Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools


Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools
Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. For some it’s a pleasure, for others it’s a chore, but for the vast majority it’s a total waste of time. That’s because far too many of us ignore the most important part — the follow-up. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. “But remember, the hard work is not in the initial meeting or LinkedIn connection. It’s recording your notes, following through on any action items, and keeping that relationship warm.”

Klaus Vedfelt | Taxi | Getty Images

Relationships are our most important asset, including in achieving our career goals, Band argues in his new book “Success Is in Your Sphere: Leverage the Power of Relationships to Achieve Your Business Goals.” But too few of us pay the necessary attention to building and maintaining those relationships in our professional lives, he said. Band is far from the first person to highlight the value of strong relationships in business success. Ever since Dale Carnegie published his seminal self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People” in 1936, business legends like Warren Buffett have espoused the role of relationships and reputation in their careers. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. That’s especially true for young professionals, who may not know where their careers are going and would benefit from a network of contacts, he said.

The overwhelming majority of professionals … attribute their relationships to be their best asset Zvi Band CEO, Contactually

It’s therefore important to follow a strategy for building and maintaining professional relationships long after the first meeting. Band said that can be broken down into a seven-step process that views relationships as “capital.” “The overwhelming majority of professionals who have reached the zenith of their potential often attribute their relationships to be their best asset,” said Band, who is CEO and founder of relationship building software platform Contactually. “Just like the dollars in your bank account, the more you pay attention to retain and grow that asset early on, the more you will be able to reap the rewards later on in your career.” Here are the seven steps to building relationship capital:

Consistent execution

The first step in building meaningful professional relationships is to make it a consistent part of your work routine, said Band. That could be as a simple as blocking out an hour each day or week to touch base with contacts, send them an email or comment on their post. As with any other process, it may take time to stick, Band noted. But there are plenty of hacks to cement the habit, such as setting an alarm, associating the task with something else you do — like checking your emails in the morning — and rewarding yourself once the task is done.

Aggregate

Compiling all your contacts into one, clean database will help speed up that process, said Band. Networking sites like LinkedIn are useful for connecting with people initially, but something as basic as an Excel spreadsheet may be the right tool for keeping everything in one place. Ensure that the database is relevant by updating it every month or so, said Band. However, don’t be tempted to write contacts off, he warned — you never know when they may become relevant again. Instead, archive those you have a high confidence you won’t work with again.

Prioritize

Some of the contacts in your database will be more important than others. Based on your overall career goals, group them into buckets that reflect those aims and prioritize them according to their urgency. Don’t overshoot though, said Band. The average person can manage a network of 15 close friends and family, followed by 50 casual friends and a further 150 acquaintances. Your list should mirror that — highlighting, for instance, 10 high priority contacts and 20 secondary level ones — and set out reasonable time frames to follow up with each.

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury | Caiaimage | Getty Images

Investigate

Building relationships is all about knowing — and caring — about the other person, noted Band. Take the time to take notes about your contacts, such as where you met, their skills and their interests, and add these to your database to help jog your memory next time you interact. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools for building that knowledge bank and keeping up with your contacts’ important milestones, he said.

Timely engagement

There are no set rules for how frequently you should engage with your network. Rather, you should think about the time you have available and the relative return on investment of each interaction, said Band. However, being thoughtful about how and when you engage with others — and showing consideration for both their time and your own — will pay dividends, he added.

Adding value

When you do follow-up with your contacts, make sure you add value by sharing information, contacts and ideas that may be useful to them, said Band. Few things will irritate your network more quickly than a stream of empty “hello” messages — or, worse still, continuous requests.

Leverage

Finally, use technology, templates and other easily replicable methods wherever you can to ease your workload and make interacting with your network as pain free, and even enjoyable, as possible, said Band. Don’t miss: The jobs market is changing — and so should your resume Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


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Technology could widen the gender employment gap, the IMF warns

Technology is often espoused as a great leveler, enabling sudden and sweeping economic progress for huge swathes of society. But it could also play a role in perpetuating a major societal divide: The gender employment gap. That’s according to a new report from the International Monetary Fund, which found that women face a greater threat of losing their jobs to technology than their male counterparts. Up to 26 million women in major economies could see their jobs displaced within the next two dec


Technology is often espoused as a great leveler, enabling sudden and sweeping economic progress for huge swathes of society. But it could also play a role in perpetuating a major societal divide: The gender employment gap. That’s according to a new report from the International Monetary Fund, which found that women face a greater threat of losing their jobs to technology than their male counterparts. Up to 26 million women in major economies could see their jobs displaced within the next two dec
Technology could widen the gender employment gap, the IMF warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, technology, imf, jobs, warns, employment, women, skills, gender, prone, men, major, tasks, perform, widen, gap


Technology could widen the gender employment gap, the IMF warns

Technology is often espoused as a great leveler, enabling sudden and sweeping economic progress for huge swathes of society.

But it could also play a role in perpetuating a major societal divide: The gender employment gap.

That’s according to a new report from the International Monetary Fund, which found that women face a greater threat of losing their jobs to technology than their male counterparts.

Up to 26 million women in major economies could see their jobs displaced within the next two decades, if technology continues at its current rate, the IMF found.

That puts 11% at high risk (a 70% likelihood) of job disruption compared to 9% of men, which the report said could lead to a further widening of the pay gap between men and women.

The disparity noted by the report is led primarily by occupational divides, which see women disproportionately represented in low-skilled, clerical and sales roles that are routine-heavy and therefore prone to automation. That’s a result of both “self-selection” — women choosing certain professions — as well as exposure, the report said.

“We find that women, on average, perform more routine or codifiable tasks than men across all sectors and occupations ― tasks that are more prone to automation,” the report’s authors wrote.

“Moreover, women perform fewer tasks requiring analytical input or abstract thinking (e.g., information-processing skills), where technological change can be complementary to human skills and improve labor productivity,” it added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, technology, imf, jobs, warns, employment, women, skills, gender, prone, men, major, tasks, perform, widen, gap


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How two Filipino brothers staved off competition from McDonald’s to build global fast food chain Jollibee

Only, for brothers Tony Tan Caktiong and Ernesto Tanmantiong, that healthy competition came early on — in the sizable form of fast food icon McDonald’s. Tony Tan Caktiong, chairman of Jollibee Foods Corp., speaks during the Hong Kong Asian Financial Forum (AFF) in Hong Kong, China, on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Ernesto Tanmantiong CEO and president, Jollibee”What we did was to have a strategic planning internally,” said Tanmantiong. It’s that unique menu — which includes a sweet “Jolly Spaghetti,” h


Only, for brothers Tony Tan Caktiong and Ernesto Tanmantiong, that healthy competition came early on — in the sizable form of fast food icon McDonald’s. Tony Tan Caktiong, chairman of Jollibee Foods Corp., speaks during the Hong Kong Asian Financial Forum (AFF) in Hong Kong, China, on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Ernesto Tanmantiong CEO and president, Jollibee”What we did was to have a strategic planning internally,” said Tanmantiong. It’s that unique menu — which includes a sweet “Jolly Spaghetti,” h
How two Filipino brothers staved off competition from McDonald’s to build global fast food chain Jollibee Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filipino, food, philippines, global, staved, chain, build, tan, caktiong, foods, weaknesses, competition, tanmantiong, fast, jollibee, business, mcdonalds, ceo


How two Filipino brothers staved off competition from McDonald's to build global fast food chain Jollibee

In business, there’s nothing like a little healthy competition to keep you motivated. Only, for brothers Tony Tan Caktiong and Ernesto Tanmantiong, that healthy competition came early on — in the sizable form of fast food icon McDonald’s. It was then 1981 and the brothers were just setting out on the ambitious dream of creating a fast food empire in their native Philippines when McDonald’s arrived in town and threatened to consume the market with its vast appetite for international expansion. Jollibee had already grown substantially from what started in 1975 as an ice cream parlor in Quezon City, just outside of the capital Manila. But, with just a couple dozen fast food outlets scattered across the fractured archipelago, it was a small fry next to McDonald’s thousands of branches in the U.S. and international markets.

Tony Tan Caktiong, chairman of Jollibee Foods Corp., speaks during the Hong Kong Asian Financial Forum (AFF) in Hong Kong, China, on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Bloomberg | Getty Images

Indeed, friends told the pair as much, and advised them to retreat from the challenge, Tanmantiong revealed in a recent episode of CNBC’s “Managing Asia.” “When we learned that McDonald’s was coming into the country, friends were telling us to shy away from the competition — do (like) other businesses and to not try confronting the global giant,” Tanmantiong, Jollibee’s president and CEO, told CNBC’s Christine Tan. But Tan Caktiong refused to hear it, Tanmantiong explained. Instead, the then-28-year-old founder called the business together to form a plan of attack.

We did a SWOT analysis on our strengths, our weaknesses and what the gaps were. Ernesto Tanmantiong CEO and president, Jollibee

“What we did was to have a strategic planning internally,” said Tanmantiong. “We did a SWOT analysis on our strengths, our weaknesses and what the gaps were,” he continued, referring to a common analysis technique which aims to assess a business’ strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. While McDonald’s benefited from economies of scale and decades’ more experience, Tanmantiong said they identified one major area in which the U.S. giant could not compete: Taste. Filipinos tend to favor sweeter and spicier flavors, he said, and it would be difficult for McDonald’s to adapt to that without hurting the iconic American taste for which they had become famed.

“After that strategic session, we came out quite confident. So instead of chickening out, we jokingly said, we actually serve Chickenjoy,” Tanmantiong said, referring to the company’s core fried chicken dish. It’s that unique menu — which includes a sweet “Jolly Spaghetti,” hot dogs and spicy burgers — that has fueled the now expanded Jollibee Foods’ vast international growth in the years since. The company now has more than 3,500 stores in the Philippines and another 1,000 internationally, including under its additional brands like Smashburger, Burger King Philippines and Panda Express Philippines. But as the business embarks on further expansion into the U.S., one of its key strategic markets next to China, it will again come head to head with McDonald’s — this time on the American rival’s home turf. Earlier this year, Jollibee launched its first branch in Manhattan, New York, one of currently just 37 outlets in the U.S.

Ernesto Tanmantiong, CEO of Jollibee Foods Corp., speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) CEO Summit. Bloomberg | Getty Images

Tanmantiong said he, Tan Caktiong (now Jollibee chairman), their two other brothers and the rest of the team, initially planned to embark on that path by by targeting Filipino customers living overseas. But, in fact, he said, they’ve been surprised to find Jollibee’s distinct taste has a home among non-native patrons, too. Indeed, they account for 50 percent of the company’s overseas customer base. That should help Tan Caktiong on his latest mission to turn Jollibee into one of the world’s top five restaurant companies in terms of market capitalization. Having become the largest restaurant in Asia in 2014, Jollibee will have to face off against the likes of Starbucks, Yum! Brands and Domino’s to secure that accolade. Tanmantiong said, however, that his brother loves a challenge. “Tony is a visionary and he loves to dream big,” Tanmantiong said. “That’s primarily the reason why (Jollibee Foods Corporation) is where it is today. Because of that bold vision, the entire organization has been challenged, but it has been fulfilling trying to achieve the vision.” Don’t miss: How these women went from earning 20 cents a day to sending their children to college Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filipino, food, philippines, global, staved, chain, build, tan, caktiong, foods, weaknesses, competition, tanmantiong, fast, jollibee, business, mcdonalds, ceo


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Growing up different helped me do my job better, says ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ star Harry Shum Jr.

Actor Harry Shum Jr. has become a familiar face on screens worldwide with his starring roles in hit TV shows “Glee” and “Shadowhunters.” When Shum landed his first TV role on “Glee” aged 26, he was originally given a minor role as the so-called Other Asian. If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage. Harry Shum Jr. actor”If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage,” continued Shum, whose character Mike Chang was given his first major


Actor Harry Shum Jr. has become a familiar face on screens worldwide with his starring roles in hit TV shows “Glee” and “Shadowhunters.” When Shum landed his first TV role on “Glee” aged 26, he was originally given a minor role as the so-called Other Asian. If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage. Harry Shum Jr. actor”If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage,” continued Shum, whose character Mike Chang was given his first major
Growing up different helped me do my job better, says ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ star Harry Shum Jr. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tv, growing, shum, harry, crazy, theyre, white, helped, going, role, im, shadowhunters, star, jr, different, job, rich


Growing up different helped me do my job better, says 'Crazy Rich Asians' star Harry Shum Jr.

Actor Harry Shum Jr. has become a familiar face on screens worldwide with his starring roles in hit TV shows “Glee” and “Shadowhunters.” But it didn’t come easily. In fact, he had to fight his way to the front of the camera precisely because he was different, Shum told CNBC Make It. When Shum landed his first TV role on “Glee” aged 26, he was originally given a minor role as the so-called Other Asian. However, he said he made it his mission to prove there could bring more to the character. “I thought: ‘I’m going to use this opportunity to make it my own and make the most out of it,'” said Shum.

If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage. Harry Shum Jr. actor

“If they’re going to cast a minority, I’m going to use this to my advantage,” continued Shum, whose character Mike Chang was given his first major story line in season three. “You only get so many opportunities, but it’s how you shape them that matters.” That’s a lesson Shum said he learned in his early days of arriving in the States. Born in Costa Rica to Chinese parents, Shum relocated to the U.S. with his family as a child and said he was struck by the value Americans placed on individualism and self-expression. “When I first moved to the U.S. it was very different because it was a lot more about individualism and expressing yourself,” said Shum. “That was a stark contrast to how I grew up, but there are a lot of benefits to that.” Namely, said Shum, it allowed him to embrace his differences growing up in the predominantly white San Luis Obispo County, California and pursue a career in acting. Now, he said, he wants to use his position to do more to represent minorities in film and TV. In his current role as Magnus Bane in “Shadowhunters,” Shum plays a bisexual warlock.

I don’t think it’s black and white. There are roles you’d stay away from. Harry Shum Jr. actor


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tv, growing, shum, harry, crazy, theyre, white, helped, going, role, im, shadowhunters, star, jr, different, job, rich


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Employees keep ‘ghosting’ their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge

Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all. But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch. According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (tho


Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all. But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch. According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (tho
Employees keep ‘ghosting’ their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -jim link, chief human resources officer for randstad north a
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, managers, leading, aged, offer, zs, charge, xers, employees, accepted, ghosting, younger, gen, offers


Employees keep 'ghosting' their job offers — and Gen Zs are leading the charge

Many of us have faced excruciating silence while waiting to hear back from a prospective employer, only to wind up hearing nothing at all.

But now, the tables could be turning as more and more job applicants leave hopeful employers in the lurch.

New research from recruitment firm Randstad suggests that as many as two-thirds (66 percent) of U.S. managers have been snubbed by candidates who initially accepted a job offer, only to retract it — or disappear entirely — ahead of their start date. That practice was dubbed “ghosting” after gaining notoriety in the realm of online dating.

And it’s not just senior employees who are calling the shots. In fact, younger staff are leading the charge.

According to Randstad’s study of 1,202 U.S. managers and employees, more than a third (43 percent) of Gen Z employees — those aged 22 and under — say they’ve accepted a job but then bailed on the offer. That figure dips to 26 percent for millennials (those aged 23-38) and Gen X-ers (those aged 39-54). For baby boomers — or those between the age of 55 and 74, it falls to 13 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -jim link, chief human resources officer for randstad north a
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, managers, leading, aged, offer, zs, charge, xers, employees, accepted, ghosting, younger, gen, offers


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The money advice every millennial needs to hear

Rent or buy? Cut out the daily coffee or concentrate on the big costs? When it comes to money, there’s so much guidance out there, it can be difficult to know where to start. So CNBC Make It took to the streets to ask millennials their biggest money questions before putting them to experts at Money 2020, annual finance conference hosted in Singapore. Here’s what the professionals had to say.


Rent or buy? Cut out the daily coffee or concentrate on the big costs? When it comes to money, there’s so much guidance out there, it can be difficult to know where to start. So CNBC Make It took to the streets to ask millennials their biggest money questions before putting them to experts at Money 2020, annual finance conference hosted in Singapore. Here’s what the professionals had to say.
The money advice every millennial needs to hear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -rohan mahadevan, senior vice president of international markets at, -eric van miltenburg, senior vice president of global operations at ripp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, took, theres, streets, needs, rent, millennial, money, startso, say, hear, singaporeheres, advice, questions, save


The money advice every millennial needs to hear

Rent or buy? Save or invest? Cut out the daily coffee or concentrate on the big costs?

When it comes to money, there’s so much guidance out there, it can be difficult to know where to start.

So CNBC Make It took to the streets to ask millennials their biggest money questions before putting them to experts at Money 2020, annual finance conference hosted in Singapore.

Here’s what the professionals had to say.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: karen gilchrist, -rohan mahadevan, senior vice president of international markets at, -eric van miltenburg, senior vice president of global operations at ripp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, took, theres, streets, needs, rent, millennial, money, startso, say, hear, singaporeheres, advice, questions, save


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The skill that helped AirAsia’s CEO turn a $0.26 airline into a billion-dollar business

The CEO of leading low-cost airline AirAsia has proven himself a master of transformation. Within a year of purchasing the ailing Malaysian carrier for one ringgit (then about 26 cents), he turned the business around and returned it to profitability. In 2018, the business saw revenues of 10.6 billion Malaysian ringgit (around $2.58 billion). But when asked the greatest skill he possesses as a leader, the 54-year-old insists on one thing: His ability to find great people. In 2018, AirAsia was vot


The CEO of leading low-cost airline AirAsia has proven himself a master of transformation. Within a year of purchasing the ailing Malaysian carrier for one ringgit (then about 26 cents), he turned the business around and returned it to profitability. In 2018, the business saw revenues of 10.6 billion Malaysian ringgit (around $2.58 billion). But when asked the greatest skill he possesses as a leader, the 54-year-old insists on one thing: His ability to find great people. In 2018, AirAsia was vot
The skill that helped AirAsia’s CEO turn a $0.26 airline into a billion-dollar business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -tony fernandes, founder, ceo of airasia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, helped, airline, ringgit, great, 026, airasias, greatest, fernandes, turn, malaysian, business, skill, airasia, billiondollar, carrier, lowcost


The skill that helped AirAsia's CEO turn a $0.26 airline into a billion-dollar business

The CEO of leading low-cost airline AirAsia has proven himself a master of transformation.

After building a successful career as a top exec at Warner Music, Tony Fernandes decided to pack it all in to try his hand at the airline industry in 2001. Within a year of purchasing the ailing Malaysian carrier for one ringgit (then about 26 cents), he turned the business around and returned it to profitability.

In 2018, the business saw revenues of 10.6 billion Malaysian ringgit (around $2.58 billion).

But when asked the greatest skill he possesses as a leader, the 54-year-old insists on one thing: His ability to find great people.

“I think my greatest strength, if I have one, is finding great people,” Fernandes shared at a recent finance conference in Singapore, Money 2020. In 2018, AirAsia was voted the world’s best low-cost carrier for the tenth year running by air transport research firm Skytrax.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -tony fernandes, founder, ceo of airasia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, helped, airline, ringgit, great, 026, airasias, greatest, fernandes, turn, malaysian, business, skill, airasia, billiondollar, carrier, lowcost


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The next big businesses will focus on these two tech trends, says investor behind Alibaba and Grab

Want to come up with the next big thing? Look no further than mobile phones and 5G technology — the next generation of wireless internet connectivity. That’s according to investing icon Jenny Lee, who says the fast-evolving technologies will be central to the leading businesses of the future. “I would say there are a couple of innings,” Lee said when asked recently where she sees the next big start-up opportunities. Meanwhile, in more technologically advanced countries like the U.S. and China, t


Want to come up with the next big thing? Look no further than mobile phones and 5G technology — the next generation of wireless internet connectivity. That’s according to investing icon Jenny Lee, who says the fast-evolving technologies will be central to the leading businesses of the future. “I would say there are a couple of innings,” Lee said when asked recently where she sees the next big start-up opportunities. Meanwhile, in more technologically advanced countries like the U.S. and China, t
The next big businesses will focus on these two tech trends, says investor behind Alibaba and Grab Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, users, wireless, businesses, lee, focus, tech, grab, trends, india, big, alibaba, 5g, mobile, asia, investor


The next big businesses will focus on these two tech trends, says investor behind Alibaba and Grab

Want to come up with the next big thing? Look no further than mobile phones and 5G technology — the next generation of wireless internet connectivity.

That’s according to investing icon Jenny Lee, who says the fast-evolving technologies will be central to the leading businesses of the future.

“I would say there are a couple of innings,” Lee said when asked recently where she sees the next big start-up opportunities.

First, there are huge opportunities for businesses to embrace the rapid mobile adoption in growing markets like India, Southeast Asia and Latin America, Lee said at finance conference Money 2020 Asia in Singapore last month.

In India alone — a country of 1.3 billion people — the number of smartphone users is set to double to 829 million by 2022.

Meanwhile, in more technologically advanced countries like the U.S. and China, there is major scope for companies to capitalize on 5G, Lee noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, users, wireless, businesses, lee, focus, tech, grab, trends, india, big, alibaba, 5g, mobile, asia, investor


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