Attorney general pick Barr hints he would look at antitrust in tech

William Barr told U.S. senators in his confirmation hearing for attorney general on Tuesday that regulators need to take a deeper look at the “huge behemoths” in tech. “The purpose of the antitrust laws, obviously, is to protect competition,” Barr, who previously served as attorney general in the administration of President George H.W. U.S. tech companies Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, Alphabet and Facebook are five of the six most valuable companies in the world. Over the past year, lawmakers have c


William Barr told U.S. senators in his confirmation hearing for attorney general on Tuesday that regulators need to take a deeper look at the “huge behemoths” in tech. “The purpose of the antitrust laws, obviously, is to protect competition,” Barr, who previously served as attorney general in the administration of President George H.W. U.S. tech companies Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, Alphabet and Facebook are five of the six most valuable companies in the world. Over the past year, lawmakers have c
Attorney general pick Barr hints he would look at antitrust in tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: lauren feiner, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, attorney, companies, look, hints, antitrust, silicon, general, pick, valley, barr, merger, tech, department, justice


Attorney general pick Barr hints he would look at antitrust in tech

William Barr told U.S. senators in his confirmation hearing for attorney general on Tuesday that regulators need to take a deeper look at the “huge behemoths” in tech.

“The purpose of the antitrust laws, obviously, is to protect competition,” Barr, who previously served as attorney general in the administration of President George H.W. Bush, said in response to a question from Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT). Barr said that competition is ultimately good for consumers, but he suggested that he needs to look more into the topic.

“At the same time, I’m sort of interested in stepping back and reassessing, or learning more about how the antitrust division has been functioning and what their priorities are,” said Barr. “I don’t think big is necessarily bad, but I think a lot of people wonder how such huge behemoths that now exist in Silicon Valley have taken shape under the nose of the antitrust enforcers. You can win that place in the marketplace without violating the antitrust laws, but I want to find out more about that dynamic.”

U.S. tech companies Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, Alphabet and Facebook are five of the six most valuable companies in the world. Over the past year, lawmakers have called for greater regulation of the industry as privacy and platform manipulation scandals have rankled Silicon Valley. Executives from Facebook, Twitter and Google have all testified in front of congress, about what they’re doing to get back on track.

Barr made it clear in his testimony that he is interested in a number of issues pertinent to tech companies. In response to a question from Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) about the Justice Department’s role is in terms of working with the Federal Trade Commission to address anti-competitive behavior.

“I would like to weigh in to some of these issues,” Barr said. “I’d like to have the antitrust [division] support that effort to get more involved in reviewing the situation from a competition standpoint. I also am interested in the issue of privacy. And the question of who owns this data. And, you know, it’s not an area that I’ve studied closely or become an expert in. But I think it’s important for the department to get more involved in these questions.”

Barr acknowledged he still doesn’t have the solutions to these questions, including about whether the Justice Department has the authority to address alleged bias on online platforms. He said he’d “have to think long and hard before I said that it was really the stuff of an antitrust matter.” But he also expressed concern over the “network effects” that have allowed tech companies to become “so powerful that particular sectors could essentially be subsumed into these networks.”

Whoever is confirmed as attorney general could play a key role in shaping the enforcement of antitrust regulation in the coming years.

Barr is plenty familiar with the topic, as he recently battled the Justice Department over the proposed merger of AT&T and Time Warner, where he was a board member. As part of the merger litigation, Barr filed an affidavit saying he was disappointed in the “inexplicable” opposition by the Justice Department’s leadership given President Donald Trump’s “prior public animus towards CNN and this merger,” according to The Washington Post.

Barr has said that if confirmed he would recuse himself from the Time Warner-AT&T case. A lower court had approved the merger in June, but the Justice Department filed an appeal in July.

Hawley asked Barr if he sees “similar concerns” to those the Justice Department raised against the Time Warner/AT&T merger “regarding how Silicon Valley firms could use their market power and social media or search to discriminate against rival products or services and viewpoints.” Noting that his response “has no application” to the merger case involving AT&T and Time Warner, Barr answered, “yes.”

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Watch: Trump AG nominee William Barr: Special counsel Bob Mueller would not be ‘involved in a witch hunt’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: lauren feiner, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, attorney, companies, look, hints, antitrust, silicon, general, pick, valley, barr, merger, tech, department, justice


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Cancer surgeons expect Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to recover in weeks

There are a number of factors that go into assessing a patient’s recovery from thoracic surgery. Surgeons consider the patient’s vitality going into the operation, their age, and how long they spend in the hospital following the operation. Despite her age, Ginsburg has a number of variables in her favor. Sudish Murthy, the section head of thoracic surgery at Cleveland Clinic, has performed about 9,000 thoracic surgeries. Ginsburg spent four days recovering at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer


There are a number of factors that go into assessing a patient’s recovery from thoracic surgery. Surgeons consider the patient’s vitality going into the operation, their age, and how long they spend in the hospital following the operation. Despite her age, Ginsburg has a number of variables in her favor. Sudish Murthy, the section head of thoracic surgery at Cleveland Clinic, has performed about 9,000 thoracic surgeries. Ginsburg spent four days recovering at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: tucker higgins
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Cancer surgeons expect Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to recover in weeks

There are a number of factors that go into assessing a patient’s recovery from thoracic surgery. Surgeons consider the patient’s vitality going into the operation, their age, and how long they spend in the hospital following the operation. The invasiveness of the surgery also has an impact on the length of the recovery.

Despite her age, Ginsburg has a number of variables in her favor. For one, the day before her surgery, she appeared completely healthy, according to Katy Tur, an NBC News correspondent and MSNBC anchor who happened to be on a flight to New York with the justice.

Tur said that Ginsburg was “moving well” and spent the entire ride working.

Ginsburg’s physical condition is also bolstered by an unusual workout routine for a woman of her advanced age. She is known to regularly train with a physical trainer, Bryant Johnson, who has worked with Ginsburg for 20 years and describes her as “tough as nails.”

Sudish Murthy, the section head of thoracic surgery at Cleveland Clinic, has performed about 9,000 thoracic surgeries. He said the best way to project a typical recovery period is to take the number of days the patient spent in the hospital and multiply by about eight to 10.

Ginsburg spent four days recovering at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, the Supreme Court has said. Given her four-day hospital stay, Murthy’s arithmetic puts the upper end of her recovery at the end of January.

“By that time much of the pain from the procedure is gone, much of the shock to the system is gone,” he said. “People with desk jobs can often return to their place of employment and do light duty work, often for half days.”

Murthy said there are two components to Ginsburg’s recovery. In addition to recovering from the loss of much of her left lung, she will also have to bounce back from being bedridden for days. At 85, he said, it is much easier to get out of shape than to get back into shape.

But, he said, the fact that her doctors recommended a lobectomy suggests that an assessment of her health showed her to be in good enough physical condition for a “Plan A” treatment. Doctors don’t recommend surgeries that they don’t believe their patients can recover from, he said, and there are other less aggressive treatments for Ginsburg’s condition.

“The age does not necessarily connote frailty,” he said. “Frailty connotes frailty.”

Murthy added that based on the court’s public statements, it appears that Ginsburg underwent a minimally invasive procedure, likely either video-assisted or performed with the use of robots, that would expedite the recovery period.

Flores, the thoracic surgeon at Mount Sinai, said that it is a positive sign that Ginsburg has not returned to the hospital and has continued to work from home.

“The thing that should not have people worried is that she’s not back in the hospital,” he said. “If she were not doing well, if there was an issue, she would be back in the hospital.”

Murthy said he is looking out for whether any further treatments are necessary. In a statement, Valerie Rusch, the surgeon who operated on Ginsburg, said that no further treatment is planned. But Murthy said that no further treatments would be planned until Ginsburg recovers from the first operation.

“This just seems completely normal,” Flores said. “She’s not going anywhere. She’s with us.”

The next oral arguments are scheduled to take place on Monday. The court will also likely decide in the coming weeks whether it will review key cases concerning the president’s immigration powers and whether employers can discriminate against LGBT employees, though Ginsburg may participate in those decisions from home.

On Feb. 19, the court will hear oral arguments in its first case of February, in a dispute involving Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’ decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surgeons, shes, justice, recover, age, spent, ginsburg, bader, weeks, physical, surgery, cancer, hospital, thoracic, ruth, expect, recovery, treatments


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Immigration courts at a standstill during government shutdown, undermining President Trump’s agenda

With the shutdown is on its 14th day, with no resolution in sight, almost all of the immigration court hearings that were scheduled for the past two weeks will need to be rescheduled for a later date. The shutdown “could not have come at a worse time due to this unprecedented backlog,” said Jeremy McKinney, North Carolina immigration lawyer and executive committee member at the American Immigration Lawyers Association. While court hearings will proceed for immigrants held in detention centers, a


With the shutdown is on its 14th day, with no resolution in sight, almost all of the immigration court hearings that were scheduled for the past two weeks will need to be rescheduled for a later date. The shutdown “could not have come at a worse time due to this unprecedented backlog,” said Jeremy McKinney, North Carolina immigration lawyer and executive committee member at the American Immigration Lawyers Association. While court hearings will proceed for immigrants held in detention centers, a
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: carmin chappell, john moore, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rescheduled, stay, hearings, shutdown, courts, backlog, president, system, trumps, immigration, agenda, court, standstill, undermining, scheduled, justice


Immigration courts at a standstill during government shutdown, undermining President Trump's agenda

The prolonged government shutdown in some respects is having the opposite effect President Donald Trump intended when he refused to compromise with Congress over his demand for $5 billion in border wall funding.

With the shutdown is on its 14th day, with no resolution in sight, almost all of the immigration court hearings that were scheduled for the past two weeks will need to be rescheduled for a later date.

For asylum seekers and others hoping to stay in the states, that means the already lengthy process of receiving a decision from a court system that is burdened with an historic backlog of cases will be extended.

Far from the president’s rallying cry of “securing our border,” delaying court hearings puts additional strain on the immigration system, while allowing those who would have been deported to stay in the country for possibly years longer as they await new court dates.

The shutdown “could not have come at a worse time due to this unprecedented backlog,” said Jeremy McKinney, North Carolina immigration lawyer and executive committee member at the American Immigration Lawyers Association.

Since the Justice Department’s funding ran out on Dec. 22, all of the approximately 400 immigration judges, who adjudicate a backlog of over 800,000 pending cases, have been furloughed.

While court hearings will proceed for immigrants held in detention centers, all other hearings scheduled during the shutdown will be rescheduled, the Executive Office for Immigration Review said in a statement.

The statement did not specify a time-frame for new court dates. When requesting comment for this story, an automated message from the Justice Department said that inquiries “may not be returned until funding is restored.”

The average wait time for immigration court hearings is 718 days, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University. Courts in San Antonio and Chicago have the longest waits at more than 1,500 days, or over 4 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-04  Authors: carmin chappell, john moore, getty images
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Justice Ginsburg working from hospital after surgery, court says

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been up and working from the New York City hospital where she recently underwent surgery to remove cancerous nodes from her lungs, according to a spokesperson. Ginsburg, 85, continued working on Sunday while still at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, according to Kathy Arberg, a spokeswoman for the court. A pathologist will determine whether it’s a recurrence of Ginsburg’s pancreatic cancer or a primary lung tumor. Despite her health issues, Gi


Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been up and working from the New York City hospital where she recently underwent surgery to remove cancerous nodes from her lungs, according to a spokesperson. Ginsburg, 85, continued working on Sunday while still at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, according to Kathy Arberg, a spokeswoman for the court. A pathologist will determine whether it’s a recurrence of Ginsburg’s pancreatic cancer or a primary lung tumor. Despite her health issues, Gi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-24  Authors: kalhan rosenblatt, the associated press
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Justice Ginsburg working from hospital after surgery, court says

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been up and working from the New York City hospital where she recently underwent surgery to remove cancerous nodes from her lungs, according to a spokesperson.

Ginsburg, 85, continued working on Sunday while still at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, according to Kathy Arberg, a spokeswoman for the court.

On Friday, Ginsburg underwent a pulmonary lobectomy to remove two malignant growths from her lungs, which were discovered after she fell and broke three of her ribs on Nov. 7.

Both “nodules removed during surgery were found to be malignant on initial pathology evaluation,” the court said, but there “was no evidence of any remaining disease.”

A pathologist will determine whether it’s a recurrence of Ginsburg’s pancreatic cancer or a primary lung tumor.

This is Ginsburg’s third bout of cancer, after surviving both colon and pancreatic cancer. She also had a heart stent procedure in 2014.

Despite her health issues, Ginsburg, the oldest justice on the Supreme Court, has never missed arguments before the court. The court next meets on Jan. 7.

There is no information about when Ginsburg will be released from the hospital, but the court said she is “expected to remain in the hospital for a few days.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-24  Authors: kalhan rosenblatt, the associated press
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Carlos Ghosn’s detention puts Japan’s justice system under microscope

His case is drawing attention to the criminal justice system in Japan, where there is no presumption of innocence and the accused can be held for months before trial. The system, sometimes called “hostage justice,” has come under fire from human rights advocates. When a court denied Tokyo prosecutors’ request to detain Ghosn another 10 days on Dec. 20, it was so unusual that the Japanese media reported he might be released. Tokyo prosecutors consider Ghosn, a Brazilian-born Frenchman of Lebanese


His case is drawing attention to the criminal justice system in Japan, where there is no presumption of innocence and the accused can be held for months before trial. The system, sometimes called “hostage justice,” has come under fire from human rights advocates. When a court denied Tokyo prosecutors’ request to detain Ghosn another 10 days on Dec. 20, it was so unusual that the Japanese media reported he might be released. Tokyo prosecutors consider Ghosn, a Brazilian-born Frenchman of Lebanese
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: issei kato
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Carlos Ghosn's detention puts Japan's justice system under microscope

Since his arrest on suspicion of falsifying financial reports, Nissan’s former Chairman Carlos Ghosn has been sitting in a humble cell for more than a month, interrogated day in and day out, without a lawyer present.

His case is drawing attention to the criminal justice system in Japan, where there is no presumption of innocence and the accused can be held for months before trial. The system, sometimes called “hostage justice,” has come under fire from human rights advocates.

When a court denied Tokyo prosecutors’ request to detain Ghosn another 10 days on Dec. 20, it was so unusual that the Japanese media reported he might be released. But such speculation was dashed when prosecutors rearrested him a day later on suspicion of breach of trust, tagging on a new set of allegations centered on Ghosn’s shifting personal investment losses of some 1.8 billion yen ($16 million) to Nissan Motor. On Sunday, a court approved prosecutors’ request to detain him through Jan. 1.

But his plight is routine in Japan. People have signed confessions, even to killings they never committed, just to get out of the ordeal.

A trial could be months away and could drag on even longer. And his chances aren’t good: The conviction rate in Japan is 99 percent.

Those close to Ghosn and his family say he is asserting his innocence. But it is unclear when release may come for Ghosn, who led a two-decade turnaround at Nissan from near-bankruptcy. Tokyo prosecutors consider Ghosn, a Brazilian-born Frenchman of Lebanese ancestry, a flight risk.

Other nations may have legal systems that are criticized as brutal and unfair. The U.S., for instance, has its share of erroneous convictions, police brutality and dubious plea bargains. But, in the U.S., a person is presumed innocent, has the right to have an attorney present and gets freed within 72 hours if there is no charge.

Carl Tobias, a professor at the University of Richmond’s School of Law, said such a longtime detention is highly unusual in the U.S.

“Each time the government reaches a deadline where Ghosn might be released, the government files new allegations and rearrests,” he said.

Deputy Chief Prosecutor Shin Kukimoto said prosecutors are merely doing their job of “trying to carry out a proper investigation.”

When asked by a reporter about “hostage justice,” he replied: “We are not in a position to comment on how the law has been designed.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-23  Authors: issei kato
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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 85, undergoes lung procedure to remove cancerous growth

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 85, underwent surgery Friday to remove two malignant nodules from her left lung, the Supreme Court said. Ginsburg, the eldest member of the court and the senior justice of its liberal wing, underwent a pulmonary lobectomy. Sloan Kettering on its website describes a lobectomy as the most common operation for non-small cell lung cancer. It is the best treatment for “isolated lung cancer in an otherwise healthy patient,” according to the hospital. Justice


Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 85, underwent surgery Friday to remove two malignant nodules from her left lung, the Supreme Court said. Ginsburg, the eldest member of the court and the senior justice of its liberal wing, underwent a pulmonary lobectomy. Sloan Kettering on its website describes a lobectomy as the most common operation for non-small cell lung cancer. It is the best treatment for “isolated lung cancer in an otherwise healthy patient,” according to the hospital. Justice
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: tucker higgins
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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 85, undergoes lung procedure to remove cancerous growth

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 85, underwent surgery Friday to remove two malignant nodules from her left lung, the Supreme Court said.

It said she was “resting comfortably” after the surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and there was no evidence of any remaining disease.

“Currently, no further treatment is planned,” the court said in a statement.

Ginsburg, the eldest member of the court and the senior justice of its liberal wing, underwent a pulmonary lobectomy. Two nodules in the lower lobe of her left lung were discovered incidentally during tests she received while being treated for rib fractures sustained in a fall last month. Both nodules were found to be malignant during an initial evaluation.

Sloan Kettering on its website describes a lobectomy as the most common operation for non-small cell lung cancer. It is the best treatment for “isolated lung cancer in an otherwise healthy patient,” according to the hospital.

Ginsburg was recovering from three rib fractures she sustained after falling in her office on Nov. 7. On Saturday, she told an audience in New York that she was “almost repaired” and had returned to doing her full workouts with her physical trainer after initially limiting her workouts to her lower body. Ginsburg did not miss any oral arguments because of her injury.

Ginsburg has quickly recovered from a number of health issues in recent years. The former ACLU litigator has survived multiple bouts with cancer, and in 2014 underwent a procedure to have a stent placed in her right coronary artery.

The justice’s health is a matter of intense public concern because her retirement would likely enable President Donald Trump to name her replacement. Trump has named two justices to the bench, Justice Neil Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The last president to nominate more than two justices to the bench was Ronald Reagan, who nominated three, including Sandra Day O’Connor, the first women to join the high court.

Ginsburg, who was appointed to the court in 1993 by President Bill Clinton, becoming the second female on the top court’s bench.

The nine-member court is divided 5-4 among Republican and Democratic nominees. A sixth justice nominated by a Republican would further cement the bench’s conservative majority, with possible ramifications on a slew of contentious legal issues the top court may review in coming terms, including reproductive rights.

The White House did not respond to a request for comment. Ginsburg’s surgery came as Congress scrambled to pass a bill to keep one-quarter of the federal government funded before a midnight deadline.

The court is in recess and is not scheduled to reconvene until Jan. 4, when the justices will meet for a private conference. The next oral arguments are scheduled for Jan. 7.

The full release is below:

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent a pulmonary lobectomy today at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Two nodules in the lower lobe of her left lung were discovered incidentally during tests performed at George Washington University Hospital to diagnose and treat rib fractures sustained in a fall on November 7. According to the thoracic surgeon, Valerie W. Rusch, MD, FACS, both nodules removed during surgery were found to be malignant on initial pathology evaluation. Post-surgery, there was no evidence of any remaining disease. Scans performed before surgery indicated no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body. Currently, no further treatment is planned. Justice Ginsburg is resting comfortably and is expected to remain in the hospital for a few days. Updates will be provided as they become available.

— CNBC’s Marty Steinberg contributed to this story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: tucker higgins
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Trump’s choice for attorney general reportedly called part of Mueller’s probe ‘fatally misconceived’

U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice for attorney general, William Barr, said in a memo earlier this year that part of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is “fatally misconceived,” The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday. The comment was made in a 20-page “unsolicited memo” dated June 8 to the Justice Department, according to the report, which added that the Journal had reviewed the document. Comey claimed that, before he was fired by the president, Trump sug


U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice for attorney general, William Barr, said in a memo earlier this year that part of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is “fatally misconceived,” The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday. The comment was made in a 20-page “unsolicited memo” dated June 8 to the Justice Department, according to the report, which added that the Journal had reviewed the document. Comey claimed that, before he was fired by the president, Trump sug
Trump’s choice for attorney general reportedly called part of Mueller’s probe ‘fatally misconceived’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: yen nee lee, dirck halstead, the life images collection, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, memo, trump, reportedly, general, barr, choice, justice, mueller, president, misconceived, fatally, muellers, called, trumps, report, attorney, according, department, journal, probe


Trump's choice for attorney general reportedly called part of Mueller's probe 'fatally misconceived'

U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice for attorney general, William Barr, said in a memo earlier this year that part of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is “fatally misconceived,” The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

The comment was made in a 20-page “unsolicited memo” dated June 8 to the Justice Department, according to the report, which added that the Journal had reviewed the document. Mueller is charged with investigating whether there are any links between Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and Russia as well as “any matters that arose or may arise directly from that investigation.”

Barr wrote in the memo that he was concerned about Mueller looking into whether Trump obstructed justice in several incidents involving former FBI Director James Comey, according to the Journal. Comey claimed that, before he was fired by the president, Trump suggested he drop an investigation into former national security advisor Michael Flynn.

Flynn has pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents about his conversations with Russia’s then-ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, in the weeks before Trump took office

Barr argued that Trump was acting well within his executive-branch authority, based on the facts as he understands them, the Journal reported. He said the inquiry into whether Trump obstructed justice is based on a “fatally misconceived” theory that could damage the presidency and the executive branch, according to the report.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment outside of U.S. business hours. It told the Journal that Barr wrote the memo “on his own initiative,” according to the report.

Barr served as attorney general from 1991 to 1993 under President George H.W. Bush. Trump said earlier this month he will nominate Barr into the position. If confirmed by the Senate, Barr would take over from Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker, who has been in that temporary role since Jeff Sessions left last month.

The Journal’s report on Wednesday is not the first time Barr’s criticisms on Mueller and his team have come to light. In a July 2017 report by The Washington Post, Barr raised questions about those in Mueller’s team who have donated to Democratic candidates.

For the full report on William Barr’s memo to the Justice Department, read The Wall Street Journal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: yen nee lee, dirck halstead, the life images collection, getty images
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Justice Department charges Chinese nationals in ‘extensive’ global hacking campaign

Over the course of the latter campaign, the two accessed computers related to victim companies in “at least 12 countries,” the filing alleges. “China’s goal, simply put, is to replace the U.S. as the world’s largest global superpower,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said at the press conference. The defendants’ group allegedly stole information from at least 45 U.S. technology companies and government agencies. APT10 allegedly hacked into more than 40 computers connected to the U.S. Navy and stol


Over the course of the latter campaign, the two accessed computers related to victim companies in “at least 12 countries,” the filing alleges. “China’s goal, simply put, is to replace the U.S. as the world’s largest global superpower,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said at the press conference. The defendants’ group allegedly stole information from at least 45 U.S. technology companies and government agencies. APT10 allegedly hacked into more than 40 computers connected to the U.S. Navy and stol
Justice Department charges Chinese nationals in ‘extensive’ global hacking campaign Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: kate fazzini, kevin breuninger
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Justice Department charges Chinese nationals in 'extensive' global hacking campaign

Through a hacking group known as “Advanced Persistent Threat 10” or “APT10” — as well as other names including “Red Apollo” and “Stone Panda” — the defendants stole information from at least 45 U.S. tech companies and government agencies, authorities said.

Prosecutors also accused the two of operating in conjunction with the Chinese government.

“China will find it difficult to pretend that it is not responsible for this action,” Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said at a press conference.

Read the DOJ’s charging document here.

The indictment says Zhu and Zhang engaged in technology thefts that began in 2006 and a campaign to steal intellectual property and other data from remote-access client-management companies that started in 2014.

Over the course of the latter campaign, the two accessed computers related to victim companies in “at least 12 countries,” the filing alleges.

“China’s goal, simply put, is to replace the U.S. as the world’s largest global superpower,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said at the press conference.

The defendants’ group allegedly stole information from at least 45 U.S. technology companies and government agencies. Most of the companies were not named, though the document says that the agencies targeted included the Department of Energy’s National Laboratory and NASA’s jet propulsion lab.

APT10 allegedly hacked into more than 40 computers connected to the U.S. Navy and stole confidential data, including “the personally identifiable information of more than 100,000 Navy personnel.”

They’re also accused of hacking three communications technology companies, three companies “involved in manufacturing advanced electronic systems,” a maritime technology company, an oil and gas company, and at least 25 other technology-related companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: kate fazzini, kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, stole, including, group, hacking, companies, information, campaign, technology, agencies, chinese, press, navy, extensive, department, justice, nationals, charges


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Acting AG Whitaker reportedly doesn’t have to recuse himself from Mueller probe

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker reportedly will not have to recuse himself from continuing to oversee special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigations. CNN reported that Whitaker, who was appointed last month to temporarily lead the Justice Department, has been told by department ethics officials that he can continue to supervise the probes. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment by CNBC. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who had been overseeing


Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker reportedly will not have to recuse himself from continuing to oversee special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigations. CNN reported that Whitaker, who was appointed last month to temporarily lead the Justice Department, has been told by department ethics officials that he can continue to supervise the probes. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment by CNBC. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who had been overseeing
Acting AG Whitaker reportedly doesn’t have to recuse himself from Mueller probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: dan mangan, scott morgan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, investigation, general, barr, attorney, mueller, probe, ag, recuse, acting, muellers, special, department, doesnt, justice, trump, whitaker


Acting AG Whitaker reportedly doesn't have to recuse himself from Mueller probe

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker reportedly will not have to recuse himself from continuing to oversee special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigations.

CNN reported that Whitaker, who was appointed last month to temporarily lead the Justice Department, has been told by department ethics officials that he can continue to supervise the probes. The investigations include whether Whitaker’s boss, President Donald Trump, tried to obstruct justice in Mueller’s inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

CNN said Whitaker would inform senators of the advice from ethics officials later Thursday.

NBC News soon confirmed the story soon afterward.

Whitaker’s previous criticisms of Mueller’s probe have worried several members of Congress, who question his ability to fairly oversee the special counsel’s office.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment by CNBC.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who had been overseeing the Muller probes before Whitaker’s appointment, was asked at a press conference Thursday what his current role is.

“We’ll have more for you on that later today,” Rosenstein said.

“In terms of my role, as we’ve described previously, we’ve continued to manage the investigation as we have in the past — and it’s being handled appropriately,” Rosenstein said.

“Whether it’s Bob Mueller or Rod Rosenstein or Matt Whitaker or Bill Barr, that investigation’s going to be handled appropriately by the Department of Justice.”

Rosenstein was also asked whether he believed, as some congressional lawmakers have argued, that legislation should be passed to protect Mueller from being fired. He also was asked if he thought Mueller’s probe is under threat. Trump has repeatedly railed against Mueller’s investigation as a “witch hunt.”

“The investigation is being conducted in accordance with the department regulation, and nothing anybody says is going to affect that,” Rosentein said. “So I believe that that investigation is being handled appropriately under the existing department regulations.”

Trump fired Whitaker’s predecessor, Jeff Sessions, last month after ripping Sessions numerous times for recusing himself from the Russia probe.

Mueller, a former FBI director, was brought in by the Justice Department to handle the existing Russian inquiry after after Sessions recused himself from any involvement in that probe because of his own contact with Russia’s ambassador prior to the election while supporting Trump’s candidacy.

Trump has nominated William Barr, a lawyer in private practice, to be his next attorney general. Barr, who in that position would have oversight over Mueller, previously served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush.

Also Thursday, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called on Trump to reconsider his nomination of Barr. Schumer said Barr should not allowed to be attorney general because he wrote an unsolicited memo to the Justice Department claiming that Mueller’s obstruction of justice inquiry was based on a “fatally misconceived” theory.

“As I understand it, his theory is premised on a novel and legally insupportable reading of the law,” Barr wrote in that memo this year, according to The Wall Street Journal.

“Moreover, in my view, if credited by the Justice Department, it would have grave consequences far beyond the immediate confines of this case and would do lasting damage to the Presidency and to the administration of law within the Executive branch,” Barr wrote.

Schumer, in a statement Thursday, said, “Mr. Barr’s memo reveals that he is fatally conflicted from being able to oversee the Special Counsel’s investigation and he should not be nominated to be attorney general.”

“Mr. Barr believes presidents in general — and more frighteningly, President Trump, who has shown less respect for the rule of law than any president — are above the law,” Schumer said. “The fact that he holds these deeply misguided views and chose to launch them in an unprovoked written attack on the Special Counsel unquestionably disqualifies Mr. Barr from serving as attorney general again.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: dan mangan, scott morgan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reportedly, investigation, general, barr, attorney, mueller, probe, ag, recuse, acting, muellers, special, department, doesnt, justice, trump, whitaker


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George HW Bush was president for only 4 years, but he shaped the Supreme Court for decades

Here’s what it’s like being a Supreme Court justice 10:18 AM ET Fri, 20 July 2018 | 04:02The court often proves to be where presidents leave their most lasting mark. But Thomas remains on the court, and Souter’s legacy has all but ensured there will never be another justice like him. In addition to his Supreme Court nominees, Bush also appointed two future justices to the federal bench: Justice Samuel Alito to the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Sonia Sotomayor to a U.S. District C


Here’s what it’s like being a Supreme Court justice 10:18 AM ET Fri, 20 July 2018 | 04:02The court often proves to be where presidents leave their most lasting mark. But Thomas remains on the court, and Souter’s legacy has all but ensured there will never be another justice like him. In addition to his Supreme Court nominees, Bush also appointed two future justices to the federal bench: Justice Samuel Alito to the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Sonia Sotomayor to a U.S. District C
George HW Bush was president for only 4 years, but he shaped the Supreme Court for decades Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: tucker higgins, chip somodevilla, getty images, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shaped, president, bush, roberts, tobias, federal, legacy, law, decades, hw, supreme, george, court, justices, justice


George HW Bush was president for only 4 years, but he shaped the Supreme Court for decades

Here’s what it’s like being a Supreme Court justice 10:18 AM ET Fri, 20 July 2018 | 04:02

The court often proves to be where presidents leave their most lasting mark. That appears to be the case with Bush.

In the 25 years since he left office, the end of the Cold War gave rise to new tensions with Russia. NAFTA is on the chopping block, as protectionism gains steam. But Thomas remains on the court, and Souter’s legacy has all but ensured there will never be another justice like him.

Bush’s selection of two justices who proved to have widely divergent judicial philosophies was made possible by the political moment in which he was president, as well as his own temperament, said Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond School of Law and an expert in federal judicial selection.

“I think that the partisanship, the Federalist Society influence that we see pervading everything now, just wasn’t that strong at the time,” Tobias said. “It was such a different world then, which he personified.”

In addition to his Supreme Court nominees, Bush also appointed two future justices to the federal bench: Justice Samuel Alito to the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Sonia Sotomayor to a U.S. District Court in New York.

He also appointed John Roberts to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, although Roberts was not confirmed. Bush’s son President George W. Bush later tapped Roberts to the position before nominating him chief justice, a positions he continues to hold.

The quality of his federal appointments, in contrast to the “mad rush to have so many people confirmed and pack the courts,” represent an under-rated aspect of Bush’s legacy, Tobias said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-04  Authors: tucker higgins, chip somodevilla, getty images, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shaped, president, bush, roberts, tobias, federal, legacy, law, decades, hw, supreme, george, court, justices, justice


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