Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan again calls for Trump to mediate on Kashmir dispute

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan once again called for U.S. President Donald Trump and the United Nations to play mediator between his country and neighbor India over disputed territory in Kashmir. “Kashmir is, you know, it’s a far more serious problem than people realize, (than) the world realizes. Khan was referring to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a Hindu nationalist group affiliated with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party. “That’s why I want


Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan once again called for U.S. President Donald Trump and the United Nations to play mediator between his country and neighbor India over disputed territory in Kashmir.
“Kashmir is, you know, it’s a far more serious problem than people realize, (than) the world realizes.
Khan was referring to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a Hindu nationalist group affiliated with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party.
“That’s why I want
Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan again calls for Trump to mediate on Kashmir dispute Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmir, world, rss, mediate, calls, state, taken, dispute, prime, imran, united, president, serious, minister, india, khan, pakistan, trump


Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan again calls for Trump to mediate on Kashmir dispute

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan once again called for U.S. President Donald Trump and the United Nations to play mediator between his country and neighbor India over disputed territory in Kashmir.

Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, Khan claimed India has been taken over by “extremist ideology” that could potentially spill over into armed conflict between the two nuclear rivals.

“Kashmir is, you know, it’s a far more serious problem than people realize, (than) the world realizes. The problem is that India has been taken over by an extremist ideology, which is called Hindutva or the RSS,” he said at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Khan was referring to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a Hindu nationalist group affiliated with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party.

“This is serious because there are two nuclear-armed countries,” Khan said. “That’s why I want President Trump, head of the most powerful country in the world — he should intervene right now. United Nations, or President Trump through the U.N. at least.”

Last year, fresh off a landslide re-election victory in Parliament, Modi’s government revoked the state of Jammu & Kashmir’s special status that allowed it to make its own laws. As a result, people from outside the state can potentially move in to settle there, buy land, and take government jobs or scholarships.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmir, world, rss, mediate, calls, state, taken, dispute, prime, imran, united, president, serious, minister, india, khan, pakistan, trump


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India’s top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted

India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August. The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time. “Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the rul


India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August.
The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time.
“Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the rul
India’s top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, shutdown, court, connections, mobile, indefinite, kashmir, unwarranted, indias, internet, withdrew, weeks


India's top court says indefinite Kashmir internet shutdown unwarranted

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India.

India’s Supreme Court said on Friday that the indefinite shutdown of the internet in Kashmir was unwarranted, rebuking the government for the communications lockdown imposed after it withdrew the Muslim majority region’s autonomy in August.

The court said the indefinite suspension violated India’s telecoms rules, and ordered authorities in Kashmir to review all curbs in a week’s time.

“Freedom of Internet access is a fundamental right,” Supreme Court justice N. V. Ramana said, delivering the ruling.

As a security measure to prevent the spread of dissent in Kashmir, the government snapped all public telecommunications connections including mobile phones and internet, arguing it was essential to maintain calm.

Although some mobile phone connections have since been restored, the internet shutdown is still in place in parts of the Himalayan region, which is also claimed by Pakistan.

The loss of internet has been severely disrupted the lives of around seven million people in the Kashmir valley, impacting everything from college admissions to businesses filing tax returns.

“The court also said the freedom of press is impacted by the shutdown,” Vrinda Grover, an advocate representing petitioners, which include journalists and civil society members.

“It is an abuse of power.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supreme, shutdown, court, connections, mobile, indefinite, kashmir, unwarranted, indias, internet, withdrew, weeks


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India, China leaders talk trade and not territorial dispute

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi avoided the topic of a territorial dispute and instead pushed forward on trade relations during their summit over the weekend. As the leaders of the world’s two most populous countries met in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India, they sidestepped what could have been another quarrel over disputed territory. Ahead of the summit, Chinese state media reported Xi would support Pakistan in the dispute over Kashmir — a


Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi avoided the topic of a territorial dispute and instead pushed forward on trade relations during their summit over the weekend. As the leaders of the world’s two most populous countries met in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India, they sidestepped what could have been another quarrel over disputed territory. Ahead of the summit, Chinese state media reported Xi would support Pakistan in the dispute over Kashmir — a
India, China leaders talk trade and not territorial dispute Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: grace shao, stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, territorial, china, dispute, leaders, summit, modi, kashmir, reported, issues, instead, india, trade, talk


India, China leaders talk trade and not territorial dispute

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi avoided the topic of a territorial dispute and instead pushed forward on trade relations during their summit over the weekend.

As the leaders of the world’s two most populous countries met in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India, they sidestepped what could have been another quarrel over disputed territory. Ahead of the summit, Chinese state media reported Xi would support Pakistan in the dispute over Kashmir — a territory also claimed by India.

But Reuters reported Xi did not discuss Kashmir with Modi on Saturday, and instead they mostly discussed issues of trade and investment.

“It seems like what the two leaders have done is try to set some of the thorny political issues to the side,” said Dhruva Jaishankar, director of the U.S. Initiative at the Observer Research Foundation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: grace shao, stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, territorial, china, dispute, leaders, summit, modi, kashmir, reported, issues, instead, india, trade, talk


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Kashmir and border dispute will likely top the agenda as India and China leaders meet

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) and China’s President Xi Jinping at the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, China, on September 4, 2017. Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be meeting in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India starting Friday. During their two-day summit, the leaders are expected to talk about their unsettled border dispute, and may also address their differences over Kashmir — a territory claimed by both India and its arch-riva


India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) and China’s President Xi Jinping at the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, China, on September 4, 2017. Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be meeting in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India starting Friday. During their two-day summit, the leaders are expected to talk about their unsettled border dispute, and may also address their differences over Kashmir — a territory claimed by both India and its arch-riva
Kashmir and border dispute will likely top the agenda as India and China leaders meet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: grace shao stella soon, grace shao, stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, agenda, summit, india, modi, kashmir, leaders, dispute, border, territory, prime, president, meet, china, pakistan


Kashmir and border dispute will likely top the agenda as India and China leaders meet

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) and China’s President Xi Jinping at the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, China, on September 4, 2017.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be meeting in the coastal town of Mamallapuram in southern India starting Friday.

During their two-day summit, the leaders are expected to talk about their unsettled border dispute, and may also address their differences over Kashmir — a territory claimed by both India and its arch-rival Pakistan. China is one of Pakistan’s top allies.

“India and China have a fraught relationship, yet they are also far from being each other’s top foreign policy issue,” said Simon Baptist, global chief economist and managing director at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

In August, India revoked the special status granted to the territory of Jammu and Kashmir — a move that angered Pakistan which has fought three wars with India since 1947 over the disputed territory.

Ahead of their meeting, Xi said on Wednesday he was watching the situation in Jammu and Kashmir and will support Pakistan in issues related to its core interests, China’s state news agency Xinhua reported.

But Modi will most likely want to reiterate to Xi that the Kashmir issue is an internal matter for India, said Rudra Chaudhuri, director of think tank Carnegie India in a note on Thursday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: grace shao stella soon, grace shao, stella soon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, agenda, summit, india, modi, kashmir, leaders, dispute, border, territory, prime, president, meet, china, pakistan


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India’s foreign minister says removing Kashmir’s special status will help the state grow

India’s foreign minister says that his country’s decision last month to revoke a special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir was done to improve governance and development in the state. The state of Jammu and Kashmir has enjoyed special privileges under a temporary provision which limits New Delhi’s power to make laws for the state. “The earlier provision of law actually impeded entrepreneurship, development, progress, governance in that state,” Jaishankar told CNBC’s Martin Soong. Jaishankar sa


India’s foreign minister says that his country’s decision last month to revoke a special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir was done to improve governance and development in the state. The state of Jammu and Kashmir has enjoyed special privileges under a temporary provision which limits New Delhi’s power to make laws for the state. “The earlier provision of law actually impeded entrepreneurship, development, progress, governance in that state,” Jaishankar told CNBC’s Martin Soong. Jaishankar sa
India’s foreign minister says removing Kashmir’s special status will help the state grow Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, provision, india, jaishankar, status, removing, development, jammu, governance, help, kashmir, temporary, grow, indias, minister, foreign, special, kashmirs, state


India's foreign minister says removing Kashmir's special status will help the state grow

India’s foreign minister says that his country’s decision last month to revoke a special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir was done to improve governance and development in the state. The state of Jammu and Kashmir has enjoyed special privileges under a temporary provision which limits New Delhi’s power to make laws for the state. It also allows Jammu and Kashmir to have its own constitution, its own flag and take decisions — except for matters related to defense and foreign affairs. Known as Article 370, the provision had been included in the Indian constitution for decades until it was revoked in August. Speaking to CNBC on Monday, India’s minister of external affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar said: “This was a temporary provision done 70 years ago, and 70 years ago is a reasonable time for the definition ‘temporary.'” “The earlier provision of law actually impeded entrepreneurship, development, progress, governance in that state,” Jaishankar told CNBC’s Martin Soong.

Integration with India

Before winning this year’s parliamentary elections, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party had argued Kashmir’s special constitutional status hindered its integration with the rest of the country. Jaishankar said Jammu and Kashmir’s special status raised the cost of doing business in the state, and claimed that funds sent for its development were being misappropriated. He added the quality of governance was not good and that there was a socio-economic misalignment with the rest of the country. Revoking Article 370 was “done with the intent of better governance, more development of creating a new paradigm in Kashmir and we think it will work,” Jaishankar said. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting cross-border terrorism carried out in Jammu and Kashmir and elsewhere in the country — a charge that Islamabad denies. “The sense of being separate from the rest of India — that was taken advantage of to actually create both a separatist political movement as well as to, by our neighbor, undertake a very nasty unrelenting effort at cross-border terrorism,” Jaishankar claimed, referring to Pakistan.

‘Prudent’ measures

Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority state. It includes the disputed Kashmir region, which both India and Pakistan lay claim to but control only parts of. Within the India-controlled region of Kashmir, an insurgency began in the late 1980s when some fought to join Pakistan and some fought for independence. The nuclear-armed rivals have fought multiple wars over the contested area. Most recently, both sides carried out air strikes in each other’s territory after a terrorist attack in India-controlled Kashmir killed more than 40 security officers in February.

Minister of External Affairs of India, Subrahmanyam Jaishankar speaks during a bilateral meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia. Anton Raharjo | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, provision, india, jaishankar, status, removing, development, jammu, governance, help, kashmir, temporary, grow, indias, minister, foreign, special, kashmirs, state


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti


Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti
Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy.

Hundreds of people protested in Kashmir’s main city of Srinagar on Sunday against India’s decision to curb its autonomy, despite new restrictions on travel and a seventh straight day of communications blackout.

Restrictions that had been temporarily eased on Friday and Saturday — allowing some bakeries, pharmacies and fruit shops to open ahead of the Muslim holy festival of Eid al-Adha — were reinstated in major parts of the city on Sunday afternoon.

Police vans drove around some areas ordering people to shut shop and go home, and most streets were silent by evening, as thousands of troops kept vigil, witnesses said.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government locked down the Muslim-majority region last Sunday, cutting off communications, detaining more than 300 political leaders and activists, and putting a “virtual curfew” into force with numerous roadblocks stopping movement.

Seeking to tighten its grip on the region also claimed by neighboring Pakistan, India announced last Monday that it was scrapping Jammu and Kashmir’s right to frame its own laws and allowed non-residents to buy property there.

Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses.

Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constitutional provision that India revoked last week. A swarm of women and girls in colourful headscarves followed the marching men.

“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now!” the crowd shouted, marching around the neighborhood.

Some of them held up paper banners, including one that read: “Modi, Kashmir is not your father’s property.”

India’s Home Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The demonstration in Soura followed a much larger protest in the same area on Friday, when pro-independence youths marched before being repelled by tear gas and pellets.

Leaders in Kashmir had warned of a backlash against the stripping of autonomy in a territory where militants have been fighting Indian rule for nearly 30 years, resulting in the deaths of more than 50,000 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pakistan reacts to India’s revoking of Kashmir’s special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s


Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s
Pakistan reacts to India’s revoking of Kashmir’s special status amid rising tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmirs, reacts, indias, rising, state, pakistan, tensions, amid, india, told, special, kashmir, jammu, international, indian, region, revoking, status


Pakistan reacts to India's revoking of Kashmir's special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty Images

Pakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. The Indian High Commissioner to Pakistan, Ajay Bisaria, was summoned by Islamabad’s ministry of foreign affairs. During that meeting, “the Foreign Secretary conveyed Pakistan’s unequivocal rejection of these illegal actions as they are in breach of international law and several UN Security Council resolutions,” Pakistan’s foreign ministry said in a statement. On Monday, Interior Minister Amit Shah told India’s parliament that the central government would scrap Article 370, a constitutional provision that allows Jammu and Kashmir to make its own laws and grants special rights and privileges to permanent residents of the state. The order was subsequently approved by the Indian president. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority state and is part of the broader disputed Kashmir region. Pakistan called for a joint session of its parliament on Tuesday while the country’s army chief summoned an important conference to discuss regional security, local media reported. Analysts told CNBC that Monday’s move in New Delhi will likely intensify the animosity between the nuclear-powered rivals who’ve fought multiple wars over Kashmir.

International pressure

Pakistan will likely increase diplomatic pressure on India by turning to the international community, experts said. “They will continue to raise this at multilateral forums, including the UN General Assembly, to bring diplomatic attention back to India’s actions,” Akhil Bery, South Asia analyst at risk consultancy Eurasia Group, told CNBC. India deployed tens of thousands of troops across the Kashmir Valley in anticipation of a backlash. Authorities also banned public movements, shut down schools and colleges indefinitely and put two former chief ministers of the state under house arrest ahead of the announcement. Moeed Yusuf, associate vice president of the Asia Center at the U.S. Institute of Peace, told CNBC that there will likely be “strong resistance” from locals inside India-controlled Kashmir. “If that happens, Pakistan is surely going to up the diplomatic temperature to raise UN concerns about the human rights aspects of the Indian crackdown,” he said. Bery added that many Kashmiris believe the special provisions are crucial to their identity and they have “long been weary of a strong influence from Delhi.”

Greater military activity along the border

Analysts said they expect greater military activity along the so-called Line of Control, which is the de facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir, and more unrest in the region. Islamabad said Monday it would “exercise all possible options” to counter the move.

“It’s important to keep in mind that in Kashmir, there’s actually two levels — there’s a domestic level, which is between the central government and the state of (Jammu and) Kashmir. Then, there’s an international component between India and Pakistan,” Faisel Pervaiz, South Asia analyst at Stratfor, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box ” on Tuesday. Both Pakistan and India lay claim to the region in full but control only parts of it. Within the India-controlled region of Kashmir, an insurgency began in the late 1980s when some fought to join Pakistan and some fought for independence. India has accused Pakistan of backing separatists by arming and training them. Islamabad denies that and says it only offers political support to the Kashmiri people, according to Reuters. International agencies have raised concerns over violence and human rights in India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in the Pakistan-controlled regions of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan. “There is a long-running insurgency in Kashmir and the question is that is there going to be an uptick in attacks?” Pervaiz said. “Because as we saw back in February, when an uptick in attack happens, that can rapidly escalate tensions.” In February, India and Pakistan carried out air strikes in each others’ territories after a terrorist attack in India-controlled Kashmir killed more than 40 security officers.

The US position


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmirs, reacts, indias, rising, state, pakistan, tensions, amid, india, told, special, kashmir, jammu, international, indian, region, revoking, status


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown

As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers. At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. “By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become activ


As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers. At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. “By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become activ
India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistani, indiapakistan, kashmir, indian, quiet, militancy, border, past, amid, wars, pakistan, crackdown, loc, tense, calm, night, camps


India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown

As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers.

At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. The exchange of fire in the past few days has killed seven people on the Pakistani side and four on the Indian side, though the release of a downed Indian fighter pilot by Pakistan on Friday night has helped de-escalate tensions.

“By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become active again,” said Chaudhry Tariq Farooq, a minister in Pakistani Kashmir. “Tension still prevails.”

Indian warplanes carried out air strikes on Tuesday inside northeast Pakistan’s Balakot on what New Delhi called militant camps. Islamabad denied any such camps existed, as did some villagers in the area when Reuters visited.

Nevertheless, Pakistan retaliated on Wednesday with its own aerial mission in a show of force. The countries have fought three wars since independence from Britain in 1947.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistani, indiapakistan, kashmir, indian, quiet, militancy, border, past, amid, wars, pakistan, crackdown, loc, tense, calm, night, camps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says

Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups. “Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because i


Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups. “Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because i
India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, nitin kanotra, hindustan times, getty images, yawar nazir, muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, -cameron munter, former us ambassador to pakistan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, need, terrorist, india, region, groups, indian, important, pakistan, problem, saran, violence, kashmir, populace, resolve, ambassador


India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says

Jammu and Kashmir was a former princely state where a large number of people were killed and others were driven away by the violence during the partition. Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region.

Speaking about India-controlled Kashmir, Munter said: “You have a mainly Muslim population and you have many hundreds of thousands of Indian troops keeping order. That’s really not a sustainable or good situation.”

“It’s not something that Indians want other people to interfere with but until that gets solved, there’s going to be a problem in Kashmir,” he added.

In a recent op-ed piece with Indian newspaper Business Standard, former Indian foreign secretary Shyam Saran said that after the Feb. 14 terror attack, India must examine why so many locals get recruited by terrorist groups operating in the area.

“There have been allegations of intelligence failure but the ability to stop terrorist incidents and apprehending terrorists is most effective if the local populace is ready to provide intelligence that is relatively specific,” Saran wrote. “This is possible only if there is a high level of trust and confidence between the populace and the security forces.”

Pakistan’s problem, according to Munter, is that no one believes they’ve cracked down on the groups like the Lashkar-e-Taiba — which carried out one of the worst terrorist attacks in India’s history — or the Jaish-e-Mohammed, which operate in that region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups.

“Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because it’s not every day that America and Iran, for example, stand shoulder-to-shoulder, criticizing the Pakistanis for not cracking down on terrorist groups,” the former envoy said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, nitin kanotra, hindustan times, getty images, yawar nazir, muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, -cameron munter, former us ambassador to pakistan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, need, terrorist, india, region, groups, indian, important, pakistan, problem, saran, violence, kashmir, populace, resolve, ambassador


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Timeline: India and Pakistan’s latest confrontation over Kashmir

Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “


Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “
Timeline: India and Pakistan’s latest confrontation over Kashmir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, saqib majeed, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistans, countries, latest, pakistan, delhi, pakistani, attack, indian, india, kashmir, strikes, timeline, confrontation, ministry


Timeline: India and Pakistan's latest confrontation over Kashmir

Tensions between nuclear rivals India and Pakistan flared up this week after both sides carried out tit-for-tat air strikes and shot down each other’s fighter jets, prompting global concerns over a potential outbreak of war in South Asia. Pakistan said it also captured an Indian pilot who was released on Friday as a gesture of peace towards New Delhi from Islamabad.

The mountainous region of Kashmir has been a source of conflict between the two countries since their independence from British colonial rule in 1947.

Jammu and Kashmir was a former princely state where a large number of people were killed and others were driven away by the violence during the partition. Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. This has led to innumerable conflicts between the two countries.

While this week’s escalation appears to be cooling for now, here is a timeline of how the events unfolded over the last two weeks.

Feb. 14: A suicide bomber rammed a car into a bus carrying Indian paramilitary police in Kashmir, killing more than 40 in what was described as one of the deadliest attacks on security forces in the region in decades.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that “a befitting reply will be given to the perpetrators of the heinous attack and their patrons.”

Feb. 15: A Pakistan-based terror group, Jaish-e-Mohammed, claimed responsibility for the attack.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said it has “always condemned heightened acts of violence” in Kashmir but it strongly rejected “any insinuation by elements in the Indian government and media circles that seek to link the attack to the State of Pakistan without investigations.”

India’s Ministry of External Affairs said Jaish-E-Mohammed and its leadership are located in Pakistan. “(They) cannot claim that it is unaware of their presence and their activities. They have not taken any action against these groups despite international demands,” the official spokesperson said.

Feb. 16: Indian Finance Minister Arun Jaitley tweeted New Delhi withdrew Pakistan’s “most favored nation” status, which is usually given to countries receiving certain trade advantages such as low tariffs. Following that, basic customs duty on Pakistani exports to India were raised to 200 percent, he said.

Feb. 18: Nine people, including four Indian soldiers and a policeman, were killed during a gun battle in India-controlled Kashmir, further escalating tensions between the two countries. Reports said the operation targeted a residential area said to be a hideout for suspected militants.

Feb. 19: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan offered India assistance to investigate the suicide bombing but he warned that his country will retaliate against any acts of aggression from New Delhi. India dismissed Khan’s offer, citing previous terror attacks in Mumbai and an airbase.

Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation.

Feb. 23—24: New Delhi stepped up its crackdown in Kashmir by detaining more than 160 separatists, reports said. Five people were killed as Indian security forces clashed with members of a Pakistani militant group in the disputed region.

Feb. 26: India said its air force conducted strikes against a Jaish-e-Mohammed training base at Balakot in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and that the attack killed a “very large number” of terrorists, trainers and senior commanders. Pakistan denied there were any casualties from that attack and said the strikes missed any targets.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said the “Indian aggression was a threat to regional peace and stability and would get a befitting response by Pakistan at a time and place of its choosing.”

Feb. 27: Pakistani media reported that Khan chaired a meeting of the National Command Authority, the body that oversees the country’s nuclear warheads.

Pakistan said its air force carried out strikes across the so-called Line of Control to demonstrate its “right, will and capability for self defense.” The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir.

A spokesman for the Pakistani armed forces said Indian planes entered its air space and two jets were shot down. One of the aircraft fell on India’s side of Kashmir while the second came down in Pakistani territory, and its pilot was captured.

India’s foreign ministry acknowledged that a pilot was missing and a combat jet had been lost. The ministry spokesperson also claimed a Pakistani jet had been shot down in the altercation.

Then, a video emerged of a man identified by Islamabad identified as the captured Indian pilot.

India also said it handed over a dossier to its counterpart with specific details of Jaish-e-Mohammed’s role in the Feb. 14 terror attack and their presence in Pakistan.

Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “better sense” would prevail to de-escalate the situation.

Feb. 28: Khan told his parliament that Pakistan will release the captured Indian pilot the next day as a “peace gesture” towards India.

The move was welcomed by the chiefs of India’s three armed forces during a joint press conference Thursday evening — but they would not say if New Delhi considered the return a de-escalation in the conflict.

Mar. 1: Pakistan handed over Wing Commander Abhinanda to India at the Wagah border crossing between the two countries.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, saqib majeed, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistans, countries, latest, pakistan, delhi, pakistani, attack, indian, india, kashmir, strikes, timeline, confrontation, ministry


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post