This small European country has been ranked the world’s best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded


Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


This small European country has been ranked the world's best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. But at a time of growing global uncertainty, Switzerland’s famed political and economic stability helped it climb the ranks of HSBC Expat’s annual survey to score the top spot for the first time. Switzerland jumped up the rankings from 8th place last year after the vast majority of people who had relocated there from overseas said they were happy with its economic (80%) and political (86%) climate. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country.

Mist above Lucerne City, Switzerland in October 2017. shan.shihan | Moment | Getty Images

Seven in 10 (71%) of those who have moved to Switzerland now enjoy higher levels of disposable income with their average salary being $111,587 — well above the global mean of $75,966. Meanwhile, 70% said their surroundings were cleaner and 42% felt physically healthier. This year’s report, which is based on responses from more than 18,000 expats across 163 markets, marks the first time in five years that Singapore was not ranked in first place. The Southeast Asian city-state shifted down one position to take second place. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded out in order by Canada, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, Turkey, Germany, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.

Singapore

Best for families

Mother and child walk close to Singapore business district. Leren Lu | Photographer’s Choice | Getty Images

Though Singapore failed to make it to the top of HSBC’s ranking for the sixth consecutive year, it remained a strong performer, especially for those moving abroad with children. Some 62% of respondents said the schooling system in Singapore is better than in their home country, while 69% rated the opportunity it afforded their kids to learn new languages.

Canada

Welcoming to foreigners

Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

A consistently high performer, Canada’s reputation for welcoming foreign visitors saw it take third place this year. The vast majority (80%) of respondents also said they enjoyed a better quality of life in their new home, compared to the global average of 65%.

Spain

High quality of living

View of The Alhambra in Granada City, Spain Gonzalo Azumendi | The Image Bank | Getty Images

While few respondents said they relocated to Spain for their careers, more than two-thirds (67%) said they’d seen an improvement in their work-life balance as a result of the move. That, coupled with the country’s top ranking for mental well-being, saw Spain jump up 10 spots this year.

New Zealand

A long-term destination

View of Queenstown, New Zealand just after sunset. Ramiro Torrents | Moment | Getty Images

Renowned for its stunning scenery and laid back way of life, more than half (57%) of people who moved to New Zealand said they did so to improve their quality of life. And it appears to pay off: 60% of those who moved stayed longer than expected. In fact, those who move to New Zealand are the most likely to stay in their new country for over 20 years. Don’t miss: Working abroad could boost your salary by more than a third Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


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China’s ‘tremendous’ tech progress could see trade tensions rumble on: Bain & Co

That’s because Trump’s apparent war against Chinese trade practices is really a war on technology — a space in which China is making “tremendous” progress, according to Henrik Naujoks, partner at the global management consultancy. “The critical point is that, behind the trade negotiations, there is an underlying theme — which is technology — and the fight for dominance in the technology space,” Naujoks told CNBC Monday at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China. As part of wider talks to curb


That’s because Trump’s apparent war against Chinese trade practices is really a war on technology — a space in which China is making “tremendous” progress, according to Henrik Naujoks, partner at the global management consultancy. “The critical point is that, behind the trade negotiations, there is an underlying theme — which is technology — and the fight for dominance in the technology space,” Naujoks told CNBC Monday at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China. As part of wider talks to curb
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, bain, chinas, china, war, products, chinese, technology, naujoks, tech, tremendous, trump, space, tensions, trade, progress, rumble


China's 'tremendous' tech progress could see trade tensions rumble on: Bain & Co

President Donald Trump has suggested he would reverse restrictions preventing American companies from selling their products to Chinese technology giant Huawei — but it remains unclear if that agreement will bring about any near-term resolution to the year-long trade fight between the U.S. and China, according to management consultancy Bain & Company.

That’s because Trump’s apparent war against Chinese trade practices is really a war on technology — a space in which China is making “tremendous” progress, according to Henrik Naujoks, partner at the global management consultancy.

“The critical point is that, behind the trade negotiations, there is an underlying theme — which is technology — and the fight for dominance in the technology space,” Naujoks told CNBC Monday at the World Economic Forum in Dalian, China.

As part of wider talks to curb an ongoing trade dispute with China, Trump agreed to remove some curbs on Huawei on Saturday, during his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

The two leaders also agreed not to levy any further tariffs against each other’s products as they sought to proceed with ongoing negotiations.

“I think we have to take this into account if we take a mid- to long-term view,” Naujoks said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, bain, chinas, china, war, products, chinese, technology, naujoks, tech, tremendous, trump, space, tensions, trade, progress, rumble


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Media icon Arianna Huffington faced 37 rejections before kick-starting her career

Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess. The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post. The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book. “One of the low points in my life was when my seco


Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess. The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post. The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book. “One of the low points in my life was when my seco
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: karen gilchrist
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Media icon Arianna Huffington faced 37 rejections before kick-starting her career

Arianna Huffington is celebrated for her publishing prowess.

The Greek American businesswoman is the founder of international news and opinion site The Huffington Post. She is also a renowned journalist and author of 15 books.

However, her path to success wasn’t without its hurdles, as Huffington keenly revealed in a recent LinkedIn post.

The 68-year-old wrote of how, as a young, aspiring author living in London, she faced 37 rejections before finally securing a publishing contract for her second book.

“One of the low points in my life was when my second book was rejected by 37 publishers,” Huffington wrote.

“By rejection 25, you would have thought I might have said, ‘Hey, you know, there’s something wrong here. Maybe I should be looking at a different career,'” she noted.

But, instead, Huffington chose to persevere with her dream.

At the time, she had one published book under her belt and was working as a journalist. So she walked into a local Barclays bank — “armed with nothing but a lot of chutzpah” — and asked for a loan to tide her over until her writing aspirations were realized.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, young, journalist, 37, author, faced, arianna, publishing, book, kickstarting, icon, wroteby, wrote, rejections, second, huffington, media, career


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US women are working longer hours as their sleep and social lives suffer

U.S. women spent longer working, caring for their families and doing jobs around the house in 2018 than in previous years. Their social lives, leisure time and even their sleep. Employed women worked approximately 7 hours and 20 minutes during the typical work day last year — the most time since the survey began in 2003. Men, meanwhile, worked around 7 hours 54 minutes on the average work day, down from eight-and-a-half hours in 2017 and the lowest level since the Great Recession. However, women


U.S. women spent longer working, caring for their families and doing jobs around the house in 2018 than in previous years. Their social lives, leisure time and even their sleep. Employed women worked approximately 7 hours and 20 minutes during the typical work day last year — the most time since the survey began in 2003. Men, meanwhile, worked around 7 hours 54 minutes on the average work day, down from eight-and-a-half hours in 2017 and the lowest level since the Great Recession. However, women
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: karen gilchrist
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US women are working longer hours as their sleep and social lives suffer

U.S. women spent longer working, caring for their families and doing jobs around the house in 2018 than in previous years.

The pay-off? Their social lives, leisure time and even their sleep.

That’s the conclusion of the annual American Time Use Survey, released Wednesday by the Labor Department.

Employed women worked approximately 7 hours and 20 minutes during the typical work day last year — the most time since the survey began in 2003.

Men, meanwhile, worked around 7 hours 54 minutes on the average work day, down from eight-and-a-half hours in 2017 and the lowest level since the Great Recession.

The research, which is based on ongoing interview surveys by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, points to a narrowing of the gap between the time spent on the job by working men and women.

That could be seen as a win for women’s increased workplace participation. However, women’s increased work hours were met by ongoing household obligations, which continue to disproportionately outweigh those of their male counterparts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, survey, work, lives, social, hours, minutes, longer, women, womens, spent, worked, suffer, ongoing, working, sleep


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New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult


New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult
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New York, London and Paris remain the world's most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities.

But their prime positions could be up for contention as progress across Europe, Asia and the Middle East shows signs of disrupting the status quo.

That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees.

For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and culture, human capital, political engagement and information exchange.

New York ranked especially highly for business activity and human capital, while Paris performed well for information exchange and London for culture.

The leading trio were joined in the top 10 of the “Global Cities Index” by Tokyo (4th), Hong Kong (5th), Singapore (6th), Los Angeles (7th), Chicago (8th), Beijing (9th) and Washington D.C. (10th).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
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No country in the world meets the mark on gender equality, but these are the best performers

As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. D


As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. D
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, performers, country, measures, score, equality, report, sdg, poor, meets, world, countries, gender, mark, 100


No country in the world meets the mark on gender equality, but these are the best performers

As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. That’s according to a new report released Monday by Equal Measures 2030, which found that 2.8 billion women and girls globally live in countries with “poor” or “very poor” levels of gender equality, despite ongoing efforts to bridge the gap. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. The SDGs are a range of measures laid out in 2015 in a bid to improve global living standards by 2030. For the purposes of the study, those categories were broken down into 51 subsections measuring factors such as health, education, gender-based violence, work and politics.

Equal Measures 2030’S 2019 SDG Gender Index

Best and worst performers

Just 8% percent of the 129 countries measured scored a “good” rating of 80 or more — out of 100 — for their progress in achieving gender equality, the report found. Meanwhile, 12% managed a “fair” rating of 70 to 79. The remaining 80% of countries measured scored either “poor” (60 to 69 points) or “very poor” (below 60). No single country achieved an “excellent” score of 90 or above. The global average score was 65.7 out of 100, which the report said was “barely (a) pass.” More than 60 countries were omitted from the list due to lack of data. Denmark emerged as the world’s most progressive country in terms of gender equality, achieving a near-excellent score of 89.3 out of 100. It was joined in the top 10 by Finland, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Germany, Canada, Ireland and Australia. The U.K. ranked 17th and the U.S. came in at 28th. At the other end of the spectrum, Chad came out at the bottom of the list, with a score of 33.4 out of 100. Other countries in the bottom 10 of the index included Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Yemen, Congo, DR Congo. All those countries also appeared on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s 2018 list of fragile states.

Equal Measures 2030’S 2019 SDG Gender Index Equal Measures 2030

A ‘wake up’ call

Overall, Europe and North America were the best performing regions, with an average regional score of 79.1. That was due in large part to the more advanced economies and greater levels of resources there. However, the report noted that even leading countries have to address a number of outstanding issues — such as gender-based violence, poverty and women’s participation in the economy — in order to reach “the last mile.” Latin America and the Caribbean ranked in second place (66.5), followed by Asia-Pacific (64.6), the Middle East and North Africa (60.8) and, lastly, Sub-Saharan Africa (51.1). The report shows there’s still a long way to go to achieve gender equality on a global level, said Alison Holder, director of Equal Measures 203, who called on governments and businesses to take coordinated action. That includes allocating more funds to equality programs and improving data, the report suggested. Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, one of the report’s contributors, said the findings should act as a “wake-up call” for policymakers. But she also highlighted the work that some of the least developed countries have made in recent years, saying that it provided hope for greater progress going forward. “Many countries with the most limited resources are making huge strides in removing the barriers for girls and women across economies, politics and society – demonstrating that when it comes to gender equality, governments shouldn’t have excuses for inaction,” said Gates. Don’t miss: Meet the woman who won over Google, Apple and Intel to get more girls into tech Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, performers, country, measures, score, equality, report, sdg, poor, meets, world, countries, gender, mark, 100


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Former Apple CEO John Sculley reveals the skill that made Steve Jobs a ‘brilliant’ leader

As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise. But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it. Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple


As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise. But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it. Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sculley, leader, steve, john, skill, brilliant, took, jobs, 12, turned, apple, visionary, reveals, ceo, ability


Former Apple CEO John Sculley reveals the skill that made Steve Jobs a 'brilliant' leader

As he’s the co-founder of Apple and the visionary behind some of the world’s leading personal computing innovations, few would question the late Steve Jobs’ expertise.

But it was a rather more common interpersonal skill that turned him into a “brilliant” business leader, according to former Apple CEO John Sculley.

That skill? The ability to listen.

Sculley, who served as Apple’s CEO for a decade from 1983 to 1993, told CNBC Make It that ability did not come naturally to Jobs. Rather, it took 12 years and a contentious departure from Apple to hone it.

Jobs famously resigned from Apple in 1985, aged 27, following a clash with Sculley (a former ally) and Apple board members over the strategic direction of the company.

In the 12 years that followed, Jobs founded another computer software company, NeXT, before returning to Apple in 1997.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sculley, leader, steve, john, skill, brilliant, took, jobs, 12, turned, apple, visionary, reveals, ceo, ability


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This 27-year-old’s start-up success could mark a major step for women entrepreneurs

Among women entrepreneurs, Ankiti Bose is something of an icon. With her rapidly growing fashion platform, Zilingo, she’s on track to become the first Indian woman to co-found a $1 billion start-up. That includes ensuring Zilingo is a 50% female company with 50% female leadership, she said. “I was phenomenally blessed to have a team of mentors, team of guides that would think of me quite genderlessly,” Bose told CNBC Make It. “I really want to see that happen with a lot of women, and I know that


Among women entrepreneurs, Ankiti Bose is something of an icon. With her rapidly growing fashion platform, Zilingo, she’s on track to become the first Indian woman to co-found a $1 billion start-up. That includes ensuring Zilingo is a 50% female company with 50% female leadership, she said. “I was phenomenally blessed to have a team of mentors, team of guides that would think of me quite genderlessly,” Bose told CNBC Make It. “I really want to see that happen with a lot of women, and I know that
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This 27-year-old's start-up success could mark a major step for women entrepreneurs

Among women entrepreneurs, Ankiti Bose is something of an icon.

With her rapidly growing fashion platform, Zilingo, she’s on track to become the first Indian woman to co-found a $1 billion start-up.

But rather than revel in the “glamorous labels,” the 27-year-old founder says she wants to use that newfound status as an opportunity to drive progress for other would-be women leaders.

Bose, who started her career as an investment analyst before launching Zilingo in 2014, said she was fortunate to find a male co-founder and team of backers who thought of her quite “genderlessly” and supported her business ambitions.

However, she acknowledged that even today that support can be hard to come by for many women, and she wants to use her leadership position to bridge that gap — particularly in the tech industry and within Asia.

That includes ensuring Zilingo is a 50% female company with 50% female leadership, she said.

“I was phenomenally blessed to have a team of mentors, team of guides that would think of me quite genderlessly,” Bose told CNBC Make It.

“I really want to see that happen with a lot of women, and I know that it doesn’t,” she continued.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-27  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, female, quite, bose, team, 50, step, success, genderlessly, women, major, 27yearolds, wants, entrepreneurs, mark, zilingo, leadership, startup


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Why this 27-year-old is happy she worked a corporate job before starting her $1 billion business

But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, ZilingoTo be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti


But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, ZilingoTo be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti
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Why this 27-year-old is happy she worked a corporate job before starting her $1 billion business

Many of us would love to be the kid who dreamed up a multimillion-dollar business idea in their college dorm room, becoming an overnight success without ever working a “real job.” The reality, though, is that those teen proteges are few and far between. But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave her the chance to watch and learn. “The fact that I was working in venture capital and consulting before that definitely played an important role in shaping our opinions in what would work and what would not work, what would build a sustainable business,” Bose said of the early years she spent working an office job.

It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, Zilingo

To be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Bose quit her job in 2015, just before her 24th birthday, and along with her co-founder Dhruv Kapoor has spent the last four years building a e-commerce platform that’s valued at nearly $1 billion, to help Southeast Asia’s independent retailers sell their products online. As of February this year, Singapore-headquartered Zilingo had 7 million active users globally and a valuation of $970 million. That puts Bose on course to become India’s first woman to co-found a $1 billion start-up.

Ankiti Bose, co-founder and CEO of Zilingo CNBC

But it was her time spent observing Asia’s burgeoning tech scene — first as a management consultant at McKinsey, and later as an investment analyst at Sequoia Capital in Bangalore, India — that first gave her that “aha” moment, said Bose. “I think it gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want,” she said of her corporate role and Kapoor’s job as a software engineer. Bose said that as an investment analyst, she followed the emergence of e-commerce powerhouses such as Amazon, Alibaba and Flipkart in major economies like the U.S., China and India. Yet it also highlighted to her the dearth of options for sellers in Southeast Asia — one of the world’s largest fashion manufacturing markets.

Despite everything that was happening in India and China at the time, Southeast Asia was the one market which was growing really fast. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, Zilingo

“Despite everything that was happening in India and China at the time, Southeast Asia was the one market which was growing really fast and had the maximum room for a product like ours,” said Bose, who first spotted the opportunity on a trip to Chatuchak market in Bangkok, Thailand. “Everybody was solving for access to the internet, but what about everything else that goes on before you actually sell the product?” Bose continued, listing common hurdles for retailers, such as procurement, design and financing. “We said hey, what about if we plug all those gaps for merchants.”

Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti Bose (center). Zilingo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
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