US DOT probes FAA’s approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ

Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours. When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesm


Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours. When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesm
US DOT probes FAA’s approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, dot, crashes, boeing, planes, investigation, probes, approval, department, journal, report, max, plane, wsj, faas, justice, reported


US DOT probes FAA's approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ

The U.S. Department of Transportation is investigating whether there were lapses in the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of Boeing planes involved in two recent fatal crashes, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

The DOT probe was launched after a new Boeing 737 Max 8 operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed into the Java Sea in October last year, according to the Journal, which cited people familiar with the inquiry. None of the 189 people on board survived.

Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said on Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian incident.

The Journal reported in an update to the article that a grand jury in Washington issued a broad subpoena one day after the Ethiopian Airlines crash to at least one person involved in the development of the Boeing 737 Max. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages.

It is not clear whether the probe by the Justice Department is related to the DOT’s investigation, according to the Journal report. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours.

Shares of Boeing, a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, rose 1.52 percent to $378.99 on Friday but have fallen sharply from their 52-week high of $446.01 reached earlier this month.

The DOT investigation is concentrated on a flight safety system suspected of playing a role in the fatal crash in Indonesia, the Journal reported. The WSJ reported in November last year that Boeing failed to warn the airline industry about a potentially dangerous feature in its new flight-control system.

When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesman referred CNBC to the DOT instead. The transportation department did not immediately reply to CNBC’s request for comment, which was sent outside U.S. office hours.

After two fatal crashes in less than six months involving the same plane model, authorities around the world — including the U.S., Europe, China and Indonesia — grounded Boeing 737 Max planes.

For the full report on the DOT’s investigation, read The Wall Street Journal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, dot, crashes, boeing, planes, investigation, probes, approval, department, journal, report, max, plane, wsj, faas, justice, reported


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US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft: WSJ

Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. It is not clea


Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. It is not clea
US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, subpoena, development, ethiopian, boeings, department, boeing, journal, wsj, 737, plane, justice, clear, data, scrutinizing, aircraft


US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing's 737 Max aircraft: WSJ

Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash.

The Journal reported in an update to the article that a grand jury in Washington issued a broad subpoena one day after the Ethiopian Airlines crash to at least one person involved in the development of the Boeing 737 Max. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages.

It is not clear whether the probe by the Justice Department is related to the DOT’s investigation, according to the Journal report. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment, sent outside U.S. office hours.

WATCH: Why Airbus and Boeing dominate 99% of the large plane market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
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French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer


It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer
French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investigator, older, boeing, clear, plane, max, lion, justice, similarities, transportation, journal, french, system, crashes, 737


French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous people familiar with the matter, reported Sunday that a grand jury issued a subpoena to “at least one person” involved in the development of the plane. It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Indonesia investigators have indicated that as a possible factor in the Lion Air crash in October.

Pilots said they were not informed about the new system until after the Lion Air crash. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer, a Boeing 737 pilot and spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, which represents American Airlines pilots.

Boeing shares were down more than 2.6 percent in afternoon trading Monday, shaving nearly 60 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as the day’s biggest loser in the index.

The FAA, Justice Department and the Transportation Department’s Office of Inspector General declined to comment. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Why Boeing and Airbus dominate 99% of the large plane market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
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Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system

We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment. Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to r


We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment. Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to r
Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, criminal, way, intelligence, artificial, day, tool, ways, ultimately, turning, using, system, decisions, justice, communities, algorithms


Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system

We all know humans are imperfect. We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment.

Some think that day has already arrived.

Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to release defendants on bail.

Supporters believe that the technology will lead to increased objectivity, ultimately creating safer communities. Others however, say that the data fed into these algorithms is encoded with human bias, meaning the tech will simply reinforce historical disparities.

Learn more about the ways in which communities, policemen and judges across the U.S. are using these algorithms to make decisions about public safety and people’s lives.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, criminal, way, intelligence, artificial, day, tool, ways, ultimately, turning, using, system, decisions, justice, communities, algorithms


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James Comey says a subpoena might not work for Mueller report

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Former FBI Director James Comey on Friday said that he did not know if Democrats could obtain an unredacted copy of the Mueller report with a subpoena if the Department of Justice declined to release it. But Comey said he hoped that a subpoena would not be necessary. House Democrats, including the chairs of the powerful Intelligence and Judiciary committees, have said they will subpoena the Department of Justice if the report is not made public. “I don’t think I’ve seen the H


WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Former FBI Director James Comey on Friday said that he did not know if Democrats could obtain an unredacted copy of the Mueller report with a subpoena if the Department of Justice declined to release it. But Comey said he hoped that a subpoena would not be necessary. House Democrats, including the chairs of the powerful Intelligence and Judiciary committees, have said they will subpoena the Department of Justice if the report is not made public. “I don’t think I’ve seen the H
James Comey says a subpoena might not work for Mueller report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: tucker higgins, carsten koall, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, work, james, comey, department, justice, mueller, public, trump, house, subpoena, unanimously


James Comey says a subpoena might not work for Mueller report

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Former FBI Director James Comey on Friday said that he did not know if Democrats could obtain an unredacted copy of the Mueller report with a subpoena if the Department of Justice declined to release it.

“I’m sure they can subpoena. They definitely can issue subpoenas for anything they want to the Department of Justice. Whether the department will compel, will abide an order to compel, if they resist that, I don’t know where that ends up,” he said.

But Comey said he hoped that a subpoena would not be necessary.

“There is a lot of transparency that is possible under the law. And so, that’s my answer. I’m not sure about the can. I hope they don’t get to that,” he said.

House Democrats, including the chairs of the powerful Intelligence and Judiciary committees, have said they will subpoena the Department of Justice if the report is not made public.

Comey, whose ouster by President Donald Trump in 2017 precipitated the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller, was responding to a question from a student during a rare hour-long question-and-answer session at his alma mater William & Mary. The talk came nearly a year after his CNN town hall here.

The college last year tapped the erstwhile government official to teach a class on ethical leadership. On Friday, he said he hoped the little-advertised forum, which he jokingly dubbed a “secret lecture series,” would open up the lessons of that class to a wider audience.

He said that with regard to the Mueller report, his hope “is that the attorney general will try to draw upon the precedents of the Department of Justice, which are extensive, that in a case with intensive public interest, that the Department of Justice will share details with the American people.”

He expanded on the arguments that he made in an article published earlier this month in The Washington Post. He wrote in the article that Republicans were incorrect in saying that transparency about Mueller’s conclusions was impossible.

His comments came during a moment of particularly intense public interest in the special counsel, who is investigating links between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Earlier in the day, Trump said “there should be no” report. On Thursday, the House of Representatives unanimously passed a symbolic resolution calling for the document’s public release.

Comey said the House vote was “good news.”

“I don’t think I’ve seen the House of Representatives vote unanimously for anything in my entire life,” Comey said Friday. “But they voted unanimously yesterday, the sense of the House, that there ought to be transparency around the Mueller report consistent with the law.”

The former FBI director has faced intense public scrutiny for his actions in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. In June, a government watchdog slammed Comey for being “insubordinate.”

Much of the focus has been on a letter Comey sent to Congress shortly before Election Day saying that he had uncovered new information that could be significant to the investigation into Democrat Hillary Clinton’s handling of classified material. Clinton’s lead in the polls sank decisively after Comey’s announcement, and some have blamed him for her defeat.

But Comey on Friday offered a stern defense of his decisions at the time, including the decision to not disclose a concurrent investigation into Russian meddling that began that summer.

Failing to tell Congress about the new information about Clinton “would have caused catastrophic damage to the administration of justice at least in our lives, probably forever,” Comey said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: tucker higgins, carsten koall, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, work, james, comey, department, justice, mueller, public, trump, house, subpoena, unanimously


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7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal

On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC. At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Andrew E.


On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC. At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Andrew E.
7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: abigail hess, david l ryan the boston globe via getty images, getty images, galit rodin, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singer, system, admissions, separate, students, allegations, case, college, shocking, 25, wealthy, reported, million, scandal, justice


7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal

On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC.

At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Singer also runs The Key Worldwide Foundation, a non-profit corporation that he established as a charity.

The Department of Justice has charged Singer with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and obstruction of justice, and alleges that his scheme included helping students cheat on SAT and ACT exams, bribing athletic coaches and administrators to pretend that students were athletic recruits, and using his charity to conceal the funds.

According to the Department of Justice, “Many clients then filed personal tax returns that falsely reported the payment to the KWF as charitable donations.” The New York Times reported that the case is the Justice Department’s largest ever education-related prosecution, and involved 200 agents and the arrest of 50 people in six states.

Andrew E. Lelling, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts described the case at a press conference on Tuesday. “There will not be a separate admissions system for the wealthy,” said Andrew E. Lelling, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, at a press conference on Tuesday, “and there will not be a separate criminal justice system, either.”

Here are the seven most shocking allegations that have emerged from the scandal:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: abigail hess, david l ryan the boston globe via getty images, getty images, galit rodin, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singer, system, admissions, separate, students, allegations, case, college, shocking, 25, wealthy, reported, million, scandal, justice


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7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal

On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC. At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Andrew E.


On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC. At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Andrew E.
7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: abigail hess, david l ryan the boston globe via getty images, getty images, galit rodin, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shocking, system, case, admissions, justice, allegations, students, separate, million, college, 25, singer, wealthy, reported, scandal


7 of the most shocking allegations of the $25 million college admissions scandal

On Tuesday, federal prosecutors brought charges against 50 people in a sweeping college cheating scandal in which wealthy parents paid roughly $25 million to help their children gain admission at exclusive colleges and universities including, Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, and USC.

At the center of the case is William Rick Singer from Newport Beach, California, the founder and owner of Edge College & Career Network — referred to as “The Key” — a for-profit college counseling organization. Singer also runs The Key Worldwide Foundation, a non-profit corporation that he established as a charity.

The Department of Justice has charged Singer with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and obstruction of justice, and alleges that his scheme included helping students cheat on SAT and ACT exams, bribing athletic coaches and administrators to pretend that students were athletic recruits, and using his charity to conceal the funds.

According to the Department of Justice, “Many clients then filed personal tax returns that falsely reported the payment to the KWF as charitable donations.” The New York Times reported that the case is the Justice Department’s largest ever education-related prosecution, and involved 200 agents and the arrest of 50 people in six states.

Andrew E. Lelling, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts described the case at a press conference on Tuesday. “There will not be a separate admissions system for the wealthy,” said Andrew E. Lelling, U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, at a press conference on Tuesday, “and there will not be a separate criminal justice system, either.”

Here are the seven most shocking allegations that have emerged from the scandal:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: abigail hess, david l ryan the boston globe via getty images, getty images, galit rodin, bloomberg
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‘Justice will have its day’: Beijing backs Huawei’s lawsuit against US government

Here’s what investors need to know 20 Hours Ago | 02:10″People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC ha


Here’s what investors need to know 20 Hours Ago | 02:10″People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC ha
‘Justice will have its day’: Beijing backs Huawei’s lawsuit against US government Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: arjun kharpal, joan cros, nurphoto, getty images, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, wang, justice, backs, huawei, right, intelligence, technology, interests, lawsuit, beijing, huaweis, day, experts, company, telecom


'Justice will have its day': Beijing backs Huawei's lawsuit against US government

Huawei is suing the US government for constitutional violations. Here’s what investors need to know 20 Hours Ago | 02:10

“People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. What we’re standing up for is not just the interests of a company, but also a country or nation’s legitimate right to innovate and by extension the basic right of all countries who wish to climb up the technology ladder,” Wang said.

Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating.

The commentary from Wang was the latest in a series of arguments from either Huawei or the Chinese government that the U.S. has engaged in a pre-meditated attack on the company. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly.

The U.S., however, has said that it is worried about the security risks posed by Huawei, alleging that the company’s equipment may contain backdoors that could be used by the Chinese government for espionage. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC have said there’s cause for skepticism about the company’s assurances it’s not a risk.

Experts point to Chinese laws that allegedly mean every domestic company is legally mandated to assist the country in intelligence gathering. China’s companies are also thought to be forbidden from talking about any intelligence work.

Huawei has argued that its absence from the U.S. telecom market could slow the rollout of next generation mobile network technology known as 5G and hurt consumers, claims experts have dismissed.

—CNBC’s Evelyn Cheng contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: arjun kharpal, joan cros, nurphoto, getty images, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, wang, justice, backs, huawei, right, intelligence, technology, interests, lawsuit, beijing, huaweis, day, experts, company, telecom


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‘Justice will have its day’: Beijing backs Huawei’s lawsuit against US government

Here’s what investors need to know 21 Hours Ago | 02:10″People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC ha


Here’s what investors need to know 21 Hours Ago | 02:10″People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC ha
‘Justice will have its day’: Beijing backs Huawei’s lawsuit against US government Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: arjun kharpal, joan cros, nurphoto, getty images, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, wang, justice, backs, huawei, right, intelligence, technology, interests, lawsuit, beijing, huaweis, day, experts, company, telecom


'Justice will have its day': Beijing backs Huawei's lawsuit against US government

Huawei is suing the US government for constitutional violations. Here’s what investors need to know 21 Hours Ago | 02:10

“People can tell right and wrong, justice will have its day. What we’re standing up for is not just the interests of a company, but also a country or nation’s legitimate right to innovate and by extension the basic right of all countries who wish to climb up the technology ladder,” Wang said.

Wang did not explain how being blocked from selling to the American government would prevent the company from innovating.

The commentary from Wang was the latest in a series of arguments from either Huawei or the Chinese government that the U.S. has engaged in a pre-meditated attack on the company. Beijing has repeatedly suggested it’s because the world’s largest economy feels its business interests are threatened by the telecom — and Chinese technology more broadly.

The U.S., however, has said that it is worried about the security risks posed by Huawei, alleging that the company’s equipment may contain backdoors that could be used by the Chinese government for espionage. Huawei has continuously denied those claims, but intelligence experts who spoke to CNBC have said there’s cause for skepticism about the company’s assurances it’s not a risk.

Experts point to Chinese laws that allegedly mean every domestic company is legally mandated to assist the country in intelligence gathering. China’s companies are also thought to be forbidden from talking about any intelligence work.

Huawei has argued that its absence from the U.S. telecom market could slow the rollout of next generation mobile network technology known as 5G and hurt consumers, claims experts have dismissed.

—CNBC’s Evelyn Cheng contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: arjun kharpal, joan cros, nurphoto, getty images, elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, wang, justice, backs, huawei, right, intelligence, technology, interests, lawsuit, beijing, huaweis, day, experts, company, telecom


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Cory Booker takes the lead on criminal justice reform in 2020 campaign with new bill

Senator Cory Booker introduced a sweeping criminal justice reform bill on Thursday, becoming the first 2020 presidential candidate to put forth a detailed plan to amend the country’s prison system. “It’s been 75 days since the First Step Act was signed into law, and already, it’s changing lives,” the New Jersey Democrat said in a statement. “But the First Step Act is just as its name suggests – it is one step on the long road toward fixing our broken criminal justice system.” Several of the refo


Senator Cory Booker introduced a sweeping criminal justice reform bill on Thursday, becoming the first 2020 presidential candidate to put forth a detailed plan to amend the country’s prison system. “It’s been 75 days since the First Step Act was signed into law, and already, it’s changing lives,” the New Jersey Democrat said in a statement. “But the First Step Act is just as its name suggests – it is one step on the long road toward fixing our broken criminal justice system.” Several of the refo
Cory Booker takes the lead on criminal justice reform in 2020 campaign with new bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: carmin chappell, ethan miller, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cory, mandatory, act, campaign, presidential, takes, justice, bill, criminal, 2020, reform, offenders, lead, booker, step, sentences


Cory Booker takes the lead on criminal justice reform in 2020 campaign with new bill

Senator Cory Booker introduced a sweeping criminal justice reform bill on Thursday, becoming the first 2020 presidential candidate to put forth a detailed plan to amend the country’s prison system.

The bill, known as the Next Step Act, includes a collection of bold reforms that largely jump past the incremental progresses of previous bills like 2018’s landmark First Step Act, which Booker co-sponsored.

“It’s been 75 days since the First Step Act was signed into law, and already, it’s changing lives,” the New Jersey Democrat said in a statement. “But the First Step Act is just as its name suggests – it is one step on the long road toward fixing our broken criminal justice system.”

The bill would slash mandatory minimum sentences in half for nonviolent drug offenders, making the longest mandatory sentence 10 years instead of 20 years. The First Step Act reduced the mandatory minimum sentences for repeat offenders but not for first-time offenders.

The bill would also completely eliminate the discrepancy between crack and powder cocaine sentences, which was first reduced in 2010 from 100:1 to 18:1 and applied retroactively in the First Step Act. Racial minorities are disproportionately sentenced for crack cocaine offenses: In fiscal year 2017, 94 percent of offenders were black or Hispanic, according to data from the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Booker also places special attention on formerly incarcerated individuals, including measures in the bill that would make it easier for those with criminal records to find jobs and obtain professional licenses. The bill would also reinstate voting rights to former felons nationwide.

Several of the reforms in the Next Step Act overlap with the marijuana legalization bill Booker introduced just last week. Both bills call for legalizing the drug nationwide, expunging criminal records for those charged with marijuana possession and investing money into communities harmed by drugs.

Criminal justice reform is shaping up to be a major issue during the 2020 presidential campaign. Bipartisan support for the issue is at its highest level in recent years, as evidenced by the passing of the First Step Act with enthusiastic support from President Donald Trump.

“People thought that passing the First Step Act was impossible, but we proved them wrong. We can do that again,” Booker said at a press conference announcing the bill.

None of Booker’s fellow Democratic presidential contenders in the Senate have signed on as co-sponsors of the bill yet. Two of the declared candidates, senators Kamala Harris of California and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, are former government prosecutors.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: carmin chappell, ethan miller, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cory, mandatory, act, campaign, presidential, takes, justice, bill, criminal, 2020, reform, offenders, lead, booker, step, sentences


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