took zero responsibility for their failures. In fact, they claimed to have done everything right.

While writing the story, Brooks said a marketing manager told him it was the customers who were at fault. “What they’d been buying for several years encouraged the industry to build exactly this kind of car,” the representative said. “We gave it to them, and they wouldn’t take it. Well, they shouldn’t have acted like that. And now the public wants these little beetles. I don’t get it!”

People often think, If I fail, I will lose something very important — like getting into a good college, working at (or starting) a great company, getting a promotion, making lots of money and so on. But learning from our mistakes is one of the greatest tools for learning; it gives us information on what we need to do differently to succeed in life.

3. Never underestimate the importance of company culture and values.

This is a powerful lesson for anyone — whether you’re a founder, manager, employee or job seeker.

Brooks describes Xerox founder Joseph C. Wilson as being ahead of his time in the ’60s because of how he prioritized building a compassionate work culture. He made it his duty to donate millions of dollars to charities and universities. He implemented progressive hiring policies during the civil rights movement.

“To set high goals, to have almost unattainable aspirations, to imbue people with the belief that they can be achieved…these are as important as the balance sheet, perhaps more so,” Wilson said once according to Brooks.

Today, more than ever, employees value unity and purpose in a company — and they’re not afraid to quit or reject a job offer from a company with a bad reputation. Having good company culture will likely lead to higher productivity and motivation, fewer employee health issues and less turnover.

Keep this in mind as well if you’re a job seeker. Joining a company with poor culture won’t keep you happy in the long run.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: david neagle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gates, bill, manager, say, wilson, youre, book, business, marketing, job, learning, important, wouldnt, company, warren, culture, buffett, best


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Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other


Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other
Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month.

Demand for German speakers peaked just before the Brexit referendum in June 2016, according to the data.

The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period.

However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. According to the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics, net migration from the EU is now at its lowest level in a decade, which could signal a reduction in the talent pool when it comes to European language skills.

“Many U.K. employers who require multilingual staff are becoming increasingly unsettled as a perfect storm brews — fewer and fewer linguists are emerging from our education system just as Brexit uncertainty looks to be deterring workers relocating here from the EU,” Bill Richards, U.K. managing director of Indeed, said in a press release.

“English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other languages. While the U.K. market clearly continues to offer many opportunities for those with additional language skills, there is a danger of a shortfall emerging as insufficient supply butts up against rising demand,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


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Foxconn Wisconsin job plans showing little progress: report

More than nine months after President Donald Trump helped Foxconn break ground on its would-be $10 billion plant in Wisconsin, little progress can be seen, a new report says. The Verge, in a report published Wednesday, found that even locals are unsure of Foxconn’s plans. This was a sharp deviation from the type of facility and jobs locals and political leaders believed Foxconn would create. The number of jobs Foxconn is promising to create in the state has also declined over time. The company i


More than nine months after President Donald Trump helped Foxconn break ground on its would-be $10 billion plant in Wisconsin, little progress can be seen, a new report says. The Verge, in a report published Wednesday, found that even locals are unsure of Foxconn’s plans. This was a sharp deviation from the type of facility and jobs locals and political leaders believed Foxconn would create. The number of jobs Foxconn is promising to create in the state has also declined over time. The company i
Foxconn Wisconsin job plans showing little progress: report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: lauren feiner, brendan smialowski, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, create, showing, project, little, foxconn, foxconns, report, verge, wisconsin, told, owner, plans, progress, job


Foxconn Wisconsin job plans showing little progress: report

More than nine months after President Donald Trump helped Foxconn break ground on its would-be $10 billion plant in Wisconsin, little progress can be seen, a new report says.

The Verge, in a report published Wednesday, found that even locals are unsure of Foxconn’s plans. Construction seems largely stalled despite the electronics company’s recent promise that its new factory would begin assembling liquid crystal display screens by the end of 2020.

In a trip to Wisconsin last month, The Verge found that while Foxconn had taken out renovation permits on several sites that would contribute to what it calls its “AI 8K+5G ecosystem,” people with knowledge said those working on the project don’t have contracts and have not been paid.

One building that was meant to be part of Foxconn’s technology hub never sold, according to The Verge, after the owner became fed up with Foxconn’s constant changes of plans. The owner said he’d held off on converting a floor of the building into apartments after Foxconn expressed interest, but once the company tried to negotiate $500,000 off the contract after going back and forth several times on whether it would need the floor, the owner terminated the contract, according to The Verge.

Foxconn and the White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Since Trump attended the groundbreaking of the Mount Pleasant site in late June 2018, the project has seemingly been in flux amid trade tensions between the U.S. and China. The project was considered an important piece of Trump’s reelection bid, since it was meant to fulfill a campaign promise of bringing back jobs to the U.S. Taiwan-based Foxconn is a major supplier to Apple, and the Wisconsin plant would be Foxconn’s first facility outside of Asia.

In late January, an assistant to Foxconn’s CEO told Reuters it was still evaluating the types of jobs it would create at the Wisconsin site, saying it wanted to create a “technology hub” rather than a factory. This was a sharp deviation from the type of facility and jobs locals and political leaders believed Foxconn would create. Rather than mainly blue-collar jobs, the assistant told Reuters, about three-quarters of the jobs would be “knowledge” positions in R&D and design.

The day after the Reuters report, Foxconn released a statement affirming it was still moving forward with construction in Wisconsin after talks with the White House but did not clarify the types of jobs it would create.

The number of jobs Foxconn is promising to create in the state has also declined over time. The company initially said it would create 13,000 jobs in the state but later said its hiring pace had slowed. A source told Reuters in January that Foxconn will likely hire about 1,000 people by the end of 2020, rather than the 5,200 it initially expected to employ by that time.

Read the full report at The Verge.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Foxconn says it will move forward with Wisconsin facility


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: lauren feiner, brendan smialowski, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, create, showing, project, little, foxconn, foxconns, report, verge, wisconsin, told, owner, plans, progress, job


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Baby boomers face retirement crisis — little savings, high health costs and unrealistic expectations

The average amount spent by Americans 65-74 is $55,000 a year, but most baby boomers don’t think they will need anywhere near that amount. A lot of people are kidding themselves:Expected annual retirement income needLess than $35,000 — 44%$35,000-$55,000 — 26%$55,000-$75,000 — 16%More than $75,000 — 14%Source: Insured Retirement InstituteWhat’s the backup plan? What happens when a lot of people realize they haven’t thought this whole retirement thing through very well? Downsize, live on Social S


The average amount spent by Americans 65-74 is $55,000 a year, but most baby boomers don’t think they will need anywhere near that amount. A lot of people are kidding themselves:Expected annual retirement income needLess than $35,000 — 44%$35,000-$55,000 — 26%$55,000-$75,000 — 16%More than $75,000 — 14%Source: Insured Retirement InstituteWhat’s the backup plan? What happens when a lot of people realize they haven’t thought this whole retirement thing through very well? Downsize, live on Social S
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: bob pisani, izusek, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, live, retirement, high, little, unrealistic, savings, crisis, gen, boomers, health, face, costs, work, plan, insured, expectations, lot, job, need


Baby boomers face retirement crisis — little savings, high health costs and unrealistic expectations

We are underestimating how much we are going to spend. The average amount spent by Americans 65-74 is $55,000 a year, but most baby boomers don’t think they will need anywhere near that amount. Indeed, 60% say they will need less than that to live on.

A lot of people are kidding themselves:

Expected annual retirement income need

Less than $35,000 — 44%

$35,000-$55,000 — 26%

$55,000-$75,000 — 16%

More than $75,000 — 14%

Source: Insured Retirement Institute

What’s the backup plan? What happens when a lot of people realize they haven’t thought this whole retirement thing through very well? Here’s the plan: Downsize, go back to work, or hit up the kids.

What will you do if you run out of money?

Downsize, live on Social Security alone — 58%

Return to work — 37%

Ask children for assistance — 6%

Source: Insured Retirement Institute

The part about returning to work, or staying at work, is already happening. One-third of employed boomers ages 67 to 72 have postponed retirement, the study says.

Do they have any regrets? Plenty. Among those not confident they did a good job preparing for retirement, the top two things they wish they had done differently were to have saved more (63%) and to have started saving earlier (58%).

Let’s hope Gen X, millennials and Gen Z will do a better job planning for retirement than baby boomers have done.

WATCH: Aging in place


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: bob pisani, izusek, getty images
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Workers worry about robots stealing jobs, just not their jobs. They may be overconfident

Despite this widespread belief that the workplace will look very different a decade from now than it does today, just 27 percent of workers in the new CNBC/SurveyMonkey poll say technology is currently threatening their jobs. No one wants to think that their own job could become obsolete, but in truth every industry will be affected by changes to technology. At present, workers in two industries — airlines & aerospace and advertising & marketing — are those mostly likely to say technology is cur


Despite this widespread belief that the workplace will look very different a decade from now than it does today, just 27 percent of workers in the new CNBC/SurveyMonkey poll say technology is currently threatening their jobs. No one wants to think that their own job could become obsolete, but in truth every industry will be affected by changes to technology. At present, workers in two industries — airlines & aerospace and advertising & marketing — are those mostly likely to say technology is cur
Workers worry about robots stealing jobs, just not their jobs. They may be overconfident Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: laura wronski, senior research scientist, jon cohen, chief research officer, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robots, overconfident, likely, job, stealing, keeping, threat, survey, changes, technology, worry, jobs, workers, say


Workers worry about robots stealing jobs, just not their jobs. They may be overconfident

Despite this widespread belief that the workplace will look very different a decade from now than it does today, just 27 percent of workers in the new CNBC/SurveyMonkey poll say technology is currently threatening their jobs. But, those few who say they are “falling behind” in keeping up with technology are more than twice as likely as those who are keeping up or ahead of the curve to say that technology is a threat. This threat is clearly a stressor; these workers who feel like they’re falling behind are also more likely to say they’ve considered quitting their job in the past three months (44 percent vs. 28 percent among those who are keeping up, and 30 percent among those who are ahead of the curve).

One way to counteract this threat from unpredictable technological change is retraining. Companies and managers who are looking ahead to the changes their industries will soon face can help their employees continue to feel like they are prepared. Employees who trust their bosses “a lot” to prepare them for changes in technology at work are one-third as likely to say they’ve recently considered quitting (18% vs. 61%) compared to workers who don’t trust their bosses at all.

No one wants to think that their own job could become obsolete, but in truth every industry will be affected by changes to technology. At present, workers in two industries — airlines & aerospace and advertising & marketing — are those mostly likely to say technology is currently threatening their work, with more than 4 in 10 workers in each industry (44% and 42%, respectively) expressing this concern. At the other end of the spectrum, a large majority of those in the nonprofit (84%), education, government, or legal industries (80% each) say their job is not currently threatened by changes from technology.

While a robot may never entirely replace a teacher, lawyer or mayor, these jobs will likely require an entirely new set of skills in the future. Workers who are prepared for this change — and the bosses who can help prepare them — will continue to be more satisfied with their jobs and more happy at work.

—By Laura Wronski, senior research scientist, and Jon Cohen, chief research officer, SurveyMonkey

The CNBC/SurveyMonkey online poll was conducted March 13–18 among a national sample of 8,664 workers in the United States. Respondents for this survey were selected from the more than 2 million people who take surveys on the SurveyMonkey platform each day. Data have been weighted initially for age, race, sex, education and geography using the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to reflect the demographic composition of the United States age 18 and over, then weighted for age, race, sex, education, employment status and geography using Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey to reflect the demographic composition of U.S. employed population. The modeled error estimate for this survey is plus or minus 1.5 percentage points. Full results available here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: laura wronski, senior research scientist, jon cohen, chief research officer, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, robots, overconfident, likely, job, stealing, keeping, threat, survey, changes, technology, worry, jobs, workers, say


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Job market bounces back in March with 196,000 gain in payrolls

Six experts on what March’s strong job numbers mean for the US economy 1 Hour Ago | 05:11Job creation posted a solid rebound in March, with nonfarm payrolls expanding by 196,000 and the unemployment rate holding steady at 3.8%, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. The unemployment rate met expectations. “Of course, last month’s nosedive was disappointing, especially after December and January had such impressive numbers despite some sizable headwinds. Wage gains fell off the recent st


Six experts on what March’s strong job numbers mean for the US economy 1 Hour Ago | 05:11Job creation posted a solid rebound in March, with nonfarm payrolls expanding by 196,000 and the unemployment rate holding steady at 3.8%, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. The unemployment rate met expectations. “Of course, last month’s nosedive was disappointing, especially after December and January had such impressive numbers despite some sizable headwinds. Wage gains fell off the recent st
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jeff cox
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Job market bounces back in March with 196,000 gain in payrolls

Six experts on what March’s strong job numbers mean for the US economy 1 Hour Ago | 05:11

Job creation posted a solid rebound in March, with nonfarm payrolls expanding by 196,000 and the unemployment rate holding steady at 3.8%, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

That was better than the 175,000 Dow Jones estimate and comes after a dismal February that had economists wondering whether the decade-old economic expansion was nearing an end. The unemployment rate met expectations.

“With a strong March employment report now in the books, we’ve gotten some reassurance that the labor market is still strong,” said Steve Rick, chief economist at CUNA Mutual Group. “Of course, last month’s nosedive was disappointing, especially after December and January had such impressive numbers despite some sizable headwinds. But a good March report shows that February was more of an outlier than a canary in the coal mine.”

Wage gains fell off the recent strong pace, increasing just 0.14% for the month and 3.2% year over year, below expectations of the 3.4% pace from last month. The average work week increased by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours.

A broader gauge of unemployment that also counts discouraged workers and those holding part-time jobs for economic reasons also was unchanged at 7.3%. The measure, known as the “real unemployment rate” is down from 7.9% a year ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unemployment, job, gain, report, labor, hour, 196000, rate, market, numbers, payrolls, bounces, month, holding, pace, strong


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After being rocked by Trump tariffs, the solar energy business is bouncing back

But recently the industry has struggled with the uncertainty brought on by new tariffs imposed in January 2018 by the Trump administration of 30% on imported solar panels. The Trump tariffs were intended to encourage American manufacturing but were met with criticism from industry advocacy groups, like the SEIA, where PetersenDean’s Liardon is a board member. The outlook for job growth in 2019 sees an increase of 7%, to a total of 259,400 jobs, according to advocacy group The Solar Foundation’s


But recently the industry has struggled with the uncertainty brought on by new tariffs imposed in January 2018 by the Trump administration of 30% on imported solar panels. The Trump tariffs were intended to encourage American manufacturing but were met with criticism from industry advocacy groups, like the SEIA, where PetersenDean’s Liardon is a board member. The outlook for job growth in 2019 sees an increase of 7%, to a total of 259,400 jobs, according to advocacy group The Solar Foundation’s
After being rocked by Trump tariffs, the solar energy business is bouncing back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: kate rogers, source, jacob jimenez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trujillo, uncertainty, solar, industry, rocked, bouncing, jobs, workers, trump, job, tariffs, different, business, energy


After being rocked by Trump tariffs, the solar energy business is bouncing back

But recently the industry has struggled with the uncertainty brought on by new tariffs imposed in January 2018 by the Trump administration of 30% on imported solar panels. (Those tariffs are set to decline by 5% each year. The first 2.5 gigawatts of imported cells are also exempted each year, and certain products, including some cells made by SunPower, were exempted from the list.)

The Trump tariffs were intended to encourage American manufacturing but were met with criticism from industry advocacy groups, like the SEIA, where PetersenDean’s Liardon is a board member. The groups argued that higher costs and uncertainty for the industry would lead to job losses — and they were right: in 2017 and 2018, solar employment declined by some 18,000 jobs.

At the time the tariffs were announced last year, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer released a statement that said in part, “[T]he President’s action makes clear again that the Trump administration will always defend American workers, farmers, ranchers, and businesses.” The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative refused to comment for this story, beyond its published materials.

“When tariffs were put on our product and our prices became more expensive, we couldn’t compete as well against other energy sources,” said Abigail Ross Hopper, president and CEO of the SEIA. “That additional cost has to be borne ultimately by the consumer.”

Now the industry is poised for a comeback of sorts, in part thanks to state initiatives such as California’s push to go solar. The outlook for job growth in 2019 sees an increase of 7%, to a total of 259,400 jobs, according to advocacy group The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census for 2018.

SEIA’s Ross Hopper said the California mandate, along with corporate procurement of solar products by big names like Target — and utility companies investing more in solar options to save customers money — are all favorable developments that will likely boost job growth in years to come.

“As we look forward and at 2019 and beyond, we see that more solar will be installed in this country,” she said. “And with that, obviously there will be more solar jobs created because we need folks to actually do that development and that installation.”

That’s where PetersenDean’s focus is right now, on finding skilled workers like 36-year-old Ruben Trujillo to meet demand. Installers make anywhere from $22 to $50 an hour, depending on skill set and experience. The company’s benefits include health-care coverage and 401(k) retirement savings plans, as well as ongoing training.

“Every day is different. Every house is different, designs are different. So you never really see the same thing every day,” Trujillo said. “I wake up looking forward to actually come to work.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: kate rogers, source, jacob jimenez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trujillo, uncertainty, solar, industry, rocked, bouncing, jobs, workers, trump, job, tariffs, different, business, energy


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March jobs report: Hiring growth and more jobs added in high-paying industries

According to data from Indeed, middle and high-paying industries have seen faster job growth than low-paying industries since the end of 2017. Middle-wage industries in particular, which include air transportation and residential building, were growing around two percent at the end of 2017. Meanwhile, growth in high-wage industries, which include legal services and hospitals, accelerated to 2.3% in January 2019. “All across the country you’ve seen the tendency for state and local governments to


According to data from Indeed, middle and high-paying industries have seen faster job growth than low-paying industries since the end of 2017. Middle-wage industries in particular, which include air transportation and residential building, were growing around two percent at the end of 2017. Meanwhile, growth in high-wage industries, which include legal services and hospitals, accelerated to 2.3% in January 2019. “All across the country you’ve seen the tendency for state and local governments to
March jobs report: Hiring growth and more jobs added in high-paying industries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: courtney connley, olga reznikova, kirsty l
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March jobs report: Hiring growth and more jobs added in high-paying industries

According to data from Indeed, middle and high-paying industries have seen faster job growth than low-paying industries since the end of 2017.

Middle-wage industries in particular, which include air transportation and residential building, were growing around two percent at the end of 2017. But in October 2018, these industries reached a high of 2.7%. Meanwhile, growth in high-wage industries, which include legal services and hospitals, accelerated to 2.3% in January 2019.

Although low-wage industries such as child care services and food and drinking establishments have seen slower job growth of around 1.5%, Gimbel says that in order to compete with higher-wage industries, employers in these fields are starting to increase pay.

For example, Hamrick says that the decision by McDonald’s to end its lobby against minimum wage hikes and Target’s decision to raise its minimum wage to $13 an hour are key signs that low-wage industries will continue to see more pay increases.

“All across the country you’ve seen the tendency for state and local governments to raise their minimum wage because the federal government isn’t in the position to do it,” he says. “So that helps to some degree to explain why we’ve seen lower-paid workers doing better.”

Aside from the already employed individuals who are taking advantage of these pay increases and opportunities, Gimbel says that now is also a good time for the long-term unemployed to finally find employment. In today’s tight labor market, she says, “the good news is that employers are having to look at workers that they might not have looked at in the past, and that includes the long-term unemployed.”

She advises anyone who’s been out of the job market for an extended period of time to update their resume with skills and qualifications that can be applicable to any industry. “The point is that people should be thinking about how their skills can transfer across a lot of different types of jobs and not get locked into this thing that ‘because I did this before, that’s therefore the area I need to stay in.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: courtney connley, olga reznikova, kirsty l
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, industries, growth, minimum, added, end, jobs, report, workers, wage, job, services, highpaying, hiring, skills, seen


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America’s bustling jobs market is still leaving some people behind

And that’s cut both ways for workers who have skills but can’t seem to find the right jobs to fit their qualifications. For folks like her, the headlines about a jobs market bursting at the seams don’t resonate for conditions she says feel like “a recession.” I keep hearing stories and news reports about there being so many jobs, that there are employers having such a difficult time finding skilled workers,” Summers said. But Summers said those numbers point up how crowded the market is and how


And that’s cut both ways for workers who have skills but can’t seem to find the right jobs to fit their qualifications. For folks like her, the headlines about a jobs market bursting at the seams don’t resonate for conditions she says feel like “a recession.” I keep hearing stories and news reports about there being so many jobs, that there are employers having such a difficult time finding skilled workers,” Summers said. But Summers said those numbers point up how crowded the market is and how
America’s bustling jobs market is still leaving some people behind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jeff cox, getty images, jonathan fickies, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, region, bustling, americas, work, know, market, leaving, workers, job, summers, shes, jobs, thats


America's bustling jobs market is still leaving some people behind

And that’s cut both ways for workers who have skills but can’t seem to find the right jobs to fit their qualifications.

Take Yolanda Summers, a 40-year-old Dallas resident who went back to college to get a finance degree but has struggled since then to get work in her field.

For folks like her, the headlines about a jobs market bursting at the seams don’t resonate for conditions she says feel like “a recession.”

“I find it strange. I keep hearing stories and news reports about there being so many jobs, that there are employers having such a difficult time finding skilled workers,” Summers said. “I know so many people who are having a different experience. I just can’t put the two together.”

The Dallas-Forth-Worth-Arlington region is one of the most bustling markets in the country. Over the past year, payrolls in the region rose by 100,100, or 3 percent, making it one of 53 regions to post net gains and the second-fastest-growing market in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate for the region is 3.9 percent, on par with the national rate.

But Summers said those numbers point up how crowded the market is and how much competition there is for job openings. She’s likely to relocate as she continues her employment search, though for now she’s taken a job at a collections firm that she says is “a fill-in position that helps me get by.”

“I’m not discouraged, because I know that I can find work in my field,” she said. “I just think I have to be more mobile, more willing to move and work outside of Dallas. I’ve started applying in other states and other cities, so that’s what I’m going to do.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: jeff cox, getty images, jonathan fickies, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, region, bustling, americas, work, know, market, leaving, workers, job, summers, shes, jobs, thats


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