Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi sees Facebook as an inspiration for his vision

India’s prime minister has shown that inspiration can come from all directions: Narendra Modi says he looks to the likes of Facebook and Twitter as an inspiration for his own goals. Modi said the success of such platforms have set the bar for the speed and extent to which technology can change people’s lives. “We have to believe that development and empowerment can spread with this same speed at which Facebook, Twitter or mobile phones have spread across the world,” Modi said at the Singapore Fi


India’s prime minister has shown that inspiration can come from all directions: Narendra Modi says he looks to the likes of Facebook and Twitter as an inspiration for his own goals. Modi said the success of such platforms have set the bar for the speed and extent to which technology can change people’s lives. “We have to believe that development and empowerment can spread with this same speed at which Facebook, Twitter or mobile phones have spread across the world,” Modi said at the Singapore Fi
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi sees Facebook as an inspiration for his vision Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fintech, minister, speed, financial, world, narendra, sees, country, indian, accounts, india, technology, facebook, prime, modi, bank, inspiration, vision


Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi sees Facebook as an inspiration for his vision

India’s prime minister has shown that inspiration can come from all directions: Narendra Modi says he looks to the likes of Facebook and Twitter as an inspiration for his own goals.

Modi said the success of such platforms have set the bar for the speed and extent to which technology can change people’s lives. He now wants to replicate that success in his plans for India.

“We have to believe that development and empowerment can spread with this same speed at which Facebook, Twitter or mobile phones have spread across the world,” Modi said at the Singapore FinTech Festival Wednesday.

The Indian leader has long been a vocal advocate of technology, employing it in unique and innovative ways at various stages of his political career. During campaigning, he used holograms to galvanize support across the vast country, and he’s frequently pushed for greater technological connectivity for Indian cities.

But it was only when Modi came to power in 2014 that he was able to start rolling out his primary vision for India: Using financial technology — or fintech — to give citizens greater access to bank accounts, credit and other financial freedoms.

“That vision is rapidly changing into a reality,” said the 68-year-old.

Just four years ago, less than 15 percent of India’s 1.35 billion citizens had bank accounts. Today, the country has more than 1 billion bank accounts. That’s due in part to the near-universal roll out of a digital biometric identification scheme in India.

“With the power of fintech, and the reach of digital connectivity, we have started a revolution of historic speed and scale,” said Modi.

Modi said that revolution was largely thanks to the millions of young entrepreneurs in his country whose work to increase financial inclusion had, he said, created an “explosion” of innovation and turned India into a “leading start-up nation.”

But he also urged more to get involved and find new ways to use financial technology to change the fortunes of billions of people’s lives, both in India and beyond.

“What we dream for India is what we also wish for the world,” said Modi. “This is a common journey for all.”

“Each era is defined by its opportunities and challenges, each generation has the responsibility to shape the future,” he continued. “At no time in history were we faced with so many possibilities to make opportunity and prosperity a reality in the lifetime of billions.”

Don’t miss: Jack Ma was inspired to create Alibaba by Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fintech, minister, speed, financial, world, narendra, sees, country, indian, accounts, india, technology, facebook, prime, modi, bank, inspiration, vision


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon is set to hire 50,000 for HQ2. This ex-employee reveals how to ace the interview

Amazon is on the cusp of revealing the location of its hotly anticipated second headquarters. Amazon has said it will invest more than $5 billion over almost two decades to expand its 613,000-strong workforce by 50,000. That build-out will offer opportunities aplenty for the tens of thousands of techies who dream of working at the tech behemoth. Between 2011 and 2013, she conducted thousands of interviews at the company’s Seattle HQ in her role as an Amazon “bar raiser.” But, for those who do, i


Amazon is on the cusp of revealing the location of its hotly anticipated second headquarters. Amazon has said it will invest more than $5 billion over almost two decades to expand its 613,000-strong workforce by 50,000. That build-out will offer opportunities aplenty for the tens of thousands of techies who dream of working at the tech behemoth. Between 2011 and 2013, she conducted thousands of interviews at the company’s Seattle HQ in her role as an Amazon “bar raiser.” But, for those who do, i
Amazon is set to hire 50,000 for HQ2. This ex-employee reveals how to ace the interview Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, lisa werner, getty images, the washington post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, role, exemployee, bar, employees, ace, workforce, hire, reveals, lin, interview, amazon, hq2, tech, set, thousands, process, 50000


Amazon is set to hire 50,000 for HQ2. This ex-employee reveals how to ace the interview

Amazon is on the cusp of revealing the location of its hotly anticipated second headquarters.

While the location — or locations — of the so-called HQ2 has yet been revealed, the expansion is set to usher in a new era of growth at the tech giant as it seeks to expand its workforce by almost 10 percent. Amazon has said it will invest more than $5 billion over almost two decades to expand its 613,000-strong workforce by 50,000.

That build-out will offer opportunities aplenty for the tens of thousands of techies who dream of working at the tech behemoth. But, with the typical Amazon job posting receiving thousands of applications, and the average salary of the new roles expected to be more than $100,000, competition is set to be fierce.

So, it’s important to figure out how you can get ahead of the crowd.

One person who understands that better than most is Sandi Lin. Between 2011 and 2013, she conducted thousands of interviews at the company’s Seattle HQ in her role as an Amazon “bar raiser.”

The position, which is held in addition to an employee’s regular role, is designed to make sure every new hire raise the talent bar across the company, while ensuring a fair final decision-making process. The idea is that they can provide a layer of objectivity to the hiring process in departments outside of their own, Amazon confirmed to CNBC Make It.

“It’s sort of like a secret society,” said Lin, noting that employees can express an interest in the role, but typically they’re “tapped” for it.

Usually only half of the employees who join the three-month program make it through to become an official bar raiser. But, for those who do, it provides a unique insight into the Amazon interview process, as Lin explained to CNBC Make It.

That process can be broken down into four main steps:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, lisa werner, getty images, the washington post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, role, exemployee, bar, employees, ace, workforce, hire, reveals, lin, interview, amazon, hq2, tech, set, thousands, process, 50000


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady

Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady. “At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.” While


Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady. “At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.” While
How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, michelle, obama, felt, purpose, discover, girls, id, true, different, writes, lady, unworthy, overcame, insecurities, role


How Michelle Obama overcame her insecurities to discover her true purpose as first lady

With any new role, it can be easy to feel out of your depth.

Studies suggest that as many as 70 percent of people have suffered from a sense of inadequacy, or “imposter syndrome,” at some stage in their lives. And it turns out, that’s no different if you’re the first lady of the United States.

Michelle Obama, in her new book “Becoming,” reveals that she felt “overwhelmed,” “unworthy” and “uncertain of [her] purpose” when her husband’s appointment as president propelled her to become the country’s first African-American first lady.

In fact, Obama said it wasn’t until two months in, when she met with a group of schoolgirls from north London, that she figured out the real purpose of her role.

“At this point, I’d been first lady for just over two months,” Obama writes in her memoir, released on Tuesday. “In different moments, I’d felt overwhelmed by the pace, unworthy of the glamour, anxious about our children, and uncertain of my purpose.”

It was early 2009, and the Obamas were in the U.K. on their first official overseas visit. While President Barack Obama was meeting with officials, the then-first lady was invited to a government-funded, all-girls secondary school in London’s Islington neighborhood. Like herself, the majority of the girls there were ethnic minorities from modest backgrounds.

As she watched a performance by the girls — a medley of Shakespeare, modern dance and a Whitney Houston song — she says she was transported to her past. Suddenly, she says, she couldn’t help feeling disheartened by the barriers that inevitably lay ahead of them, no matter their academic abilities.

“You had only to look around at the faces in the room to know that despite their strengths, these girls would need to work hard to be seen,” the former first lady says of the students at Elizabeth Garrett Anderson School.

“There were girls in hijab, girls for whom English was a second language, girls whose skin made up every shade of brown,” she says. “I knew they’d have to push back against the stereotypes that would get put on them, all the ways they’d be defined before they’d have a chance to define themselves.”

But then she saw the young girls’ optimism. In that moment, she says, she realized that despite her own feelings of inadequacy in the role, being first lady would open up a door of opportunity for so many others like her.

“Here, finally, speaking to those girls, I felt something completely different and pure — an alignment of my old self with this new role,” writes Obama.

“Their faces were hopeful, and now so was I. For me, it was a strange, quiet revelation: They were me, as I’d once been. And I was them, as they could be,” she continues.

“The energy I felt thrumming in that school had nothing to do with obstacles. It was the power of 900 girls striving.”

Don’t miss: Here’s how Michelle Obama’s No. 1 daily habit can make you happier

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: karen gilchrist, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, michelle, obama, felt, purpose, discover, girls, id, true, different, writes, lady, unworthy, overcame, insecurities, role


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 steps to negotiating your next pay raise

Negotiating a pay raise can be tough. Whether you’re starting a new job, or looking for a boost from your current employer, you need to tread carefully. “Employers don’t have the same ability to be as picky as they were five to six years ago,” Gimbel told CNBC Make It last month. “If you are looking to walk into your boss’s office to ask for a raise, now is probably a pretty good time.” Oliver Cooke, executive director at New York City recruitment firm Selby Jennings, told CNBC Make It it comes


Negotiating a pay raise can be tough. Whether you’re starting a new job, or looking for a boost from your current employer, you need to tread carefully. “Employers don’t have the same ability to be as picky as they were five to six years ago,” Gimbel told CNBC Make It last month. “If you are looking to walk into your boss’s office to ask for a raise, now is probably a pretty good time.” Oliver Cooke, executive director at New York City recruitment firm Selby Jennings, told CNBC Make It it comes
3 steps to negotiating your next pay raise Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: karen gilchrist, ivan-balvan, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, gimbel, pay, director, york, walk, youre, negotiating, looking, steps, raise, told


3 steps to negotiating your next pay raise

Negotiating a pay raise can be tough.

Whether you’re starting a new job, or looking for a boost from your current employer, you need to tread carefully. Go in too hard and you may burn your bridges; go in too soft and you could miss your chance.

Yet, experts suggest now could be the time to give it a shot. With unemployment in the U.S. at its lowest level since 1969, employees today are in their strongest position in years to negotiate a raise, according to Martha Gimbel, director of economic research at job search site Indeed.

“Employers don’t have the same ability to be as picky as they were five to six years ago,” Gimbel told CNBC Make It last month. “If you are looking to walk into your boss’s office to ask for a raise, now is probably a pretty good time.”

So just how should you go about it? Oliver Cooke, executive director at New York City recruitment firm Selby Jennings, told CNBC Make It it comes down to three steps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: karen gilchrist, ivan-balvan, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, gimbel, pay, director, york, walk, youre, negotiating, looking, steps, raise, told


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Advice for entrepreneurs: Women’s best advice for running a business

The number of women-owned businesses is on the rise. Four in 10 businesses in the U.S. are now majority-owned, operated and controlled by women, according to the latest State of Women-owned Businesses report from American Express. Last year alone, 1,821 new women-owned businesses opened in the U.S. each day. The shift marks a major step forward for women entrepreneurs across the country. So, how can women entrepreneurs make sure their company goes the extra mile and breaks through those boundari


The number of women-owned businesses is on the rise. Four in 10 businesses in the U.S. are now majority-owned, operated and controlled by women, according to the latest State of Women-owned Businesses report from American Express. Last year alone, 1,821 new women-owned businesses opened in the U.S. each day. The shift marks a major step forward for women entrepreneurs across the country. So, how can women entrepreneurs make sure their company goes the extra mile and breaks through those boundari
Advice for entrepreneurs: Women’s best advice for running a business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: karen gilchrist, hero images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, number, sure, business, advice, running, best, womens, company, total, surpass, workforce, women, businesses, entrepreneurs, womenowned


Advice for entrepreneurs: Women's best advice for running a business

The number of women-owned businesses is on the rise.

Four in 10 businesses in the U.S. are now majority-owned, operated and controlled by women, according to the latest State of Women-owned Businesses report from American Express.

That’s a total of 12.3 million companies — or 58 percent more than the number that existed just over a decade ago. In contrast, the number of businesses with majority-male or shared ownership grew 12 percent in that period.

Last year alone, 1,821 new women-owned businesses opened in the U.S. each day.

The shift marks a major step forward for women entrepreneurs across the country. However, there remains progress to be made. Women-owned businesses continue to lag behind in other metrics, employing just 8 percent of the private sector workforce and contributing 4.3 percent of total revenues.

Often, that means women business-owners can be the sole employee of their company and annual revenues can struggle to surpass $100,000.

So, how can women entrepreneurs make sure their company goes the extra mile and breaks through those boundaries? CNBC Make It spoke to successful women business owners to find out their advice.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: karen gilchrist, hero images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, number, sure, business, advice, running, best, womens, company, total, surpass, workforce, women, businesses, entrepreneurs, womenowned


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Interview tips: Salary negotiation, how to respond to questions on pay

It’s the question you hope will never arise during your job interview: What is your current salary? Answer honestly, and you risk getting low-balled and missing your chance to climb the pay scale. New York City, Delaware, Amazon and Facebook are but a few of the places to make the shift away from the question. Research suggests that salary history questions can cause pay disparities between men and women to snowball over time. According to compensation research firm PayScale, 43 percent of U.S.


It’s the question you hope will never arise during your job interview: What is your current salary? Answer honestly, and you risk getting low-balled and missing your chance to climb the pay scale. New York City, Delaware, Amazon and Facebook are but a few of the places to make the shift away from the question. Research suggests that salary history questions can cause pay disparities between men and women to snowball over time. According to compensation research firm PayScale, 43 percent of U.S.
Interview tips: Salary negotiation, how to respond to questions on pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: karen gilchrist, pattanaphong khuankaew, istock, getty images, steve debenport
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cooke, tips, job, respond, interview, york, negotiation, shift, firm, question, salary, history, pay, questions, research


Interview tips: Salary negotiation, how to respond to questions on pay

It’s the question you hope will never arise during your job interview: What is your current salary?

Answer honestly, and you risk getting low-balled and missing your chance to climb the pay scale. Bend the truth, and you might overshoot the mark or, worse still, be found out as a liar.

In the U.S., the once routine query is becoming increasingly uncommon as a number of states, cities and companies have moved to ban it. New York City, Delaware, Amazon and Facebook are but a few of the places to make the shift away from the question.

The move is part of efforts to reduce the gender pay gap. Research suggests that salary history questions can cause pay disparities between men and women to snowball over time.

In some cases, the ban appears to be working. New York City-based recruitment specialist Oliver Cooke told CNBC Make It that one female candidate who interviewed through his firm secured a 100 percent pay increase shortly after the city-wide regulation came into effect.

“I’m pretty confident that if she had said her salary history she would have been offered much less,” remarked Cooke, who said he had seen a “big shift” in the year since the roll out.

Yet, elsewhere, the question continues to rear its head. According to compensation research firm PayScale, 43 percent of U.S. workers are still asked about their salary history. Meanwhile, in other countries, the request is still widespread.

So, how should you respond to make the most of your next job opportunity?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-01  Authors: karen gilchrist, pattanaphong khuankaew, istock, getty images, steve debenport
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cooke, tips, job, respond, interview, york, negotiation, shift, firm, question, salary, history, pay, questions, research


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How failure helped 6 millennials launch a multimillion-dollar international start-up

If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again. That’s how the saying goes — and for six millennials from Singapore it proved to be a winning strategy after they turned a string of failures into a multimillion-dollar international business. In the past four years, the start-up has saved more than $25 million for its six million users across Asia-Pacific. But it was not a straightforward path to success. In fact, it took two failed businesses and several shifts to get to that point, as its foun


If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again. That’s how the saying goes — and for six millennials from Singapore it proved to be a winning strategy after they turned a string of failures into a multimillion-dollar international business. In the past four years, the start-up has saved more than $25 million for its six million users across Asia-Pacific. But it was not a straightforward path to success. In fact, it took two failed businesses and several shifts to get to that point, as its foun
How failure helped 6 millennials launch a multimillion-dollar international start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, helped, took, millennials, startup, failure, users, turned, multimilliondollar, launch, million, told, try, succeed, string, success, international


How failure helped 6 millennials launch a multimillion-dollar international start-up

If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

That’s how the saying goes — and for six millennials from Singapore it proved to be a winning strategy after they turned a string of failures into a multimillion-dollar international business.

Henry Chan and five others co-founded ShopBack, an e-commerce platform that gives shoppers cashback on purchases made from any of its more than 1,500 partner merchants, including the likes of ASOS, eBay and Expedia.

In the past four years, the start-up has saved more than $25 million for its six million users across Asia-Pacific. But it was not a straightforward path to success. In fact, it took two failed businesses and several shifts to get to that point, as its founders told CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-31  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, helped, took, millennials, startup, failure, users, turned, multimilliondollar, launch, million, told, try, succeed, string, success, international


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jack Ma says he ‘hated’ Bill Gates. Here’s why and what changed his mind

As the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates is a source of inspiration for many aspiring entrepreneurs, not least some of today’s top tech icons. But when Alibaba’s Jack Ma was just starting out, Gates was a source of real frustration too, the self-made billionaire revealed Thursday. “When I was young, I hated Bill Gates because I thought Microsoft took all the opportunities,” Ma said as he spoke at an innovation summit in Tel Aviv, Israel. “IBM, Oracle, they take all the opportunities,” Alibaba’s e


As the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates is a source of inspiration for many aspiring entrepreneurs, not least some of today’s top tech icons. But when Alibaba’s Jack Ma was just starting out, Gates was a source of real frustration too, the self-made billionaire revealed Thursday. “When I was young, I hated Bill Gates because I thought Microsoft took all the opportunities,” Ma said as he spoke at an innovation summit in Tel Aviv, Israel. “IBM, Oracle, they take all the opportunities,” Alibaba’s e
Jack Ma says he ‘hated’ Bill Gates. Here’s why and what changed his mind Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: karen gilchrist, david a grogan, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changed, young, gates, microsoft, jack, mind, source, opportunities, took, alibabas, ma, hated, todays, bill, heres


Jack Ma says he 'hated' Bill Gates. Here's why and what changed his mind

As the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates is a source of inspiration for many aspiring entrepreneurs, not least some of today’s top tech icons.

But when Alibaba’s Jack Ma was just starting out, Gates was a source of real frustration too, the self-made billionaire revealed Thursday.

“When I was young, I hated Bill Gates because I thought Microsoft took all the opportunities,” Ma said as he spoke at an innovation summit in Tel Aviv, Israel.

“IBM, Oracle, they take all the opportunities,” Alibaba’s executive chairman continued.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: karen gilchrist, david a grogan, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changed, young, gates, microsoft, jack, mind, source, opportunities, took, alibabas, ma, hated, todays, bill, heres


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 steps that helped a Harvard Business School start-up conquer Southeast Asia

Building one that thrives across multiple geographical locations, languages and cultures is even harder. In the six years since its launch, the technology company has grown rapidly across the region, expanding to 235 cities and acquiring Uber’s local business. Not bad for a start-up born out of a competition at Harvard Business School. According to the company’s chief technology officer, Theo Vassilakis, it comes down to this: “Always think hyperlocal.” For Grab, that meant breaking the process


Building one that thrives across multiple geographical locations, languages and cultures is even harder. In the six years since its launch, the technology company has grown rapidly across the region, expanding to 235 cities and acquiring Uber’s local business. Not bad for a start-up born out of a competition at Harvard Business School. According to the company’s chief technology officer, Theo Vassilakis, it comes down to this: “Always think hyperlocal.” For Grab, that meant breaking the process
3 steps that helped a Harvard Business School start-up conquer Southeast Asia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helped, technology, school, vassilakis, region, building, ubers, business, thrives, steps, conquer, asia, harvard, grab, southeast, think, whats, startup


3 steps that helped a Harvard Business School start-up conquer Southeast Asia

Building a successful business is not easy. Building one that thrives across multiple geographical locations, languages and cultures is even harder.

Yet it’s a feat that Southeast Asian ride-hailing platform Grab has achieved in spades. In the six years since its launch, the technology company has grown rapidly across the region, expanding to 235 cities and acquiring Uber’s local business.

Not bad for a start-up born out of a competition at Harvard Business School.

So, what’s the secret to succeeding in a region of 11 countries and more than 650 million people? According to the company’s chief technology officer, Theo Vassilakis, it comes down to this: “Always think hyperlocal.”

“Every country is different,” he said, speaking in Singapore at FUTR — a retail, marketing and commerce summit. “But if you approach each market with that in mind, you can do much better.”

For Grab, that meant breaking the process down into three steps, Vassilakis said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helped, technology, school, vassilakis, region, building, ubers, business, thrives, steps, conquer, asia, harvard, grab, southeast, think, whats, startup


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post