Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti


Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy. Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses. Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constituti
Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Hundreds chant anti-India slogans in seething Kashmir on eve of Muslim holy festival

Pakistani Christian shout slogans in support of Kashmiris at a rally in the connection of the country Independence Day in Quetta on August 11, 2019, after the Indian government stripped Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy.

Hundreds of people protested in Kashmir’s main city of Srinagar on Sunday against India’s decision to curb its autonomy, despite new restrictions on travel and a seventh straight day of communications blackout.

Restrictions that had been temporarily eased on Friday and Saturday — allowing some bakeries, pharmacies and fruit shops to open ahead of the Muslim holy festival of Eid al-Adha — were reinstated in major parts of the city on Sunday afternoon.

Police vans drove around some areas ordering people to shut shop and go home, and most streets were silent by evening, as thousands of troops kept vigil, witnesses said.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government locked down the Muslim-majority region last Sunday, cutting off communications, detaining more than 300 political leaders and activists, and putting a “virtual curfew” into force with numerous roadblocks stopping movement.

Seeking to tighten its grip on the region also claimed by neighboring Pakistan, India announced last Monday that it was scrapping Jammu and Kashmir’s right to frame its own laws and allowed non-residents to buy property there.

Angry Kashmiris gathered at a mosque in Srinagar’s Soura neighborhood after afternoon prayers on Sunday and began shouting anti-India slogans, according to two Reuters witnesses.

Protesters carried a large banner carrying the words “Save Article 35A,” referring to the constitutional provision that India revoked last week. A swarm of women and girls in colourful headscarves followed the marching men.

“What do we want? Freedom! When do we want it? Now!” the crowd shouted, marching around the neighborhood.

Some of them held up paper banners, including one that read: “Modi, Kashmir is not your father’s property.”

India’s Home Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The demonstration in Soura followed a much larger protest in the same area on Friday, when pro-independence youths marched before being repelled by tear gas and pellets.

Leaders in Kashmir had warned of a backlash against the stripping of autonomy in a territory where militants have been fighting Indian rule for nearly 30 years, resulting in the deaths of more than 50,000 people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eve, slogans, indian, soura, kashmirs, holy, jammu, hundreds, chant, india, seething, antiindia, kashmiris, marching, kashmir, region, festival, muslim


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pakistan reacts to India’s revoking of Kashmir’s special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s


Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty ImagesPakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority s
Pakistan reacts to India’s revoking of Kashmir’s special status amid rising tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmirs, reacts, indias, rising, state, pakistan, tensions, amid, india, told, special, kashmir, jammu, international, indian, region, revoking, status


Pakistan reacts to India's revoking of Kashmir's special status amid rising tensions

Pilgrims with their luggage seen going to the railway station during restrictions on Aug. 5, 2019 in Jammu, India. Nitin Kanotra | Hindustan Times | Getty Images

Pakistan has blamed India for illegally scrapping Kashmir’s special status, as tensions rise between the two nations. On Monday, Pakistan government said that New Delhi’s move to revoke a special status granted to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir was in breach of international law. The Indian High Commissioner to Pakistan, Ajay Bisaria, was summoned by Islamabad’s ministry of foreign affairs. During that meeting, “the Foreign Secretary conveyed Pakistan’s unequivocal rejection of these illegal actions as they are in breach of international law and several UN Security Council resolutions,” Pakistan’s foreign ministry said in a statement. On Monday, Interior Minister Amit Shah told India’s parliament that the central government would scrap Article 370, a constitutional provision that allows Jammu and Kashmir to make its own laws and grants special rights and privileges to permanent residents of the state. The order was subsequently approved by the Indian president. Jammu and Kashmir is India’s only Muslim-majority state and is part of the broader disputed Kashmir region. Pakistan called for a joint session of its parliament on Tuesday while the country’s army chief summoned an important conference to discuss regional security, local media reported. Analysts told CNBC that Monday’s move in New Delhi will likely intensify the animosity between the nuclear-powered rivals who’ve fought multiple wars over Kashmir.

International pressure

Pakistan will likely increase diplomatic pressure on India by turning to the international community, experts said. “They will continue to raise this at multilateral forums, including the UN General Assembly, to bring diplomatic attention back to India’s actions,” Akhil Bery, South Asia analyst at risk consultancy Eurasia Group, told CNBC. India deployed tens of thousands of troops across the Kashmir Valley in anticipation of a backlash. Authorities also banned public movements, shut down schools and colleges indefinitely and put two former chief ministers of the state under house arrest ahead of the announcement. Moeed Yusuf, associate vice president of the Asia Center at the U.S. Institute of Peace, told CNBC that there will likely be “strong resistance” from locals inside India-controlled Kashmir. “If that happens, Pakistan is surely going to up the diplomatic temperature to raise UN concerns about the human rights aspects of the Indian crackdown,” he said. Bery added that many Kashmiris believe the special provisions are crucial to their identity and they have “long been weary of a strong influence from Delhi.”

Greater military activity along the border

Analysts said they expect greater military activity along the so-called Line of Control, which is the de facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir, and more unrest in the region. Islamabad said Monday it would “exercise all possible options” to counter the move.

“It’s important to keep in mind that in Kashmir, there’s actually two levels — there’s a domestic level, which is between the central government and the state of (Jammu and) Kashmir. Then, there’s an international component between India and Pakistan,” Faisel Pervaiz, South Asia analyst at Stratfor, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box ” on Tuesday. Both Pakistan and India lay claim to the region in full but control only parts of it. Within the India-controlled region of Kashmir, an insurgency began in the late 1980s when some fought to join Pakistan and some fought for independence. India has accused Pakistan of backing separatists by arming and training them. Islamabad denies that and says it only offers political support to the Kashmiri people, according to Reuters. International agencies have raised concerns over violence and human rights in India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in the Pakistan-controlled regions of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan. “There is a long-running insurgency in Kashmir and the question is that is there going to be an uptick in attacks?” Pervaiz said. “Because as we saw back in February, when an uptick in attack happens, that can rapidly escalate tensions.” In February, India and Pakistan carried out air strikes in each others’ territories after a terrorist attack in India-controlled Kashmir killed more than 40 security officers.

The US position


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kashmirs, reacts, indias, rising, state, pakistan, tensions, amid, india, told, special, kashmir, jammu, international, indian, region, revoking, status


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown

As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers. At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. “By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become activ


As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers. At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. “By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become activ
India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistani, indiapakistan, kashmir, indian, quiet, militancy, border, past, amid, wars, pakistan, crackdown, loc, tense, calm, night, camps


India-Pakistan border quiet but Kashmir tense amid militancy crackdown

As India and Pakistan seemingly dial down hostilities that brought the arch enemies to the brink of another war, a massive crackdown on militancy in the Indian-controlled Kashmir region is killing both militants and security personnel in big numbers.

At the Line of Control (LoC), the de facto border between the nuclear-armed neighbours, there was relative calm in the past 24 hours, their armies said on Sunday. The exchange of fire in the past few days has killed seven people on the Pakistani side and four on the Indian side, though the release of a downed Indian fighter pilot by Pakistan on Friday night has helped de-escalate tensions.

“By and large the LoC was calm last night but you never know when it will become active again,” said Chaudhry Tariq Farooq, a minister in Pakistani Kashmir. “Tension still prevails.”

Indian warplanes carried out air strikes on Tuesday inside northeast Pakistan’s Balakot on what New Delhi called militant camps. Islamabad denied any such camps existed, as did some villagers in the area when Reuters visited.

Nevertheless, Pakistan retaliated on Wednesday with its own aerial mission in a show of force. The countries have fought three wars since independence from Britain in 1947.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-03  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistani, indiapakistan, kashmir, indian, quiet, militancy, border, past, amid, wars, pakistan, crackdown, loc, tense, calm, night, camps


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says

Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups. “Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because i


Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups. “Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because i
India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, nitin kanotra, hindustan times, getty images, yawar nazir, muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, -cameron munter, former us ambassador to pakistan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, need, terrorist, india, region, groups, indian, important, pakistan, problem, saran, violence, kashmir, populace, resolve, ambassador


India and Pakistan still need to resolve two important issues, former US ambassador says

Jammu and Kashmir was a former princely state where a large number of people were killed and others were driven away by the violence during the partition. Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Many have raised concerns over violence and human rights abuses in both India-controlled Jammu and Kashmir, as well as in Pakistan-controlled Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan region.

Speaking about India-controlled Kashmir, Munter said: “You have a mainly Muslim population and you have many hundreds of thousands of Indian troops keeping order. That’s really not a sustainable or good situation.”

“It’s not something that Indians want other people to interfere with but until that gets solved, there’s going to be a problem in Kashmir,” he added.

In a recent op-ed piece with Indian newspaper Business Standard, former Indian foreign secretary Shyam Saran said that after the Feb. 14 terror attack, India must examine why so many locals get recruited by terrorist groups operating in the area.

“There have been allegations of intelligence failure but the ability to stop terrorist incidents and apprehending terrorists is most effective if the local populace is ready to provide intelligence that is relatively specific,” Saran wrote. “This is possible only if there is a high level of trust and confidence between the populace and the security forces.”

Pakistan’s problem, according to Munter, is that no one believes they’ve cracked down on the groups like the Lashkar-e-Taiba — which carried out one of the worst terrorist attacks in India’s history — or the Jaish-e-Mohammed, which operate in that region. India has long accused Pakistan of supporting those groups.

“Until the Pakistanis are credible in cracking down on these groups, they’re going to have a problem. Because it’s not every day that America and Iran, for example, stand shoulder-to-shoulder, criticizing the Pakistanis for not cracking down on terrorist groups,” the former envoy said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, nitin kanotra, hindustan times, getty images, yawar nazir, muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, -cameron munter, former us ambassador to pakistan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, need, terrorist, india, region, groups, indian, important, pakistan, problem, saran, violence, kashmir, populace, resolve, ambassador


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Timeline: India and Pakistan’s latest confrontation over Kashmir

Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “


Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “
Timeline: India and Pakistan’s latest confrontation over Kashmir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, saqib majeed, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistans, countries, latest, pakistan, delhi, pakistani, attack, indian, india, kashmir, strikes, timeline, confrontation, ministry


Timeline: India and Pakistan's latest confrontation over Kashmir

Tensions between nuclear rivals India and Pakistan flared up this week after both sides carried out tit-for-tat air strikes and shot down each other’s fighter jets, prompting global concerns over a potential outbreak of war in South Asia. Pakistan said it also captured an Indian pilot who was released on Friday as a gesture of peace towards New Delhi from Islamabad.

The mountainous region of Kashmir has been a source of conflict between the two countries since their independence from British colonial rule in 1947.

Jammu and Kashmir was a former princely state where a large number of people were killed and others were driven away by the violence during the partition. Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. This has led to innumerable conflicts between the two countries.

While this week’s escalation appears to be cooling for now, here is a timeline of how the events unfolded over the last two weeks.

Feb. 14: A suicide bomber rammed a car into a bus carrying Indian paramilitary police in Kashmir, killing more than 40 in what was described as one of the deadliest attacks on security forces in the region in decades.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that “a befitting reply will be given to the perpetrators of the heinous attack and their patrons.”

Feb. 15: A Pakistan-based terror group, Jaish-e-Mohammed, claimed responsibility for the attack.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said it has “always condemned heightened acts of violence” in Kashmir but it strongly rejected “any insinuation by elements in the Indian government and media circles that seek to link the attack to the State of Pakistan without investigations.”

India’s Ministry of External Affairs said Jaish-E-Mohammed and its leadership are located in Pakistan. “(They) cannot claim that it is unaware of their presence and their activities. They have not taken any action against these groups despite international demands,” the official spokesperson said.

Feb. 16: Indian Finance Minister Arun Jaitley tweeted New Delhi withdrew Pakistan’s “most favored nation” status, which is usually given to countries receiving certain trade advantages such as low tariffs. Following that, basic customs duty on Pakistani exports to India were raised to 200 percent, he said.

Feb. 18: Nine people, including four Indian soldiers and a policeman, were killed during a gun battle in India-controlled Kashmir, further escalating tensions between the two countries. Reports said the operation targeted a residential area said to be a hideout for suspected militants.

Feb. 19: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan offered India assistance to investigate the suicide bombing but he warned that his country will retaliate against any acts of aggression from New Delhi. India dismissed Khan’s offer, citing previous terror attacks in Mumbai and an airbase.

Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation.

Feb. 23—24: New Delhi stepped up its crackdown in Kashmir by detaining more than 160 separatists, reports said. Five people were killed as Indian security forces clashed with members of a Pakistani militant group in the disputed region.

Feb. 26: India said its air force conducted strikes against a Jaish-e-Mohammed training base at Balakot in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and that the attack killed a “very large number” of terrorists, trainers and senior commanders. Pakistan denied there were any casualties from that attack and said the strikes missed any targets.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said the “Indian aggression was a threat to regional peace and stability and would get a befitting response by Pakistan at a time and place of its choosing.”

Feb. 27: Pakistani media reported that Khan chaired a meeting of the National Command Authority, the body that oversees the country’s nuclear warheads.

Pakistan said its air force carried out strikes across the so-called Line of Control to demonstrate its “right, will and capability for self defense.” The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir.

A spokesman for the Pakistani armed forces said Indian planes entered its air space and two jets were shot down. One of the aircraft fell on India’s side of Kashmir while the second came down in Pakistani territory, and its pilot was captured.

India’s foreign ministry acknowledged that a pilot was missing and a combat jet had been lost. The ministry spokesperson also claimed a Pakistani jet had been shot down in the altercation.

Then, a video emerged of a man identified by Islamabad identified as the captured Indian pilot.

India also said it handed over a dossier to its counterpart with specific details of Jaish-e-Mohammed’s role in the Feb. 14 terror attack and their presence in Pakistan.

Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “better sense” would prevail to de-escalate the situation.

Feb. 28: Khan told his parliament that Pakistan will release the captured Indian pilot the next day as a “peace gesture” towards India.

The move was welcomed by the chiefs of India’s three armed forces during a joint press conference Thursday evening — but they would not say if New Delhi considered the return a de-escalation in the conflict.

Mar. 1: Pakistan handed over Wing Commander Abhinanda to India at the Wagah border crossing between the two countries.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, saqib majeed, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistans, countries, latest, pakistan, delhi, pakistani, attack, indian, india, kashmir, strikes, timeline, confrontation, ministry


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pakistan says it has returned downed fighter pilot to India

Pakistan handed a captured Indian pilot back to his country on Friday as the nuclear-armed neighbors scaled back their confrontation, at least temporarily. Indian officials confirmed he had been returned and said he would be taken for medical checks. Before the pilot was released, Pakistani television stations broadcast video of him, looking cleaned up, thanking the Pakistani army for treating him well. “Pakistan is releasing our pilot, I thank them for that,” said Kulwant Singh, who has run a f


Pakistan handed a captured Indian pilot back to his country on Friday as the nuclear-armed neighbors scaled back their confrontation, at least temporarily. Indian officials confirmed he had been returned and said he would be taken for medical checks. Before the pilot was released, Pakistani television stations broadcast video of him, looking cleaned up, thanking the Pakistani army for treating him well. “Pakistan is releasing our pilot, I thank them for that,” said Kulwant Singh, who has run a f
Pakistan says it has returned downed fighter pilot to India Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: narinder nanu, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistan, returned, released, pakistani, india, kashmir, fighter, militants, indian, war, downed, qureshi, officials, pilot


Pakistan says it has returned downed fighter pilot to India

Pakistan handed a captured Indian pilot back to his country on Friday as the nuclear-armed neighbors scaled back their confrontation, at least temporarily.

Television footage showed Wing Commander Abhinandan walking across the border near the town of Wagah just before 9.00 p.m. (1600 GMT). Indian officials confirmed he had been returned and said he would be taken for medical checks.

Abhinandan was shot down on Wednesday while flying a MiG-21 fighter jet that crashed in Pakistani territory after a dogfight with a Pakistani JF-17.

World powers have urged restraint from the two nations, as tensions escalated following a suicide car bombing that killed at least 40 Indian paramilitary police in Indian-controlled Kashmir on Feb. 14.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi said earlier on Friday the pilot would be released “as a gesture of peace and to de-escalate matters.”

Before the pilot was released, Pakistani television stations broadcast video of him, looking cleaned up, thanking the Pakistani army for treating him well.

“The Pakistani army is a very professional service,” he said.

Throughout the day, crowds on the Indian side thronged the road to the crossing, shouting nationalist slogans and waving Indian flags.

“Pakistan is releasing our pilot, I thank them for that,” said Kulwant Singh, who has run a food stall at the crossing for 20 years.

“War can never be good. War is bad for business, war is bad for our soldiers.”

The disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir has been at the root of two of the three wars fought between India and Pakistan since they gained independence from Britain in 1947.

There was some firing along the contested border dividing Kashmir on Friday, according to a spokesman for India’s defence ministry, but the hostilities were well short of previous days.

Pakistan reopened some airports on Friday, after easing airspace restrictions that had disrupted flights between Asia and Europe for several days during the conflict.

Relations between the two countries, however, remain strained. Qureshi said he would not attend a meeting of foreign ministers from the

Organisation of Islamic Cooperation in Abu Dhabi this weekend, because his Indian counterpart had been invited to the event.

India also faces an ongoing battle against armed militants in its portion of Kashmir. On Friday, four security personnel and a civilian were killed in a gun battle with militants, officials said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: narinder nanu, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pakistan, returned, released, pakistani, india, kashmir, fighter, militants, indian, war, downed, qureshi, officials, pilot


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

India-Pakistan crisis intensifies, visitors flee Jammu and Kashmir

“I first came here two years ago, but decided last night it’s no longer safe to remain here. Prasad was leaving with a group of seven other men who worked together in Jammu and Kashmir. At the adjoining taxi stand, taxi drivers’ union leader Ravinder Singh said March to September was usually the busiest season but this year prospects were looking grim. They did visit Vaishno Devi but cut short their stay in the state by a few days. Such truncated trips and a fall in the numbers of visitors are p


“I first came here two years ago, but decided last night it’s no longer safe to remain here. Prasad was leaving with a group of seven other men who worked together in Jammu and Kashmir. At the adjoining taxi stand, taxi drivers’ union leader Ravinder Singh said March to September was usually the busiest season but this year prospects were looking grim. They did visit Vaishno Devi but cut short their stay in the state by a few days. Such truncated trips and a fall in the numbers of visitors are p
India-Pakistan crisis intensifies, visitors flee Jammu and Kashmir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: yawar nazir, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visitors, state, singh, pakistan, railway, flee, taxi, station, india, indiapakistan, crisis, visit, kashmir, intensifies, business, jammu


India-Pakistan crisis intensifies, visitors flee Jammu and Kashmir

Migrant workers are fleeing India’s northern state of Jammu and Kashmir and tourist arrivals have fallen to a trickle amid an escalating conflict with Pakistan, badly hurting businesses in the Himalayan region known for its scenic beauty and fruit harvests.

Hundreds of taxis stood idle at the main railway station of Jammu, the winter capital of the state, after Pakistan said it carried out air strikes in India and shot down two Indian jets on Wednesday, a day after Indian warplanes struck inside Pakistan for the first time since a war in 1971.

“My wife is really scared and has been calling me back,” Brajesh Prasad, who works at a white limestone factory near Jammu, told Reuters outside the emergency ticket counter at the railway station, as he sought to catch a train back to his village in Uttar Pradesh state.

“I first came here two years ago, but decided last night it’s no longer safe to remain here. I know there would be no work back home for me, it’s not even the planting or harvest season to get some farm work.”

Prasad was leaving with a group of seven other men who worked together in Jammu and Kashmir.

At the adjoining taxi stand, taxi drivers’ union leader Ravinder Singh said March to September was usually the busiest season but this year prospects were looking grim.

He said taxi business was down by more than 80 percent compared with two years ago, as very few people were in town to visit the famous Hindu shrine of Vaishno Devi, 62 km (38 miles) north of Jammu, which usually attracts millions of people every year.

“The situation is very bad for us taxi operators,” Singh said. “I think the time has come to settle this India-Pakistan conflict for good.”

Outside Singh’s office, a group of three Hindu pilgrims from the western city of Pune waited for their husbands to return from the railway station with tickets, after their flight was cancelled when India temporarily shut half a dozen airports in the region following the aerial clashes with Pakistan. They did visit Vaishno Devi but cut short their stay in the state by a few days.

Such truncated trips and a fall in the numbers of visitors are particularly bad for hotel chains, both local and international.

Ratandeep Singh, owner of a 40-room four-star hotel in Jammu, said he had only eight customers left last night at a time of year when the property would normally be booked out. Tourism accounts for more than 7 percent of the state’s economy.

But the President of Jammu’s Chamber of Commerce and Industries, Rakesh Gupta, said its members were willing to “lose business for the sake of the country”.

He said India rightly avenged the killing of 40 paramilitary police in the state on Feb. 14 in a suicide attack claimed by a Pakistan-based Islamist militant group.

“Such tensions can never be good for any business but nation comes first,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: yawar nazir, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visitors, state, singh, pakistan, railway, flee, taxi, station, india, indiapakistan, crisis, visit, kashmir, intensifies, business, jammu


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pakistan shoots down Indian jets, carries out airstrikes in Kashmir

Pakistan shot down two Indian jets on Wednesday, a spokesman for the Pakistan armed forces said, a day after Indian warplanes struck inside Pakistan for the first time since a war in 1971, prompting leading powers to urge the nuclear armed rivals to show restraint. But while India said a large number of JeM fighters had been killed, Pakistani officials said the Indian airstrike was a failure and inflicted no casualties. Indian air force planes strayed into Pakistani airspace on Wednesday after P


Pakistan shot down two Indian jets on Wednesday, a spokesman for the Pakistan armed forces said, a day after Indian warplanes struck inside Pakistan for the first time since a war in 1971, prompting leading powers to urge the nuclear armed rivals to show restraint. But while India said a large number of JeM fighters had been killed, Pakistani officials said the Indian airstrike was a failure and inflicted no casualties. Indian air force planes strayed into Pakistani airspace on Wednesday after P
Pakistan shoots down Indian jets, carries out airstrikes in Kashmir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shelling, indian, shoots, kashmir, spokesman, officials, shot, pakistan, killed, air, carries, airstrikes, jets, pakistani


Pakistan shoots down Indian jets, carries out airstrikes in Kashmir

Pakistan shot down two Indian jets on Wednesday, a spokesman for the Pakistan armed forces said, a day after Indian warplanes struck inside Pakistan for the first time since a war in 1971, prompting leading powers to urge the nuclear armed rivals to show restraint.

Tensions have been elevated since a suicide car bombing by Pakistan-based militants in Indian-controlled Kashmir killed at least 40 Indian paramilitary police on Feb. 14, but the risk of conflict rose dramatically on Tuesday when India launched an air strike on what it said was a militant training base.

The attack targeted the Jaish-e-Mohammed militant, the group that claimed credit for the suicide attack. But while India said a large number of JeM fighters had been killed, Pakistani officials said the Indian airstrike was a failure and inflicted no casualties.

Indian air force planes strayed into Pakistani airspace on Wednesday after Pakistan had carried out airstrikes in Indian-occupied Kashmir, said Major General Asif Ghafoor, a spokesman for the Pakistan armed forces.

“PAF shot down two Indian aircrafts inside Pakistani airspace,” he said in a tweet.

One of the aircraft fell on India’s side of Kashmir, while the second came down in Pakistani-held territory, and its pilot was captured, he added.

A spokesman for India’s defense ministry was not immediately available for comment.

Police officials in Indian-occupied Kashmir said that two Indian pilots and a civilian had died after an Indian air force plane crashed in Kashmir, but did not confirm if the plane had been shot down by Pakistani forces.

Indian officials said three Pakistani jets had also entered Indian airspace, before being intercepted and forced turned back.

The Indian air force has ordered Kashmir’s main airport in Srinagar along with at least three others in neighboring states to be closed because of the two incidents, an official said.

On Tuesday evening, Pakistan began shelling using heavy caliber weapons in 12 to 15 places along the de facto border in Kashmir, known as the Line of Control (LoC), a spokesman for the Indian defense forces said.

“The Indian Army retaliated for effect and our focused fire resulted in severe destruction to five posts and number of casualties,” the spokesman said.

Five Indian soldiers suffered minor wounds in the shelling that ended on Wednesday morning, he added.

“So far there are no (civilian) casualties but there is panic among people,” said Rahul Yadav, the deputy commissioner of the Poonch district where some of the shelling took place.

“We have an evacuation plan in place and if need arises we will evacuate people to safer areas,” he said.

Local officials on the Pakistani side said at least four people had been killed and seven wounded, though it was unclear if the casualties were civilian or military.

India has also continued its crackdown on suspected militants operating in Kashmir, a mountainous region that both countries claim in full but rule in part.

On Wednesday, security forces killed two Jaish militants in a gun battle, Indian police said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shelling, indian, shoots, kashmir, spokesman, officials, shot, pakistan, killed, air, carries, airstrikes, jets, pakistani


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pakistani PM says he’s willing to talk but warns India

Khan said in a televised speech that, should there be an attack from India, “Pakistan will not merely think of retaliation, but rather, we will retaliate.” Tensions between Pakistan and India soared following the attack, which Islamabad condemned while also cautioning India against linking it to the bombing without an investigation. India and Pakistan each administer a part of Kashmir, but both claim the Himalayan territory in its entirety. Rebels have been fighting Indian rule since 1989, deman


Khan said in a televised speech that, should there be an attack from India, “Pakistan will not merely think of retaliation, but rather, we will retaliate.” Tensions between Pakistan and India soared following the attack, which Islamabad condemned while also cautioning India against linking it to the bombing without an investigation. India and Pakistan each administer a part of Kashmir, but both claim the Himalayan territory in its entirety. Rebels have been fighting Indian rule since 1989, deman
Pakistani PM says he’s willing to talk but warns India Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talk, delhi, hes, attack, sense, india, warns, pakistans, pakistan, pakistani, indian, minister, willing, kashmir


Pakistani PM says he's willing to talk but warns India

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan said Tuesday he hopes “better sense” will prevail and offered to hold talks with India even as he warned New Delhi to refrain from launching any attacks on Pakistan following last week’s suicide bombing in Indian-controlled Kashmir that killed at least 40 Indian troops.

Khan said in a televised speech that, should there be an attack from India, “Pakistan will not merely think of retaliation, but rather, we will retaliate.”

New Delhi has blamed Islamabad and threatened a “jaw-breaking response” for the attack last Thursday in Kashmir in which a militant rammed an explosive-laden van into a paramilitary bus. It was the worst attack against Indian government forces in Kashmir’s history.

Tensions between Pakistan and India soared following the attack, which Islamabad condemned while also cautioning India against linking it to the bombing without an investigation. On Monday, four Indian soldiers, three suspected militants, a police official and a civilian were killed as Indian soldiers searched for militants.

“I have an offer for the Indian government, if you have any actionable evidence, share it with us and we will take action,” Khan said. “We are ready to cooperate with India in the investigations.”

“I hope better sense will prevail,” Khan added.

His remarks were in response to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announcement that his government forces have been “given total freedom” to deal with the militants In Kashmir.

India and Pakistan each administer a part of Kashmir, but both claim the Himalayan territory in its entirety. They have fought two of their three wars over it.

Rebels have been fighting Indian rule since 1989, demanding Indian-controlled Kashmir be united either under Pakistani rule or established as an independent country.

Earlier on Tuesday, Pakistan’s foreign ministry said it recalled its ambassador from India and appealed for UN help to de-escalate and defuse tensions with New Delhi after the Kashmir attack.

According to the statement, Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi sent a letter to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres alleging that “for domestic political reasons, India has deliberately ratcheted up its hostile rhetoric against Pakistan and created a tense environment.”

Also, Pakistani Ambassador Suhail Mahmood was asked to return home from India, after New Delhi recalled its own envoy from Islamabad.

“It is with a sense of urgency that I draw your attention to the deteriorating security situation in our region resulting from the threat of use of force against Pakistan by India,” Qureshi said in his letter.

There were expectations that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who concluded a two-day visit to Pakistan on Monday and travelled on to India, could encourage the two South Asian neighbors to try to resolve their issues through talks.

India’s Ministry of External Affairs said it had no comment on Pakistan’s letter to the UN.

Meanwhile, a senior Indian military official in Kashmir, Lt. Gen. K.J.S. Dhillon, on Tuesday told reporters in Srinagar, the main city of Indian-held Kashmir, that Indian forces there have killed the chief of the Jaish-e-Mohammed militant group behind Monday’s gunbattle and last week’s suicide bombing.

The leader was a Pakistani national by the name of Kamran, Dhillon said.

Jaish-e-Mohammed is outlawed in Pakistan but thought to operate from safe havens there.

The Indian military and Pakistan did not immediately comment on Dhillon’s statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: muhhamad reza, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talk, delhi, hes, attack, sense, india, warns, pakistans, pakistan, pakistani, indian, minister, willing, kashmir


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US advisor Bolton promises India support after Kashmir attack

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton spoke to his Indian counterpart promising support to bring those responsible for a deadly car bombing in disputed Kashmir to justice, the Indian Foreign Ministry said on Saturday. A Pakistan-based militant group, Jaish-e-Mohammad, has claimed responsibility for the attack on a military convoy in which 44 paramilitary police were killed, raising tensions with India. Bolton told Ajit Doval in a telephone conversation that the United States supported India


U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton spoke to his Indian counterpart promising support to bring those responsible for a deadly car bombing in disputed Kashmir to justice, the Indian Foreign Ministry said on Saturday. A Pakistan-based militant group, Jaish-e-Mohammad, has claimed responsibility for the attack on a military convoy in which 44 paramilitary police were killed, raising tensions with India. Bolton told Ajit Doval in a telephone conversation that the United States supported India
US advisor Bolton promises India support after Kashmir attack Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, pakistan, support, work, promises, indian, vowed, united, terrorist, advisor, india, attack, bolton, kashmir, ministry, foreign


US advisor Bolton promises India support after Kashmir attack

U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton spoke to his Indian counterpart promising support to bring those responsible for a deadly car bombing in disputed Kashmir to justice, the Indian Foreign Ministry said on Saturday.

A Pakistan-based militant group, Jaish-e-Mohammad, has claimed responsibility for the attack on a military convoy in which 44 paramilitary police were killed, raising tensions with India.

Bolton told Ajit Doval in a telephone conversation that the United States supported India’s right to self-defense against cross-border terrorism, the Indian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

India has demanded Pakistan act against the Jaish. Pakistan had condemned the attack but denied any complicity.

“The two NSAs vowed to work together to ensure that Pakistan cease to be a safe haven for JeM and terrorist groups that target India, the U.S. and others in the region,” the ministry said.

“They resolved to hold Pakistan to account for its obligations under U.N. resolutions.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, pakistan, support, work, promises, indian, vowed, united, terrorist, advisor, india, attack, bolton, kashmir, ministry, foreign


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post