Australia’s PM: Restrict social media after Christchurch mosque attack

Facebook confirmed on Monday that a livestreamed video apparently showing last week’s attack was viewed 4,000 times before it was removed. During the livestream itself, the video was viewed fewer than 200 times, but views racked up after news of the attack broke. The footage was later shared on other platforms, including YouTube and Twitter. Facebook said on Saturday that it removed 1.5 million videos of the attack in the first 24 hours after it was originally livestreamed. Reddit, Twitter and Y


Facebook confirmed on Monday that a livestreamed video apparently showing last week’s attack was viewed 4,000 times before it was removed. During the livestream itself, the video was viewed fewer than 200 times, but views racked up after news of the attack broke. The footage was later shared on other platforms, including YouTube and Twitter. Facebook said on Saturday that it removed 1.5 million videos of the attack in the first 24 hours after it was originally livestreamed. Reddit, Twitter and Y
Australia’s PM: Restrict social media after Christchurch mosque attack Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: karen gilchrist, quinn rooney, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, viewed, social, livestreamed, video, twitter, youtube, mosque, media, attack, weeks, australias, videos, restrict, times, letter


Australia's PM: Restrict social media after Christchurch mosque attack

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has called for a global crackdown on social media after footage of last Friday’s mosque attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand was livestreamed on Facebook, calling into question the extent to which the world’s biggest tech giants can successfully monitor their own platforms.

In a letter to Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Morrison asked the G-20 chair to make the issue central to the world leaders’ upcoming summit in Osaka in June.

Morrison shared the letter in a Twitter post on Tuesday.

“It is unacceptable to treat the internet as an ungoverned space,” the Morrison’s letter read.

“It is imperative that the global community works together to ensure that technology firms meet their moral obligation to protect the communities which they serve and from which they profit.”

Facebook and Alphabet’s YouTube are among those to have faced heavy criticism for their failure to block videos of last week’s twin shootings, which left 50 dead and several others critically injured.

Facebook confirmed on Monday that a livestreamed video apparently showing last week’s attack was viewed 4,000 times before it was removed.

During the livestream itself, the video was viewed fewer than 200 times, but views racked up after news of the attack broke. The footage was later shared on other platforms, including YouTube and Twitter.

Facebook said on Saturday that it removed 1.5 million videos of the attack in the first 24 hours after it was originally livestreamed. Facebook said 1.2 million of those videos “were blocked at upload.” Reddit, Twitter and YouTube also tried to move quickly to remove content related to the shooting.

—CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: karen gilchrist, quinn rooney, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, christchurch, viewed, social, livestreamed, video, twitter, youtube, mosque, media, attack, weeks, australias, videos, restrict, times, letter


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7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou


She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou
7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here's how to tackle them

Nevertheless, approaching difficult conversations is not only an important workplace skill, it could also be what enables your next step forward, said Sarah Sheehan, Bravely’s chief customer officer, who co-founded the company with Hervey as a platform for confidential professional advice.

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work.

1. Consider viewpoints beyond your own

“It’s easy to think about yourself and only yourself when you’re dealing with something challenging at work, but take the time to think through how someone might see it from the other side, and whether certain circumstances could be creating the situation at hand,” said Sheehan.

Your manager is a person, too, noted Sheehan, so sometimes the best thing you can do is to put yourself in their shoes and try to think things through from a new perspective.

2. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst

While you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted.

“Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. That way, you might be less likely to react with emotion,” she said.

3. Say it out loud

Finally, try rehearsing the conversation, either to yourself or someone else, to hone your message and perfect your delivery, said Sheehan.

“It will no doubt feel awkward at first,” she said, adding that “forcing yourself to say the words will help you hone how you deliver it, control the tone (which is super important!), and ensure you stick the landing.”

Don’t miss: Think your boss hates you? You could be onto something

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


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Meet the woman who won over Google, Apple and Intel to get more girls into tech

In a small village four hours outside of Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, there exists a community with no currency and little access to technology. They were put there by a group of ten Bolivian teenage girls who wanted to make the hours-long walk to school a little more fun for local children. The game works by encouraging bypassers to scan the barcodes with their smartphones – the one common technology in the area. For every correct answer, players receive a point, which they can use to compete aga


In a small village four hours outside of Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, there exists a community with no currency and little access to technology. They were put there by a group of ten Bolivian teenage girls who wanted to make the hours-long walk to school a little more fun for local children. The game works by encouraging bypassers to scan the barcodes with their smartphones – the one common technology in the area. For every correct answer, players receive a point, which they can use to compete aga
Meet the woman who won over Google, Apple and Intel to get more girls into tech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, hero images, getty images, -tara chklovski, founder, ceo of iridescent
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, meet, works, woman, won, walking, google, technology, girls, sarana, intel, tech, programming, learn, apple, wanted, little


Meet the woman who won over Google, Apple and Intel to get more girls into tech

In a small village four hours outside of Bolivia’s capital, La Paz, there exists a community with no currency and little access to technology.

And yet, the pathways are littered with QR codes.

They were put there by a group of ten Bolivian teenage girls who wanted to make the hours-long walk to school a little more fun for local children.

The game works by encouraging bypassers to scan the barcodes with their smartphones – the one common technology in the area.

The offline app then presents them with a multiple-choice quiz on a range of educational subjects, such as computer programming, history, English and Aymara — the village’s native language. For every correct answer, players receive a point, which they can use to compete against their friends.

For the girls who built the app – “Learn by Sarana” (Sarana translates to walking in Aymaran) – it was their first real opportunity to learn about technology, let alone programming.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, hero images, getty images, -tara chklovski, founder, ceo of iridescent
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, meet, works, woman, won, walking, google, technology, girls, sarana, intel, tech, programming, learn, apple, wanted, little


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Bill Gates-backed Impossible Burger CEO Patrick Brown on fighting meat

When Pat Brown was working in his research lab in 2009, he had “zero” intention of starting a business — much less one that would win United Nations backing and investment from the likes of Microsoft founder Bill Gates. No, his goal then was “simple.” “I basically decided I was going to look for the most important problem that I could have the opportunity of solving,” he told CNBC Make It. But when the former pediatrician-turned-Stamford professor discovered what that problem was — namely the “c


When Pat Brown was working in his research lab in 2009, he had “zero” intention of starting a business — much less one that would win United Nations backing and investment from the likes of Microsoft founder Bill Gates. No, his goal then was “simple.” “I basically decided I was going to look for the most important problem that I could have the opportunity of solving,” he told CNBC Make It. But when the former pediatrician-turned-Stamford professor discovered what that problem was — namely the “c
Bill Gates-backed Impossible Burger CEO Patrick Brown on fighting meat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, impossible foods, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fighting, zero, told, ceo, system, problem, brown, solving, working, impossible, united, bill, patrick, simplei, win, starting, burger, meat, gatesbacked


Bill Gates-backed Impossible Burger CEO Patrick Brown on fighting meat

When Pat Brown was working in his research lab in 2009, he had “zero” intention of starting a business — much less one that would win United Nations backing and investment from the likes of Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

No, his goal then was “simple.”

“I basically decided I was going to look for the most important problem that I could have the opportunity of solving,” he told CNBC Make It.

But when the former pediatrician-turned-Stamford professor discovered what that problem was — namely the “catastrophic” use of animals in our food system” — he realized he had to go “all in.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, impossible foods, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fighting, zero, told, ceo, system, problem, brown, solving, working, impossible, united, bill, patrick, simplei, win, starting, burger, meat, gatesbacked


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How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce

Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other. For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Planning ahead – Y


Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other. For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Planning ahead – Y
How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, vasyl dolmatov, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gen, baby, future, likely, millennials, employees, younger, boomers, work, reshaping, workforce, managers


How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce

Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. Brandished the work-shy generation of “snowflake” tendencies, millennials are said to expect too much freedom of their employers, and yet 84 percent report to experiencing burnout from their excessive workloads.

However, the post-1980s cohort of employees is actually inspiring meaningful ideas that will change the future of work as we know it. That’s according to a new study from human resources research firm Inavero and freelancing website Upwork, which has highlighted four major ways in which the youngest members of the workforce are setting in motion fundamental change.

Those four shifts include a growing emphasis on self-development, remote working, freelance roles and future-proofing strategies. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other.

For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Conversely, three times as many millennials and Gen Z-ers believe the onus is on them, rather than their employer, to develop new skills.

Meanwhile, the report which surveyed over 1,000 hiring managers based in the U.S., found that younger managers were much more willing to accommodate flexible working requests of their employees — and indeed want them for themselves — then their older colleagues.

Here are the ways in which millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the workforce:

Reskilling – With job automation a growing subject of debate, almost all managers (96 percent) say they believe reskilling is important for employees. However, there is a generational divide on the best approach. While the vast majority of baby boomers feel the onus is on employers to reskill their staff, millennials and Gen Z-ers are more likely to proactively seek out self-development and training schemes.

Planning ahead – Younger generation managers are more likely than their elders to consider future workforce planning a top priority. Indeed, they are nearly two times more likely than baby boomers to have made progress in developing a flexible talent strategy as well as in investing in technology to support a remote workforce.

Remote working – Younger generation managers are more likely to embrace remote working, both for their employees and their staff. Three-quarters (74 percent) of millennial and Gen Z managers have team members who work a significant portion of their time remotely, versus 58 percent of baby boomers. By 2028, 73 percent of all teams are expected to have remote workers.

Embracing freelancers – Millennial managers are more than twice as likely as baby boomers to have increased their use of freelancers in the past few years, and are projected to continue increasing their usage going forward. That is due to the value they see in terms of productivity and cost efficiencies.

With the majority of baby boomers on the cusp of retirement, and a new wave of millennials and Gen Z-ers set to join the workforce in the coming years, that gives an indication of kinds of ideas that likely lie ahead, Upwork’s CEO Stephane Kasriel told CNBC Make It.

“As younger generations ascend in the workforce and become the majority of managers in corporate America they’ll reshape work as we know it,” said Kasriel.

Millennials and Gen Z currently account for slightly over a third of the workforce (38 percent). In the next decade, that figure is set to shoot up to 58 percent, making the youthful generations the most dominant in the workplace. With that will come a greater number of them in managerial positions, too. Already today, 48 percent of younger generation managers are director level or higher.

Kasriel explained that it means employees can expect to see more support from their managers for flexible and unconventional work structures.

“The traditional 9-to-5 office job doesn’t adequately support the lives millennials and Gen Zs want to live,” he said. “They are flexible-work natives, raised during and after the dotcom bubble, where the acceleration of technology has sped up exponentially over time.

“As they ascend into managerial positions, they’re ditching traditional, archaic models of work in favor of a flexible, remote workforce. They’ll work with more freelancers, invest in reskilling and empower their teams to work remotely.”

Kasriel also noted that it creates opportunities for millennials and Gen Z-ers who enter managerial positions to right some of the wrongs of his own older generation.

“They should fix the issues that my generation didn’t see coming or didn’t have the courage to fix,” Kasriel said of millennial managers. More specifically, that should include investing in lifelong learning for employees and encouraging flexible working structures to increase their freedoms and reduce pressures on some of the most overcrowded cities, he said.

“It’s time to build the workforce of the 21st century, and the social contract that goes with it,” said Kasriel.

Don’t miss: Microsoft calls it a key skill for the future. Here’s 4 steps to mastering it

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, vasyl dolmatov, istock, getty images
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How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce

Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other. For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Planning ahead – Y


Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other. For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Planning ahead – Y
How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, vasyl dolmatov, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boomers, younger, work, gen, managers, baby, likely, employees, workforce, millennials, future, reshaping


How millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the future of the workforce

Millennials and their younger “Gen Z” counterparts are used to facing sweeping criticism over their commitment to the workplace. Brandished the work-shy generation of “snowflake” tendencies, millennials are said to expect too much freedom of their employers, and yet 84 percent report to experiencing burnout from their excessive workloads.

However, the post-1980s cohort of employees is actually inspiring meaningful ideas that will change the future of work as we know it. That’s according to a new study from human resources research firm Inavero and freelancing website Upwork, which has highlighted four major ways in which the youngest members of the workforce are setting in motion fundamental change.

Those four shifts include a growing emphasis on self-development, remote working, freelance roles and future-proofing strategies. On these core concepts, the report found a major ideological divide between baby boomers and Gen X — those born from 1965 to 1981 — at one end, and younger millennials and Gen Z at the other.

For instance, just one in 10 baby boomers feel they are personally responsible for reskilling as technology threatens the stability of many traditional careers. Conversely, three times as many millennials and Gen Z-ers believe the onus is on them, rather than their employer, to develop new skills.

Meanwhile, the report which surveyed over 1,000 hiring managers based in the U.S., found that younger managers were much more willing to accommodate flexible working requests of their employees — and indeed want them for themselves — then their older colleagues.

Here are the ways in which millennials and Gen Z are reshaping the workforce:

Reskilling – With job automation a growing subject of debate, almost all managers (96 percent) say they believe reskilling is important for employees. However, there is a generational divide on the best approach. While the vast majority of baby boomers feel the onus is on employers to reskill their staff, millennials and Gen Z-ers are more likely to proactively seek out self-development and training schemes.

Planning ahead – Younger generation managers are more likely than their elders to consider future workforce planning a top priority. Indeed, they are nearly two times more likely than baby boomers to have made progress in developing a flexible talent strategy as well as in investing in technology to support a remote workforce.

Remote working – Younger generation managers are more likely to embrace remote working, both for their employees and their staff. Three-quarters (74 percent) of millennial and Gen Z managers have team members who work a significant portion of their time remotely, versus 58 percent of baby boomers. By 2028, 73 percent of all teams are expected to have remote workers.

Embracing freelancers – Millennial managers are more than twice as likely as baby boomers to have increased their use of freelancers in the past few years, and are projected to continue increasing their usage going forward. That is due to the value they see in terms of productivity and cost efficiencies.

With the majority of baby boomers on the cusp of retirement, and a new wave of millennials and Gen Z-ers set to join the workforce in the coming years, that gives an indication of kinds of ideas that likely lie ahead, Upwork’s CEO Stephane Kasriel told CNBC Make It.

“As younger generations ascend in the workforce and become the majority of managers in corporate America they’ll reshape work as we know it,” said Kasriel.

Millennials and Gen Z currently account for slightly over a third of the workforce (38 percent). In the next decade, that figure is set to shoot up to 58 percent, making the youthful generations the most dominant in the workplace. With that will come a greater number of them in managerial positions, too. Already today, 48 percent of younger generation managers are director level or higher.

Kasriel explained that it means employees can expect to see more support from their managers for flexible and unconventional work structures.

“The traditional 9-to-5 office job doesn’t adequately support the lives millennials and Gen Zs want to live,” he said. “They are flexible-work natives, raised during and after the dotcom bubble, where the acceleration of technology has sped up exponentially over time.

“As they ascend into managerial positions, they’re ditching traditional, archaic models of work in favor of a flexible, remote workforce. They’ll work with more freelancers, invest in reskilling and empower their teams to work remotely.”

Kasriel also noted that it creates opportunities for millennials and Gen Z-ers who enter managerial positions to right some of the wrongs of his own older generation.

“They should fix the issues that my generation didn’t see coming or didn’t have the courage to fix,” Kasriel said of millennial managers. More specifically, that should include investing in lifelong learning for employees and encouraging flexible working structures to increase their freedoms and reduce pressures on some of the most overcrowded cities, he said.

“It’s time to build the workforce of the 21st century, and the social contract that goes with it,” said Kasriel.

Don’t miss: Microsoft calls it a key skill for the future. Here’s 4 steps to mastering it

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WATCH: Forget 9-to-5. Four hour workdays are the future, says Jack Ma


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, vasyl dolmatov, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boomers, younger, work, gen, managers, baby, likely, employees, workforce, millennials, future, reshaping


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Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it

“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It. “You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.” Spe


“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It. “You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.” Spe
Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, hours, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategy, particular, job, skills, wo, thinking, calls, microsoft, miaskiewicz, key, think, design, theres, mastering, future, skill, steps


Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it

With increasing talk of job disruption and automation, it’s important to think about the skills that will be most in demand in the future.

Microsoft, in its latest research, defined those as digital skills, analytical abilities and continuous learning capabilities. In particular, the tasks that require strong analytic abilities will call for a creative approach, explained Kevin Wo, Microsoft’s managing director for Singapore.

“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees.

“Design thinking” is a term for a particular method of problem solving, which dictates that individuals should try and get into a customer’s shoes to generate practical, user-friendly solutions. That could mean creating a new technology or product, such as Apple’s iPhone. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It.

“You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.”

Speaking at a recent careers conference in Singapore, Miaskiewicz said the strategy can be broken down into four key steps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, hours, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, strategy, particular, job, skills, wo, thinking, calls, microsoft, miaskiewicz, key, think, design, theres, mastering, future, skill, steps


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Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it

“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It. “You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.” Spe


“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It. “You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.” Spe
Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, hours, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skills, thinking, strategy, steps, skill, key, future, calls, microsoft, design, mastering, miaskiewicz, wo, particular, job, think, theres


Microsoft calls it a key skill of the future. Here are 4 steps to mastering it

With increasing talk of job disruption and automation, it’s important to think about the skills that will be most in demand in the future.

Microsoft, in its latest research, defined those as digital skills, analytical abilities and continuous learning capabilities. In particular, the tasks that require strong analytic abilities will call for a creative approach, explained Kevin Wo, Microsoft’s managing director for Singapore.

“I think there’s a need for them to learn about skills around design thinking,” Wo said of employees.

“Design thinking” is a term for a particular method of problem solving, which dictates that individuals should try and get into a customer’s shoes to generate practical, user-friendly solutions. That could mean creating a new technology or product, such as Apple’s iPhone. But the strategy can — and should — also be applied to other job functions, design thinking specialist Kasia Miaskiewicz told CNBC Make It.

“You can apply it anywhere,” said Miaskiewicz, a director at UBS Evolve, the Swiss bank’s center for design thinking and innovation. “As long as there is a user, a recipient – and there always is – there’s always an opportunity to apply design thinking.”

Speaking at a recent careers conference in Singapore, Miaskiewicz said the strategy can be broken down into four key steps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: karen gilchrist, hours, digitalvision, getty images
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HR experts share the skills they say employees will most need in the future

As the future of work changes, it’s more important than ever for employees to make sure they have the skills required to keep up. That was the message this week from People Matters TechHR 2019, Asia’s largest human resources conference. The remarks out of that Singapore event form part of a growing discourse around the impact technology and automation will have on the jobs landscape. It’s estimated that by 2030, 75 million to 375 million workers (3 to 14 percent of the global workforce) will nee


As the future of work changes, it’s more important than ever for employees to make sure they have the skills required to keep up. That was the message this week from People Matters TechHR 2019, Asia’s largest human resources conference. The remarks out of that Singapore event form part of a growing discourse around the impact technology and automation will have on the jobs landscape. It’s estimated that by 2030, 75 million to 375 million workers (3 to 14 percent of the global workforce) will nee
HR experts share the skills they say employees will most need in the future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: karen gilchrist, getty images, caiaimage sam edwards, caiaimage, -nora abd manaf, group chief human capital officer at maybank, -morne swart, vice president, global product, transformation
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, technology, need, hr, young, future, employees, million, jobs, important, workforce, workers, share, skills, say


HR experts share the skills they say employees will most need in the future

As the future of work changes, it’s more important than ever for employees to make sure they have the skills required to keep up. That was the message this week from People Matters TechHR 2019, Asia’s largest human resources conference.

The remarks out of that Singapore event form part of a growing discourse around the impact technology and automation will have on the jobs landscape. It’s estimated that by 2030, 75 million to 375 million workers (3 to 14 percent of the global workforce) will need to switch occupational categories, according to one McKinsey report.

While research from LinkedIn suggests that young people are more optimistic than any other generation about the shifting trends — after all, many of those jobs are expected to be replaced by new ones — the need to acquire new skills to keep apace with that change is undeniable.

CNBC Make It spoke to careers experts on the ground at the conference (as well as those responsible for the technology reshaping employment methods) to find out what they believe will be most important skills for the future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: karen gilchrist, getty images, caiaimage sam edwards, caiaimage, -nora abd manaf, group chief human capital officer at maybank, -morne swart, vice president, global product, transformation
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, technology, need, hr, young, future, employees, million, jobs, important, workforce, workers, share, skills, say


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Oscar-winner ‘Free Solo’ offers an important lesson for overcoming your fears

National Geographic’s “Free Solo” this week won an Academy Award for best documentary feature after capturing the journey of 33-year-old Alex Honnold as he achieved the seemingly impossible: Scaling 3,000-feet of Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan rock formation without so much as a rope. The film left audiences reeling. Many were awestruck by what the New York Times described as “one of the great athletic feats of any kind, ever.” Meanwhile others were more skeptical, questioning whether Honno


National Geographic’s “Free Solo” this week won an Academy Award for best documentary feature after capturing the journey of 33-year-old Alex Honnold as he achieved the seemingly impossible: Scaling 3,000-feet of Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan rock formation without so much as a rope. The film left audiences reeling. Many were awestruck by what the New York Times described as “one of the great athletic feats of any kind, ever.” Meanwhile others were more skeptical, questioning whether Honno
Oscar-winner ‘Free Solo’ offers an important lesson for overcoming your fears Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: karen gilchrist, national geographic, kevork djansezian, getty images entertainment, getty images, -jb mackinnon, -alex honnold, free solo, rock climber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overcoming, important, honnold, lesson, yosemite, offers, times, seemingly, york, won, oscarwinner, solo, week, free, fears, national, skeptical


Oscar-winner 'Free Solo' offers an important lesson for overcoming your fears

National Geographic’s “Free Solo” this week won an Academy Award for best documentary feature after capturing the journey of 33-year-old Alex Honnold as he achieved the seemingly impossible: Scaling 3,000-feet of Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan rock formation without so much as a rope.

The film left audiences reeling. Many were awestruck by what the New York Times described as “one of the great athletic feats of any kind, ever.” Meanwhile others were more skeptical, questioning whether Honnold even possesses the primal instinct that has deterred so many before him: fear.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: karen gilchrist, national geographic, kevork djansezian, getty images entertainment, getty images, -jb mackinnon, -alex honnold, free solo, rock climber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, overcoming, important, honnold, lesson, yosemite, offers, times, seemingly, york, won, oscarwinner, solo, week, free, fears, national, skeptical


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