How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers. Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs


In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region.
His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths.
To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.
Developing the Coalfield formulaDennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subs
How a ‘superhero’ CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


How a 'superhero' CEO has made a living helping over 1,000 people find jobs

In West Virginia, coal is as deeply entwined and entrenched in the geographic landscape, the sweeping, rolling Appalachian Mountains, as it is in the culture of the region. It’s how millions of people earn and have earned a living. Coal “has a cultural power,” says Brandon Dennison, a 33-year-old native West Virginian. Dennison is the founder and CEO of Coalfield Development Corporation, a community-based nonprofit business incubator located in the tiny Appalachian town of Wayne, West Virginia, 140 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. “Coal mining is a job people are really, really proud of,” he says. “There’s a pride that a lot of modern America was built on coal.” But as coal production has declined significantly in recent years, so has the number of coal mining jobs. When those jobs disappear, the communities dependent upon them often suffer. A recent report from the Appalachian Regional Commission shows that dozens of counties in the area are at “distressed” economic levels, meaning that their economies are among the worst 10% in the U.S. As much of the world moves on from coal, Dennison has taken on the job of helping coal-dependent communities pivot, too. His aim: helping the down-and-out and unemployed in rural West Virginia develop skills and find new career paths. To date, Coalfield Development has created 225 full-time jobs and trained more than 1,000 workers.

Developing the Coalfield formula

Dennison spends his days overseeing Coalfield Development and its dozen or so subsidiaries. Those include the construction and real estate firm Revitalize Appalachia, carpentry company Saw’s Edge Woodshop, solar enterprise Rewire Appalachia (recently acquired by Solar Holler), and a sustainable agricultural operation called Refresh Appalachia. The organization’s goal is to train, retrain, or otherwise prepare West Virginians for a different economy, one that’s shifted away from coal production. Coalfield helps by finding and hiring unemployed people, enrolling them in community colleges, and allowing them to build skills on the job while also earning a degree.

Brandon Dennison. Courtesy Coalfield Development

Over time, the combo has distilled into what Coalfield refers to as the “33-6-3 model.” That means that workers devote 33 hours per week training on the job, six hours per week doing schoolwork to earn an associate’s degree, and three hours devoted to personal development coaching. “That degree will benefit our workers for the rest of their lives, even if they weren’t working with us,” says Dennison.

Growing up in coal country

Even as a child, Dennison saw that there were deep, systemic issues in and around Appalachia. His parents taught at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, providing a layer of economic security that many of his peers lacked. At one point, for instance, he realized that some of his schoolmates were living in abject poverty. Some didn’t even have running water. Those early experiences left an impression on Dennison, and it’s one of the primary motivators that led him to start his organization in his home state. “The more I traveled, the more I felt connected to West Virginia,” he says. “West Virginia was really my place. It’s where I belong, and I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard.”

I feel like I can have the greatest impact right in my own backyard. Brandon Dennison Founder and CEO, Coalfield Development

After earning a graduate degree from Indiana University, he came back to West Virginia and started working as a grant writer and consultant. Meanwhile, he patched together a mix of grants, donor fundraising, and loans to kick-start Coalfield Development. The organization officially launched in 2010, engaging mostly in small-scale community projects. Coalfield’s first big project was refurbishing an old building in Wayne. That renovation included training workers in clean, energy-efficient construction and destruction techniques, to turn the old residential building into new apartments. Coalfield blossomed into other business areas, creating companies under its nonprofit umbrella that worked in different sectors, such as clothing production and solar panel installation. By 2016, Dennison was able to transition to Coalfield full time. He now earns $80,000 per year running the company.

Expanding Coalfield’s reach

Coalfield was originally focused on helping young people build skills and earn degrees. But after the company opened up opportunities to out-of-work coal miners, Dennison says, it started getting attention — and, crucially, funding — from outside of the state. Carter Stewart, a board member at Coalfield Development and a managing director of the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, which provided Coalfield with funding, says that the organization stood out among the many others that come to them for money. Stewart says that’s because Coalfield has an innovative approach to solving problems, and it’s a model that can be adopted elsewhere. Dennison, in particular, won over the DRK Foundation. “We found Brandon to be a very thoughtful, charismatic, passionate leader,” Stewart says. “He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds.”

He’s very much a humble leader with an iron will who’s willing to walk through walls to make sure his organization succeeds. Carter Stewart Managing director, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

‘He’s a superhero in West Virginia’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, superhero, development, helping, jobs, coalfield, west, ceo, coal, organization, 1000, appalachia, living, virginia, dennison, stewart, job


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

As the job market remains strong, older workers are sticking around

The number of employed workers age 65 or older rose by 697,000 — about 36% of the total gain. Another possible reason for increased participation by older workers is changing education levels, Madowitz said. These are folks who were 50 years old then, 55, looking to retire in three or four years time, lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their retirements. The majority of the people that come to us are people who have continued to work,” Wolniewicz said. Some older workers still need to work


The number of employed workers age 65 or older rose by 697,000 — about 36% of the total gain.
Another possible reason for increased participation by older workers is changing education levels, Madowitz said.
These are folks who were 50 years old then, 55, looking to retire in three or four years time, lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their retirements.
The majority of the people that come to us are people who have continued to work,” Wolniewicz said.
Some older workers still need to work
As the job market remains strong, older workers are sticking around Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, market, sticking, age, wolniewicz, remains, lost, work, labor, strong, workers, older, jobs


As the job market remains strong, older workers are sticking around

Bertram McKenzie works at Home Depot in Boston, Massachusetts. Melanie Stetson Freeman | The Christian Science Monitor | Getty Images

The latest leg of the economic expansion has been fueled in part by older Americans, as increased employment among workers who are at least 65 years old has accounted for an out-sized proportion of job growth. The economy gained a little more than 2 million jobs over the past 12 months, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of employed workers age 65 or older rose by 697,000 — about 36% of the total gain. “I think the strong economy really has allowed more people to stick around in the labor force longer than they might have thought possible, especially 10 years ago,” said Matt Rutledge, an economist with Boston College’s Center for Retirement Research. To be sure, part of the gain among workers older than 65 is due to demographic changes, with workers steadily aging into a new category but not yet retiring, so those gains in the group aren’t necessarily new additions for the overall economy. “It’s unlikely that it’s got to do with workers doing a lot of searching. We know that this is a group that doesn’t have a lot of bargaining power,” said Michael Madowitz, an economist at the Center for American Progress. However, the gain by workers at least 65 years old over the last two years represents a sharp spike relative to total job gains. That ratio has typically been between 10% and 30%, Madowitz said, but it has been above that in the last two years.

The labor force participation rate for this group has been steadily improving over the last decade as well, indicating that there is more to the trend than just a larger number of older Americans. 25.5% of the people older than 65 without a disability were in the labor force in January, according to the BLS, up from 22.3% a decade earlier. Over that same time span, the labor force participation rate for all workers has declined, and the rate for prime age workers is roughly flat, inching up to 83% from 82.5%.

Another possible reason for increased participation by older workers is changing education levels, Madowitz said. As a more educated generation enters into the 65 and above age bracket, there are an increased number of workers who are more likely to live longer and to have jobs that are not as physically demanding.

Economic reasons

For lower-income people around retirement age, the effects of the financial crisis may be a factor in keeping them in the workforce, said Gary A. Officer, president and CEO of Senior Service America. “Many older Americans who wanted to retire lost everything. These are folks who were 50 years old then, 55, looking to retire in three or four years time, lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their retirements. And all of a sudden they’re starting back from scratch,” Officer said. Senior Service America works with local organizations around the country like Supportive Services Corporation in Buffalo, New York, sponsoring programs designed to keep or bring back older people to the workforce. Anita Wolniewicz, a program director at Supportive Services, says she has seen strong interest from workers past retirement age that want to work. In one federal program that helps place older workers with non-profits while they look for more permanent work, 27% of participants have been 66 or older over the past year, Wolniewicz said. Most of the interest comes from workers who recently left a different job and not workers being pulled off the sideline. “It’s a small percentage of them that come to us that have retired and decided, ‘Eh, I’m bored.’ It happens, but it’s not the majority. The majority of the people that come to us are people who have continued to work,” Wolniewicz said. Some older workers still need to work but are trying to transition into jobs that are less physically demanding. “We had a lady the other day, and she was a cleaner. It was a really physical job,” Wolniewicz said. “And she wants to continue to work and yet she has some now physical limitations. Not that she can’t work, but she can’t do what she used to do.”

New expectations


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, market, sticking, age, wolniewicz, remains, lost, work, labor, strong, workers, older, jobs


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

These workers are most likely to quit their jobs—and it can impact your ability to find a new job, too

In 2019, U.S. workers quit their jobs at the fastest rate on record, according to the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In its Workforce Management Benchmark Report, Workforce Logiq uses an artificial intelligence model to calculate how likely workers of a certain title, industry and city are to quit their job. Given the historic tight job market, recruiters are all the more important in bringing in new talent to fill open positions. The workers most lik


In 2019, U.S. workers quit their jobs at the fastest rate on record, according to the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
In its Workforce Management Benchmark Report, Workforce Logiq uses an artificial intelligence model to calculate how likely workers of a certain title, industry and city are to quit their job.
Given the historic tight job market, recruiters are all the more important in bringing in new talent to fill open positions.
The workers most lik
These workers are most likely to quit their jobs—and it can impact your ability to find a new job, too Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, impact, market, jobsand, ability, recruiters, talent, workforce, quit, jobs, hanna, workers, likely


These workers are most likely to quit their jobs—and it can impact your ability to find a new job, too

In 2019, U.S. workers quit their jobs at the fastest rate on record, according to the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A record 4.48 million people packed up their desks in August alone. And as it turns out, the people most likely to be open to hearing from recruiters about a new job are recruiters themselves. Recruiters and other HR professionals are 115% more likely than the average worker to explore a new job opportunity, according to recent research from Workforce Logiq, a provider of artificial intelligence technology and services to businesses. In its Workforce Management Benchmark Report, Workforce Logiq uses an artificial intelligence model to calculate how likely workers of a certain title, industry and city are to quit their job. The algorithm draws on more than 1 billion data points and 40,000 sources to track events that can impact employment volatility, such as general labor market trends, company-level social media sentiment, employee churn indicators (like hiring or layoff announcements) and industry news and events. Using these indicators, workers were given a Talent Retention Risk, shortened to TRR, score to represent the likelihood they would respond to a recruiter message inviting them to consider a new job opportunity. Given the historic tight job market, recruiters are all the more important in bringing in new talent to fill open positions. That said, moderate wages for recruitment work don’t reflect the high demand for it, says Workforce Logiq chief strategy officer Joe Hanna. “Recruiters in general have not been on the higher end of compensation, outside of the very few who hire at a higher level of talent,” Hanna tells CNBC Make It. According to Payscale, recruiters earn a median salary of $49,819 per year. Hanna adds that, according to industry data, entry- and mid-level human resources workers tend to have a median tenure of just 18 to 21 months with a given employer.

The workers most likely to quit their jobs

In addition to recruiters, people most likely to be open to new job opportunities work in software engineering, marketing, finance and investing. While these workers are at higher risk of quitting their jobs, researchers say it could indicate confidence in where they stand within a competitive job market. The algorithm uses data points that point to both positive organizational impacts (such as stock price increases and new office openings) as well as negative events (such as executive departures and accounting scandals). “Higher TRR scores don’t always correlate to a negative culture or environment for workers,” Cindy Whitehead, chief data scientist and talent economist at Workforce Logiq, tells CNBC Make It. “It also correlates to talent demand and market dynamics.” Take the job outlook for technology workers, for instance. “The market for software engineers is robust,” Whitehead says, “and they are smartly taking advantage of the market demand to increase compensation and move up the corporate ladder.”

Quitting is the fastest way to earn a bigger paycheck

In general, the best way for workers to earn more is to quit their jobs and change employers, Brian Kropp, vice president at research firm Gartner, previously told CNBC Make It. “Companies are willing to pay about 15% more for new employees, but they’re only willing to give their current employees about a 2% or 3% annual raise,” he explains, citing Gartner’s research. “So to get ahead financially, what a lot of employees have realized is that in today’s tight labor market, the best thing to do is to go to another company to get more money rather than trying to get more money by staying at your current company.” At this point in time, Hanna points to the need for employers to invest in their retention efforts to engage current workers and give them reason to stick around. “An expression that’s starting to trend in our world is that retention is the new recruiting,” Hanna says, “meaning employers need to do as much internal recruiting, marketing and engagement work as they do externally.” Whitehead adds that employers should examine what their strengths are as a company and how they can maximize those offerings to current talent. That includes providing a positive working environment, good culture, competitive salary and benefits, and opportunities to help workers advance within the organization.

Millennials aren’t the only ones job-hopping

Millennials are the largest generation in the U.S. workforce. And contrary to the belief that they’re all entitled newcomers to the working world, today’s millennials are between the ages of 24 and 39 in 2020. Older millennials who are taking on more financial responsibilities, such as buying homes and starting families, may be buoyed by the strong job market to change employers and secure better pay. Research has also shown that millennials, more so than previous generations, place great value in a company’s culture and opportunities for advancement. As a result, they may be more willing to move around and find an employer with these attractive working conditions. “The mindset of millennials — the most impactful generation in the workforce right now — is to seek best-in-class fits: flexibility, jobs that align with their interest, strong compensation and benefits, etc.,” Whitehead says. “So they are, generally speaking, more open to hearing about new opportunities.” That said, the report debunks the myth that younger workers are the only ones moving around. Roughly half of chief marketing officers, for example, were identified as being more likely than the average worker to quit their job. These executives earn a median salary of $172,492 per year, according to PayScale, and more than half of those represented in the report have more than 20 years of experience.

The workers least likely to quit their jobs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, impact, market, jobsand, ability, recruiters, talent, workforce, quit, jobs, hanna, workers, likely


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

4 ‘ballsy questions’ everyone should ask in job interviews—but most don’t, says hiring CEO of 10 years

You also have to ask the right questions. After running a recruiting firm for more than 10 years, I’ve found that most candidates fail to ask the hard-hitting questions during job interviews — out of fear that they might look clueless or less confident. Here are four questions that I wish more candidates would ask during job interviews:1. If your hiring manager describes someone who sounds a lot like you, it’s a clear sign that you should reconsider whether you’re right for the job. Hiring manag


You also have to ask the right questions.
After running a recruiting firm for more than 10 years, I’ve found that most candidates fail to ask the hard-hitting questions during job interviews — out of fear that they might look clueless or less confident.
Here are four questions that I wish more candidates would ask during job interviews:1.
If your hiring manager describes someone who sounds a lot like you, it’s a clear sign that you should reconsider whether you’re right for the job.
Hiring manag
4 ‘ballsy questions’ everyone should ask in job interviews—but most don’t, says hiring CEO of 10 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: atta tarki
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hiring, offer, work, salary, candidates, ask, job, right, interviewsbut, dont, questions, youre, ballsy, ceo


4 'ballsy questions' everyone should ask in job interviews—but most don't, says hiring CEO of 10 years

The key to nailing a job interview isn’t just about giving the right answers. You also have to ask the right questions. After running a recruiting firm for more than 10 years, I’ve found that most candidates fail to ask the hard-hitting questions during job interviews — out of fear that they might look clueless or less confident. From a hiring manager’s perspective, however, not speaking up actually makes them look disengaged. But you can’t just pull a random question out of a hat. It’s always the ballsy — and often uncomfortable — ones that impress me the most. Here are four questions that I wish more candidates would ask during job interviews:

1. ‘Can you give examples of people who previously held this role, but were a bad fit? And why?’

If your hiring manager describes someone who sounds a lot like you, it’s a clear sign that you should reconsider whether you’re right for the job. Also be on the lookout for the manager who dismisses a previous employee by citing non-specific reasons. A few examples: “They seemed very lazy” or “I just never knew what they spent their time doing.” More often than not, these are warning signs of a boss with poor management and leadership skills. If this happens, try responding with, “Were there any individuals that you respected on a personal level, but weren’t qualified for the position?”

2. ‘How many hours do you expect the person in this role to work per week?’

For many people, this is a hard topic to bring up, as they don’t won’t to give the impression that they’re not a diligent worker who is willing to work longer hours. However, if a company is expecting you to work 80-hour workweeks, that may not be feasible based on your lifestyle. If you’re a parent who requires more flexibility, for example, you could say, “I know I’d be great at this job, but it’s also important for me to be able to pick my kids up from school in the afternoon. Is that something you’d be okay with?” Hiring managers appreciate when candidates are honest and make their priorities clear right from the start. It saves both parties a lot of time and energy.

3. ‘How often does this company give salary raises to its employees?’

Discussions about money are always tricky. Most candidates try to avoid it altogether during the interview process. Or they’ll wait until after they’re given an offer to bring it up. So I’m always impressed by people who aren’t afraid to ask about it during the initial stages. I once interviewed a candidate who was bold enough say: “I’m looking for a job that offers financial viability. How often are employees considered for raises, and based on what factors?” If an employer finds a strong candidate that they really want on their team, they’ll often go out of their way to offer a competitive starting salary. They may even throw in a bonus agreement, like: “If you meet [X, Y, Z] expectations during your first year on the job, you’ll get a salary raise of [X]%.”

4. ‘What kind of professional development benefits do you offer?’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: atta tarki
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hiring, offer, work, salary, candidates, ask, job, right, interviewsbut, dont, questions, youre, ballsy, ceo


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Attorney General William Barr says Trump’s tweets ‘make it impossible for me to do my job’

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that President Donald Trump should stop tweeting about the Department of Justice, complaining that the president’s comments “make it impossible for me to do my job.” “I’m going to do what I think is right,” Barr said. President Trump uses social media very effectively to fight for the American people against injustices in our country, including the fake news. The President has full faith and confidence in Attorney General Barr to do his job and uphold


Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that President Donald Trump should stop tweeting about the Department of Justice, complaining that the president’s comments “make it impossible for me to do my job.”
“I’m going to do what I think is right,” Barr said.
President Trump uses social media very effectively to fight for the American people against injustices in our country, including the fake news.
The President has full faith and confidence in Attorney General Barr to do his job and uphold
Attorney General William Barr says Trump’s tweets ‘make it impossible for me to do my job’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: kevin breuninger dan mangan, kevin breuninger, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attorney, prosecutors, trumps, right, president, sentencing, justice, general, barr, trump, william, stone, job, tweets, impossible, department, think


Attorney General William Barr says Trump's tweets 'make it impossible for me to do my job'

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that President Donald Trump should stop tweeting about the Department of Justice, complaining that the president’s comments “make it impossible for me to do my job.”

Barr’s unusual critique of his boss came in an ABC News interview.

The remarks followed days of sharp criticism of Barr, Trump and the DOJ by congressional Democrats over the department’s decision to reverse a harsh sentencing recommendation for Trump’s friend, Republican political consultant Roger Stone.

“I think it’s time to stop the tweeting about Department of Justice criminal cases,” Barr told ABC News Chief Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas.

“I will make those decisions based on what I think is the right thing to do, and I’m not going to be bullied or influenced by anybody … whether it’s Congress, a newspaper editorial board, or the president,” Barr said.

“I’m going to do what I think is right,” Barr said. “I cannot do my job here at the department with a constant background commentary that undercuts me.”

Trump’s tweets, “make it impossible for me to do my job and to assure the courts and the prosecutors in the department that we’re doing our work with integrity,” he said.

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham responded to Barr’s comments with the following statement:

“The President wasn’t bothered by the comments at all and he has the right, just like any American citizen, to publicly offer his opinions. President Trump uses social media very effectively to fight for the American people against injustices in our country, including the fake news. The President has full faith and confidence in Attorney General Barr to do his job and uphold the law.”

The four prosecutors who handled Stone’s trial on Monday night told a judge in a court filing that Stone should serve between seven to nine years in prison, the same span called for under federal sentencing guidelines as determined by U.S. probation officials.

Within hours of that filing, Trump blasted the sentencing recommendation as a “disgrace.”

And hours after that, the Justice Department said it would filed a new sentencing suggestion for Stone, calling for a markedly lower prison term.

All four prosecutors quit the case in apparent protest on Tuesday — and one resigned from the Justice Department altogether.

Trump praised Barr on social media after the Justice Department pushed the prosecutors in Stone’s case to weaken their proposal.

In his ABC interview, Barr, for the first time publicly, detailed his account of the decision to reduce Stone’s sentencing recommendation.

Barr said that Timothy Shea, his former counselor who recently became the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, on Monday “came by to briefly chat with me and say that the team [of trial prosecutors] very much wanted to recommend the 7-9 year to the judge, but he thought that there was a way of satisfying everybody and providing more flexibility.”

“And there was a brief discussion of that. I was under the impression that what was going to happen was very much what I had suggested, which was deferring to the judge,” Barr told ABC.

“Monday night, when I first saw the news reports [about the sentencing proposal], I said “gee, the news is spinning this. This is not what we were going to do.’ ”

“I was very surprised. And once I confirmed that that’s actually what we filed, I said that night to my staff that we had to get ready cause we had to do something in the morning to amend that and clarify what our position was,” the attorney general said.

“I had made a decision that I thought was fair and reasonable in this particular case. And once the tweet [by Trump condemning the sentencing proposal] occurred, the question was, well, now what do I do? Do you go forward with what you think is the right decision? Or do you pull back because of the tweet?”

“And that just sort of illustrates how disruptive these tweets can be,” Barr said.

Barr added that while “I have a problem with some of the tweets, I’m happy to say that in fact, the President has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case.

Asked if he had ever spoken with Trump about the sentencing recommendations for Stone, Barr said, “Never.”

Barr also denied that anyone from the White House had called him to try to influence him about Stone: “No. I have not discussed the Roger Stone case at the White House.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: kevin breuninger dan mangan, kevin breuninger, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attorney, prosecutors, trumps, right, president, sentencing, justice, general, barr, trump, william, stone, job, tweets, impossible, department, think


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: ‘You only gotta be right once’

Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures. “It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4. Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed. While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys. “It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book.


Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures.
“It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4.
Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed.
While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys.
“It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book.
3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: ‘You only gotta be right once’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, book, wrote, sport, right, failed, fired, business, billionaire, cuban, times, selling, start, job, gotta, win, mark


3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: 'You only gotta be right once'

Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures. But if you ask him, past mistakes don’t matter.

“It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4. “You only gotta be right once. Then everybody tells you how lucky you are.”

Cuban said people only focus on his big successes: first selling start-up MicroSolutions in 1990 to CompuServe for $6 million, and nine years later selling Broadcast.com to Yahoo for $5.7 billion in stock. They never talk about the hiccups that came first.

Cuban’s first fail happened while he was still in college.

“I started a bar, Motley’s Pub, when I wasn’t even of legal drinking age the summer before my senior year at Indiana University,” he wrote in his book “How to Win at the Sport of Business: If I Can Do It, You Can Do It.”

The campus bar was cited for having underage patrons and was shut down, according to the Dallas Morning News.

“No one really asks me how it turned out. It was great until we got busted for letting a 16-year-old win a wet T-shirt contest. (I swear I checked her ID, and it was good!),” he wrote in “How to Win at the Sport of Business.”

After graduating from Indiana University in 1981, Cuban had “quit or been fired from three straight jobs,” he said on an episode of ABC’s “Shark Tank.”

At 22, Cuban moved back to his hometown, Pittsburgh, got a job at Mellon Bank and ultimately quit because he didn’t like the CEO, he wrote in a piece for Forbes in 2013. He also worked for a TV repair franchise Tronics 2000, but that job didn’t work out either.

Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed. After, Cuban landed a sales gig at computer company Your Business Software, but got fired for closing a deal without approval from the CEO (another fail). But getting fired led him to start his own computer systems company, MicroSolutions.

While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys. He often came home to the lights turned off and he had his credit cards cut as he struggled to make ends meet, he said during an Oxford Union Q&A in 2017.

“No one really asks me about my adventures working for Mellon Bank, or Tronics 2000, or trying to start a business selling powdered milk (it was cheaper by the gallon, and I thought it tasted good enough),” he wrote in his book “How to Win at the Sport of Business.”

“They don’t ask me about getting fired from my job at Your Business Software for wanting to close a sale rather than open up the store. No one ever asks me about what it was like when I started MicroSolutions or how I used to count the months I was in business, hoping to outlast my previous endeavors and make this one a success.”

But according to Cuban, all that matters is one success.

“It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book. “To be a success, you only have to be right once. One single time and you are set for life.”

Today, Cuban is worth $4.1 billion, according to Forbes.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, book, wrote, sport, right, failed, fired, business, billionaire, cuban, times, selling, start, job, gotta, win, mark


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

More workers call the shots as the labor market tightens. So who’s the boss?

But in 2020, businesses should prepare for a greater hurdle in their hiring challenge: an actual tight labor market where workers call the shots. The idea that labor markets aren’t tight — yet — will come as a surprise for many business owners who are currently feeling the pressure of hiring. And with unemployment at just 3.6%, the data may seem to be confirming that labor markets are tight already. Business owners and hiring managers have gotten used to the glut of workers that is characteristi


But in 2020, businesses should prepare for a greater hurdle in their hiring challenge: an actual tight labor market where workers call the shots.
The idea that labor markets aren’t tight — yet — will come as a surprise for many business owners who are currently feeling the pressure of hiring.
And with unemployment at just 3.6%, the data may seem to be confirming that labor markets are tight already.
Business owners and hiring managers have gotten used to the glut of workers that is characteristi
More workers call the shots as the labor market tightens. So who’s the boss? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: adam ozimek, upworks chief economist, markus strobel, president of procter, gambles global skin, personal care, tom connor, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, tight, businesses, hiring, shots, markets, unemployment, boss, tightens, whos, work, workers, labor, market


More workers call the shots as the labor market tightens. So who's the boss?

Nonfarm payrolls rose 225,000 for the month, well above Wall Street estimates, and the unemployment rate ticked higher, to 3.6%. Labor force participation rose 0.2% to 63.4%, matching its highest level since June 2013, according to data released Friday by the Labor Department.

But for businesses across the U.S., there seems to be a general consensus that hiring is a major challenge. In fact, a recent survey found that 26% of small businesses say finding qualified talent is their biggest problem right now — a 46-year high.

On the heels of the Great Recession, businesses may feel that hiring is impossible and bound to improve soon. But in 2020, businesses should prepare for a greater hurdle in their hiring challenge: an actual tight labor market where workers call the shots.

The idea that labor markets aren’t tight — yet — will come as a surprise for many business owners who are currently feeling the pressure of hiring. And with unemployment at just 3.6%, the data may seem to be confirming that labor markets are tight already. However, the share of prime working-age adults with a job, which is a wider and more accurate measure of labor market tightness, is still below where it was for much of the late 1990s.

Even December’s lower-than-expected job growth of 145,000 was more than enough to keep up with population growth. Additionally, when taking a step back and looking at the overall health of the labor market, employers are still managing to add 2 million new workers every year without raising wages at a fast pace. Does that sound like there is nobody left to hire?

To understand why businesses think it’s hard to hire, it is important to keep in mind that it has been nearly two decades since the labor market has been genuinely healthy. Business owners and hiring managers have gotten used to the glut of workers that is characteristic of a weak labor market. They have not had to manage in a truly tight market in a long time, and many under the age of 35 have never had to do so. They have grown accustomed to applications rushing in without raising pay much and to workers who don’t have much bargaining power.

For more on tech, transformation and the future of work, join CNBC at the @Work Summit in New York City on April 1–2, 2020.

Now imagine instead of plenty of workers on the sidelines who need a job, it’s two years from now: Hiring has continued apace, and labor markets are truly tight. Many who have the skills businesses need already have work, and the balance of power is in labor’s hands. The stronger economy will mean that workers will get to dictate the terms of when and how they want to work and businesses should be prepared.

Aside from requests for wage increases and bonuses, more flexibility will be a top demand from talent. This will look different for every worker, but businesses should be prepared for demands for more flexible schedules and the ability to work remotely and even greater choice to be an independent professional.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: adam ozimek, upworks chief economist, markus strobel, president of procter, gambles global skin, personal care, tom connor, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, tight, businesses, hiring, shots, markets, unemployment, boss, tightens, whos, work, workers, labor, market


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Post-tax cut job gains weren’t quite as great as initially thought

“The new data show that the trend in job growth stepped down in 2016 and has been little changed, net, since then.” Benchmark revisions to the March 2019 payrolls number showed the economy created 514,000 fewer jobs than initially reported over the previous 12-month period. That high-powered job growth following the 2017 tax cut lost a little of its sizzle Friday after the government released revised figures over the past year. For all of 2019, job gains were 175,000 a month, according to monthl


“The new data show that the trend in job growth stepped down in 2016 and has been little changed, net, since then.”
Benchmark revisions to the March 2019 payrolls number showed the economy created 514,000 fewer jobs than initially reported over the previous 12-month period.
That high-powered job growth following the 2017 tax cut lost a little of its sizzle Friday after the government released revised figures over the past year.
For all of 2019, job gains were 175,000 a month, according to monthl
Post-tax cut job gains weren’t quite as great as initially thought Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, werent, economy, quite, job, cut, 2019, tax, showed, chief, data, initially, economist, revisions, posttax, thought, great, gains


Post-tax cut job gains weren't quite as great as initially thought

“The increase in the pace of payroll growth visible in the previous data for 2018, which most analysts ascribed to the tax cuts, has disappeared,” Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said in a note. “The new data show that the trend in job growth stepped down in 2016 and has been little changed, net, since then.”

Benchmark revisions to the March 2019 payrolls number showed the economy created 514,000 fewer jobs than initially reported over the previous 12-month period. That was slightly more than the initial estimate and took monthly job creation below 200,000 in the months following the December 2017 reform bill that slashed corporate taxes and cut levies for many Americans.

That high-powered job growth following the 2017 tax cut lost a little of its sizzle Friday after the government released revised figures over the past year.

However, the pace is still a strong one.

Friday’s report on nonfarm payrolls showed a gain of 225,000, much stronger than what Wall Street had anticipated and a sign that there is considerable slack left in the economy and room for more growth.

In addition, the subsequent months’ revisions actually showed the labor market gaining momentum through 2019, with gains between April and December revised up a total of 92,000.

“That means the rebound in employment growth in the tail end of last year only looks stronger now, suggesting that the economy has more momentum than we previously believed,” wrote Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

For all of 2019, job gains were 175,000 a month, according to monthly revisions the government also released Friday.

The annual revisions, then, appear more to be backward-looking data that don’t portend any meaningful slowing ahead, according to multiple economists who reviewed the latest numbers.

“Much ado about nothing,” was how Joseph LaVorgna, chief Americas economist at Natixis, said of the benchmark revisions. “Anybody who’s talking about revisions is trying to spin a negative story. You’ve got job growth across the board, high participation. Manufacturing is weak and you’re still getting this kind of growth? The labor market is booming.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, werent, economy, quite, job, cut, 2019, tax, showed, chief, data, initially, economist, revisions, posttax, thought, great, gains


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

These companies let people work from anywhere in the world—and they’re hiring

For those interested in a remote work arrangement, it’s worth knowing that the vast majority, 95%, still have a location requirement, according to FlexJobs, a listing site for remote jobs. FlexJobs recently identified the top companies in their database that posted the most work-from-anywhere job listings in 2019. Job seekers interested in these roles should highlight skills that demonstrate strong communication and teamwork skills, as well as comfort with technology, and any previous remote wor


For those interested in a remote work arrangement, it’s worth knowing that the vast majority, 95%, still have a location requirement, according to FlexJobs, a listing site for remote jobs.
FlexJobs recently identified the top companies in their database that posted the most work-from-anywhere job listings in 2019.
Job seekers interested in these roles should highlight skills that demonstrate strong communication and teamwork skills, as well as comfort with technology, and any previous remote wor
These companies let people work from anywhere in the world—and they’re hiring Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldand, companies, remote, workfromanywhere, office, job, let, company, hiring, theyre, vast, reynolds, work, skills


These companies let people work from anywhere in the world—and they're hiring

If you’ve ever dreamed of ditching office life for good and working from the comfort of your home — or the beach — you’re in good company. As of 2017, 3.4 million U.S. employees primarily worked from home, according to the most recent data from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, and that number has likely increased in the years since.

For those interested in a remote work arrangement, it’s worth knowing that the vast majority, 95%, still have a location requirement, according to FlexJobs, a listing site for remote jobs.

These requirements — whether it’s a specific city, state or region of the country — could be in place so the worker can visit the employer’s office for in-person meetings, to facilitate timely communication within a certain time zone, or to abide by employment tax law requirements.

That means, for workers who want a truly location-agnostic job, just 5% of remote opportunities don’t have a location requirement.

A job seeker’s best bet for landing a work-from-anywhere job is to first identify companies who are completely remote, says Brie Weiler Reynolds, career development manager and coach at FlexJobs. These organizations operate without a physical office or headquarters and rely on a suite of digital collaboration tools (think: online messaging, videoconferencing, document sharing, project management programs) to function.

FlexJobs recently identified the top companies in their database that posted the most work-from-anywhere job listings in 2019. The organizations span a range of sizes and industries, Reynolds tells CNBC Make It, but those with a focus in certain areas, including computers and IT, writing and editing, project management, marketing, software development and education, tend to fare best in a remote structure.

“It’s a common assumption that this type of job must be a freelance or contract role, but the vast majority of work-from-anywhere jobs on our site, over 75%, are employee roles,” Reynolds adds.

Job seekers interested in these roles should highlight skills that demonstrate strong communication and teamwork skills, as well as comfort with technology, and any previous remote work experience.

“Even if the company doesn’t have something open in your field, you might consider reaching out to their HR team or even the CEO if it’s a smaller company, and introducing yourself,” Reynolds says. “Tell them how you can help their company in particular, and ask them to keep you in mind for future hiring needs in your line of work.”

Here are the top companies that are hiring people to work from anywhere in the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worldand, companies, remote, workfromanywhere, office, job, let, company, hiring, theyre, vast, reynolds, work, skills


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Oscar nominee Margot Robbie’s first job was making sandwiches at Subway

On Sunday, Feb. 9, at the 92nd Academy Awards, Margot Robbie is looking to win her first Oscar. She’s nominated for best supporting actress for her role in the 2019 drama “Bombshell.” Even the 29-year-old Australian actress, who’s one of the biggest stars in Hollywood, had to start somewhere: Before her acting career took off, she was making sandwiches at Subway. After her third year on “Neighbours,” Robbie moved to Los Angeles and signed a contract with talent management company Management 360.


On Sunday, Feb. 9, at the 92nd Academy Awards, Margot Robbie is looking to win her first Oscar.
She’s nominated for best supporting actress for her role in the 2019 drama “Bombshell.”
Even the 29-year-old Australian actress, who’s one of the biggest stars in Hollywood, had to start somewhere: Before her acting career took off, she was making sandwiches at Subway.
After her third year on “Neighbours,” Robbie moved to Los Angeles and signed a contract with talent management company Management 360.
Oscar nominee Margot Robbie’s first job was making sandwiches at Subway Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, role, nominee, australian, subway, oscar, job, drama, robbies, worked, neighbours, work, margot, sandwiches, tonya, acting, robbie, actress


Oscar nominee Margot Robbie's first job was making sandwiches at Subway

On Sunday, Feb. 9, at the 92nd Academy Awards, Margot Robbie is looking to win her first Oscar. She’s nominated for best supporting actress for her role in the 2019 drama “Bombshell.”

Even the 29-year-old Australian actress, who’s one of the biggest stars in Hollywood, had to start somewhere: Before her acting career took off, she was making sandwiches at Subway.

“I’ve had every kind of job. Before ‘Neighbours,’ I was working at Subway,” Robbie said in a 2013 interview with the Australian Council of Trade Unions, referring to her first major acting role, in which she played a bisexual teen in the Australian soap opera “Neighbours.” Robbie, who was 17 at the time, landed the gig by cold-calling the casting agent.

“I’ve worked in restaurants — behind the bar, in the kitchen — I did retail for two years, I’ve done some secretary work,” she added.

After her third year on “Neighbours,” Robbie moved to Los Angeles and signed a contract with talent management company Management 360. She worked on another TV show, “Pan Am,” which opened the door for bigger opportunities, including a role in the 2013 drama “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Robbie continued to land bigger roles. She co-starred with Will Smith in the 2015 thriller “Focus” and with Tina Fey in the 2016 drama “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot” before playing figure skater Tonya Harding in 2018’s “I, Tonya.” Her performance as Harding earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Actress.

Robbie, who earned $23.5 million last year, making her the eighth highest-paid actress of 2019, according to Forbes, isn’t just an on-screen talent: In 2014, she and her now-husband Tom Ackerley co-founded LuckyChap Entertainment, a production company that focuses on telling women-driven stories. One such project is “Birds of Prey,” a female-led superhero movie released on Feb. 7, 2020, which Robbie stars in.

Robbie isn’t the only Hollywood star who started out with a less-than-glamorous gig. Before Kevin Bacon got his first big break, he bussed tables in New York City to make ends meet. Melissa McCarthy worked at Starbucks and the YMCA when she first moved to Los Angeles to pursue acting.

While Robbie has established herself as one of the most successful actors of her generation, her family wasn’t always on board with her career path: “My family has no connection to the entertainment industry whatsoever, so when I started acting, everyone was like, that’s fun, but when are you going to actually get a real job?” she told British Vogue in 2018. “And that went on for years.”

Hopefully by now they’ve accepted her work as a “real job.”

Don’t miss: Melissa McCarthy, one of the highest-paid actresses, once worked at Starbucks and the YMCA

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, role, nominee, australian, subway, oscar, job, drama, robbies, worked, neighbours, work, margot, sandwiches, tonya, acting, robbie, actress


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post