Here’s the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume

But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t. If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume. Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine. For positions where a secondary lang


But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t. If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume. Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine. For positions where a secondary lang
Here’s the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: ruth umoh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, ask, augustine, speak, language, job, career, youd, role, youre, heres, resume


Here's the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume

In today’s global economy, speaking a second language is highly prized. But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t.

If you’re not a native speaker and it’s not something you’ve been building on for your specific career, “I don’t think it belongs [on your resume],” Amanda Augustine, a TopResume career advice expert, tells CNBC Make It.

To determine your level of proficiency, Augustine says to ask yourself: Could I travel to a country that only speaks this language and hold fluent conversations without any outside assistance?

If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume.

Granted, being bilingual or multilingual is incredibly marketable, says Augustine, but the costs can outweigh the benefits if you’re not as proficient as you claim to be.

“It really depends on if it’s important to your role,” says the career expert. If you’re fairly proficient in a language but it has no bearing on the job to which you are applying, don’t bother adding it to your resume, says Augustine.

Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine.

If you’re hired without a test, your company might eventually expand to another country or conduct business with clients who speak a different language. As a result, your employer will quickly learn that you fibbed, a risk you shouldn’t take when the role likely didn’t require a foreign language in the first place.

For positions where a secondary language is desirable or crucial to the role, ask yourself whether you’d feel comfortable holding the entire interview in that language, says Augustine. She recommends that you also ask yourself if you’d be able to conduct business deals in that second language.

For native speakers, there’s no downside to disclosing a foreign language. But do remember that you have limited space on your resume so you should still prioritize any job-related skills.

If you still want to include a language, provide context. Augustine suggests explaining whether you speak fluently or conversationally, for instance. Understand, however, that such descriptions are highly subjective and could create confusion.

No matter what you do, if you pretend you have a higher level of proficiency than you have, “you’re probably not going to land the job,” says Augustine.

“You need to sell yourself,” she says. “If it doesn’t help your candidacy, eliminate it.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Hiring managers share the No. 1 resume lie that could cost you the job


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: ruth umoh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, ask, augustine, speak, language, job, career, youd, role, youre, heres, resume


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Head for the door if you spot these red flags during a job interview

Ever get an uncomfortable feeling in your stomach during a job interview? A company’s use of old tech can be a pain point once you’re actually working there, Sahni said. Sahni recalls a colleague who turned down a job with a significant salary bump at a major tech firm. “They could so easily have let him stay home to do this, or they could have had him meet people in person,” Sahni said. The point is, they did not use the available tech to its best advantage, which gave the candidate serious res


Ever get an uncomfortable feeling in your stomach during a job interview? A company’s use of old tech can be a pain point once you’re actually working there, Sahni said. Sahni recalls a colleague who turned down a job with a significant salary bump at a major tech firm. “They could so easily have let him stay home to do this, or they could have had him meet people in person,” Sahni said. The point is, they did not use the available tech to its best advantage, which gave the candidate serious res
Head for the door if you spot these red flags during a job interview Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: jill cornfield, urbazon, getty images, -sahil sahni, co-founder of allyo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, head, sahni, interview, technology, door, sign, retirement, point, company, person, job, red, youre, tech, flags, spot


Head for the door if you spot these red flags during a job interview

Ever get an uncomfortable feeling in your stomach during a job interview? Ever see two interviewers swivel their heads toward one another, lock eyes and pause before answering your question?

If you’re the kind of person who wants to know the other side of the story, here’s a way to interpret some interview clues that could foretell a dismal future job experience.

For starters, check out the technology the company uses in recruiting.

“If you have to use Internet Explorer to review documents or sign documents and mail them back, that tells you something important about their attitude toward technology,” said Sahil Sahni, co-founder of AllyO, an AI-based recruiting software.

It also reveals how they feel about investing in new technology.

A company’s use of old tech can be a pain point once you’re actually working there, Sahni said.

More in Personal Finance:

Ditch retirement cost worries by moving

Want to be rich someday? Do these three things

The young and financially independent share early retirement tips

You may have to fill out formal requests for information or wait days for an answer to your questions. Whether it’s a payroll question about your remaining days off or your benefits, it’s a sign of a company that is not technologically innovative.

How a company recruits can be a tipoff.

Sahni recalls a colleague who turned down a job with a significant salary bump at a major tech firm.

The reason? He took a day off from work to fly from Texas to California. When he arrived, the HR contact sat him in a room so he could have three video conferences with people in the organization.

“They could so easily have let him stay home to do this, or they could have had him meet people in person,” Sahni said.

The point is, they did not use the available tech to its best advantage, which gave the candidate serious reservations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: jill cornfield, urbazon, getty images, -sahil sahni, co-founder of allyo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, head, sahni, interview, technology, door, sign, retirement, point, company, person, job, red, youre, tech, flags, spot


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos to employees: ‘One day, Amazon will fail’ but our job is to delay it as long as possible

The key to prolonging that demise, Bezos continued, is for the company to “obsess over customers” and to avoid looking inward, worrying about itself. “If we start to focus on ourselves, instead of focusing on our customers, that will be the beginning of the end,” he said. “We have to try and delay that day for as long as possible.” Amazon’s workforce has grown by more than 20-fold in the last eight years to over 600,000 employees, and the stock price has more than quadrupled since 2013. This wee


The key to prolonging that demise, Bezos continued, is for the company to “obsess over customers” and to avoid looking inward, worrying about itself. “If we start to focus on ourselves, instead of focusing on our customers, that will be the beginning of the end,” he said. “We have to try and delay that day for as long as possible.” Amazon’s workforce has grown by more than 20-fold in the last eight years to over 600,000 employees, and the stock price has more than quadrupled since 2013. This wee
Jeff Bezos to employees: ‘One day, Amazon will fail’ but our job is to delay it as long as possible Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: eugene kim, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, fail, bezos, jeff, day, workforce, yorks, woo, possible, delay, amazons, customers, amazon, worrying, employees, company, long


Jeff Bezos to employees: 'One day, Amazon will fail' but our job is to delay it as long as possible

The key to prolonging that demise, Bezos continued, is for the company to “obsess over customers” and to avoid looking inward, worrying about itself.

“If we start to focus on ourselves, instead of focusing on our customers, that will be the beginning of the end,” he said. “We have to try and delay that day for as long as possible.”

Bezos’ comments come at a time of unprecedented success at Amazon, with its core retail business continuing to grow while the company is winning the massive cloud-computing market and gaining rapid adoption of its Alexa voice assistant in the home.

But some employees are expressing concern about the pace of expansion. Amazon’s workforce has grown by more than 20-fold in the last eight years to over 600,000 employees, and the stock price has more than quadrupled since 2013.

The company has caught the ire of President Trump, who has employed personal attacks against Bezos, and is now catching flack for demanding that cities spend a year coming up with a roster of incentives attractive enough to woo Amazon’s HQ2. This week, the company announced it will open offices in New York’s Long Island City and the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., with plans to add 25,000 jobs in each location.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: eugene kim, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, fail, bezos, jeff, day, workforce, yorks, woo, possible, delay, amazons, customers, amazon, worrying, employees, company, long


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Former Instagram CEO: Policing social media is important to the future of the world

Instagram co-founder and former CEO Kevin Systrom said it is important for the future of the world that social media companies be policed well and seriously address the issues of misinformation and harassment on their services. Systrom said Russian meddling in U.S. elections and the exploitation of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica have highlighted just how big social media companies have become and the implications of their reach. “We’re on a steep curve here,” said Systrom, adding that


Instagram co-founder and former CEO Kevin Systrom said it is important for the future of the world that social media companies be policed well and seriously address the issues of misinformation and harassment on their services. Systrom said Russian meddling in U.S. elections and the exploitation of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica have highlighted just how big social media companies have become and the implications of their reach. “We’re on a steep curve here,” said Systrom, adding that
Former Instagram CEO: Policing social media is important to the future of the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, josh edelson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, ceo, social, tradeoffs, services, world, job, companies, important, media, instagram, systrom, facebook, policing


Former Instagram CEO: Policing social media is important to the future of the world

Instagram co-founder and former CEO Kevin Systrom said it is important for the future of the world that social media companies be policed well and seriously address the issues of misinformation and harassment on their services.

Systrom said Russian meddling in U.S. elections and the exploitation of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica have highlighted just how big social media companies have become and the implications of their reach.

“You start to realize … how important it’s going to be for the future of the world that we police these things well, that we take it very seriously and put real resources against solving the problems now that you’re at this scale,” said Systrom, speaking Tuesday evening at the WSJ Tech D.LIVE conference in Laguna Beach, California.

Systrom, who left his role at Facebook as head of Instagram in September, did not call for the regulation of social services, but he did highlight anti-bullying features built by Instagram under his tenure as examples of the necessary policing. Those features include letting users turn off comments on their posts and using machine learning filters to stop bullying.

“We’re on a steep curve here,” said Systrom, adding that he’s bullish that social media companies will be able to solve these issues. “That’s not to say that it won’t be without its challenges.”

In particular, Systrom highlighted “deepfakes,” which are highly-believable doctored videos that are beginning to make their way onto social services. This emerging type of fake content will be among the next set of problems social media companies will have to contend with, he said.

“It’s getting on the margin of real,” Systrom said. “In an era when you can distribute information widely to the world very, very quickly and amplify it, what happens when you think some political figure said something they didn’t?”

Since leaving Facebook alongside his Instagram Co-founder Mike Krieger, Systrom has not shared many details about his reason for leaving. At another conference in October, Systrom said that “no one ever leaves a job because everything’s awesome.”

He echoed that sentiment on Tuesday.

“Every job has tradeoffs,” he said. “You have tradeoffs in your job, and not everything is always perfect.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: salvador rodriguez, josh edelson, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, future, ceo, social, tradeoffs, services, world, job, companies, important, media, instagram, systrom, facebook, policing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

11 jobs at Amazon that pay over $150,000

After much anticipation and speculation, Amazon has announced that Arlington, Virginia, and the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, New York, are the official locations of the company’s next headquarters. Right now, employees living in the Arlington, Virginia, area and the New York City area earn average annual salaries of $60,890 and $63,029, respectively, according to Glassdoor estimates. But those who secure a job at the e-commerce giant have the potential to earn far more. Glassdoor too


After much anticipation and speculation, Amazon has announced that Arlington, Virginia, and the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, New York, are the official locations of the company’s next headquarters. Right now, employees living in the Arlington, Virginia, area and the New York City area earn average annual salaries of $60,890 and $63,029, respectively, according to Glassdoor estimates. But those who secure a job at the e-commerce giant have the potential to earn far more. Glassdoor too
11 jobs at Amazon that pay over $150,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: courtney connley, lisa werner, getty images, vgajic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, companys, pay, salaries, 11, area, job, jobs, 150000, glassdoor, virginia, york, amazon, arlington, city


11 jobs at Amazon that pay over $150,000

After much anticipation and speculation, Amazon has announced that Arlington, Virginia, and the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, New York, are the official locations of the company’s next headquarters.

These new offices will provide more 25,000 job opportunities in each location. Right now, employees living in the Arlington, Virginia, area and the New York City area earn average annual salaries of $60,890 and $63,029, respectively, according to Glassdoor estimates.

But those who secure a job at the e-commerce giant have the potential to earn far more. Glassdoor took a look at some of the company’s highest-paying positions. Here are 11 jobs at Amazon that offer salaries of $150,000 or more:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: courtney connley, lisa werner, getty images, vgajic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earn, companys, pay, salaries, 11, area, job, jobs, 150000, glassdoor, virginia, york, amazon, arlington, city


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon has promise to create 50,000 new jobs—here’s how to land one

Amazon is a continually expanding company, not just in terms of its number of headquarters but also in the number of industries it is invested in. The tech company dominates the e-commerce industry and is taking on sectors like groceries and pharmaceuticals. Amazon requires a massive and organized workforce, both inside and outside of their distribution centers. That means the first step of getting a job at Amazon involves narrowing down the opportunities and finding the position that best match


Amazon is a continually expanding company, not just in terms of its number of headquarters but also in the number of industries it is invested in. The tech company dominates the e-commerce industry and is taking on sectors like groceries and pharmaceuticals. Amazon requires a massive and organized workforce, both inside and outside of their distribution centers. That means the first step of getting a job at Amazon involves narrowing down the opportunities and finding the position that best match
Amazon has promise to create 50,000 new jobs—here’s how to land one Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: abigail hess, reuters pascal rossignol, courtesy of amazon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expanding, employer, amazon, job, opportunities, promise, land, number, lot, 50000, create, company, jobsheres, understand, work


Amazon has promise to create 50,000 new jobs—here's how to land one

Amazon is a continually expanding company, not just in terms of its number of headquarters but also in the number of industries it is invested in.

The tech company dominates the e-commerce industry and is taking on sectors like groceries and pharmaceuticals. Amazon requires a massive and organized workforce, both inside and outside of their distribution centers.

“We’re obviously expanding globally and continue to grow in marketplaces around the world,” Kelley tells CNBC Make It. “We’re in a lot of business and a lot of markets and expanding.”

That means the first step of getting a job at Amazon involves narrowing down the opportunities and finding the position that best matches your skills. Search through the job openings on Amazon’s career page and filter opportunities based on job category, job type and location to find the role that is right for you.

“People shouldn’t just take a job at Amazon — or any other company for that matter — without understanding what parts of the employment value proposition are the most important for them and how that aligns with potential employers. For some, the move to Amazon will be a great move, for others it will be a bad one,” says Kropp. “The key is to understand what the jobs are actually like.”

He continues, “The best place to get that information about Amazon or any other employer is not by reading the material from that employer, it is by talking to people that worked or still currently work for that employer to understand what it is actually like to work there.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: abigail hess, reuters pascal rossignol, courtesy of amazon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expanding, employer, amazon, job, opportunities, promise, land, number, lot, 50000, create, company, jobsheres, understand, work


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The jobs most unique to each US state

If you’re a fashion designer, odds are you’re based in New York state. That’s because each of these states employs a higher share of workers in these jobs than the national average. Some states’ most unique jobs will have an outsize score. Some states share the same most unique job. Logging worker is the most unique job in both Oregon and Washington, because the logging industry is heavily concentrated in both states and generates a number of jobs that far surpasses the national average.


If you’re a fashion designer, odds are you’re based in New York state. That’s because each of these states employs a higher share of workers in these jobs than the national average. Some states’ most unique jobs will have an outsize score. Some states share the same most unique job. Logging worker is the most unique job in both Oregon and Washington, because the logging industry is heavily concentrated in both states and generates a number of jobs that far surpasses the national average.
The jobs most unique to each US state Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, kirk edwards, getty images, patrick smith, getty images sport, construction photography avalon, hulton archive, sergei supinsky, afp, jeff greenberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, workforce, national, unique, job, state, jobs, youre, quotient, states


The jobs most unique to each US state

If you’re a fashion designer, odds are you’re based in New York state. Work in a quarry? Oklahoma is likely home.

That’s because each of these states employs a higher share of workers in these jobs than the national average. Fashion designer, for example, isn’t the most common job in the Empire State, but you’re five times more likely to run into one there than in the rest of the country.

To determine the job most unique to each state, CNBC Make It analyzed data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) that measures “location quotient,” or the concentration of a specific occupation’s workforce in a single state as compared to the national average.

The higher the location quotient, the more clustered a workforce is in a single geographic area. Some states’ most unique jobs will have an outsize score. Washington, D.C.’s quotient of 117.08 for political scientists, for example, emphasizes politics as the city’s biggest employer.

But other places, like Pennsylvania, have more diverse economies that aren’t particularly dominated by one industry or job. Pennsylvania’s most unique role, ambulance driver, earns a score of 3.66, which is above but still fairly close to the national average. Some states share the same most unique job. Logging worker is the most unique job in both Oregon and Washington, because the logging industry is heavily concentrated in both states and generates a number of jobs that far surpasses the national average.

Read on to see what job is most heavily represented in your state as compared to the nation, as well as exactly how many people in the state hold the title, what it pays there, and the BLS description of the job.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, kirk edwards, getty images, patrick smith, getty images sport, construction photography avalon, hulton archive, sergei supinsky, afp, jeff greenberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, workforce, national, unique, job, state, jobs, youre, quotient, states


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Race doesn’t impact how job-seekers negotiate salaries—but it does affect how much money they get

But regardless of how much you prepare, new research suggests that if you’re black, racial bias can lessen the offer you end up receiving. In 2016 the Pew Research Center reported that college-educated black men earn 20 percent less than college-educated white men. Participants who demonstrated racial bias, the researchers found, expected black job-seekers would negotiate less than white job seekers. “Racially-biased job evaluators consistently overestimated the number of offers and counteroffer


But regardless of how much you prepare, new research suggests that if you’re black, racial bias can lessen the offer you end up receiving. In 2016 the Pew Research Center reported that college-educated black men earn 20 percent less than college-educated white men. Participants who demonstrated racial bias, the researchers found, expected black job-seekers would negotiate less than white job seekers. “Racially-biased job evaluators consistently overestimated the number of offers and counteroffer
Race doesn’t impact how job-seekers negotiate salaries—but it does affect how much money they get Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yoni blumberg, getty images, -derek avery, professor, wake forest university school of business
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, race, racial, collegeeducated, evaluators, money, bias, jobseekers, doesnt, black, affect, job, impact, salariesbut, white, negotiate, participants


Race doesn't impact how job-seekers negotiate salaries—but it does affect how much money they get

Conventional wisdom holds that you should negotiate your salary when you apply for a job, since that usually won’t hurt your chances of landing an offer as long as you remain likable, and pocketing a few extra thousand dollars every year can add up as you get older. And when it comes to negotiating there’s no shortage of advice on what works and what doesn’t. You should know what you’re worth, for instance, and be ready to justify why you’re asking for more.

But regardless of how much you prepare, new research suggests that if you’re black, racial bias can lessen the offer you end up receiving.

“Racially-biased job evaluators see black job-seekers as less deserving of higher monetary awards and take issue when the black job seekers ask for more,” Morela Hernandez, an associate professor at the University of Virginia, tells CNBC Make It.

In the paper “Bargaining While Black,” Hernandez and her colleagues suggest this bias may help explain the significant racial wage gap in the U.S. In 2016 the Pew Research Center reported that college-educated black men earn 20 percent less than college-educated white men. That’s the difference between making $25 and $32 per hour.

Meanwhile, college-educated black women earn 8 percent less than college-educated white women. When you don’t account for education, the gap becomes even more significant.

The researchers identified the salary negotiation process as a potential contributor to this trend through a series of experiments. In the first, study participants completed a survey to determine their own racial bias. Then they looked at resumes and headshots to estimate the likelihood that hypothetical job seekers would negotiate their salaries. Participants who demonstrated racial bias, the researchers found, expected black job-seekers would negotiate less than white job seekers.

Then participants were randomly assigned to be either hiring evaluators or job candidates and, in one-on-one scenarios, negotiated for a salary between $82,000 to $90,000. Race had no real effect on how much the candidates negotiated, but some of the participants incorrectly thought it did.

“Racially-biased job evaluators consistently overestimated the number of offers and counteroffers black job seekers made,” says Hernandez. “This underlines how our brains can see something that isn’t in fact there by virtue of the lens we use to interpret the situation.”

Biased evaluators expected black job-seekers to negotiate less than the white job-seekers. Yet once the researchers put it to the test, those evaluators thought the black job-seekers actually negotiated more. As a result, they were “less willing to make concessions.”

In other words, because their expectations were violated, they gave the black candidates less money.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yoni blumberg, getty images, -derek avery, professor, wake forest university school of business
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, race, racial, collegeeducated, evaluators, money, bias, jobseekers, doesnt, black, affect, job, impact, salariesbut, white, negotiate, participants


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Suzy Welch: Here’s how long you should stay in a job

“In my opinion, a reasonable timeline for your departure from a job is three to five years,” she says. “The longer you stay at one company,” Welch says, “the more hiring managers start to ask, ‘Can this candidate adjust to a different culture, a different pace, a different way of doing things?'” “If you’ve got a passion for what you do, and see an achievable path to the top, by all means — stay put. Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journali


“In my opinion, a reasonable timeline for your departure from a job is three to five years,” she says. “The longer you stay at one company,” Welch says, “the more hiring managers start to ask, ‘Can this candidate adjust to a different culture, a different pace, a different way of doing things?'” “If you’ve got a passion for what you do, and see an achievable path to the top, by all means — stay put. Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journali
Suzy Welch: Here’s how long you should stay in a job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suzy, different, job, timeline, tolls, managers, welch, heres, say, long, start, stay


Suzy Welch: Here's how long you should stay in a job

“In my opinion, a reasonable timeline for your departure from a job is three to five years,” she says. “The longer you stay at one company,” Welch says, “the more hiring managers start to ask, ‘Can this candidate adjust to a different culture, a different pace, a different way of doing things?'”

Ultimately, she says, hiring managers want to know “if they can teach an old dog — you — new tricks.” She advises employees to start thinking about their next career move on their third anniversary at a job, because she says “it will give you enough runway to take off before your resume starts to raise red flags.”

There is, Welch warns, one exception to her three-to-five-year timeline. “If you’ve got a passion for what you do, and see an achievable path to the top, by all means — stay put. There’s no reason to leave a job you love if it holds an exciting future for you.”

“But if, like most people, you know your departure is only a matter of time,” says Welch, “don’t ask for whom the bell tolls. At five years, it tolls for thee.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Beatriz Bajuelos Castillo

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

More from Suzy Welch:

What to say when an interviewer asks, ‘What are your salary requirements?’

What to say when a job interviewer asks, ‘Who’s your role model?’

The 4 business buzzwords you should stop using immediately


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suzy, different, job, timeline, tolls, managers, welch, heres, say, long, start, stay


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The organization helping veterans get jobs by teaching them how to re-adjust to civilian life

But for one military veteran, it also meant saving his life. While serving as a recruiting officer in New York City, Marine Corps veteran Michael Abrams had the chance to meet and know many military service members. FourBlock offers veterans a free semester-long, university accredited course in nearly 20 cities across the country, with plans to expand to three more. The curriculum, developed in partnership with Columbia University, helps veterans translate their military skills into career oppor


But for one military veteran, it also meant saving his life. While serving as a recruiting officer in New York City, Marine Corps veteran Michael Abrams had the chance to meet and know many military service members. FourBlock offers veterans a free semester-long, university accredited course in nearly 20 cities across the country, with plans to expand to three more. The curriculum, developed in partnership with Columbia University, helps veterans translate their military skills into career oppor
The organization helping veterans get jobs by teaching them how to re-adjust to civilian life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: erin barry, frederic j brown afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, civilian, organization, fourblock, youve, life, military, veterans, teaching, job, career, service, readjust, jobs, vets, veteran, abrams, helping


The organization helping veterans get jobs by teaching them how to re-adjust to civilian life

Finding a job often means economic security. But for one military veteran, it also meant saving his life.

While serving as a recruiting officer in New York City, Marine Corps veteran Michael Abrams had the chance to meet and know many military service members. But he told CNBC that one in particular stuck with him. His name was Allen Strifler, an Iwo Jima survivor and former Marine Corps corporal.

Strifler shared with Abrams that he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and that the only thing that got him out of bed was when he got a job. Strifler said that working meant “he finally had meaning and purpose in his life,” Abrams recalled to CNBC’s “On the Money” in a recent interview.

That anecdote spurred Abrams to launch his nonprofit, called FourBlock, while pursuing his MBA at New York University.

FourBlock offers veterans a free semester-long, university accredited course in nearly 20 cities across the country, with plans to expand to three more. The curriculum, developed in partnership with Columbia University, helps veterans translate their military skills into career opportunities.

Each week, veterans have online lessons, in-person lectures and visits with different businesses to hear from senior executives. Some of the companies that participate include Amazon, Deloitte, Facebook, and JPMorgan.

Abrams said the career transition program is aimed at vets “to help get them employed with a purpose sooner, so they don’t fall down a downward spiral.”

Each year, approximately 250,000 service members transition from active duty and enter a job market that’s quite different from what they are used to in the military.

Overall veteran unemployment reached 2.9 percent in October 2018, and 3.1 percent for post September 11 veterans, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

While those numbers seems low, FourBlock says that nearly 50 percent of veterans leave their first post-military job within the first year, a symptom of the challenges vets face when returning to the civilan workforce. Abrams said veterans may experience the feeling of “underemployment,” which happens when a job occupant feel overqualified or underutilized for a specific job.

“I always preach to vets that they will have to take a few steps back professionally after leaving the service, and beginning a new career, so that they can learn their new trade and corporate culture,” Abrams told CNBC.

He added: “You’re starting all over again, you’ve got to prove yourself, you’ve got to earn your stripes, and then you gotta move up.”

The FourBlock founder explained that veterans need to figure out that they want to do, and must adapt to the corporate culture of their respective jobs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-11  Authors: erin barry, frederic j brown afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, civilian, organization, fourblock, youve, life, military, veterans, teaching, job, career, service, readjust, jobs, vets, veteran, abrams, helping


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post