Gymboree brand will stage a comeback in 2020 thanks to Children’s Place

The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place. The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Can


The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place. The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Can
Gymboree brand will stage a comeback in 2020 thanks to Children’s Place Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, place, childrens, comeback, stores, 2020, kids, gymboree, stage, parents, brand, market, gymboreecom, thanks


Gymboree brand will stage a comeback in 2020 thanks to Children's Place

The Gymboree clothing brand for boys and girls will be back online and in some stores next year, thanks to The Children’s Place.

The Children’s Place had paid $76 million for the rights associated with both Gymboree and its Crazy 8 brand earlier this year, after Gymboree filed for bankruptcy protection back in January. At the time, Gymboree had 800 locations, all of which shuttered. It marked the second time Gymboree had gone bankrupt in under two years.

On Tuesday morning, The Children’s Place announced in a press release it will relaunch Gymboree.com in 2020 and add Gymboree shops inside 200 of its stores across the U.S. and Canada.

“The goal is to provide a Gymboree brand experience that reconnects mom to the branded product that she love,” Claudia Lima-Guinehut, senior vice president of global merchandising for The Children’s Place, said in a statement.

The Children’s Place said it will launch a new loyalty program for Gymboree customers as well, and that shoppers will be able to order from both Gymboree.com and TheChildrensPlace.com using a shared shopping cart.

Gymboree’s liquidation had presented parents with a more fragmented landscape to shop for kids clothing.

Target had been gaining market share with its private labels, while Gap was also winning more parents, having acquired the rights to Janie & Jack, which sells kids clothing a bit more on the pricier side.

Shares of The Children’s Place have fallen more than 16% this year. The company has a market cap of about $1.2 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rights, place, childrens, comeback, stores, 2020, kids, gymboree, stage, parents, brand, market, gymboreecom, thanks


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it

For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense. “Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder


For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense. “Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder
Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitcher, daniel, game, playoff, birth, praise, told, missed, family, hudson, miss, kids, getting, daughterand, everybodys, missing, nationals


Nationals pitcher Daniel Hudson missed a playoff game for the birth of his daughter—and is getting praise for it

On Oct. 11, the Washington Nationals announced that pitcher Daniel Hudson would be placed on postseason paternity leave, which allowed him to be away from the team for one to three days to support his wife as she gave birth to their third child.

For Hudson, being present for the birth of his daughter, Millie Lou, was an obvious choice, but taking one day off meant missing Game One of the National League Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals — and facing a few critics.

For instance, in response to the news, David Samson, former president of the Marlins, tweeted, “Unreal that Daniel Hudson is on paternity list and missing game 1 of #NLCS. Only excuse would be a problem with the birth or health of baby or mother. If all is well, he needs to get to St. Louis. Inexcusable. Will it matter?”

It didn’t matter. The Nationals ended up winning the game, and fans, franchise leaders and teammates came to Hudson’s defense.

“Boss moves by Daniel Hudson missing Game 1 of the #NLCS for #paternityleave to be there for the birth of his daughter,” wrote Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian on Instagram. “I’m buying his jersey right now.”

“It’s all about family, man,” Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo told USA Today after the Nationals’ win. “We said, ‘You have to take care of your family,’ that’s a No. 1 priority and you do what you have to do. No second thoughts about that, by any means.”

“If your reaction to someone having a baby is anything other than, ‘Congratulations, I hope everybody’s healthy,’ you’re an a——,” Sean Doolittle, a fellow Nationals pitcher, told reporters. “As important as our careers are to us as players, nothing is more important to us than our families. Our careers will end someday, but family is forever.”

He continued, “We sacrifice so much and we miss so much during our careers. We miss graduations and weddings. Lots of players might miss their kids’ first steps or first words. They’re gone six to eight months out of the year and can’t take their kids to school or help their wives with taking care of the kids. So when he said, ‘Hey, I need a day to be with my family because my wife is about to give birth,’ it was a no-brainer for me, and we focused all our energy on picking him up.”

Hudson said he is grateful for the support he and his family have received. “We were made aware of a lot of negative comments, but everybody’s got their opinions and everybody’s got their own priorities,” he told NBC Sports. “And this organization was 100% on board with what my priorities are, and I’m really appreciative of that.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pitcher, daniel, game, playoff, birth, praise, told, missed, family, hudson, miss, kids, getting, daughterand, everybodys, missing, nationals


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi


Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi
You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, bentley, understand, heres, little, kids, theyre, money, spend, say, start, pick, experts, financial, teaching, child


You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here's how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. That’s a mistake, says Nikhol Bentley, a math teacher at Gilbert Stuart Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island. “People tend to sell kids short,” says Bentley. “They are extremely smart, and letting them be part of the financial conversations at home is a good way to make sure that they’re able to make smarter financial choices when they’re older.” Teaching your child concepts like spending, saving, and earning can help them establish good financial habits that can last them the rest of their lives. And there are age-appropriate ways to get started early on. The National Education Association (NEA) provides lesson plans for teaching financial literacy to children as young as 4, and there are ways to lay the groundwork with even younger kids.

Counting

Around age 2, your child may be able to sound out different numbers, recognize numerals, or count out a sequence of numbers that they’ve heard over and over again. By age 4, most children are counting up to 10 or even beyond, according to LeapFrog, which helps parents use technology as a learning tool. Counting is the first step in building and strengthening math skills in the classroom. It’s basic but absolutely necessary. Parents can help reinforce this skill by encouraging their child count everyday items like crayons or the number of apples or bananas you pick up at the grocery store.

Spending and earning

Children can loosely understand the concept of income early on, says Bentley: As soon as they start school, or even before, they can grasp how currency works. Though they’re not actually exchanging goods for money, they can show they understand value by trading Pokemon cards with each other, for example. “They learn to share, trade cards or toys for things that they want, or some teachers will have some sort of ticket system that reinforces this concept of saving up your tickets for rewards or what it means to not have enough,” says Bentley. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Any type of reward system helps emphasize this idea of currency, and kids will pick up on the fact that there are certain things they need to do or behaviors they need to manage in order to earn that extra ‘income,'” explains Bentley. The goal isn’t to teach them not to spend but to show them how to spend wisely so they end up feeling satisfied. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. “Maybe it’s letting them pick out a reasonably priced souvenir on a family vacation. They are capable of understanding and retaining these things.”

Saving

Two in three parents give their child an allowance, shelling out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save what they get. Encouragement from parents, though, can make a difference.

Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money. Marguerita Cheng chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth

Bentley suggests one helpful exercise to help even younger children get used to saving: Let your child pick out a toy at the store. Explain how much it costs, and emphasize that they’ll need to save up their own money if they want to take it home. However old your child is when you start offering an allowance, make sure to give them a consistent amount on a consistent basis, “because it’s like getting a paycheck,” Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education told Grow earlier this year.

Avoiding conversations about money can cost you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, bentley, understand, heres, little, kids, theyre, money, spend, say, start, pick, experts, financial, teaching, child


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s how to avoid accidentally disinheriting your kids after you remarry

“It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.” You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. Account beneficiariesOne easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your pa


“It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.” You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. Account beneficiariesOne easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your pa
Here’s how to avoid accidentally disinheriting your kids after you remarry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disinheriting, trust, remarry, beneficiary, spouse, money, assets, avoid, heres, accidentally, children, kids, dont, estate, vasileff


Here's how to avoid accidentally disinheriting your kids after you remarry

If you head down the aisle later in life, there’s another step you might want to take if you have adult children: Making sure you don’t accidentally disinherit them. While many people lack even a basic will, the stakes can be higher for those who remarry and do no estate planning but have assets they want to pass on to their kids. “A conversation about estate planning is absolutely critical in remarriages,” said certified financial planner Lili Vasileff, founder and president of Divorce and Money Matters in Greenwich, Connecticut. “It’s emotional and hard to talk about, but the last thing you want to do is leave adult kids with a disaster.”

Maria Teijeiro | OJO Images | Getty Images

Roughly 17% of people remarry after their first marriage ends due to divorce or the death of a spouse, according to the latest data from the Census Bureau. And although the rate of remarriage has dropped over time for most age groups, it’s higher among the 55-and-older crowd: 57% in 2013, versus 42% in 1960. The older you are when you remarry, the more likely that you’re bringing assets into the marriage — retirement savings, life insurance policies, brokerage accounts, real estate and the like. You also could have family heirlooms or other belongings that you want to make sure end up with your children. This is when estate planning helps avoid family conflict, experts say. “When I talk with older couples who are remarrying, I ask them, ‘if you’re both on a boat and it goes down, can you trust the two sides of the families to get together and do what you wanted?'” Vasileff said.

If you die without a will — called dying intestate — the courts in your state will decide who gets what. That process is public and often messy if would-be heirs have competing priorities and conflicting notions of what is rightfully theirs. “You don’t want to leave it to the state,” said Melissa Brennan, a CFP and senior financial planner with CFO4Life in Richardson, Texas. “It can be a long drawn-out procedure that no one wants to go through.” While every situation is different and some can be more complex than others, here are some key things to consider when contemplating how to make sure your heirs end up with the assets you want them to.

Account beneficiaries

One easily overlooked item after people remarry is updating beneficiaries on retirement accounts, life insurance policies and the like. Whoever is listed as a beneficiary will get that money when you die. That designation supersedes any intention stated in your will. “No amount of estate planning can fix having the wrong beneficiary listed,” said CFP DeDe Jones, managing director at Innovative Financial in Lakewood, Colorado. In other words, if you named your ex-spouse as the beneficiary on your life insurance policy, guess who gets the money.

If you’re both on a boat and it goes down, can you trust the two sides of the families to get together and do what you wanted? Lili Vasileff Founder and president of Divorce and Money Matters

Additionally, 401(k) plans require that your current spouse is the beneficiary unless they legally agree otherwise. This means that if your husband is your listed beneficiary and you predecease him, those 401(k) assets become his to do with as he wants, which might not include passing on any money to your kids. Same goes for other accounts for which the spouse is the beneficiary and, typically, those on which they are a joint owner. For example, say someone has $500,000 in a non-retirement account and adds his new wife to his account with rights to full ownership upon his death. “If his intention was to leave part of that to his kids, he didn’t do that,” Brennan said.

Your house

Often, remarriage involves a jointly owned home. Depending on the laws of your state and how the property is titled, your desire for your children to inherit your share of it could be upended. In most states, if it is deeded as “joint tenancy with right of survivorship” or “tenancy by the entirety,” the property automatically belongs to the surviving spouse, no matter what your will says. If you own the house in “tenancy in common,” you can leave your share to someone other than your spouse if you choose. However, some states have different rules. Moreover, there can be other considerations when it comes to how a house is titled, including protection from potential creditors or for tax reasons later when the home is sold. That makes it important to consult with professionals before making a decision.

Your belongings

If you want your children to receive particular items when you pass away, it’s important to be as specific as possible in your will so there is no room for interpretation. “The more particular you are, the better,” Vasileff said.

Consider a trust

If you want your kids to receive money but don’t want to give a young adult — or one prone to poor money management — unfettered access to a sudden windfall, you can consider creating a trust to be the beneficiary of a particular asset. A trust holds assets on behalf of your beneficiary or beneficiaries, and is a legal entity dictated by the documents creating it. If you go that route, the assets go into the trust instead of directly to your heirs. They can only receive money according to how (or when) you’ve stipulated in the trust documents. “The trust distributes money based on any criteria you decide,” said Innovative Financial’s Jones. More from Personal Finance:

The top 10 best places to retire

Trump’s Medicare reform would expand this tax-free account

Earning income after 65? How to make it work for you

Communicate

Experts often recommend discussing your goals with not only your spouse, but your children, as well. While you don’t necessarily need to go into dollar amounts, managing expectations can help avoid discord between your partner and your children. “If your kids or spouse don’t know what to expect when you die, there can be a lot of conflict,” Brennan said. “I’m a big believer in getting all the information out there.”

Other considerations


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disinheriting, trust, remarry, beneficiary, spouse, money, assets, avoid, heres, accidentally, children, kids, dont, estate, vasileff


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th


If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th
3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, allowance, golden, save, child, financial, ways, parents, help, money, kids


3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. Consider getting them a savings jar or even opening them a bank account. Two in three parents give their child an allowance. They dole out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and in many cases the money is linked to the completion of household chores. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” Nearly all, or 92%, of parents say it’s important for their child to learn how to manage money, and helping your kids become savers early on is a great way to make that happen. By saving a third of a $30 weekly allowance, your child would be able to sock away over $500 every year. “It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money,” says Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education. “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. They’re the front line of defense.”

Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster Money

Here are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make the most of it over time.

1. Set kids up to be savers

Encouraging your kid to save even part of their allowance can help them establish healthy financial habits. Start by conditioning your kids to automatically save a certain amount each month because “then they don’t miss it,” says Golden. With younger children, Golden suggests using a savings jar so they can see the money building up. Then, once your child starts asking about how banks work, consider opening a savings account. Pay attention to their cues and take advantage of their interest, he says. “Once you’ve started with the habit of saving when you’re young, you start seeing what saving [money] actually does for you,” Clark D. Randall, a certified financial planner and the founder of Financial Enlightenment in Dallas, Texas, told Grow earlier this year. Parents are usually the No. 1 money influence on their kids. In a recent survey of “supersavers,” or people who put an impressive share of their income away for retirement, 80% gave credit to their parents for positively influencing their savings habits.

It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money. Paul Golden Managing director, National Endowment for Financial Education

2. Teach them to budget

Instead of saving, kids, like many adults, put money toward the things they want in the moment. In the AICPA’s survey, parents reported that kids spend most of their allowance money on outings with friends (47%) followed by digital devices and downloads (37%) and toys (33%). Learning to budget, though, will allow your child to think about all what they want to prioritize in the coming week, month, or year. If there’s something expensive your child really wants, you can drive home the connection between spending and earning by explaining how budgeting can help them meet their goals. Let’s say they want a $200 tablet but they end up blowing their allowance each week going out with friends. By setting aside, say, $20 of their $30 allowance, they can count on getting what they want in only 10 weeks. If they want it sooner, they can sock away the full $30 each week. And if they continue to splurge instead of save, don’t get mad. “It’s OK to make mistakes,” says Golden. “That starts to condition us as adults. There’s not some fairy that will come down and get you through till the next paycheck” when you’re an adult, either. So the best time for kids to trip up is when parents are there to guide and counsel them, and help them figure out what to do better going forward.

3. Help them differentiate between wants and needs

By helping them learn to budget for short- and long-term goals at a young age, you’re setting your kids up to tell the difference between wants and needs, explains Golden. Older kids may have to cover bills for the first time. “Once you have teens, they have to start prioritizing things they’ve never done [before], like putting gas in the car or paying for auto insurance,” he says. Condition kids to put money aside by encouraging them to save and budget starting at a young age, and they’ll be prepared to put their needs first. That, in turn, can help them avoid certain pitfalls of overspending, like winding up without money for gas.

Bonus advice: How much to give and how to set an example


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, allowance, golden, save, child, financial, ways, parents, help, money, kids


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Target is going to power Toys R Us’ new website

You’ll be able to shop at Toys R Us online again — thanks to a little help from Target. Target announced on Tuesday that it’s partnering with the parent company of the Toys R Us brand, TRU Kids, to help it relaunch ToysRUs.com. The deal will allow Toys R Us to once again have an online presence, post bankruptcy, as it simultaneously begins to open Toys R Us stores in the U.S. again. Ahead of this holiday season, it will open Toys R Us Adventure, “an immersive wonderland that celebrates the whims


You’ll be able to shop at Toys R Us online again — thanks to a little help from Target. Target announced on Tuesday that it’s partnering with the parent company of the Toys R Us brand, TRU Kids, to help it relaunch ToysRUs.com. The deal will allow Toys R Us to once again have an online presence, post bankruptcy, as it simultaneously begins to open Toys R Us stores in the U.S. again. Ahead of this holiday season, it will open Toys R Us Adventure, “an immersive wonderland that celebrates the whims
Target is going to power Toys R Us’ new website Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, target, holiday, website, toy, power, going, season, toys, tru, stores, open, kids


Target is going to power Toys R Us' new website

You’ll be able to shop at Toys R Us online again — thanks to a little help from Target.

Target announced on Tuesday that it’s partnering with the parent company of the Toys R Us brand, TRU Kids, to help it relaunch ToysRUs.com.

The deal will allow Toys R Us to once again have an online presence, post bankruptcy, as it simultaneously begins to open Toys R Us stores in the U.S. again. And it could also be a huge boost to Target’s already-strong toy business ahead of this holiday season.

Starting Tuesday, shoppers who visit ToysRUs.com to buy the latest L.O.L. Surprise! dolls or Hot Wheels cars will be redirected to Target.com, to complete the purchase, once they select “buy.”

The companies declined to comment on how much of each sale goes to Target versus TRU Kids.

Tru Kids CEO Richard Barry, who previously worked as chief merchandising officer at Toys R Us, said Target was ultimately tapped to power the website because of its already impressive toy business, its strong supply chain and clear “understanding of the [toy] category.”

“We spoke to a lot of different folks as we went through this process,” Barry said. “What inspired me about Target was their investment in the category.”

He said the new site won’t be just for making purchases. Instead, TRU Kids hopes ToysRUs.com will become a resource for parents looking for the latest toys to buy, and an educational tool for kids. It will have videos, top toy lists and product reviews, for example.

“We have completely reimagined [the website] … to a site which is immersive and heavily content oriented,” Barry said. “One of the things we have been working on with the initial launch is to make the site very relevant for consumers this holiday season … with a big focus on the products we think will be magic this year.”

For Target, the deal builds on its investments in the toy aisles for more than a year.

Ahead of last holiday season, Target added a quarter-million square feet of space permanently dedicated to toys across more than 500 stores. About 100 stores received a fuller remodeling in the toy aisles. When it reported 2018 holiday results, Target said same-store sales were up 5.7%, with the toy category being one of its strongest.

At the end of August, it announced a deal with Disney to open Disney stores within its own stores, exclusively selling toys, apparel and accessories. Twenty-five of those shop-in-shops opened Friday and dozens are planned for the next year.

“Toys has always been an important category for Target,” said Nikhil Nayar, senior vice president of merchandising for Target. “Last year, with TRU not being in the marketplace … we accelerated that business.”

The Toys R Us deal will help “broaden our reach,” Nayar said, adding that Target is “confident” it has the right inventory in place this holiday season to handle any surge in orders. One bonus, he said, will be ToysRUs.com customers who get redirected to Target to complete a purchase will then add Target items to their shopping carts.

From a supply-chain standpoint, Target is seen by retail analysts as one of the best in the business, thanks to recent investments. It acquired delivery provider Shipt for $550 million two years ago, allowing it to offer customers same-day delivery for thousands of items. Target also offers online purchasers free curbside pickup at 1,500 stores and free in-store pickup at all 1,850 U.S. Target shops.

The partnership with Target marks one of a handful that have been announced by TRU Kids.

Through a joint venture with software retailer b8ta, it will open two permanent stores next month — at Simon Property Group’s The Galleria mall in Houston and at Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield’s Garden State Plaza mall in Paramus, New Jersey — marking Toys R Us’ return.

Toys R Us liquidated last year, forcing 800 U.S. stores to go dark. Under its new ownership, 10 Toys R Us stores are expected to open in the U.S. in 2020. Target said it will also power the online sales in those stores, should sales associates have to order any items that aren’t stocked.

TRU Kids also announced last month a partnership with Candytopia, the company known for its interactive candy exhibits, as part of its efforts to revive and evolve the toy store. Ahead of this holiday season, it will open Toys R Us Adventure, “an immersive wonderland that celebrates the whimsical, silly and fun of toys,” in Atlanta and in Chicago.

Following the Toys R Us bankruptcy, the company’s lenders acquired the rights to the Toys R Us brand name and the iconic Geoffrey the Giraffe mascot. Tru Kids, which is managing those brands now on behalf of the toy retailer’s lenders, has been trying to stage a comeback that reimagines how retailers might best take advantage of the Toys R Us legacy.

— CNBC’s Lauren Hirsch contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, target, holiday, website, toy, power, going, season, toys, tru, stores, open, kids


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here’s how to turn that into a money lesson

But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your


But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your
Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here’s how to turn that into a money lesson Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, makes, almonte, savings, kids, parents, lesson, heres, bank, allowance, teach, 1500, money, turn, kid, financial, save


Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here's how to turn that into a money lesson

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Children are pocketing an average of $30 a week in allowance — enough to rack up around $1,500 in a year. But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. Only 3% of parents say their kids primarily save their cash, according to a new telephone survey from the American Institute of CPAs. The organization polled 1,002 adults from Aug. 22 to Aug. 28. Of these, 273 identified as a parent or guardian of at least one child aged 25 or younger who is living at home. “Once you put money in someone’s hands, it feels like it’s just burning a hole there and they have to do something about it,” said David Almonte, CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission.

Close to half of the parents said their children’s allowances go toward outings with friends, while 37% said their kids spend the money on digital devices or downloads. A third of parents said their kids use the cash to buy toys. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Whats the benefit of waiting?” Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Here are some tips on how to do that.

Make them earn it

SDI Productions | E+ | Getty Images

Nothing is free — not even that weekly allowance. “If you just give someone money, you help them resolve a short-term need,” Almonte said. “If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life.” One way to do this is through chores. This teaches children the real world lesson that, “if you don’t show up and put in the effort, you don’t get a paycheck,” Almonte said. Another option is to reward them for saving by matching dollars for dollars — this allows them to turn $20 of savings, for example, into $40.

Show them where the money goes

Open a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. Bring your kids to the bank and explain to them what happens to their money when they keep it in a savings account instead of spending it. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your allowance,’ then take it back to put it into savings,” Almonte said. “As a kid, you’re like ‘where did my money go?”

If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life. David Almonte CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission

Because a lot of banking is now done digitally, this can also be done online. Cristina Guglielmetti, a certified financial planner and founder of Future Perfect Planning in New York, does this with her 9-year-old son. “I log into the bank and show him ‘this is where our interest is, this is how much we had last month and this is how much we have this month,'” Guglielmetti said. Seeing and understanding bank statements can help children track the increase in their savings and the decrease in their spending. Another way to show them where their money goes is to tell them that for every dollar they save, you’ll donate 10% to an organization of their choice. You and your child can hand-deliver the donation, Almonte said.

Talk about money early and often

kate_sept2004 | E+ | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, makes, almonte, savings, kids, parents, lesson, heres, bank, allowance, teach, 1500, money, turn, kid, financial, save


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

How and when to talk about the cost of college with your kids

Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, a


Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, a
How and when to talk about the cost of college with your kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: myelle lansat, ivana pino, aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planner, families, parents, kids, tuition, suggest, price, fouryear, financial, college, talk, cost


How and when to talk about the cost of college with your kids

College is a major expense. Nearly three-quarters of parents now talk to their kids about how much money it costs, according to a 2018 survey from T. Rowe Price. Researchers surveyed 1,014 parents with children ages 8-14, and 1,000 young adults ages 18-24.

For most families, though, these conversations don’t happen all that often, even though there’s a lot of ground to cover.

Try talking about the cost of college regularly and starting earlier, experts suggest. Having ongoing conversations helps students better understand the financial aid process and prepares them to make thoughtful choices. They can “think about what they’re attending college for and [if] that will get [them] a job, as opposed to just attending college because everyone else is,” says Victoria Fillet, a certified financial planner at Roosevelt Wealth Management in New York City.

You could even begin during your child’s freshman year of high school, says Sean T. Keating, a certified financial planner at Patriot Financial Advisors in Long Branch, New Jersey.

The average price tag for tuition, room and board, and fees for an undergraduate at a public four-year college was $19,080 during the 2018-2019 academic year, according to The College Board. The average jumps to $46,680 for a private nonprofit four-year college. It’s important to remember, though, that university “sticker prices” do not account for scholarships, grants, or tax benefits — and some states offer free or reduced tuition for families who make below a certain amount.

Setting expectations early will help your kids figure out what kind of college may be right for them, and how they can pay for it. Here are three guidelines experts suggest you following in discussing the costs of college with your kids.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: myelle lansat, ivana pino, aditi shrikant
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planner, families, parents, kids, tuition, suggest, price, fouryear, financial, college, talk, cost


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say

Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions. The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. Not surprisingly, they s


Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions. The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. Not surprisingly, they s
This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, words, controlling, parents, kids, adolescents, teens, best, supportive, feeling, motivate, study, tone, mothers, researchers, voice


This is the best tone of voice parents should use to motivate their kids, researchers say

The tone that a parent uses when telling their kid to do something can go a long way.

When mothers use a tone that’s supportive rather than controlling, teens are more likely to follow through and have success with the task at hand, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Developmental Psychology.

Researchers from Cardiff University tested two styles of speaking that have been shown to motivate people in different ways: controlling and “autonomous supportive.” A controlling tone is used to coerce someone to do something, whereas an autonomous supportive one encourages someone to make their own decisions.

The researchers had 1,000 British children ages 14 to 15 years listen to mothers of adolescents read 30 sentences that were meant to be motivational instructions. The statements included, “It’s time now to go to school,” “You will read this book tonight,” and “You will do well on this assignment.”

(Since only mothers were used in the study, it’s unclear whether the findings would be different for father-child relationships.)

Then, the teens completed a survey about how they would feel if their mother spoke to them like the women they just listened to. Not surprisingly, they said they were more willing to put effort into completing tasks that were communicated using a supportive tone. They also reported feeling closer to speakers who adopted this tone.

When spoken to with more controlling and neutral tones, the teens said they felt the opposite way, and even reported feeling negative emotions.

“If parents want conversations with their teens to have the most benefit, it’s important to remember to use supportive tones of voice,” Netta Weinstein, an author of the study and a psychology lecturer at Cardiff University, said in a press release. “It’s easy for parents to forget, especially if they are feeling stressed, tired, or pressured themselves.”

Of course, tone is just one piece of the communication puzzle. The words a parent uses can also significantly affect a child’s willingness to listen. A 2005 study, for example, found that specific words and phrases, such as “you should” and “you have to,” can come off as controlling to adolescents. A more supportive way to frame instructions might be “I ask” or “I propose.”

“These findings elucidate how mothers’ spoken communications can impact adolescents, with implications for the quality of parent-child relationships, adolescents’ well-being and engagement,” the authors of the study wrote.

Past research has also shown that when parents give kids autonomy and support, they’re more motivated in school, get better grades and feel more competent.

Don’t miss:

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, words, controlling, parents, kids, adolescents, teens, best, supportive, feeling, motivate, study, tone, mothers, researchers, voice


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad

David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then someThe Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. David Almonte. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy CommissionIt’s


David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then someThe Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. David Almonte. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy CommissionIt’s
4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: lisa ferber, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, lessons, cpa, david, ernie, brothers, dad, learned, money, parents, almonte, kids


4 of the top money lessons a CPA learned from his CPA dad

David Almonte, a certified public accountant and a member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, grew up playing with money. He and his four brothers were raised in Rhode Island by their dad Ernie, who is also a CPA, and their mom Kathy, a secretary at an accounting firm. They were taught to focus on financial wellness at a young age, in part because Ernie had seen firsthand the negative repercussions of poor financial planning, and he wanted to make sure his sons had good financial knowledge. They started by playing simple math games at the dinner table, like, “You have two meatballs, then you have one,” David recalls. Then the games and questions got more advanced. The kids carried these financial lessons into adulthood: Three of David’s brothers also work in the accounting industry. Here are some of the top money management tips the Almonte children learned:

1. If you borrow money, you have to pay it back and then some

The Almonte kids learned from experience that borrowing can lead to debt. “We had to do chores to get our allowance,” David says. When he and his brothers wanted to buy something that cost more than they had, they would take out a loan from their parents — with interest. Ernie says all the financial lessons were conducted to replicate reality. “By charging these boys interest on loans, I was trying to teach them about the reality of life,” he says. He also emphasized the importance of saving, though: David says that his dad would match, dollar-for-dollar, the amount the kids put into their savings accounts. And one Christmas, David says, Ernie gave the boys a piece of paper canceling all their loans: “It was the greatest day ever.”

David Almonte. Courtesy FountainHead RI

2. Create a budget as soon as you start earning

Before he moved away for a job after graduation, David told his dad his new salary. “He wanted to make sure I was set up financially, and he was like, ‘You’re basically going from zero to $40-45,000, and making up a budget is unbelievably important before you get that check in the bank,'” David says. The costs of life’s necessities totaled a bit more than David expected: “He sat me down and pretty much made me cry.” With his dad’s help, he realized, “when you’re paying electric and gas it can add up. … I was trying to find things I could weed out like, ‘I don’t need the lights on … all day.’ When I got my first paycheck I’m like, ‘I’m rich!’ And when I called him at the end of the month, I’m like, ‘I’m broke.'”

From a very early age our parents would teach us about the importance and difference between needs vs. wants. David Almonte CPA and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission

It’s crucial to live within or below your means, he learned. “From a very early age our parents would teach us about the importance and difference between needs vs. wants,” David says. “They would put this into practice when my brothers or I would be interested in a new toy or added expense.” His parents never told the kids not to buy something. Instead, they helped shape the way the children thought about spending. Ernie says that by teaching his kids about budgeting, he was teaching them how to take control of their financial lives. “With a proper plan that they created and they followed, they would know what the outcome would be now and in the future,” he says.

3. Don’t invest without doing your homework

When it came to the stock market, Ernie made sure his kids did their research. “I was teaching the boys how to invest with play money so they could learn the rules of investing and that this was not gambling,” he says. David says his father set the kids up with a million dollars of fake money to put in a play portfolio. The kids chose their stocks, and the father traded for them on AOL. “It was similar to trading portfolios on Yahoo Finance today where you can open up a free account and track live stock performance via a fake portfolio in terms of dollars,” he says. “No real dollars traded hands. “You could only buy and sell at the end of the day. If someone got a tip and we were in school, they couldn’t trade,” says David. Their dad encouraged the kids to make informed choices about their stock purchases. “Let’s say it’s Apple: You’d have to tell my mom and dad what product Apple makes, and a fun fact like where their headquarters are so you’re not just buying,” David says. “He would make you support that decision.”

4. Take advantage of retirement accounts and the employer match


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-24  Authors: lisa ferber, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, lessons, cpa, david, ernie, brothers, dad, learned, money, parents, almonte, kids


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post