Japan inflation ticks up as oil rises but the central bank’s target remains elusive

Japan’s annual core consumer inflation ticked up in September but remained at half the pace of the central bank’s elusive 2 percent target, underscoring the challenge of meeting the price goal as escalating trade frictions cloud the economic outlook. Private spending needs to increase more for core consumer inflation to accelerate beyond 1 percent,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute. BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda on Thursday offered a slightly more upbeat view


Japan’s annual core consumer inflation ticked up in September but remained at half the pace of the central bank’s elusive 2 percent target, underscoring the challenge of meeting the price goal as escalating trade frictions cloud the economic outlook. Private spending needs to increase more for core consumer inflation to accelerate beyond 1 percent,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute. BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda on Thursday offered a slightly more upbeat view
Japan inflation ticks up as oil rises but the central bank’s target remains elusive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, ticks, core, japan, central, elusive, trade, months, inflation, target, rises, boj, remains, price, costs, oil, slightly, prices, consumer


Japan inflation ticks up as oil rises but the central bank's target remains elusive

Japan’s annual core consumer inflation ticked up in September but remained at half the pace of the central bank’s elusive 2 percent target, underscoring the challenge of meeting the price goal as escalating trade frictions cloud the economic outlook.

While the rate of increase was the fastest in seven months, the gain was due mostly to higher oil costs with most other items rising only slightly, government data showed on Friday.

“We’re not seeing inflationary pressure build up. Private spending needs to increase more for core consumer inflation to accelerate beyond 1 percent,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute.

“Inflation will probably stagnate around current levels for some time.”

The nationwide core consumer price index (CPI), which strips away the effect of volatile fresh food costs, rose 1.0 percent in September from a year earlier, matching a median market forecast and ticking up from 0.9 percent in August.

The so-called core-core CPI, a more closely watched gauge the Bank of Japan uses that excludes the effect of both fresh food and energy costs, stood at 0.4 percent in September, in line with the previous month.

The inflation data will be among factors the central bank examines at its rate review on Oct. 30-31, when it conducts a quarterly review of its growth and price projections.

BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda on Thursday offered a slightly more upbeat view on prices than three months ago, saying that core consumer inflation was “moving around 1 percent.”

Rising energy costs may give the BOJ justification to slightly revise up its inflation forecasts, though the boost may be moderated by uncertainty over the fallout from escalating trade frictions, analysts say.

In a quarterly report scrutinizing Japan’s regional economies, the BOJ cut its assessment for two regions and warned that companies were becoming increasingly worried about the hit from the simmering Sino-U.S. trade frictions.

Under current projections made in July, the BOJ expects core consumer inflation to hit 1.1 percent in the year ending in March 2019, and accelerate to 1.5 percent the following year.

Stubbornly soft inflation has dashed the BOJ’s hopes that solid economic growth will translate into higher prices, and could delay the central bank’s exit from ultra-loose policy.

Japan’s economy rebounded in the second quarter from a contraction in the first three months of this year thanks to robust business spending.

But escalating trade frictions and a series of natural disasters that disrupted supply chains cloud the outlook for the export-reliant economy, with some analysts projecting a slight contraction in the July-September quarter.

Uncertainty over the economic outlook adds to challenges for the BOJ, which has struggled to fire up wages and prices despite years of heavy money printing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-19  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, banks, ticks, core, japan, central, elusive, trade, months, inflation, target, rises, boj, remains, price, costs, oil, slightly, prices, consumer


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Japan exports fall for first time since 2016 as trade war fears mount

Japan’s exports fell in September for the first time since 2016 as shipments to the United States and China declined, adding to concerns about the broadening impact of an escalating Sino-U.S. trade war. Japan’s exports to the United States declined 0.2 percent in the year to September, dragged down by falling shipments of construction and mining machinery, auto parts and medicines. The U.S. Trade Representative’s office told Congress on Tuesday it would open trade talks with Japan, describing th


Japan’s exports fell in September for the first time since 2016 as shipments to the United States and China declined, adding to concerns about the broadening impact of an escalating Sino-U.S. trade war. Japan’s exports to the United States declined 0.2 percent in the year to September, dragged down by falling shipments of construction and mining machinery, auto parts and medicines. The U.S. Trade Representative’s office told Congress on Tuesday it would open trade talks with Japan, describing th
Japan exports fall for first time since 2016 as trade war fears mount Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2016, japans, war, fears, trade, yen, united, mount, surplus, billion, states, exports, showed, fall, japan


Japan exports fall for first time since 2016 as trade war fears mount

Japan’s exports fell in September for the first time since 2016 as shipments to the United States and China declined, adding to concerns about the broadening impact of an escalating Sino-U.S. trade war.

The data comes days after a Reuters poll showed a third of Japanese companies have been affected by the trade conflict between the world’s two biggest economies with firms fretting about slower Chinese demand.

Japanese policymakers also worry about the overall economic impact of the international trade tensions. A powerful typhoon that hit Japan last month has added to the strain on factories, disrupting output and physical distribution.

Ministry of Finance (MOF) data out on Thursday showed Japanese exports fell 1.2 percent in September from a year earlier, against a 1.9 percent increase expected by economists in a Reuters poll, following a 6.6 percent gain in August.

It was the first decline since November 2016.

“The continued weakness in exports in September suggests that economic activity may have stagnated in Q3,” Marcel Thieliant, senior Japan economist at Capital Economics, said in a note to clients.

Japan’s exports to the United States declined 0.2 percent in the year to September, dragged down by falling shipments of construction and mining machinery, auto parts and medicines.

U.S.-bound auto exports amounted to some 143,000 cars, down 7.0 percent in a snapback from the previous year’s brisk shipments.

Imports from the United States rose 3.1 percent in September, led by crude oil, liquefied petroleum gas, helping reduce Japan’s trade surplus with the United States by 4.0 percent year-on-year to 590 billion yen ($5.24 billion).

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office told Congress on Tuesday it would open trade talks with Japan, describing the country as an important yet underperforming market for U.S. exports.

Tokyo and Washington last month agreed to start trade talks in an arrangement that, for now, avoids the worst-case scenario of an imminent 25 percent tariff on cars.

Trump has made clear he is unhappy with Japan’s $69 billion trade surplus with the United States – nearly two-thirds of it from auto exports – and wants a two-way agreement to address it.

Tokyo pushed back on a straight bilateral Free Trade Agreement (FTA) that Washington had sought, fearing it could put Japan under pressure to open politically sensitive sectors such as agriculture.

Thursday’s trade data showed exports to China, Japan’s biggest trading partner, fell 1.7 percent in the year to September, the first decline in seven months, dragged down by semiconductor production equipment.

Shipments to Asia, which account for more than half of Japan’s overall exports, rose 0.9 percent.

Overall imports rose 7.0 percent in the year to September, versus the median estimate for a 13.7 percent annual increase.

The trade balance was surplus of 139.6 billion yen, compared with the median estimate for a shortfall of 50.0 billion yen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 2016, japans, war, fears, trade, yen, united, mount, surplus, billion, states, exports, showed, fall, japan


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

IMF’s Christine Lagarde postpones trip to the Middle East

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde has postponed her trip to the Middle East, according to an IMF statement on Wednesday. “The Managing Director’s previously scheduled trip to the Middle East region is being deferred,” an IMF spokesperson said. He was last seen on Oct. 2 when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Turkish officials told media outlets that Khashoggi was killed and dismembered with a bone saw inside the consulate. He is due to fly to the Turkish c


International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde has postponed her trip to the Middle East, according to an IMF statement on Wednesday. “The Managing Director’s previously scheduled trip to the Middle East region is being deferred,” an IMF spokesperson said. He was last seen on Oct. 2 when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Turkish officials told media outlets that Khashoggi was killed and dismembered with a bone saw inside the consulate. He is due to fly to the Turkish c
IMF’s Christine Lagarde postpones trip to the Middle East Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, joanna tan, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, riyadh, trip, lagarde, christine, imf, ceo, khashoggi, turkish, imfs, east, told, event, consulate, postpones, officials, saudi


IMF's Christine Lagarde postpones trip to the Middle East

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde has postponed her trip to the Middle East, according to an IMF statement on Wednesday.

Lagarde’s visit to the region included attending the Future Investment Initiative, also known as “Davos in the Desert,” in Saudi Arabia. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 23 to 25.

“The Managing Director’s previously scheduled trip to the Middle East region is being deferred,” an IMF spokesperson said. The IMF did not give a reason for the postponement. CNBC has reached out to the IMF for clarification.

The investing event in Riyadh has seen mounting cancellations since the disappearance and suspected killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Turkish officials allege that he was murdered by a team of Saudi operatives, but Riyadh has fiercely denied the claim.

Media outlets including CNBC, Financial Times, CNN and The New York Times have also withdrawn from the event, citing concerns about Khashoggi’s disappearance.

Several prominent business leaders have also said they will not be attending the event, including J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, BlackRock CEO Larry Fink, Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman and Mastercard CEO Ajay Banga.

Last week, Lagarde told reporters at the IMF and World Bank annual meetings in Bali, Indonesia, that while she was “horrified” at the disappearance and suspected killing of Khashoggi, she was still planning to attend the conference in Riyadh.

“I have to conduct the business of IMF in all corners of the world, and with many governments,” she said at that time. “When I visit a country, I always speak my mind. You know me, I do. At this point in time, my intention is to not change my plan and to be very attentive to the information that is coming out in the next few days, but I speak my mind.”

Khashoggi, who had been living in the United States as a voluntary exile from Saudi Arabia, was a prominent critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and the Saudi royal family. He was last seen on Oct. 2 when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Turkish officials told media outlets that Khashoggi was killed and dismembered with a bone saw inside the consulate. The Saudi government has denied those allegations.

An official told the Associated Press on Tuesday that a police search of the consulate found evidence that Khashoggi was slain there.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed and Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir in Riyadh on Tuesday to discuss the matter. He is due to fly to the Turkish capital of Ankara on Wednesday to meet Turkish officials.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, joanna tan, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, riyadh, trip, lagarde, christine, imf, ceo, khashoggi, turkish, imfs, east, told, event, consulate, postpones, officials, saudi


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Softbank ‘anxiously’ monitoring Saudi Arabia situation, says executive

Softbank’s $93 billion Vision Fund has become one of the primary funding vehicles for technology companies around the world. Softbank is also raising a second $100 billion Vision Fund. “We don’t have a date” for the closing of the second Vision Fund, he said. The Vision Fund acquired a 25 percent stake in Arm from Softbank last year, among the fund’s largest deals to date for Softbank Chief Executive Masayoshi Son. The companies’ chip designs have begun working their way into data centers, where


Softbank’s $93 billion Vision Fund has become one of the primary funding vehicles for technology companies around the world. Softbank is also raising a second $100 billion Vision Fund. “We don’t have a date” for the closing of the second Vision Fund, he said. The Vision Fund acquired a 25 percent stake in Arm from Softbank last year, among the fund’s largest deals to date for Softbank Chief Executive Masayoshi Son. The companies’ chip designs have begun working their way into data centers, where
Softbank ‘anxiously’ monitoring Saudi Arabia situation, says executive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vision, billion, softbank, situation, technology, fund, second, companies, monitoring, executive, chip, anxiously, arabia, claure, saudi


Softbank 'anxiously' monitoring Saudi Arabia situation, says executive

Softbank Group Chief Operating Officer Marcelo Claure said on Tuesday it is “business at usual” at companies backed by its nearly $100 billion Vision Fund despite a tense situation with Saudi Arabia, which provided nearly half of the fund’s capital.

Claure spoke at a technology conference in San Jose, California for British chip design firm Arm Holdings, which was acquired by Softbank Group in 2016 for $32 billion. Claure said Softbank is “anxiously looking at what is happening” regarding the fate of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who disappeared after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week.

“We, like most parties in the world, are watching events unfold,” Claure said. “We are just monitoring.”

Softbank’s $93 billion Vision Fund has become one of the primary funding vehicles for technology companies around the world. Saudi Arabia provided $45 billion for the fund, and unease over Softbank’s ties to the kingdom dragged down its shares earlier this week.

Softbank is also raising a second $100 billion Vision Fund. Earlier this month, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman told Bloomberg that the country’s Public Investment Fund would contribute $45 billion to the second Vision Fund.

Claure declined to comment to reporters on whether Softbank would accept the capital if it were offered.

“There’s no certainty,” he said. “We don’t have a date” for the closing of the second Vision Fund, he said.

The Vision Fund acquired a 25 percent stake in Arm from Softbank last year, among the fund’s largest deals to date for Softbank Chief Executive Masayoshi Son. The British chip design firm licenses its technology to chipmakers such as Qualcomm Inc and phone makers such as Apple to power mobile devices and other technologies. The companies’ chip designs have begun working their way into data centers, where they compete with Intel.

Arm Chief Executive Simon Segars said the company has been able to expand rapidly under Softbank’s ownership, hiring 2,000 people in the past two years for a total of 6,000 employees.

He said Arm was still profitable but less so than when it was a public company and was working with other Softbank Vision Fund Firms, for example by striking a deal with Softbank-backed Sprint around so-called internet of things technology.

“That saves Sprint from engineering something very similar to what we already had. That lets us both go faster,” Segars said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-17  Authors: kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vision, billion, softbank, situation, technology, fund, second, companies, monitoring, executive, chip, anxiously, arabia, claure, saudi


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness,’ says IMF’s Christine Lagarde

International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde said Thursday she “would not associate” U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell “with craziness.” “I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness. Lagarde made the comment in response to a question from CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore about U.S. President Donald Trump. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president said after walking off Air Force One in Erie, Pennsylvania for a rally. Lagarde added: “All over the world, it is certainly a


International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde said Thursday she “would not associate” U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell “with craziness.” “I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness. Lagarde made the comment in response to a question from CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore about U.S. President Donald Trump. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president said after walking off Air Force One in Erie, Pennsylvania for a rally. Lagarde added: “All over the world, it is certainly a
‘I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness,’ says IMF’s Christine Lagarde Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: weizhen tan, ted kemp, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walking, christine, jay, associate, president, bank, fed, imfs, craziness, certainly, central, powell, think, world, lagarde


'I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness,' says IMF's Christine Lagarde

International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde said Thursday she “would not associate” U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell “with craziness.”

“I would not associate Jay Powell with craziness. No, no, he comes across, and members of his board, as extremely serious, solid and certainly keen to base their decisions on actual information, and decide to communicate that properly,” she said, speaking to CNBC at the IMF and World Bank annual meetings in Bali, Indonesia.

Lagarde made the comment in response to a question from CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore about U.S. President Donald Trump. The American leader knocked the Fed on Wednesday for continuing to raise interest rates despite some recent market turbulence.

“I think the Fed is making a mistake. They are so tight. I think the Fed has gone crazy,” the president said after walking off Air Force One in Erie, Pennsylvania for a rally.

Lagarde added: “All over the world, it is certainly a good principle to have independence of the central banks and of the central bank governors. Certainly we have advocated that in all countries, and I think that the Fed is no exception.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: weizhen tan, ted kemp, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walking, christine, jay, associate, president, bank, fed, imfs, craziness, certainly, central, powell, think, world, lagarde


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Italy’s debt needs to come down, EU’s Moscovici says

However, Brussels also needs to ensure the euro zone economy remains stable, the European Commissioner for economic affairs told CNBC on Thursday. There are strong concerns that the intentions from the new government in Rome to raise spending, and subsequently the debt pile, could brought up another debt crisis in the euro zone. Italy and the European Commission have been embroiled in an ongoing battle of words over Rome’s 2019 budget. The 2019 budget is set to point to an increase in structural


However, Brussels also needs to ensure the euro zone economy remains stable, the European Commissioner for economic affairs told CNBC on Thursday. There are strong concerns that the intentions from the new government in Rome to raise spending, and subsequently the debt pile, could brought up another debt crisis in the euro zone. Italy and the European Commission have been embroiled in an ongoing battle of words over Rome’s 2019 budget. The 2019 budget is set to point to an increase in structural
Italy’s debt needs to come down, EU’s Moscovici says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: silvia amaro, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, italys, euro, italian, told, budget, needs, debt, moscovici, zone, european, come, 2019, eus


Italy's debt needs to come down, EU's Moscovici says

The European Union wants to avoid a “crisis” with Italy over the country’s spending plans. However, Brussels also needs to ensure the euro zone economy remains stable, the European Commissioner for economic affairs told CNBC on Thursday.

“We want to avoid a crisis with Rome… but at the same time we need, absolutely, to make sure that the Italian debt decreases and the stability of the euro zone is ensured,” Pierre Moscovici, European Commissioner, told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford in Bali.

Italy’s public debt represents 130 percent of gross domestic product and totals 2.3 trillion euros ($2.6 trillion). There are strong concerns that the intentions from the new government in Rome to raise spending, and subsequently the debt pile, could brought up another debt crisis in the euro zone.

“This is why I would say this is a delicate matter,” Moscovici added.

Italy and the European Commission have been embroiled in an ongoing battle of words over Rome’s 2019 budget. The anti-establishment Italian government has said that it will change previous reforms and raise public spending, bringing the country’s deficit to 2.4 percent of GDP in 2019 —a number that Brussels has already criticized for being three times higher than what Italy had agreed to earlier this year.

“We will have to receive next week the Italian budget. I cannot jump into conclusions,” Moscovici said.

“What I can see from what I know already is that there is a risk of what we call a ‘significant deviation’ according to our rules, which are common to all euro zone members.”

The 2019 budget is set to point to an increase in structural deficit, which excludes growth, by 0.8 percentage points. Rome had told Brussels that the structural deficit in 2019 would be lowered by 0.6 percentage points.

“I urge the Italian authorities to be closer to the medium-term objectives,” Moscovici said.

Last week, Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini called Moscovici and the President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, the “enemies of Europe”.

“I am not going to respond to that kind of provocation,” Moscovici said.

Italy is due to submit its 2019 budget plan to the EU by next Monday. The European Commissioner has until the end of November to present its opinion on the financial plan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-11  Authors: silvia amaro, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spending, italys, euro, italian, told, budget, needs, debt, moscovici, zone, european, come, 2019, eus


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

From space stations to factories: Five interesting ways that solar power is being harnessed

Solar power is becoming an increasingly important part of the planet’s energy mix. In 2016, for example, new solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity increased by 50 percent globally, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The IEA also noted that, for the first time, solar PV additions grew faster than any other fuel. Here, Sustainable Energy looks at five interesting ways solar power is being used around the world.


Solar power is becoming an increasingly important part of the planet’s energy mix. In 2016, for example, new solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity increased by 50 percent globally, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The IEA also noted that, for the first time, solar PV additions grew faster than any other fuel. Here, Sustainable Energy looks at five interesting ways solar power is being used around the world.
From space stations to factories: Five interesting ways that solar power is being harnessed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: anmar frangoul, getty images, image courtesy of innogy renewables, kazuhiro nogi, afp, carlsberg group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, planets, used, power, factories, space, world, interesting, sustainable, pv, energy, iea, harnessed, solar, stations


From space stations to factories: Five interesting ways that solar power is being harnessed

Solar power is becoming an increasingly important part of the planet’s energy mix.

In 2016, for example, new solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity increased by 50 percent globally, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The IEA also noted that, for the first time, solar PV additions grew faster than any other fuel.

Here, Sustainable Energy looks at five interesting ways solar power is being used around the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-13  Authors: anmar frangoul, getty images, image courtesy of innogy renewables, kazuhiro nogi, afp, carlsberg group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, planets, used, power, factories, space, world, interesting, sustainable, pv, energy, iea, harnessed, solar, stations


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Sony lays out plans for 100 percent renewable electricity use

Sony is aiming to use 100 percent renewable electricity for all its business sites by 2040, the company announced on Monday. The global tech giant has also joined the RE100, a global initiative made up of some of the world’s biggest companies, all committed to using 100 percent renewable electricity. In the fiscal year for 2017, renewable energy represented 5 percent of its international electricity use. The Climate Group’s CEO, Helen Clarkson, described Sony as the “largest entertainment and te


Sony is aiming to use 100 percent renewable electricity for all its business sites by 2040, the company announced on Monday. The global tech giant has also joined the RE100, a global initiative made up of some of the world’s biggest companies, all committed to using 100 percent renewable electricity. In the fiscal year for 2017, renewable energy represented 5 percent of its international electricity use. The Climate Group’s CEO, Helen Clarkson, described Sony as the “largest entertainment and te
Sony lays out plans for 100 percent renewable electricity use Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: anmar frangoul, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images, carla gottgens, bloomberg, michael owens, scott mlyn, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, sony, climate, electricity, 100, global, business, lays, plans, re100, renewable, international


Sony lays out plans for 100 percent renewable electricity use

Sony is aiming to use 100 percent renewable electricity for all its business sites by 2040, the company announced on Monday.

The global tech giant has also joined the RE100, a global initiative made up of some of the world’s biggest companies, all committed to using 100 percent renewable electricity.

In the fiscal year for 2017, renewable energy represented 5 percent of its international electricity use. In order to help achieve its goal, Sony said Monday that it would, among other things, expand its use of renewable energy in both North America and China and promote the installation of solar panels at manufacturing facilities in Japan and Thailand.

Kenichiro Yoshida, the Sony Corporation’s president and CEO, said in a statement that the business was “pleased to join RE100 and contribute to the realization of a society that operates on fully renewable energy.”

Other members of the RE100 include Facebook, Google, Goldman Sachs and Microsoft. The RE100 is operated by The Climate Group, an international non-governmental organization, in partnership with the CDP, formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project.

The Climate Group’s CEO, Helen Clarkson, described Sony as the “largest entertainment and technology business in the world stepping up and switching its entire operations to 100 percent renewable electricity.” Clarkson added that Sony’s commitment showed the global marketplace that “renewable energy is the future.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: anmar frangoul, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images, carla gottgens, bloomberg, michael owens, scott mlyn, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, sony, climate, electricity, 100, global, business, lays, plans, re100, renewable, international


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Kudlow on why the stock market is ignoring Cohen, Manafort news: ‘The economy’s everything’

Chief White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Wednesday that a thriving economy is allowing markets to continue to perform well amid the barrage of seemingly damaging political headlines. The bull market on Wall Street set history this week when it eclipsed the S&P 500’s all-time high. That came even amid more headaches for the White House. Kudlow, in an exclusive interview Wednesday with CNBC.com, said a thriving economy is overcoming those issues. “The economy’s everything when it comes


Chief White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Wednesday that a thriving economy is allowing markets to continue to perform well amid the barrage of seemingly damaging political headlines. The bull market on Wall Street set history this week when it eclipsed the S&P 500’s all-time high. That came even amid more headaches for the White House. Kudlow, in an exclusive interview Wednesday with CNBC.com, said a thriving economy is overcoming those issues. “The economy’s everything when it comes
Kudlow on why the stock market is ignoring Cohen, Manafort news: ‘The economy’s everything’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-22  Authors: jeff cox, al drago, bloomberg, getty images, brendan mcdermid, tasnim news agency, daniel acker, kazuhiro nogi, afp, jabin botsford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thriving, cohen, think, markets, white, political, market, kudlow, quarter, president, house, ignoring, stock, manafort, economys, fraud


Kudlow on why the stock market is ignoring Cohen, Manafort news: 'The economy's everything'

Chief White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow said Wednesday that a thriving economy is allowing markets to continue to perform well amid the barrage of seemingly damaging political headlines.

The bull market on Wall Street set history this week when it eclipsed the S&P 500’s all-time high.

That came even amid more headaches for the White House. Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s one-time campaign manager, was found guilty Tuesday on multiple fraud counts, while longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen admitted to tax fraud and making an illegal campaign contribution.

Through it all, and through continuing worries about a global trade war and an assortment of other controversies surrounding the president, the markets have persevered and even climbed into the green on Wednesday.

Kudlow, in an exclusive interview Wednesday with CNBC.com, said a thriving economy is overcoming those issues.

“The economy’s everything when it comes to markets and confidence, and I think that markets frankly look through all these various political issues,” he said. “There’s no change in policy coming, that’s what really matters. Keep your eye on the ball, and I think the markets have done a good job.”

GDP grew at a 4.1 percent pace in the second quarter, and the Atlanta Fed is forecasting 4.3 percent growth in the third quarter. Unemployment is at 3.9 percent, around the lowest since 1969, and business and consumer confidence remains high.

However, the political hits have continued.

Kudlow himself was in the crosshairs following a Washington Post report that a man with ties to a white supremacy group was a dinner guest at his home recently.

Asked if the continuing barrage of political mayhem was bothering him, Kudlow said he’s doing fine.

“I feel great, I sleep well, I show up for work every day, and it’s my honor to help out there,” he said.

However, he acknowledged that the environment can be challenging.

“Washington is a funny place these days,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-22  Authors: jeff cox, al drago, bloomberg, getty images, brendan mcdermid, tasnim news agency, daniel acker, kazuhiro nogi, afp, jabin botsford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thriving, cohen, think, markets, white, political, market, kudlow, quarter, president, house, ignoring, stock, manafort, economys, fraud


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

JP Morgan says global stock markets are doing something they’ve never done before

J.P. Morgan is telling its clients that the strange uncorrelated relative performances between U.S. and international stocks will not last. As a result, the firm predicts international stocks will outperform the domestic market the rest of the year. “The recent divergence in the performance of US Equities vs. the rest of the world is unprecedented in history. The U.S. stock market has soundly outperformed emerging market stocks this year. The S&P 500 is up 7 percent year to date through Tuesday


J.P. Morgan is telling its clients that the strange uncorrelated relative performances between U.S. and international stocks will not last. As a result, the firm predicts international stocks will outperform the domestic market the rest of the year. “The recent divergence in the performance of US Equities vs. the rest of the world is unprecedented in history. The U.S. stock market has soundly outperformed emerging market stocks this year. The S&P 500 is up 7 percent year to date through Tuesday
JP Morgan says global stock markets are doing something they’ve never done before Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-22  Authors: tae kim, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, markets, months, market, emerging, yearthe, stock, doing, theyve, rest, morgan, global, international, jp, clients, stocks


JP Morgan says global stock markets are doing something they've never done before

J.P. Morgan is telling its clients that the strange uncorrelated relative performances between U.S. and international stocks will not last.

As a result, the firm predicts international stocks will outperform the domestic market the rest of the year.

“The recent divergence in the performance of US Equities vs. the rest of the world is unprecedented in history. For instance, if one looks at price momentum – it is positive for US stocks and negative for Europe and Emerging markets across all relevant lookback windows [one month, three months, six months and 12 months]. This has never happened before,” quantitative and derivative strategist Marko Kolanovic said in a note clients Tuesday.

The U.S. stock market has soundly outperformed emerging market stocks this year. The S&P 500 is up 7 percent year to date through Tuesday versus the iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ETF’s (EEM) 9 percent decline in the same time period.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-22  Authors: tae kim, kazuhiro nogi, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, markets, months, market, emerging, yearthe, stock, doing, theyve, rest, morgan, global, international, jp, clients, stocks


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post