Trump claims inner workings of Robert Mueller’s investigation are mess

President Donald Trump on Thursday claimed, without offering any evidence, that “the inner workings of” special counsel Robert Mueller’s “investigation are a total mess.” Trump’s remark about the “inner workings” of the Mueller probe come amid ongoing controversy over the president’s firing last week of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Whitaker before joining the Justice Department as Sessions’s chief of staff had been a critic of the Mueller investigation. Whitaker, Trump said, “is just somebody


President Donald Trump on Thursday claimed, without offering any evidence, that “the inner workings of” special counsel Robert Mueller’s “investigation are a total mess.” Trump’s remark about the “inner workings” of the Mueller probe come amid ongoing controversy over the president’s firing last week of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Whitaker before joining the Justice Department as Sessions’s chief of staff had been a critic of the Mueller investigation. Whitaker, Trump said, “is just somebody
Trump claims inner workings of Robert Mueller’s investigation are mess Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: dan mangan, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, probe, whitaker, muellers, investigation, robert, workings, president, mueller, mess, justice, trump, claims, inner, sessions, senate


Trump claims inner workings of Robert Mueller's investigation are mess

President Donald Trump on Thursday claimed, without offering any evidence, that “the inner workings of” special counsel Robert Mueller’s “investigation are a total mess.”

“They have found no collusion and have gone absolutely nuts. They are screaming and shouting at people, horribly threatening them to come up with the answers they want,” Trump said in a tweet, one of four blasting Mueller and his team.

“They are a disgrace to our Nation” and “gang of Democrat thugs.”

Trump’s remark about the “inner workings” of the Mueller probe come amid ongoing controversy over the president’s firing last week of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Trump named Sessions’s chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, as acting attorney general.

Whitaker before joining the Justice Department as Sessions’s chief of staff had been a critic of the Mueller investigation. He now has oversight over that probe and power to fire Mueller for cause.

Trump’s Twitter tantrum came as Democrats in Congress and Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona called for legislation that would protect the former FBI Director Mueller from being fired before his investigation is finished.

Trump has been angered since last year over Mueller’s probe into whether Trump’s presidential campaign colluded with the Russians to interfere in the 2016 election, and into whether the president obstructed justice by trying to impede that inquiry.

Trump has repeatedly denied both claims. He also has highlighted the fact that a number of Mueller’s prosecutors have been registered Democrats and contributed money to Democrats, although he does not mention that Mueller himself is a Republican.

The president had long blamed Sessions for Mueller’s appointment, which was set in motion when Sessions recused himself from overseeing investigations into Russian interference because of his own contact with Russians during the campaign.

Two days before Trump teed off on Mueller, NBC News reported that the president’s legal team was close to finishing a series of written answers Mueller’s team has posed to Trump.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., criticized Trump for his latest tweets, saying the president “continues to wage an all-out campaign to obstruct the Mueller investigation.”

And Pelosi accused Trump of putting Whitaker in charge of the Justice Department “for one purpose — to end the investigation.”

Democrats, and some Republicans, have said that Whitaker could not legally be appointed acting attorney general because he was being elevated from a position that did not require Senate approval. The Justice Department disputed that argument in an opinion released Wednesday.

Trump called that “a very strong opinion” in an interview Wednesday with The Daily Caller.

In that same interview, the president linked Whitaker to Trump’s longstanding critique of the Mueller investigation.

Whitaker, Trump said, “is just somebody that’s very respected.”

“I knew him only as he pertained, you know, as he was with Jeff Sessions,” Trump told The Daily Caller. “And, you know, look, as far as I’m concerned this is an investigation that should have never been brought. It should have never been had.

“It’s something that should have never been brought. It’s an illegal investigation. And you know, it’s very interesting because when you talk about not Senate confirmed, well, Mueller’s not Senate confirmed.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: dan mangan, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, probe, whitaker, muellers, investigation, robert, workings, president, mueller, mess, justice, trump, claims, inner, sessions, senate


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Top lawyers rally fellow conservatives to speak out against Trump

The Federalist Society’s annual convention has been called the “Super Bowl” for lawyers. In a mission statement dated Tuesday, the group said it stands for “the rule of law, the power of truth, the independence of the criminal justice system, the imperative of individual rights, and the necessity of civil discourse.” The group includes more than a dozen conservative and libertarian lawyers, many of whom who have held high-profile positions in Republican presidential administrations. The group’s


The Federalist Society’s annual convention has been called the “Super Bowl” for lawyers. In a mission statement dated Tuesday, the group said it stands for “the rule of law, the power of truth, the independence of the criminal justice system, the imperative of individual rights, and the necessity of civil discourse.” The group includes more than a dozen conservative and libertarian lawyers, many of whom who have held high-profile positions in Republican presidential administrations. The group’s
Top lawyers rally fellow conservatives to speak out against Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: tucker higgins, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, trumps, rule, speak, president, meyer, trump, married, rally, members, conservatives, federalist, lawyers, kavanaugh, conservative, fellow


Top lawyers rally fellow conservatives to speak out against Trump

The Federalist Society’s annual convention has been called the “Super Bowl” for lawyers.

This year, following the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, yet another member of the group’s ranks sent to the highest court in the land, it might have been expected to be a celebration of Kavanaugh and the president who appointed him.

But just days before the convention is set to begin at The Mayflower Hotel in Washington, some of its most prominent members have banded together to form “Checks and Balances,” a slate of like-minded attorneys who are encouraging their fellow conservatives to speak out against what they see as President Donald Trump’s undermining of the rule of law.

In a mission statement dated Tuesday, the group said it stands for “the rule of law, the power of truth, the independence of the criminal justice system, the imperative of individual rights, and the necessity of civil discourse.”

The group includes more than a dozen conservative and libertarian lawyers, many of whom who have held high-profile positions in Republican presidential administrations. The group’s members have been influential in shaping conservative legal thought.

Among its founding signatories are Tom Ridge, the former Pennsylvania governor who served as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security under George W. Bush; George Conway, a conservative attorney who is married to Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway; Peter Keisler, the former head of the Department of Justice’s Civil Division; and Lori Meyer, an attorney married to Eugene Meyer, the president of the Federalist Society.

Neither the White House nor the Federalist Society immediately responded to a requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: tucker higgins, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, trumps, rule, speak, president, meyer, trump, married, rally, members, conservatives, federalist, lawyers, kavanaugh, conservative, fellow


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DOJ cleared Matthew Whitaker to be acting attorney general

The Justice Department told President Donald Trump that Matthew Whitaker could hold the post of acting attorney general, before Trump appointed him to that post. That argument was based on the fact that Whitaker had not held a Senate-approved position before he was appointed acting AG. Whitaker was named to the post a week ago, after Trump forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He now has oversight of Mueller’s office, due to his appointment as acting attorney general. He will be allowed to


The Justice Department told President Donald Trump that Matthew Whitaker could hold the post of acting attorney general, before Trump appointed him to that post. That argument was based on the fact that Whitaker had not held a Senate-approved position before he was appointed acting AG. Whitaker was named to the post a week ago, after Trump forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He now has oversight of Mueller’s office, due to his appointment as acting attorney general. He will be allowed to
DOJ cleared Matthew Whitaker to be acting attorney general Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: dan mangan, allison shelley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, appointed, sessions, whitaker, doj, trump, cleared, department, attorney, matthew, office, acting, general


DOJ cleared Matthew Whitaker to be acting attorney general

The Justice Department told President Donald Trump that Matthew Whitaker could hold the post of acting attorney general, before Trump appointed him to that post.

News of that preapproval comes as critics have said Trump violated the Constitution by installing the 49-year-old Whitaker on a temporary basis as the nation’s top law enforcement official without first getting Senate approval.

That argument was based on the fact that Whitaker had not held a Senate-approved position before he was appointed acting AG. The state of Maryland cited that claim when it filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging Whitaker’s appointment, calling him an “unqualified” partisan.

But NBC News reported Wednesday that the department told Trump, before he tapped Whitaker for the job, that he could appoint Whitaker as acting head of Justice.

Whitaker was named to the post a week ago, after Trump forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

His temporary appointment immediately sparked concerns that he will squelch the ongoing investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, and possible coordinating with the Trump campaign in that effort.

Whitaker before joining the Justice Department had been a critic of Mueller’s probe. He now has oversight of Mueller’s office, due to his appointment as acting attorney general.

Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Iowa, had been Sessions’ chief of staff. He will be allowed to serve as acting attorney general for at up to at least 210 days.

Steven Engel, assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel, said in a written opinion cited by NBC News that his office told the White House — before Whitaker was appointed — that the president “could designate a senior Department of Justice official, such as Whitaker, as acting attorney general.”

According to Engel’s opinion, the Justice Department has identified more than 160 occasions in which a president appointed government officials who not been confirmed by the Senate to serve in high-level positions, NBC News reported.

A senior Justice Department official told NBC that that advice was offered “after the White House asked what the president’s option would be in the event the office of attorney general was vacant and who might be eligible to serve.”

Trump had been angry at Sessions for more than a year because of the attorney general’s decision to recuse himself from overseeing the Justice Department investigation into Russian election interference. Sessions’ recusal was based on the fact that he had been involved in Trump’s campaign.

The Washington Post reported, a day before Sessions announced his recusal on March 2, 2017, that he had twice met with Russia’s ambassador to the United States during the campaign, but failed to disclose that fact during his confirmation hearing in the Senate.

The recusal of Sessions left Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in charge of the Russia probe. Two months after that recusal, Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Mueller to handle that investigation.

Mueller’s appointment infuriated Trump, who has called the probe a witch hunt.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: dan mangan, allison shelley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, appointed, sessions, whitaker, doj, trump, cleared, department, attorney, matthew, office, acting, general


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Snap subpoenaed by Justice Department over its IPO disclosures

The U.S. Justice Department and Securities and Exchange Commission have subpoenaed Snap for information about its March 2017 initial public offering, the social media app maker told Reuters on Tuesday. Snap said in a statement it has responded to the government subpoenas and other requests for information. The previously unreported federal inquiries follow an ongoing shareholder lawsuit in which investors allege that Snap misled the public about how competition from Facebook’s Instagram service


The U.S. Justice Department and Securities and Exchange Commission have subpoenaed Snap for information about its March 2017 initial public offering, the social media app maker told Reuters on Tuesday. Snap said in a statement it has responded to the government subpoenas and other requests for information. The previously unreported federal inquiries follow an ongoing shareholder lawsuit in which investors allege that Snap misled the public about how competition from Facebook’s Instagram service
Snap subpoenaed by Justice Department over its IPO disclosures Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: courtesy of snap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, federal, snap, previously, competition, disclosures, unreported, subpoenaed, instagram, department, public, understanding, visibility, ipo


Snap subpoenaed by Justice Department over its IPO disclosures

The U.S. Justice Department and Securities and Exchange Commission have subpoenaed Snap for information about its March 2017 initial public offering, the social media app maker told Reuters on Tuesday.

Snap said in a statement it has responded to the government subpoenas and other requests for information.

The previously unreported federal inquiries follow an ongoing shareholder lawsuit in which investors allege that Snap misled the public about how competition from Facebook’s Instagram service had affected the company’s growth.

Snap said it believes that the federal regulators “are investigating issues related to the previously disclosed allegations asserted in the class action about our IPO disclosures.”

“While we do not have complete visibility into these investigations, our understanding is that the DOJ is likely focused on IPO disclosures relating to competition from Instagram,” the company said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: courtesy of snap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, federal, snap, previously, competition, disclosures, unreported, subpoenaed, instagram, department, public, understanding, visibility, ipo


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Britain’s foreign minister to call for an end to Yemen war, Khashoggi justice during Saudi visit

British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt will visit Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates on Monday to press for an end to the war in Yemen and to call on Saudi leaders to cooperate with an investigation into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The foreign ministry said Hunt would meet Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, Yemeni Vice President Ali Mohsen and Foreign M


British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt will visit Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates on Monday to press for an end to the war in Yemen and to call on Saudi leaders to cooperate with an investigation into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The foreign ministry said Hunt would meet Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, Yemeni Vice President Ali Mohsen and Foreign M
Britain’s foreign minister to call for an end to Yemen war, Khashoggi justice during Saudi visit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: sean gallup, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, end, britains, minister, justice, investigation, yemen, war, foreign, khashoggi, murder, visit, saudi, united


Britain's foreign minister to call for an end to Yemen war, Khashoggi justice during Saudi visit

British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt will visit Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates on Monday to press for an end to the war in Yemen and to call on Saudi leaders to cooperate with an investigation into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The visit comes at a time when Riyadh, already under scrutiny for civilian deaths in Yemen air strikes, is facing global criticism and potential sanctions over the murder of Khashoggi at its Istanbul consulate on Oct. 2.

Britain has called for a “credible” investigation into Khashoggi and has pushed for new action at the United Nations Security Council to try to end hostilities in Yemen and find a political solution to the war there.

“The human cost of war in Yemen is incalculable: with millions displaced, famine and disease rife and years of bloodshed, the only solution is now a political decision to set aside arms and pursue peace,” Hunt said in a statement.

“So today I am travelling to the Gulf to demand that all sides commit to this process.”

The foreign ministry said Hunt would meet Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir, Yemeni Vice President Ali Mohsen and Foreign Minister Khaled Al Yamani.

Hunt, the first British minister to visit Saudi Arabia since the murder of Khashoggi a month ago, will also call on the Saudi authorities to do more to deliver justice and accountability for his family.

“The international community remain united in horror and outrage at the brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi one month ago. It is clearly unacceptable that the full circumstances behind his murder still remain unclear,” he said.

“We encourage the Saudi authorities to cooperate fully with the Turkish investigation into his death, so that we deliver justice for his family and the watching world.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: sean gallup, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, end, britains, minister, justice, investigation, yemen, war, foreign, khashoggi, murder, visit, saudi, united


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Mueller report may never come as Democrats wait to talk impeachment

Top Democrats in the chamber, including the likely incoming chairs of the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees, as well as Minority Leader and potential Speaker Nancy Pelosi, have said that talk of impeachment is contingent on new evidence of wrongdoing provided by special counsel Robert Mueller. But it is far from assured that there will be any public “Mueller report” for Democrats to lean on. The only related requirement under the Justice Department rules governing Mueller’s work is for


Top Democrats in the chamber, including the likely incoming chairs of the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees, as well as Minority Leader and potential Speaker Nancy Pelosi, have said that talk of impeachment is contingent on new evidence of wrongdoing provided by special counsel Robert Mueller. But it is far from assured that there will be any public “Mueller report” for Democrats to lean on. The only related requirement under the Justice Department rules governing Mueller’s work is for
Mueller report may never come as Democrats wait to talk impeachment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: tucker higgins, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mueller, come, public, democrats, reports, justice, talk, department, impeachment, counsel, report, special, work, wait


Mueller report may never come as Democrats wait to talk impeachment

As Democrats clamor for the House of Representatives to take up impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump when the party takes power next year, the party leadership has a message: Not so fast.

Top Democrats in the chamber, including the likely incoming chairs of the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees, as well as Minority Leader and potential Speaker Nancy Pelosi, have said that talk of impeachment is contingent on new evidence of wrongdoing provided by special counsel Robert Mueller.

The Democratic leadership has also noted that the findings would have to be damning enough to pressure Republicans to join in a bipartisan effort.

But it is far from assured that there will be any public “Mueller report” for Democrats to lean on.

The only related requirement under the Justice Department rules governing Mueller’s work is for a “confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions” Mueller makes in the course of his inquiry.

The confidential aspect to the report is not an afterthought. When the Justice Department revamped the rules relating to special prosecutors in the late 1990s, it was largely in response to criticisms leveled against the highly public reports issued by Kenneth Starr, the independent counsel who investigated President Bill Clinton.

In a section-by-section discussion of the special counsel regulations, published in the Federal Register in 1999, the Justice Department said that the “principal source of the problems” with previous independent counsel reports was that they were typically “made public, unlike the closing documentation of any other criminal investigation.”

The department found that the requirement led prosecutors to “over-investigate” in order to avoid public backlash for “not having turned over every stone.”

The special counsel regulations also call for a report to members of Congress from the attorney general. That report, which will be submitted by acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker unless he is replaced before Mueller finishes his work, is expected to be sparse on detail.

“These reports will be brief notifications, with an outline of the actions and the reasons for them,” the Justice Department said in its 1999 report.

The special counsel’s office declined to comment for this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: tucker higgins, tom williams, cq roll call, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mueller, come, public, democrats, reports, justice, talk, department, impeachment, counsel, report, special, work, wait


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Senate Democrats consider legal action against Trump’s Whitaker appointment

U.S. Senate Democrats are considering legal action over President Donald Trump’s appointment of a new acting attorney general, congressional sources said on Friday, as some outside experts called the move unconstitutional. The move made Whitaker supervisor of the investigation, which has hung over Trump’s presidency. A spokesman for Senate Judiciary chairman Chuck Grassley said Trump had the authority to appoint Whitaker as acting attorney general temporarily, even though he had not been confirm


U.S. Senate Democrats are considering legal action over President Donald Trump’s appointment of a new acting attorney general, congressional sources said on Friday, as some outside experts called the move unconstitutional. The move made Whitaker supervisor of the investigation, which has hung over Trump’s presidency. A spokesman for Senate Judiciary chairman Chuck Grassley said Trump had the authority to appoint Whitaker as acting attorney general temporarily, even though he had not been confirm
Senate Democrats consider legal action against Trump’s Whitaker appointment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: charlie neibergall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whitaker, succession, democrats, action, department, legal, consider, appointment, general, justice, attorney, trumps, trump, senate, probe


Senate Democrats consider legal action against Trump's Whitaker appointment

U.S. Senate Democrats are considering legal action over President Donald Trump’s appointment of a new acting attorney general, congressional sources said on Friday, as some outside experts called the move unconstitutional.

Trump on Wednesday named Matthew Whitaker to replace former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who was forced out after months of attacks by Trump for recusing himself from an ongoing probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

The move made Whitaker supervisor of the investigation, which has hung over Trump’s presidency. Whitaker has criticized the probe in the past as too wide-ranging, which has raised concerns among Democrats that Sessions’ ouster and Whitaker’s appointment might be precursors to Trump moving to end it.

Senate Democrats were considering suing Trump, the sources said, on the grounds that, in naming Whitaker, the president ignored a statutory line of succession at the Justice Department and deprived senators of their constitutional “advice and consent” role on some presidential appointments.

“The only two paths to that office are regular succession, and advice (and) consent,” said a source close to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal told Reuters late on Friday he was “considering action that might be brought against an interim appointment that violates the normal statutory line of succession and raises very serious constitutional questions.”

He said he was speaking only for himself and he hoped Republicans might join as plaintiffs if a lawsuit goes forward.

The Appointments Clause of the U.S. Constitution states that some senior government officials, known as “principal officers,” must be confirmed by the Senate.

A spokesman for Senate Judiciary chairman Chuck Grassley said Trump had the authority to appoint Whitaker as acting attorney general temporarily, even though he had not been confirmed by the Senate.

Such appointments can be done for senior officials who have worked in the department for at least 90 days and can last for up to 210 days, spokesman George Hartmann said.

As the minority party in the Senate, Democrats might need some Republican support to have legal standing to sue Trump under the Appointments Clause, said Andrew Wright, who was a White House lawyer under former President Barack Obama.

The source close to the Senate Judiciary Committee said Democrats were unsure whether they would reach out to Republicans to join the lawsuit, but added it was “not likely.”

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, who earlier this year introduced legislation to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is conducting the probe, said Whitaker did not pose a threat to his work.

“Mueller will be allowed to do his job,” Graham said in a Friday interview on Fox News Radio.

John Yoo, a former Justice Department lawyer in the George W. Bush administration, said “the Supreme Court made clear that the Attorney General is a principal officer” in a 1998 case.

“Therefore, Whitaker cannot serve as acting Attorney General … Any other officer in the Justice Department who was appointed through advice and consent can serve, including the Deputy AG, the solicitor general, and the assistant AGs,” said Yoo, now a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, a career Justice Department official already confirmed by the Senate, should have been named the new attorney general.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: charlie neibergall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whitaker, succession, democrats, action, department, legal, consider, appointment, general, justice, attorney, trumps, trump, senate, probe


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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is ‘up and working’ after a fall that broke her ribs

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is already up and working in her hospital room, a day after breaking three ribs in a fall, her nephew said late on Thursday at the Hollywood premiere of a film about her life. Ginsburg, a ground-breaking liberal jurist who at 85 is the oldest U.S. Supreme Court justice, was hospitalized on Thursday after falling at her office at the court, a court spokeswoman said. If Ginsburg were unable to continue serving, Trump could replace her with a conservat


U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is already up and working in her hospital room, a day after breaking three ribs in a fall, her nephew said late on Thursday at the Hollywood premiere of a film about her life. Ginsburg, a ground-breaking liberal jurist who at 85 is the oldest U.S. Supreme Court justice, was hospitalized on Thursday after falling at her office at the court, a court spokeswoman said. If Ginsburg were unable to continue serving, Trump could replace her with a conservat
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is ‘up and working’ after a fall that broke her ribs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chris kleponis, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, majority, kavanaugh, rights, ruth, president, senate, broke, fall, ribs, court, working, bader, trump, ginsburg, film, supreme, justice


Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 'up and working' after a fall that broke her ribs

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is already up and working in her hospital room, a day after breaking three ribs in a fall, her nephew said late on Thursday at the Hollywood premiere of a film about her life.

Ginsburg, a ground-breaking liberal jurist who at 85 is the oldest U.S. Supreme Court justice, was hospitalized on Thursday after falling at her office at the court, a court spokeswoman said.

“The last I heard she was up and working, of course, because what else would she be doing, and cracking jokes,” her nephew Daniel Stiepleman said at the premiere of the film “On the Basis of Sex”, about a gender-based discrimination case Ginsburg tried as a young lawyer in 1972.

“I can’t promise they were good jokes but they were jokes,” said Stiepleman, who wrote the script for the film with input from the justice herself.

Ginsburg, who made her name as an advocate for women’s rights, is one of four liberals sitting on the court, to which she was appointed in 1993 by then President Bill Clinton.

The court’s 5-4 conservative majority was restored last month when the Senate confirmed Republican President Donald Trump’s appointee Brett Kavanaugh after a contentious nomination process in which Kavanaugh denied a sexual assault allegation from his youth.

Ginsburg went home after the fall but experienced discomfort overnight and went to George Washington University Hospital on Thursday morning, court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in a statement.

Tests showed Ginsburg fractured three ribs on her left side and she was admitted for observation and treatment, Arberg added. The court is due to hear its next arguments on Nov. 26.

If Ginsburg were unable to continue serving, Trump could replace her with a conservative, further shifting the court to the right. A potentially dominant 6-3 conservative majority would have major consequences for issues including abortion, the death penalty, voting rights, gay rights and religious liberty.

As the oldest justice, Ginsburg is closely watched for any signs of deteriorating health. She has bounced back from previous medical issues and has fallen twice before at her home, in 2012 and 2013, leading to rib injuries. She was treated in 1999 for colon cancer and again in 2009 for pancreatic cancer, but did not miss any argument sessions either time.

In 2014, doctors placed a stent in her right coronary artery to improve blood flow after she reported discomfort following routine exercise. She was released from a hospital the next day.

Trump went to the court on Thursday for a ceremony welcoming Kavanaugh to the nation’s highest court. Kavanaugh was sworn in to the lifetime job last month. The president sat with first lady Melania Trump at the front of the marble-walled courtroom near the justices’ mahogany bench, making no public remarks.

Some leading congressional Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and outspoken Trump ally Senator Lindsey Graham, attended. The event came a day after Trump fired Jeff Sessions as attorney general; Matthew Whitaker, who Trump named as Sessions’ interim replacement, participated.

Critical comments

Ginsburg called Trump an egotistical “faker” when he was running for president in 2016, in an unusual foray into politics by a justice. Trump responded, saying her “mind is shot” and she should resign. Ginsburg later expressed regret, saying “judges should avoid commenting on a candidate for public office.”

She is a hero among many U.S. liberals, who revere her as “The Notorious R.B.G”, a nickname based on a late rap star. A documentary film about her, “RBG,” was released earlier this year, and the Hollywood biopic will be released on Christmas.

The director, Mimi Leder, called described the film as Ginsburg’s “origin story”, a term used in superhero movies.

“Our thoughts are with her tonight after her fall yesterday. We send her our love and pray for a speedy recovery. I have it on good word that shes in great shape, and she is shooing the doctors out of her room so she can work,” Leder said at the premiere. She told Reuters her own information about Ginsburg’s health had come from Stiepleman.

Ginsburg has helped buttress equality rights during her time on the high court, including in sex discrimination cases.

Her career was shaped in part by discrimination she faced as a young lawyer in a predominantly male profession: she was one of just nine women at Harvard Law School in the 1950s, and later struggled to find a firm that would hire her.

“She was making mistakes, finding out who she was, had a very young family, her husband wasn’t very well,” actress Felicity Jones, who plays her in the film, told Reuters on the red carpet. “She was juggling a lot of difficult things at the same time but always (had) this absolute commitment to the law.”

Ginsburg voiced support for the #MeToo movement against sexual misconduct after Kavanaugh was accused of sexual assault by a university professor, saying that unlike in her youth, “women nowadays are not silent about bad behavior.”

Kavanaugh’s Senate confirmation process convulsed the nation just weeks before Tuesday’s congressional elections in which Trump’s fellow Republicans lost control of the House of Representatives but expanded their majority in Senate.

On Wednesday, Trump credited the fight over confirming Kavanaugh, who was strongly opposed by Democrats, for the gains in the Senate.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: chris kleponis, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, majority, kavanaugh, rights, ruth, president, senate, broke, fall, ribs, court, working, bader, trump, ginsburg, film, supreme, justice


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Justice Ginsburg released from hospital after fall, plans to work from home Friday

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital and plans to work from home Friday, according to a release from the U.S. Supreme Court. “Justice Ginsburg has been discharged from the hospital,” court spokeswoman Kathleen Arberg said. “She is doing well and plans to work from home today.” The 85-year-old justice was admitted to George Washington University Hospital early Thursday morning after falling in her office the night before. Ginsburg’s hospitalization caused her to miss the i


Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital and plans to work from home Friday, according to a release from the U.S. Supreme Court. “Justice Ginsburg has been discharged from the hospital,” court spokeswoman Kathleen Arberg said. “She is doing well and plans to work from home today.” The 85-year-old justice was admitted to George Washington University Hospital early Thursday morning after falling in her office the night before. Ginsburg’s hospitalization caused her to miss the i
Justice Ginsburg released from hospital after fall, plans to work from home Friday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: tucker higgins, pat greenhouse, boston globe, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ginsburg, recent, plans, fall, hospital, released, liberal, court, miss, justice, discharged, work


Justice Ginsburg released from hospital after fall, plans to work from home Friday

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged from the hospital and plans to work from home Friday, according to a release from the U.S. Supreme Court.

“Justice Ginsburg has been discharged from the hospital,” court spokeswoman Kathleen Arberg said. “She is doing well and plans to work from home today.”

The 85-year-old justice was admitted to George Washington University Hospital early Thursday morning after falling in her office the night before. Tests showed that she fractured three ribs on her left side.

The liberal justices’s health has been a matter of intense public interest in recent years as the court has grown increasingly polarized.

Ginsburg is the most senior member of the court’s liberal wing and has been instrumental in shaping the court’s jurisprudence around matters of gender discrimination and women’s rights, among other areas. She is the oldest justice.

Ginsburg’s hospitalization caused her to miss the investiture of the most recent addition to the court, Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The ceremony took place Thursday morning.

But Ginsburg did not miss any oral argument. The next arguments before the court are scheduled for the final week of November.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: tucker higgins, pat greenhouse, boston globe, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ginsburg, recent, plans, fall, hospital, released, liberal, court, miss, justice, discharged, work


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UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities

The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint. It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007. The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial


The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint. It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007. The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial
UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, sued, group, expects, sale, sought, bank, ubs, law, mortgage, department, crisisera, settled, securities


UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities

UBS Group, Switzerland’s largest bank, said it expects to be sued by the U.S. Department of Justice as early as Thursday on civil charges related to the sale of mortgage-backed securities in the run-up to the 2008-2009 financial crisis, according to a company statement.

The bank said the claims were not supported by the facts or the law and it would contest any such complaint “vigorously.”

The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint.

It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007.

The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial crisis.

The Department of Justice has settled similar claims with Citigroup, Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan Chase, Credit Suisse Group, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America and Barclays.

Barclays settled for $2 billion in March after resisting a penalty the U.S. government sought near the end of the Obama administration in 2016. Justice had sought a much higher fine at the time and, when the two sides could not come to terms, the department filed a lawsuit.

More recently, HSBC Holdings agreed to pay $765 million last month to settle with the Justice Department over its sale of defective mortgage securities before the crisis, while major player Royal Bank of Scotland Group reached a $4.9 billion deal in May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, sued, group, expects, sale, sought, bank, ubs, law, mortgage, department, crisisera, settled, securities


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