LA’s top real estate agent says this is the biggest misconception about the job

As a top realtor, Kirman makes seven figures , but not all agents earn a ton of money — and that’s one of the biggest misconceptions about the job. Aaron Kirman has sold roughly $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No. A top producer is selling between $30 million and $40 million of real estate a year, which equates to a $300,000 or $400,000 salary. Another misconception, he says, is that the realtors at the top don’t work that hard: “It’s a tough job. ETDon’t


As a top realtor, Kirman makes seven figures , but not all agents earn a ton of money — and that’s one of the biggest misconceptions about the job.
Aaron Kirman has sold roughly $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No.
A top producer is selling between $30 million and $40 million of real estate a year, which equates to a $300,000 or $400,000 salary.
Another misconception, he says, is that the realtors at the top don’t work that hard: “It’s a tough job.
ETDon’t
LA’s top real estate agent says this is the biggest misconception about the job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, agent, agents, real, estate, world, biggest, misconception, kirman, million, work, theres, las, think, job


LA's top real estate agent says this is the biggest misconception about the job

Entry level agents can bring home even less than that because “it takes about a year to sell something,” he says.

“On average, agents make anywhere between $30,000 and $50,000 , which isn’t what the public thinks that they make,” he tells CNBC Make It . “It’s a lot less than you think because it’s such a competitive industry.”

As a top realtor, Kirman makes seven figures , but not all agents earn a ton of money — and that’s one of the biggest misconceptions about the job.

Aaron Kirman has sold roughly $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No. 1 agent in Los Angeles and among the best in the country.

A top producer is selling between $30 million and $40 million of real estate a year, which equates to a $300,000 or $400,000 salary. “Then you have the very, very, very top, which is a select few that make more than a million,” says Kirman. “And there’s one level up, which is big, mega brokers. There are not that many in the world, but there are a few, and I’m pretty lucky to consider myself one of those.”

“Mega brokers” make between $5 million and $12 million a year.

Another misconception, he says, is that the realtors at the top don’t work that hard: “It’s a tough job. There are a lot of nuances that make it extremely complicated, and I think that agents deserve every penny of every dollar they make.”

Even Kirman, who’s established himself as one of the most successful agents in the world, works long days that often end past 9 p.m.

To be successful in real estate you have to put in the hours, he says: “60% of it is showing up. You just have to work really hard. And then there’s intelligence involved — you have to understand market dynamics, human nature and the product.”

Plus, he adds, “there’s always a little bit of luck.”

″Listing Impossible″ airs on CNBC Wednesdays at 10 p.m. ET

Don’t miss: A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, agent, agents, real, estate, world, biggest, misconception, kirman, million, work, theres, las, think, job


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A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich

Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate. He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today. “There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”Aaron has a p


Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate.
He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today.
“There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive.
Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”Aaron has a p
A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, tells, work, luxury, makes, day, million, super, morning, property, estate, properties, selling, life, rich, aaron, millions, team


A day in the life of the top real estate agent in LA, who makes millions selling luxury properties to the super rich

Aaron Kirman knows how to close a deal: He’s sold roughly $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No. 1 agent in Los Angeles and among the top in the country. Aaron routinely sells multimillion-dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps homeowners sell their luxury real estate. He also runs the Aaron Kirman Group (AKG), a real estate team he started in 2017 that’s grown from seven agents at its inception to nearly 70 today. As a top realtor, Aaron makes seven figures, but not all real estate agents earn a ton of money — and that’s one of the biggest misconceptions of the job. Most bring home less than $50,000 a year, Aaron estimates, while a top producer will make between $200,000 and $500,000. “Then you have the very, very, very top — a select few who make more than a million,” he says, adding: “And then there’s one level up, which is big, mega brokers. I’m pretty lucky to consider myself one of those.” To experience a sliver of what it’s like to be the top realtor in the City of Angels, I spent a day with Aaron, meeting clients and looking at listings in some of the wealthiest neighborhoods in LA.

The author and Aaron, in front of a $65 million home CNBC Make It

It’s a brisk Monday in October. I leave my apartment around 6 a.m. to give myself plenty of time to navigate LA traffic and make it to Aaron’s home in Beverly Hills on time. His two dogs, Jack and Lucy, greet me at the front door. Aaron just moved in three weeks ago, but you can’t tell. The three-bedroom home is immaculate. It has a mid-century vibe, tons of natural light and the walls are covered in funky art pieces. “There is no typical day in real estate,” he warns me when I arrive. “When we think we have a schedule, it changes. At the level that we do, people need you when they need you and they want you when they want you.” True to his word, our schedule changes multiple times over the next 12 hours. Here’s how the day unfolds.

7 a.m. The morning starts with Starbucks

Aaron can’t function without his Starbucks. “It’s my addiction,” he tells me. “No matter where I am, in any given city, I can’t get up without it.” By the time I show up, he already has a triple soy cappuccino — his typical order — in hand. His personal assistant picked it up on her way to his house.

Aaron and his go-to order: a triple soy cappuccino

Most days, like this one, start between 7 and 7:30 a.m. “A lot of people start at like 5 or 6 — it’s just not in my nature to do that,” he says. A later start does typically means a longer day: “We sometimes work until 10 p.m. When I don’t have dinners or events, it’s more like 8:30 to 9.”

7:30 a.m. He meditates, swims and gets ready for the day

Aaron has a detailed and time-consuming morning routine that, even on the busiest days, he refuses to cut short. “I’m very careful with self-care,” he says. “I notice if I don’t take care of myself in the morning, I’m in a bad mood. I’m crotchety.” After his coffee, he meditates for five to six minutes by his outdoor pool. For him, that’s a long time: “In the past, meditation was almost impossible for me. I move really fast, so I’ve had to work on that part of me. But I’ve noticed that I’m now much more creative, innovative, calm and centered.”

Not a bad place to meditate CNBC Make It

He then swims a few laps and reads the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal to catch up on the news before getting ready for the day. He throws on some exercise clothes and packs his work outfit, as he won’t come back home after going to the gym. He used to get dressed up, but now that he’s established himself, he can get away with a more casual look. Plus, he’s learned that “the more comfortable you are in life, the better you’ll do. My competition gets dressed to the nines. They wear suits, they wear ties, they wear $5,000 clothes every day. I’m a T-shirt and jeans guy.”

The more comfortable you are in life, the better you’ll do. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”

He hasn’t yet eaten — “breakfast is not my meal,” he tells me — but grabs a protein shake for the road.

9:45 a.m. He hits the gym

Just before 10 a.m., we head to the gym. Today, we’re taking Aaron’s Bentley instead of his Porsche. Since we’re already behind schedule, he does an efficient, 20-minute circuit with one of his personal trainers (he has two). He aims to exercise at least 40 minutes a day — on a jam-packed day like today, he’ll do the second half of his workout at night. His morning routine pushes back the start of his work day quite a bit, something he’s fully aware of: “Our schedule is insane, and it doesn’t help that I have this morning routine that probably drives everyone crazy. “My staff is like, Would you mind skipping the gym? Would you mind not swimming? Would you mind not meditating? And my answer is, no. I have to protect my time. My performance is much better when I’m happy, healthy and living the way I choose to, which means being semi-selfish in the morning.”

Aaron works out every day with one of his two trainers CNBC Make It

11 a.m. Appointment 1, Beverly Hills

While our work day doesn’t officially start until 11 a.m., Aaron has been taking phone calls all morning, from home and the car. Most of the calls concern a listing party he’s hosting tonight at a $65 million mansion. His team has put a lot of time and money into the event and 200 people are expected to come, but there’s a fire in the area that’s already closed down major roads. Aaron’s trying to decide whether it’s appropriate to host the party and is having his team monitor the situation throughout the morning so he can make a final call by 1 p.m. He puts the decision on hold during his appointments. The first is with a property developer who’s interested in hiring Aaron to sell a multimillion-dollar home he and his brother built. It’s their first time meeting and they’ll have a few more walk-throughs before deciding whether to move forward.

The first property we visit is a $15.5 million home in the heart of the Beverly Hills flats Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

Aaron has a lot of meetings like this, in which sellers are “interviewing” him to sell their property. It’s a two-way street, though: Aaron is also interviewing the seller to make sure they’ll be a good match.

12:30 p.m. Appointments 2 and 3, Beverly Hills

We’re already running late for several appointments, but it doesn’t phase Aaron. He simply makes a few phone calls to his assistants, who will push back his schedule. Our next two meetings are with clients whose homes are nearly ready to put on the market — one will be listed for about $20 million and the other for about $33 million. Aaron does a walk-through of both to assess the staging.

The second property we visit, a 6-bed, 9.5 bath listed for $19.995 million Matthew Momberger

He’s very pleased with some design aspects and highly unimpressed with others — and he doesn’t hold back when offering feedback. His commentary ranges from “Love, love, love, love.” to “Hate the chandelier. We gotta get this down.” to “Everything is disgusting,” which was his gut reaction to one particular home theater.

The third home we visit is an 8-bed, 12-bath listed for $33.4 million Juwan Li

Besides helping stage the home, another important part of his job is advising the seller on how to pick a fair price for the property. “In today’s market, we really want to price houses exactly where they should be because that’s how we get the highest number,” he tells me. “If a seller prices too high, it sits on the market and we have to go to them and ask for a reduction. We don’t want that. We want to sell the house for what it’s worth and get them on their way.” While Aaron can make price suggestions, at the end of the day, it’s the seller who makes the final call.

2:15 p.m. Appointments 3 and 4, Bel Air

Between meetings, we’re in the car, which acts as Aaron’s second office. “My car time is my work time,” he tells me. “It’s the only time we can really catch up on phone calls because we’re usually so back-to-back on appointments.” Our final two appointments are in Bel Air — specifically, at the Bel Air Golf Club. “This is where the big money LA is,” Aaron tells me. “Houses are huge. The biggest sales we have in LA are here.” We spend just 20 minutes at the first property. It’s still under construction and the seller has a lot of work to do, but just seeing the view from the infinity pool is enough to tell that this home will eventually come with a fat sticker price.

This particular property still has a lot of work to be done, but the infinity pool is in nice shape CNBC Make It

The last appointment of the day is with a potential buyer: He’s a billionaire interested in a $65 million mansion. It’s the home where Aaron’s listing party was supposed to take place. He made the decision to cancel it because he felt it would be insensitive to host a fun event while neighboring communities were dealing with a destructive fire. Additionally, the theme of the event was fire and water and there were supposed to be fire dancers performing. “That would have been a PR nightmare,” he says. “In real estate, when you’re at the top of the game like we are, people like to talk and read and write and so we have to be very cautious with our approach. Anything we do can make the news.” Working with the super rich is part of Aaron’s day-to-day. Surprisingly, they’re also some of his more frugal clients, he tells me: “Ironically, I’ve noticed that sometimes the more money people have, the less they want to spend it, so getting these deals through can be a challenge.” I can’t tag along to meet the billionaire buyer because NDAs have been signed, but Aaron shows me the property after they chat. It’s a 28,000-square-foot masterpiece with nine beds, 17 baths, a moat and 160-foot swimming pool.

The last property we see is a resort-like oasis Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

It even has a full-service hair and nail salon in the master suite.

Features in this $65 million mansion include a hair and nail salon Juwan Li / Marc Angeles

4:30 p.m. Lunch break and team meetings

Our last stop of the day is Aaron’s office, where his entire AKG team is based. It’s in Beverly Hills, not too far from his home where we began the day. “The secret of Los Angeles is working close to where you live,” he tells me. “That way you’re not stuck in traffic for hours and hours.” He has a brief moment to eat his first real meal of the day (pasta and chicken) before stepping into a tech meeting. Finally, around 5:30 p.m., he can check in face-to-face with his assistants and office manager, who help run his business and life. “People don’t realize that behind every person who’s very successful there’s a team of people who drive that support system,” he tells me. “I wouldn’t survive day in and day out if I didn’t have somebody doing my emails, my calendar, my marketing, my advertising, my technology.”

People don’t realize that behind every person who’s very successful there’s a team of people who drive that support system. Aaron Kirman real estate agent, star of CNBC’s “Listing Impossible”

Aaron has a personal assistant, whose day starts when his does. After delivering his morning coffee to his home, she’ll do everything from feeding and walking his dogs to restocking his fridge to filling up his gas tank. Other assistants handle the phone calls that come into his office, the hundreds of emails he gets a day and all of his schedule changes. It’s already been a full day, but he hasn’t done any “actual work,” he says. “This is where the business is actually going to get done,” Aaron tells me from his corner office. Before diving into the financials of the company and other business tasks with his office manager, he grabs a bag of Pirate’s Booty for a snack. An assistant brings him an English tea, which is a new part of his evening routine. “At the end of the day my voice sounds like my Grandma and it sounds like I have nodules even though I don’t,” says Aaron. He’s hoping the tea helps with that.

7 p.m. The day wraps


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, real, tells, work, luxury, makes, day, million, super, morning, property, estate, properties, selling, life, rich, aaron, millions, team


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Russell Wilson is the highest-paid player in the NFL—here’s how much he makes

In April 2019, Russell Wilson became the highest-paid player in the NFL on an annual basis when he signed a $140 million, four-year extension with the Seattle Seahawks. The deal also included a $65 million signing bonus. Today, with an average annual salary of $35 million, Wilson is earning more than 40 times his rookie salary. Catch the divisional round between the Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers on Sunday, January 12 at 6:40 p.m. Don’t miss: NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, su


In April 2019, Russell Wilson became the highest-paid player in the NFL on an annual basis when he signed a $140 million, four-year extension with the Seattle Seahawks.
The deal also included a $65 million signing bonus.
Today, with an average annual salary of $35 million, Wilson is earning more than 40 times his rookie salary.
Catch the divisional round between the Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers on Sunday, January 12 at 6:40 p.m.
Don’t miss: NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, su
Russell Wilson is the highest-paid player in the NFL—here’s how much he makes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seahawks, nflheres, starting, russell, signing, signed, million, turn, nfl, player, seattle, wilson, rookie, makes, highestpaid


Russell Wilson is the highest-paid player in the NFL—here's how much he makes

In April 2019, Russell Wilson became the highest-paid player in the NFL on an annual basis when he signed a $140 million, four-year extension with the Seattle Seahawks. The deal also included a $65 million signing bonus.

Wilson, whose team heads to the Green Bay on Sunday for the NFC divisional round of the NFL playoffs, was the 75th overall pick in the 2012 draft. He immediately took over as the starting quarterback and earned $750,000 his rookie year. While that’s enormous compared to the average American’s salary, it’s relatively cheap for a starting quarterback.

In 2015, he signed his second contract with Seattle, which paid $88 million over four years.

Today, with an average annual salary of $35 million, Wilson is earning more than 40 times his rookie salary.

He has additional income coming in from endorsement deals with Nike, Mercedes, Bose and more. Plus, he’s dipping his toe into the business world: Wilson launched a mobile gaming app called Tally, which is backed by investors like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Alibaba co-founder Joe Tsai, and he started a fashion line called Good Man Brand.

The 31-year-old likes to share his wealth when he can: After signing the $140 million contract in 2019, he gave $156,000 worth of Amazon stock to his 13 offensive linemen (the teammates assigned to block for and protect him on the field).

“You sacrifice your physical and mental well-being to protect me, which in turn allows me to provide care for my family,” Wilson wrote in a letter to his linemen. “Now it is my turn to return the favor.”

He also launched the Why Not You Foundation in 2014, with the mission of motivating and empowering today’s youth.

Catch the divisional round between the Seattle Seahawks and the Green Bay Packers on Sunday, January 12 at 6:40 p.m. ET.

Don’t miss: NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, surprised his dad with a house—here’s how other pros spent their first big checks

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: kathleen elkins
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NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, surprised his dad with a house—here’s how other pros spent their first big checks

“I normalized a lot of things growing up — like I never thought, Damn, I’m sleeping in a car,” Jacobs told ESPN in 2018. “I think that it’s important to spend money on yourself,” he said. That was always in the back of my mind, so it made me want to be more realistic with how I spent money.” “I spent like two or three grand and it felt like I spent a million dollars. I didn’t know how to spend money.”


“I normalized a lot of things growing up — like I never thought, Damn, I’m sleeping in a car,” Jacobs told ESPN in 2018.
“I think that it’s important to spend money on yourself,” he said.
That was always in the back of my mind, so it made me want to be more realistic with how I spent money.”
“I spent like two or three grand and it felt like I spent a million dollars.
I didn’t know how to spend money.”
NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, surprised his dad with a house—here’s how other pros spent their first big checks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, househeres, pros, money, rippon, nfl, grand, spent, told, surprised, homeless, million, spend, dad, pay, josh, jacobs, williams, rookie


NFL rookie Josh Jacobs, once homeless, surprised his dad with a house—here's how other pros spent their first big checks

When running back Josh Jacobs was selected by the Oakland Raiders in the first round of the 2019 NFL draft, he earned a $6.7 million signing bonus. It was more money than he’d ever seen. Jacobs, who was a high school standout and recruited by college football powerhouse Alabama, grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with four siblings. His parents separated when he was eight and his dad, Marty, got full custody. Already struggling to make ends meet, Marty’s financial situation became even more desperate. Unable to afford housing, he and his kids lived out of a car and occasionally bounced around from one inexpensive hotel room to the next.

“I normalized a lot of things growing up — like I never thought, Damn, I’m sleeping in a car,” Jacobs told ESPN in 2018. In a way, “I feel like it’s an advantage,” he reflected on his childhood situation. “Because I grind. I wouldn’t get complacent because I never had it easy.” After a strong first year in the pros, Jacobs is considered a favorite for the 2019 NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year award — and he’s getting paid for it: His average annual salary is just under $3 million. He used part of his rookie year earnings to buy his dad a house, he announced on Twitter this week. Here’s how four other professional athletes spent their first big paychecks.

Adam Rippon splurged on a winter coat

Early in his career, American figure skater Adam Rippon lived in his coach’s basement and swiped apples from his gym to save money on groceries. It wasn’t until a big performance at an event right before the 2014 Olympics that Rippon’s net worth shot up. The Olympian couldn’t immediately celebrate, though, he told Wealthsimple: “I needed to pay my coaches right away, and I needed to pay for the costumes that I said I would pay for. And I had a leased 2003 Volkswagen Jetta that I was like, OK, time to make that monthly payment.” After covering those expenses, Rippon did allow himself one splurge: He went to Bloomingdale’s for the first time and bought a Canada Goose jacket, which cost anywhere from several hundred dollars to over a grand. “I think that it’s important to spend money on yourself,” he said. “That’s what making money is for.”

Venus Williams went straight to the bank

Tennis legend Venus Williams started earning big money at a young age: When she won her first Grand Slam title at 20, it came with a check for about half a million dollars. But rather than splurging, Williams saved every penny. “I really didn’t spend any of it,” she told CNBC Make It. “I just didn’t want to become a statistic, or one of those athletes who had it all and then in the end had nothing. That was always in the back of my mind, so it made me want to be more realistic with how I spent money.”

Andre Iguodala headed to Niketown

Andre Iguodala’s first NBA contract was “for four years, $9 million,” he told Wealthsimple. “You get an advance over the summer and, just before the draft, you get an advance for trading cards and an advance for a shoe contract. I remember a loan agency floating me until I got the advances. They sent me a check for $25,000.” The basketball star, who was 20 at the time, bought “a whole bunch of pairs of Jordans,” he said. “I spent like two or three grand and it felt like I spent a million dollars. I didn’t know how to spend money.”

Harrison Barnes bought his dream mattress


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: kathleen elkins
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Don’t make these 3 mistakes with your end-of-year bonus

If you’re on the receiving end of a holiday bonus this year, it’s OK to treat yourself and spend some of it on something you want. Here are mistakes to avoid when your bonus lands in your bank account. Trying to show up your friendsLiving up to your friends’ or coworkers’ standards is tempting, especially when you’re feeling flush. To get the most out of your money, spend on things or experiences you actually enjoy that will add value to your life. A handful of self-made millionaires and billion


If you’re on the receiving end of a holiday bonus this year, it’s OK to treat yourself and spend some of it on something you want.
Here are mistakes to avoid when your bonus lands in your bank account.
Trying to show up your friendsLiving up to your friends’ or coworkers’ standards is tempting, especially when you’re feeling flush.
To get the most out of your money, spend on things or experiences you actually enjoy that will add value to your life.
A handful of self-made millionaires and billion
Don’t make these 3 mistakes with your end-of-year bonus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, wrong, longterm, bonus, dont, endofyear, mistakes, paying, savings, spend, money, youre, investing


Don't make these 3 mistakes with your end-of-year bonus

If you’re on the receiving end of a holiday bonus this year, it’s OK to treat yourself and spend some of it on something you want. But before you go blow the whole thing, take a few minutes to consider the smartest way to spend the extra cash. Here are mistakes to avoid when your bonus lands in your bank account.

Trying to show up your friends

Living up to your friends’ or coworkers’ standards is tempting, especially when you’re feeling flush. But if you make a habit out of choosing where to eat, what to wear, and what gadgets to buy based on what your friends do, you can end up wrecking your budget and blowing through your bonus. Before you spend anything, come up with a plan. Try a twist of the “50-30-20 rule” when dealing with any windfall: Put 50% of the money straight to savings, perhaps in an emergency fund or a long-term savings or investment account. Use 30% to fund your lifestyle and the last 20% can go toward something fun. If you’re paying off debt, another option is to use 80% of the bonus to make an extra payment on your student loans or outstanding credit card balance and the remaining 20% on something for yourself, like a nice dinner out or a new pair of shoes. With this method, you get both immediate gratification of spending some on yourself and the long-term benefits of paying off more of your debt.

Spending it on the wrong things

How you spend matters — it can even be more important than how much you spend in total. To get the most out of your money, spend on things or experiences you actually enjoy that will add value to your life. On that note, consider investing in yourself, whether that means taking a class in order to develop a specific skill, buying books in subjects that interest you or hiring a career or success coach. A handful of self-made millionaires and billionaires agree that investing in yourself is the best investment you can make.

Investing it in the wrong places


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: kathleen elkins
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5 lifestyle changes to make if you want to get rich in 2020

If your’re looking to build more wealth in 2020, money won’t simply appear — you’re probably going to have to make some changes to reach your goals. Here are five lifestyle changes that have helped self-made millionaires get to where they are today. “The only reason to save money is to one day invest money.” The only reason to save money is to one day invest money. If you have even bigger wealth goals, automation can help get you there, too.


If your’re looking to build more wealth in 2020, money won’t simply appear — you’re probably going to have to make some changes to reach your goals.
Here are five lifestyle changes that have helped self-made millionaires get to where they are today.
“The only reason to save money is to one day invest money.”
The only reason to save money is to one day invest money.
If you have even bigger wealth goals, automation can help get you there, too.
5 lifestyle changes to make if you want to get rich in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
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5 lifestyle changes to make if you want to get rich in 2020

If your’re looking to build more wealth in 2020, money won’t simply appear — you’re probably going to have to make some changes to reach your goals. Here are five lifestyle changes that have helped self-made millionaires get to where they are today. If they worked for them, they could also work for you.

Generate two incomes — or more

The richest people focus on earning, and they typically aren’t content with one source of revenue. As author Thomas C. Corley found in his multi-year study of self-made millionaires, the rich “do not rely on one singular source of income,” he writes in “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.” In fact, “65% had at least three streams of income that they created prior to making their first million dollars,” Corley says, such as real-estate rentals, a side hustle or a part-time job. Once you start bringing home two paychecks, try Jay Leno’s strategy: Save the bigger of the two checks and live on the other. It not only frees up more cash that you can save and invest, but it helps prevent lifestyle inflation, which is when you increase your spending as your income increases.

Save to invest

“Investing money is how you will get super rich,” says self-made millionaire Grant Cardone. “The only reason to save money is to one day invest money.”

The only reason to save money is to one day invest money. Grant Cardone self-made millionaire

In fact, how much you save and invest is often more important than the size of your paycheck, says personal finance expert Ramit Sethi. “On average, millionaires invest 20% of their household income each year. Their wealth isn’t measured by the amount they make each year, but by how they’ve saved and invested over time,” he writes in his book, “I Will Teach You to Be Rich.” Ready to put your money to work? Read this investing guide for beginners.

Automate your finances

Once you’ve committed to investing your money, the easiest way to stick with it over time is to make the process automatic. Set up a regular transfer so that money from your paycheck is sent to your savings or investment accounts every month, before you even see it. Say one of your 2020 goals is to put $2,000 into an emergency fund. Start by figuring out how much you’d have to save per paycheck over the course of the year to reach that goal. Then set up an automatic transfer so you move that amount from your checking account to your savings each time you get paid. If you have even bigger wealth goals, automation can help get you there, too. It helped one millennial, Grant Sabatier, save over half his income and eventually become a millionaire. “Automation is essential,” he tells CNBC Make It. “When I first started saving and investing, I was a little more old school — I was trying to invest as much as possible into the online savings accounts I had set up, and it was a pretty manual process. Now, one of the biggest recommendations I make is to automate as much of your savings as possible.”

Build relationships with successful people

Your community matters. It can even affect your net worth, says self-made millionaire and author Steve Siebold: “In most cases, your net worth mirrors the level of your closest friends. … We become like the people we associate with, and that’s why winners are attracted to winners.”

We become like the people we associate with, and that’s why winners are attracted to winners. Steve Siebold

Coreley agrees: “Wealthy, successful people are very particular about who they associate with,” he writes. “Their goal is to develop relationships with other success-minded individuals.” If you don’t have highly motivated people in your network, Corley suggests joining groups for people who share your same career goals or personal interests.

Think big


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, savings, winners, income, invest, changes, goals, writes, 2020, wealth, selfmade, money, lifestyle, rich


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant is giving away a free year in NYC—here’s how to win

And, in 2020, Serhant wants to help someone else realize their dream by giving them a “free year” in the city. His success didn’t happen overnight: After two years of struggling to make a living from acting gigs, he pivoted and decided to get his real estate license. He made just $9,000 his first year as a real estate agent, but he hustled to gain a foothold in the industry . Serhant understands first-hand how difficult it can be to try to build a career in such an expensive city. Don’t miss: ‘M


And, in 2020, Serhant wants to help someone else realize their dream by giving them a “free year” in the city.
His success didn’t happen overnight: After two years of struggling to make a living from acting gigs, he pivoted and decided to get his real estate license.
He made just $9,000 his first year as a real estate agent, but he hustled to gain a foothold in the industry .
Serhant understands first-hand how difficult it can be to try to build a career in such an expensive city.
Don’t miss: ‘M
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant is giving away a free year in NYC—here’s how to win Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listing, dream, star, serhant, city, york, vlog, nyc, free, giving, dollar, million, nycheres, youtube, ryan, real, estate, win


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant is giving away a free year in NYC—here's how to win

“Everything I have, over the last 10 years that I’ve built up — I really owe it to New York City,” he says in a vlog posted to his YouTube channel. And, in 2020, Serhant wants to help someone else realize their dream by giving them a “free year” in the city.

His success didn’t happen overnight: After two years of struggling to make a living from acting gigs, he pivoted and decided to get his real estate license. He made just $9,000 his first year as a real estate agent, but he hustled to gain a foothold in the industry . Today, Serhant is one of the most successful brokers in the world.

“This city has given me everything I have — a career, the most amazing family and the ability to follow whatever dream I have every single day,” says the 35-year-old “Million Dollar Listing” star , who moved to NYC in 2006 to pursue acting with just a small amount of savings.

Serhant plans to pay for one person’s rent for 12 months, plus provide a generous stipend: “They’ll have spending cash, they will have everything they need to not have any financial stress for 12 months,” he tells YouTube star Casey Neistat, who he’s teamed up with to promote the contest.

Applications are due Wednesday, January 8, 2020, and the winner will be announced later in the month. Here are the stipulations:

You have to be 21. You have to have “massive dreams,” says Serhant, and a passion for wanting to be in NYC. Your dream could be “literally anything,” he adds. “You could want to be a scientist or an actor or a content creator.” You have to be able to explain why you deserve this opportunity.

“It’s an application-based competition where someone will be hand picked by our team,” Serhant explains on the contest site, adding: “This is your chance to go all-in on yourself and focus solely on making it happen without any personal financial constraints.”

Serhant understands first-hand how difficult it can be to try to build a career in such an expensive city. “It’s hard to come here,” he says in his vlog, “especially when you’re young, if you can’t afford it.” But he also believes that he wouldn’t have been able to achieve his goals anywhere else in the world: “Yes, I work my ass off, but the city has helped — and now I want New York City to help somebody else.”

Find out more information about how to apply here.

Don’t miss: ‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant started in real estate the day the market crashed 10 years ago — here’s what he learned

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listing, dream, star, serhant, city, york, vlog, nyc, free, giving, dollar, million, nycheres, youtube, ryan, real, estate, win


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Barack Obama shares his favorite TV shows, movies and music of 2019

On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books. Over the next few days, he also shared his favorite movies, TV shows and songs of 2019. Obama’s movie list includes “American Factory,” a documentary from his and his wife Michelle’s new production company, Higher Ground Productions. SiR “Juice” by Lizzo “Redesigning Women” by The Highwomen “Anybody” by Burna Boy “Burning” by Maggie Rogers “Baila Baila Baila” (Remix) by Ozuna feat. Don’t miss: Barack O


On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books.
Over the next few days, he also shared his favorite movies, TV shows and songs of 2019.
Obama’s movie list includes “American Factory,” a documentary from his and his wife Michelle’s new production company, Higher Ground Productions.
SiR “Juice” by Lizzo “Redesigning Women” by The Highwomen “Anybody” by Burna Boy “Burning” by Maggie Rogers “Baila Baila Baila” (Remix) by Ozuna feat.
Don’t miss: Barack O
Barack Obama shares his favorite TV shows, movies and music of 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, favorite, works, shares, 2019, list, movies, remix, obama, obamas, baila, shows, love, barack, feat, women, music


Barack Obama shares his favorite TV shows, movies and music of 2019

On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books. Over the next few days, he also shared his favorite movies, TV shows and songs of 2019.

“While each of us has plenty that keeps us busy — work and family life, social and volunteer commitments — outlets like literature and art can enhance our day-to-day experiences,” he wrote in a post on Instagram. “They’re the fabric that helps make up a life — the album that lifts us up after a long day, the dog-eared paperback we grab off the shelf to give to a friend, the movie that makes us think and feel in a new way, works that simply help us escape for a bit.”

Obama’s movie list includes “American Factory,” a documentary from his and his wife Michelle’s new production company, Higher Ground Productions. “It’s our first offering in partnership with Netflix, and I’m excited about the other projects we’ve got in the works,” he writes.

Here’s the full list of Obama’s favorite movies of 2019:

“American Factory” “Amazing Grace” “Apollo 11” “Ash Is Purest White” “Atlantics” “Birds of Passage” “Booksmart” “Diane” “The Farewell” “Ford v Ferrari” “The Irishman” “Just Mercy” “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” “Little Women” “Marriage Story” “Parasite” “The Souvenir” “Transit”

Here are Obama’s favorite TV shows of 2019:

“Fleabag: Season 2” “Unbelievable” “Watchmen”

Here are Obama’s favorite songs of 2019:

“Playing Games” by Summer Walker “Not” by Big Thief “Go DJ” by Kaytranada feat. SiR “Juice” by Lizzo “Redesigning Women” by The Highwomen “Anybody” by Burna Boy “Burning” by Maggie Rogers “Baila Baila Baila” (Remix) by Ozuna feat. Daddy Yankee, J Balvin, Farruko and Anuel AA “Different Kind of Love” by Adia Victoria “Change” by Mavis Staples “Toast” by Koffee “Oblivions” by The National “Binz” by Solange “Seventeen” by Sharon Van Etten “Middle Child” by J. Cole “Jícama” by Angelica Garcia “Go” by The Black Keys “La Vida Es Un Carnaval” (Rollo Tomasi Remix) by Angélique Kidjo “Show Me Love” by Alicia Keys feat. Miguel “Joke Ting” by Goldlink feat. Ari Pensmith “Old Town Road” (Remix) by Lil Nas X feat. Billy Ray Cyrus “cold/mess” by Prateek Kuhad “Suge” by DaBaby “Hello Sunshine” by Bruce Springsteen “In My Room” by Frank Ocean “Iron Man” by Rema “The London” by Young Thug feat. J. Cole and Travis Scott “Raleighwood Hills” by LesTheGenius feat. Sonny Miles and Jaxson Free “Pure Water” by Mustard feat. Migos “3 Nights” by Dominic Fike “The Fact of Love” by Joe Henry “Con Altura” by Rosalía “I Want You Around” by Snoh Aalegra “On Chill” by Wale feat. Jeremih “MOOD 4 EVA” by Beyoncé

Obama started the tradition of sharing his reading lists and playlists during his presidency as a “nice way to reflect on the works that resonated with me and lift up authors and artists from around the world,” he said in 2017.

Check out his list of favorites from 2018.

Don’t miss: Barack Obama shares his 19 favorite books of 2019

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, favorite, works, shares, 2019, list, movies, remix, obama, obamas, baila, shows, love, barack, feat, women, music


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Barack Obama shares his 19 favorite books of 2019

On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books. Later in the weekend, he also shared his favorite movies and TV shows of the year, including “Booksmart,” “The Irishman” and “Fleabag.” This year’s book list consisted of 19 reads that “made the last year a little brighter for me,” he wrote. “Most of them came out in 2019, but a few were older ones that were new to me this year.” Here’s the full list of Obama’s favorite books of 2019.


On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books.
Later in the weekend, he also shared his favorite movies and TV shows of the year, including “Booksmart,” “The Irishman” and “Fleabag.”
This year’s book list consisted of 19 reads that “made the last year a little brighter for me,” he wrote.
“Most of them came out in 2019, but a few were older ones that were new to me this year.”
Here’s the full list of Obama’s favorite books of 2019.
Barack Obama shares his 19 favorite books of 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, life, favorite, youtube, novel, shares, obama, list, way, works, books, 2019, barack


Barack Obama shares his 19 favorite books of 2019

On Dec. 28, former President Barack Obama revealed his annual year-end list of favorite books. Later in the weekend, he also shared his favorite movies and TV shows of the year, including “Booksmart,” “The Irishman” and “Fleabag.” He said he’ll release his favorite music of the year as well.

“While each of us has plenty that keeps us busy — work and family life, social and volunteer commitments — outlets like literature and art can enhance our day-to-day experiences,” he wrote in a post on Instagram. “They’re the fabric that helps make up a life — the album that lifts us up after a long day, the dog-eared paperback we grab off the shelf to give to a friend, the movie that makes us think and feel in a new way, works that simply help us escape for a bit.”

This year’s book list consisted of 19 reads that “made the last year a little brighter for me,” he wrote. “Most of them came out in 2019, but a few were older ones that were new to me this year.”

Notable selections include Sally Rooney’s novel “Normal People,” which is being adapted for Hulu and set to premiere next year, and Bernardine Evaristo’s 2019 Booker Prize-winning novel, “Girl, Woman, Other.”

Here’s the full list of Obama’s favorite books of 2019. The last two are “for the sports fans,” he noted.

Obama started the tradition of sharing his reading lists and playlists during his presidency as a “nice way to reflect on the works that resonated with me and lift up authors and artists from around the world,” he said in 2017.

Check out his list of favorites from 2018.

Don’t miss: Bill Gates sent an 81-pound package to his Reddit Secret Santa—here’s what was inside

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, life, favorite, youtube, novel, shares, obama, list, way, works, books, 2019, barack


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