Unilever will stop advertising ice cream to kids over obesity concerns

Unilever also said it will not direct any social media at kids under 13. For the content, it said creative execution marketing communications should not be designed target kids under 12. Other companies have rules around marketing food and beverages to kids. General Mills, for example, says it does not direct any marketing to children under 12 unless it meets “strict nutrition standards.” In the U.S., those standards are the ones established by the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initia


Unilever also said it will not direct any social media at kids under 13.
For the content, it said creative execution marketing communications should not be designed target kids under 12.
Other companies have rules around marketing food and beverages to kids.
General Mills, for example, says it does not direct any marketing to children under 12 unless it meets “strict nutrition standards.”
In the U.S., those standards are the ones established by the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initia
Unilever will stop advertising ice cream to kids over obesity concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ice, advertising, unilever, marketing, products, kids, ads, children, food, standards, social, concerns, obesity, company, cream, stop


Unilever will stop advertising ice cream to kids over obesity concerns

Consumer packaged goods giant Unilever said Wednesday that it’s updating its principles for marketing food and beverages to children, including a change that will no longer target ads to children under 12, amid widespread concerns about childhood obesity.

The company, whose portfolio includes Ben & Jerry’s and Klondike, said the change will apply to all food and beverage products, and defines marketing communications as TV and radio ads, digital activity, social media and digital ads, apps, PR materials, online games and other communication like product placements. The company said it previously had allowed ads for products that met its “Highest Nutritional Standards,” which takes into consideration factors like sodium, saturated fat and sugars.

In a blog post, Unilever said a key reason for the new principles is the fact that the World Health Organization calls childhood obesity one of the most serious public health issues of the 21st century.

“It’s a move designed to help parents, caregivers and kids make informed choices about the food and drinks they buy, and to address the rise of social media, and the vast increase in products on sale,” the post says.

Unilever also said it will not direct any social media at kids under 13. It will also restrict its influencer policy, not using influencers under the age of 12, nor influencers who primarily appeal to children under 12. (Major social networks like Facebook and Instagram don’t allow users under the age of 13.)

Unilever says the changes in targeting take into consideration both the content of the advertising and its placement. The company said for television and other measurable media, it will not run ads where children aged under 12 represent over 25% of the audience. For the content, it said creative execution marketing communications should not be designed target kids under 12.

The company added it will only show kids under 12 in its marketing communications if it’s for products that meet high nutritional standards or if it’s “relevant to the marketing message,” like a family activity, it said. “Parents or gatekeepers will always be portrayed in control of the access to a product,” the company writes in its policy.

It also said it will limit the use of licensed cartoon characters and of “brand-equity” characters to point-of-sale communications (like in-store displays or ice cream freezers) and will only use them with products that meet its “self-imposed Highest Nutritional Criteria.” The company says it previously allowed the use of characters in its marketing communications.

Unilever says it has been applying specific measures for the marketing of food and beverages since 2003 and has adopted those principles since then. The deadline for the new measures is the end of this year.

Other companies have rules around marketing food and beverages to kids. General Mills, for example, says it does not direct any marketing to children under 12 unless it meets “strict nutrition standards.” In the U.S., those standards are the ones established by the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative, it says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ice, advertising, unilever, marketing, products, kids, ads, children, food, standards, social, concerns, obesity, company, cream, stop


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The coronavirus appears to be sparing one group of people: Kids

Mehedi Hasan | NurPhoto | Getty ImagesThe new coronavirus that has already killed more people than the 2003 SARS epidemic appears to be sparing one population group: kids. Fortunately for many worried parents, there appear to be few confirmed cases of the virus among children so far. Symptoms can include a sore throat, runny nose, fever or pneumonia and can progress to multi-organ failure or even death in some cases, world health officials say. With age, immune systems weaken, leaving the elderl


Mehedi Hasan | NurPhoto | Getty ImagesThe new coronavirus that has already killed more people than the 2003 SARS epidemic appears to be sparing one population group: kids.
Fortunately for many worried parents, there appear to be few confirmed cases of the virus among children so far.
Symptoms can include a sore throat, runny nose, fever or pneumonia and can progress to multi-organ failure or even death in some cases, world health officials say.
With age, immune systems weaken, leaving the elderl
The coronavirus appears to be sparing one group of people: Kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, cases, virus, disease, officials, appears, according, kids, group, sparing, say, coronavirus, age, health


The coronavirus appears to be sparing one group of people: Kids

Bangladeshi students wear masks for protection against Coronavirus on January 29, 2020. Mehedi Hasan | NurPhoto | Getty Images

The new coronavirus that has already killed more people than the 2003 SARS epidemic appears to be sparing one population group: kids. Of the more than 43,100 people it’s infected since Dec. 31, World Health Organization officials say the majority are over 40 years old and it’s hitting those with underlying health conditions and the elderly particularly hard. “Increasing age increases the risk for death,” Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, head of WHO’s emerging diseases and zoonosis unit, said Thursday at a news conference at the agency’s headquarters in Geneva. “It appears even over 80 is the highest risk factor.” Fortunately for many worried parents, there appear to be few confirmed cases of the virus among children so far. Officials caution that the virus is so new, there is still a lot that they don’t know about it and the data they are seeing today will likely look different a month from now.

About 80% of people who died from the virus in China were over the age of 60, and 75% had pre-existing conditions such as heart disease or diabetes, according to a recent report from China’s National Health Commission. A small study published Jan 30 in the peer-reviewed medical journal The Lancet found that the average age of coronavirus patients was roughly 55 years old. The study looked at 99 patients at Jinyintan Hospital in Wuhan, China, from Jan. 1 to Jan. 20. Last week, Singapore confirmed a case in a 6-month-old baby whose parents were also both infected, and an infant in China was born Feb. 2 with the virus. The baby’s mother also tested positive. But infections in children appear to rare for now, according to a Feb. 5 study in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association. Symptoms can include a sore throat, runny nose, fever or pneumonia and can progress to multi-organ failure or even death in some cases, world health officials say.

Some infectious disease specialists and scientists say older adults may be more vulnerable to the virus, which has been named COVID-19, due to their weaker immune systems. With age, immune systems weaken, leaving the elderly at an especially higher risk of developing serious complications from a respiratory illness, public health officials say. “It’s usually the very old, sometimes the very young and certainly people with other medical conditions who typically have more severe manifestations,” said Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist and professor at the University of Toronto. The apparent lack of children among confirmed coronavirus cases could also be because they are getting infected but developing more mild symptoms and aren’t being reported to local authorities, according to Marc Lipsitch, a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. World health officials say they are working to improve surveillance of the disease and expect more mild cases to be reported. It could be a while before we have a clear picture on cases, Lipsitch said. “The data is coming out in so many places and so many forms,” he said in a recent interview. The differences in symptoms among different age groups are seen in other respiratory illnesses as well. The seasonal flu, which infects millions in the U.S. each year, can usually be more severe in adults than children. Thousands of children are hospitalized each year from the flu, but death is rare, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, between 50% and 70% of flu-related hospitalizations in the U.S. occur in people 65 years and older, and between 70% and 85% of deaths occur in the same age group, the CDC says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, children, cases, virus, disease, officials, appears, according, kids, group, sparing, say, coronavirus, age, health


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Stanford psychology expert: These are the top 3 things kids need—but most parents fail to provide

Kids have psychological needsJust as the human body requires macronutrients to run properly, the human psyche has its own needs in order to flourish. So when kids aren’t given the “psychological nutrients” they require, they are more likely to overdo unhealthy behaviors and look for satisfaction — often in virtual environments. If you want to raise highly successful and “indistractable” kids, these are the three most important psychological nutrients that need to be met:1. In an interview with N


Kids have psychological needsJust as the human body requires macronutrients to run properly, the human psyche has its own needs in order to flourish.
So when kids aren’t given the “psychological nutrients” they require, they are more likely to overdo unhealthy behaviors and look for satisfaction — often in virtual environments.
If you want to raise highly successful and “indistractable” kids, these are the three most important psychological nutrients that need to be met:1.
In an interview with N
Stanford psychology expert: These are the top 3 things kids need—but most parents fail to provide Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: nir eyal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, good, fail, isnt, feeling, expert, mayan, nutrients, psychology, provide, distractions, things, kids, needbut, stanford, goal, parents, psychological


Stanford psychology expert: These are the top 3 things kids need—but most parents fail to provide

Society’s fear of how technology is hurting our kids’ ability to focus and achieve success has reached a fever pitch — and many parents have resorted to extreme measures. A quick search on YouTube reveals thousands of videos of parents storming into their kids’ rooms, unplugging the computers or gaming consoles, and smashing the devices into bits. But here’s what most parents don’t understand: Technology isn’t the problem, and enforcing strict rules around tech usage isn’t the solution. Rather, it’s the root causes to children’s distractions that need to be addressed.

Kids have psychological needs

Just as the human body requires macronutrients to run properly, the human psyche has its own needs in order to flourish. Distractions satisfy deficiencies. So when kids aren’t given the “psychological nutrients” they require, they are more likely to overdo unhealthy behaviors and look for satisfaction — often in virtual environments. If you want to raise highly successful and “indistractable” kids, these are the three most important psychological nutrients that need to be met:

1. Autonomy

It might sound like a horrible idea, but giving your kid freedom of control over their choices can actually be a good thing. According to one study conducted by two psychology professors, Marciela Correa-Chavez and Barbara Rogoff, Mayan children who have less exposure to formal education show “more sustained attention and learning than their counterparts from Mayan families with extensive involvement in Western schooling.” In an interview with NPR, Dr. Suzanne Gaskins, who has studied Mayan villages for decades, explained that many Mayan parents give their kids a tremendous amount of freedom. “Rather than having the parent set the goal — and then having to offer enticements and rewards to reach that goal — the child is setting the goal,” she said. “Then the parents support that goal however they can.” Most formal schooling in America and similar industrialized countries, on the other hand, is the antithesis of a place where kids have the autonomy to make their own choices. In her study, Rogoff notes: “It may that [some American] children give up control of their attention when it’s always managed by an adult.” What parents can do: Instead of being the one to enforce strict rules on things like tech usage, help your kids create their own boundaries. The goal is to get them to understand why their screen time should be limited. The more you make decisions with them, as opposed to for them, the more they may be willing to listen to your guidance.

2. Competence

Think about something you’re good at, like cooking a delicious meal or parallel parking in a tight space. Competence feels good, doesn’t it? And that feeling grows alongside your ability to achieve success in life. Unfortunately, the joy of progress is a waning feeling among kids today. Too often, kids are given the message that they’re not competent at what they do. Standardized tests, for example, are a major contribution to this problem, because they don’t account for the fact that different kids have different developmental rates. If a child isn’t doing well in school and doesn’t get the necessary individualized support, they may start to believe that achieving competence is impossible. So they stop trying. In the absence of competency in the classroom, kids turn to potentially unhealthy outlets to experience the feeling of growth and development. Companies making games, apps and other potential distractions are happy to fill that void by selling ready-made solutions for the “psychological nutrients” kids lack. They know much consumers enjoy leveling up, like gaining more followers or getting likes. These accomplishments all provide the fast feedback of achievement that feels good. What parents can do: Ease up on structured academic or athletic activities, as well as the pressures and expectations surrounding them. Have a discussion with your kid about what they enjoy doing, and encourage them to pursue it in ways where they can achieve a level of competence.

3. Relatedness


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: nir eyal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, good, fail, isnt, feeling, expert, mayan, nutrients, psychology, provide, distractions, things, kids, needbut, stanford, goal, parents, psychological


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6 ways to keep a money talk with your teens from turning into a heated argument

Combine teens, money and something they want, and you’ve got all the ingredients for a situation. “All of a sudden you’re trying to have a money conversation at a time when it’s emotionally charged,” Henske said. “I think it teaches a great lesson that they have to work at things,” Henske said. In order to have a spending plan, CFP Thomas Henske says kids should be able to compare what things cost. Discuss prices for various things, and let them know the percentage of the family budget their clo


Combine teens, money and something they want, and you’ve got all the ingredients for a situation.
“All of a sudden you’re trying to have a money conversation at a time when it’s emotionally charged,” Henske said.
“I think it teaches a great lesson that they have to work at things,” Henske said.
In order to have a spending plan, CFP Thomas Henske says kids should be able to compare what things cost.
Discuss prices for various things, and let them know the percentage of the family budget their clo
6 ways to keep a money talk with your teens from turning into a heated argument Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, argument, kids, money, heated, teen, know, things, youre, ways, teens, think, talk, turning, henske, let


6 ways to keep a money talk with your teens from turning into a heated argument

Conversations with kids can be adversarial at the best of times. Combine teens, money and something they want, and you’ve got all the ingredients for a situation. If your family hasn’t been in the habit of holding regular financial chats, the risk is even higher for the talk to turn negative, says Thomas Henske, a certified financial planner with Lenox Advisors in New York. Generally, these conversations start because someone (your teenager) wants something. “All of a sudden you’re trying to have a money conversation at a time when it’s emotionally charged,” Henske said. You might not think that thing is worth buying. Then you’re both off and running. Before you lose your cool, here are six ways to keep things on an even keel.

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1. Ask, don’t tell

Henske’s default: Ask a question. “Seek first to understand,” he said, a tenet from Stephen Covey’s “7 Habits of Highly Effective People.” Let the kids have their say without interrupting. “A lot of times, you can diffuse it by letting them talk it through,” Henske said. Be prepared for the unexpected: They might talk you into whatever they want. It doesn’t mean you’ll have to pay for it, however. You might say something along the lines of “We shouldn’t spend our money like that, but if you want to use your own, go ahead,” Henske said.

2. Let them pay

Kids should have some skin in the game, especially if they want something you’re unwilling to pay for. The solution is easy: The kid finds a way to earn the cash to buy it, or to make up the shortfall between what parents are and aren’t willing to cough up. “I think it teaches a great lesson that they have to work at things,” Henske said. The needed amount often is not going to materialize after just one week of work. “You get a much better appreciation of what it takes to earn [something],” he said. Suddenly the teen has a better grasp on the relationship between hours worked and the cost of things. More from Invest in You:

Money mind hacks from bloggers can boost your finances

Retirement luxury on a Social Security budget

If you don’t know much about investing start here Henske compares the process to working out: going to the gym once won’t make a difference. But if you go every day for three months, you can see that it’s paying off. Like success in school or saving, “it’s small things you do that lead to big results,” he said.

3. Be open

Transparency helps tame the heat. “When kids, especially teens, feel like any area that impacts them is a black box, it frustrates them,” said Jared Snider, senior wealth advisor at Exencial Wealth Advisors in Oklahoma City. In order to have a spending plan, CFP Thomas Henske says kids should be able to compare what things cost. “They know a dollar doesn’t buy dinner out,” he said. “But they need to know dinner doesn’t cost $1,000.”

Discuss prices for various things, and let them know the percentage of the family budget their clothes or entertainment equals. You can put sums in terms of percentages, Snider says, to explain why a teen can’t take that $3,000 ski trip over spring break. Maybe the family has planned for braces instead. “These are real-world tradeoffs you have to think through.”

4. Trust them

Snider encourages parents to give kids some money to manage. You might consider letting a teen be responsible for meals at school or athletic equipment. Some parents ask their kids to be responsible for gifts for siblings at birthdays and holidays. Clothing can be an opportunity to level up in responsibility. In the first stage, parents tell the teen how much they can spend. They shop together, the kid picks out clothes and parents give the green light to buy. Once they’ve proven they can do this, they get more freedom: actual cash without supervision.

5. Let them screw up

Give kids the chance to make relatively inconsequential mistakes. For instance, Snider says, give them a set amount of $50 for meals out. Blowing too much on pizza will mean they need to pack lunch for school.

6. Say nothing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, argument, kids, money, heated, teen, know, things, youre, ways, teens, think, talk, turning, henske, let


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‘Shark Tank’: Why this Shark laid into a contestant for still being financially supported by dad

Sometimes the stars of ABC’s “Shark Tank” disagree on what makes a great entrepreneur. On Sunday’s episode, Shark Barbara Corcoran turned down a founder because she was still being financially supported by her father, while Mark Cuban and Daymond John told Corcoran her thinking was wrong. I just graduated from NYU,” Bartow told the Sharks. After the deal, Corcoran told the Sharks she insulted Bartow to determine whether she would have a strong response. “Barbara’s got the best people skills,” he


Sometimes the stars of ABC’s “Shark Tank” disagree on what makes a great entrepreneur.
On Sunday’s episode, Shark Barbara Corcoran turned down a founder because she was still being financially supported by her father, while Mark Cuban and Daymond John told Corcoran her thinking was wrong.
I just graduated from NYU,” Bartow told the Sharks.
After the deal, Corcoran told the Sharks she insulted Bartow to determine whether she would have a strong response.
“Barbara’s got the best people skills,” he
‘Shark Tank’: Why this Shark laid into a contestant for still being financially supported by dad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financially, shark, dad, person, john, laid, told, supported, company, thats, tank, contestant, bartow, cuban, kids, corcoran, line


'Shark Tank': Why this Shark laid into a contestant for still being financially supported by dad

Sometimes the stars of ABC’s “Shark Tank” disagree on what makes a great entrepreneur.

On Sunday’s episode, Shark Barbara Corcoran turned down a founder because she was still being financially supported by her father, while Mark Cuban and Daymond John told Corcoran her thinking was wrong.

Standing before the judges was Melissa Bartow, who pitched her vegan date spread company Wanna Date?. Bartow said she worked on the business full time, and that it had brought in about $31,000 in sales in 2019 up to that point.

But when she revealed how she stayed afloat, Corcoran was not impressed.

“Originally I’m from northwest Georgia, a town called Kennesaw. I just graduated from NYU,” Bartow told the Sharks. “My dad supports me still.”

To that, Corcoran responded, “Here’s where, for me, it falls apart.”

“When I was starting my business, if I didn’t make a deal within two weeks, I was dead,” she said. “I needed to live somewhere and eat.

“What is in your way, I believe, is that your father is helping you, because succeeding is an option, versus a necessity. I found that the people that really succeed have a real necessity — they have to do it, or the sky is going to fall in. With the absence of that, I can’t believe enough to put my money in, so I’m out.”

“Take away the security blanket of having your rent paid, and the comparison would be night and day in what you can accomplish. I’ve seen it over and over again with so many people,” Corcoran said.

Corcoran herself has said she worked 22 different jobs before taking a $1,000 loan from her boyfriend to start her own real estate firm in Manhattan in 1973. She sold The Corcoran Group for $66 million in 2001.

But Bartow objected, telling Corcoran she was “never handed anything.”

“I won’t be homeless if this fails, but I do everything on my own. My dad believes in me. I am not a rich kid. I don’t sleep. I carry cases all over New York. I work events, I do them all myself. Nobody helps me,” Bartow said. “Failure is when you quit. I don’t quit, so this won’t fail, because I will go until it succeeds.”

John also disagreed with Corcoran’s reasoning.

“Listen, I started out, and my mother mortgaged the house. And without her mortgaging the home, I couldn’t have financed my first couple of shirts. So, that’s Barbara’s opinion,” John said.

John launched apparel line Fubu with only $40 in 1992 and applied for bank loans to finance his company. He was rejected 27 times, and his mother took out an equity line on their house in Queens, New York, giving him $100,000 to purchase equipment. According to John, Fubu grew into a billion-dollar brand.

Cuban wasn’t buying Corcoran’s theory either.

“You know what Melissa, I don’t agree,” Cuban said. “I understand from an investment perspective, there is value when someone’s back is against the wall. We’ve all faced it. But that’s like saying, if Barbara’s right, that means none of our kids could ever do anything on their own, and I refuse to believe that.”

Cuban has said he slept on the floor of a $600-a-month, three-bedroom apartment with five roommates in his 20s before selling his first business, software seller MicroSolutions, to CompuServe for $6 million in 1990. He later co-founded Broadcast.com, which sold to Yahoo for $5.7 billion in stock in 1999.

In fact, Cuban was interested in investing in Bartow’s company: “I just went vegetarian, so I’m always looking for things that are healthy, healthy for my family. The idea of a date-spread is great.”

With a few contingencies, including changing packaging and adjusting the line of flavors, Cuban offered Bartow $100,000 for 33% of the company, and Bartow accepted.

After the deal, Corcoran told the Sharks she insulted Bartow to determine whether she would have a strong response.

“Did you notice after I insulted her, she was a different person?” Corcoran said, referring to Bartow’s passionate response. “I wanted to see if she had what it took.”

To that, John said, “after you insult anyone, they’re a different person, Barbara.”

“I think Mark brought up a point,” he continued. Does that mean “none of our kids will be successful?” he asked.

“There are a lot of wealthy kids who become extremely successful,” Corcoran said, “and I expect that from my children. But until I insulted her, I wasn’t feeling her vibe. She came back like a fire, that’s what I wanted to see!”

Previously, Cuban has praised Corcoran’s knack for reading entrepreneurs in the Tank.

“Barbara’s got the best people skills,” he said told Corcoran on her “888-Barbara” podcast in November. “Her ability to recognize the good and bad in somebody and what they’ll be like as an entrepreneur, what they’ll be like as a person. Barbara picks up on that stuff in a minute.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financially, shark, dad, person, john, laid, told, supported, company, thats, tank, contestant, bartow, cuban, kids, corcoran, line


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How to teach your kids about money: the tween and early teen years

The tween and early teen years can be a tricky time for kids. “Kids this age are old enough to really understand how money works,” said Chantel Bonneau, a wealth management advisor at Northwestern Mutual. With that in mind, here are 10 money lessons you can use with kids ages 10 to 14. Teach them how to earn moneyHelp your child come up with ways to earn money so that they can start saving toward their goal. “Maybe the child isn’t really recognizing what is going on, but they are starting to at


The tween and early teen years can be a tricky time for kids.
“Kids this age are old enough to really understand how money works,” said Chantel Bonneau, a wealth management advisor at Northwestern Mutual.
With that in mind, here are 10 money lessons you can use with kids ages 10 to 14.
Teach them how to earn moneyHelp your child come up with ways to earn money so that they can start saving toward their goal.
“Maybe the child isn’t really recognizing what is going on, but they are starting to at
How to teach your kids about money: the tween and early teen years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, early, age, bonneau, tween, money, teach, child, teen, pay, kids, really, hutchinson, understand


How to teach your kids about money: the tween and early teen years

The tween and early teen years can be a tricky time for kids. Not only are they encountering new social situations and gaining more responsibility, they are also forming a big part of their relationship with money. “Kids this age are old enough to really understand how money works,” said Chantel Bonneau, a wealth management advisor at Northwestern Mutual. “They are starting to understand the consumer world,” she added. “It’s a really great opportunity to make money relatable.” It’s also a time when kids are starting to have true peer-to-peer relationships and begin measuring themselves against others, said Ali Hutchinson, managing director at Brown Brothers Harriman and leader of the firm’s next generation program. “Having conversations at home, early and often, about things like income disparity, wealth disparity, the value of money —including online currency — is going to equip the kids to have a better chance at success,” she said. It’s also important to teach them autonomy and how to delay gratification during these years. With that in mind, here are 10 money lessons you can use with kids ages 10 to 14.

1. Set goals

fotostorm

The next time your child asks you to buy something that is out of the norm — such as Justin Beiber concert tickets or a video game — ask your kid to come up with a plan to save up for it. Work up the cost and build a plan on how you can save for it — and whether it is even within the range of your saving ability, Bonneau said. In fact, even adults aren’t always connecting financial decisions to goals. That’s where they get lost, she said. “The clearer you are on the goals, it makes it so much easier to make the right decisions.”

2. Teach them how to earn money

Help your child come up with ways to earn money so that they can start saving toward their goal. If you have the ability, pay your kid an allowance or pay for doing certain chores around the house. You can also help your child come up with other ideas to make money, like babysitting or dog walking.

3. Understand needs vs. wants

Now that your children have their own spending money, they’ll have to learn the difference between something they need and something they want. They’ll also have to gain the ability to delay a purchase.

You want to teach them how to make a good and best choice … with the amount of resources they have. Chantel Bonneau wealth management advisor, Northwestern Mutual

“If you want what you want and want it right now, you won’t have the time to do your due diligence on the item you desire,” Hutchinson said. Have them conduct research of the item they want to buy — which will also teach them to spend wisely. Show them online reviews and help them differentiate between paid advertising, influencers and unbiased reviews.

4. Let your children fail

Even if they did their due diligence, your children may still make the wrong spending choice. Let them, Hutchinson said. “Research has found that maybe it makes sense to let them ‘fail’ a little bit now,” she explained. “Maybe they will remember that feeling when it comes to potentially a bigger failure later on.”

5. Set a shopping budget

JGI/Jamie Grill

When you take your kids shopping for something like clothes, give them a budget to work with. Have them add up the purchase total, including a tax, before they bring it to the register, Bonneau said. So, if you give your child a $100 budget and he or she comes back with $120 worth of clothing, they’ll have to decide what to keep and what to put back. “You want to teach them how to make a good and best choice … with the amount of resources they have,” she said. This way, “they don’t become an adult that just puts everything on a credit card because they didn’t know how to work within the context of a budget.”

6. Talk about money

Conversations around money used to feel taboo. Yet experts believe they are vital, especially for children. You can start by asking your kids questions, such as how would you describe our family’s values, and how would you respond to a friend who wants you to pay for something you don’t want to pay for, Hutchinson advised. “When comes to 10- to 14-year-olds, it’s really hard to know exactly what they know, so asking questions and listening to their responses is really important in this age range,” she said. “They may know a lot more at this age then you are giving them credit for.”

7. Get visual

This is the age where charts and graphics are really helpful. So, if your child has a savings goal, make a chart and track every time he or she saves money. “That’s really a good way to help them visualize and feel a little bit of instant gratification,” Bonneau said.

8. Charge them interest

This is a good age to start introducing the concept of interest — paying it and receiving it. However, sitting kids down with a spreadsheet can be counterproductive. Instead, try a “real life concrete example instead of an abstract concept,” Hutchinson said. More from Invest in You:

Top 5 money lessons for kids as young as 5

How to teach your kid to think like an entrepreneur

Your kids don’t think your money skills measure up For example, if they have a purchase they just can’t put off, consider lending them money and charging them interest. Teach them how, over time, they’ll have to pay you back and that it will be a little bit more, she advised. It’s also a lesson on how to build reserves and a rainy day fund, when they understand that interest can work in their favor, as well.

9. Buy a stock

If you are able, consider buying your child one share of a company they can relate to, Bonneau suggests. It can be a part of the child’s college savings plan or other fund. Then, engage your child by going over the statements, having ongoing conversations about it and reviewing the investment. This way you can build a habit, even if they don’t fully grasp the concept. “Maybe the child isn’t really recognizing what is going on, but they are starting to at least understand,” she said.

10. Give to charity


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, early, age, bonneau, tween, money, teach, child, teen, pay, kids, really, hutchinson, understand


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FDA to consider restricting menthol vape products if teens begin using them, official says

The Food and Drug Administration would consider restricting the sale of menthol-flavored vaping products if teens start using them as the agency moves to ban most other flavors, an FDA official said Friday. Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that if kids start to “migrate” to menthol-flavored pods, then the federal agency will “revisit” its rules. The FDA announced Thursday it is banning most fruit- and mint-flavored nicotine vaping products


The Food and Drug Administration would consider restricting the sale of menthol-flavored vaping products if teens start using them as the agency moves to ban most other flavors, an FDA official said Friday.
Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that if kids start to “migrate” to menthol-flavored pods, then the federal agency will “revisit” its rules.
The FDA announced Thursday it is banning most fruit- and mint-flavored nicotine vaping products
FDA to consider restricting menthol vape products if teens begin using them, official says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, menthol, vape, fda, nicotine, restricting, begin, using, teens, ecigarettes, official, vaping, pods, flavors, kids, consider, tobacco, mentholflavored, products


FDA to consider restricting menthol vape products if teens begin using them, official says

The Food and Drug Administration would consider restricting the sale of menthol-flavored vaping products if teens start using them as the agency moves to ban most other flavors, an FDA official said Friday.

Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that if kids start to “migrate” to menthol-flavored pods, then the federal agency will “revisit” its rules.

The FDA announced Thursday it is banning most fruit- and mint-flavored nicotine vaping products in an effort to curb a surge in teen use. It is specifically banning cartridge-based nicotine pods like Juul, allowing vape shops to continue selling tank-based flavored nicotine liquids. Companies will still be able to sell tobacco and menthol-flavored pods for adults who use them to quit smoking.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters Thursday that the FDA’s allowed tobacco and menthol flavors to stay on the market because they were “less appealing” to kids.

According to two studies published in November in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association, more than half of teenagers who vape use Juul e-cigarettes, and its mint pods were the No. 1 flavor favored by high school kids.

But public health experts, some of who are calling for the elimination of all flavored e-cigarettes, fear that kids could end up switching to menthol once the fruity flavors are all gone.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said at a congressional hearing earlier this year that a flavor ban should include menthol.

Zeller said the FDA has the ability to monitor any changes in teen use of e-cigarettes, which he called an “epidemic.”

“Too many kids are walking around thinking that e-cigarettes are harmless,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, menthol, vape, fda, nicotine, restricting, begin, using, teens, ecigarettes, official, vaping, pods, flavors, kids, consider, tobacco, mentholflavored, products


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Top 5 money lessons for kids as young as 5 years old

Have conversationsMoMo Productions | Taxi | Getty ImagesWith young kids, start having regular conversations around the dinner table about things like savings accounts and budgeting. You can talk about different types of money, the difference between checks and credit cards and cash,” said Henske, who developed and runs his firm’s smart-money kids program. For example, with younger kids talk about coins and simple concepts; with older ones you can delve into the rewards of earning an allowance. “


Have conversationsMoMo Productions | Taxi | Getty ImagesWith young kids, start having regular conversations around the dinner table about things like savings accounts and budgeting.
You can talk about different types of money, the difference between checks and credit cards and cash,” said Henske, who developed and runs his firm’s smart-money kids program.
For example, with younger kids talk about coins and simple concepts; with older ones you can delve into the rewards of earning an allowance.

Top 5 money lessons for kids as young as 5 years old Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: michelle fox, dr brad klontz, financial psychologist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rewards, kids, child, boudewyn, good, henske, lessons, old, engage, way, young, money, difference


Top 5 money lessons for kids as young as 5 years old

1. Have conversations

MoMo Productions | Taxi | Getty Images

With young kids, start having regular conversations around the dinner table about things like savings accounts and budgeting. “Just pick a word. You can talk about different types of money, the difference between checks and credit cards and cash,” said Henske, who developed and runs his firm’s smart-money kids program. “You are not trying to get them to really remember the concept as much as just be comfortable talking about it.” Of course, there’s a difference between a 5-year-old and a 9 -ear-old, so keep your conversations age appropriate. For example, with younger kids talk about coins and simple concepts; with older ones you can delve into the rewards of earning an allowance. Part of that conversation can also take place at a bank. While banking is becoming more mobile, it is still a good idea to take your child to your local branch so they can understand what it is and what it does, Henske said. “It’s not very practical, because they are not going to use a physical bank the way you and I use the bank,” he said. However, “it lays some history down.”

2. Engage together in payment transactions

How often is your child with you while you are checking out at the grocery store? Whether it is rarely or regularly, it’s a good teaching opportunity. “That is a great moment to engage the child in how much grocery items cost and really get them to dialogue with you about it,” Boudewyn said. If you have coupons or a reward system with the retailer, show them the before-and-after prices.

Kids learn very quickly that they can tie effort and input to financial rewards. Arne Boudewyn head of Abbot Downing’s Institute for Family Culture

You can also engage your kid in the payment transaction — let them press buttons on the credit card machine or your smartphone’s wallet, or even have them hand over the cash.

3. Give an allowance

By the time your child is 6 or 7 years old, you can start giving them an allowance. It doesn’t have to be much and can be tied into chores around the house, such as household errands or cleaning his or her room. “Kids learn very quickly that they can tie effort and input to financial rewards,” Boudewyn said. That will help them become a “much more prepared adult when they are 20, 21, 22,” he added. Henske advised using physical money to pay your child at this age, as opposed to using prepaid cards that are targeted toward kids, like Greenlight, Current and gohenry. “It’s important for them to take money and put it somewhere and see it,” Henske explained. It also is a good time to teach them to divide their allowance into spending, saving and philanthropy.

4. Make them use their own money

Inti St Clair

When kids have something that is a want rather than a need, you should use it as an opportunity for them to use their own money. Henske said he did this with his daughter, who felt like “a million bucks” when she went up to the cash register and paid for the item herself. “Everything that has empowered you in life, it involves you being hands-on and doing and not reading,” he said. “And by the way, making mistakes is OK, too.” Another way to address it is to have your child help put money toward a large purchase he or she wants, Boudewyn said. For example, one person he knows has a son who wanted an expensive baseball bat. The parents offered to buy the regular one, or they could give him that money instead and he could pay the difference for the higher-end product. In the end the boy learned a “wonderful lesson” and went about finding all sorts of ways to earn the money for his special bat, Boudewyn said.

5. Don’t forget philanthropy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03  Authors: michelle fox, dr brad klontz, financial psychologist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rewards, kids, child, boudewyn, good, henske, lessons, old, engage, way, young, money, difference


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Elon Musk’s mom on raising successful kids: ‘I didn’t treat them like babies or scold them’

My middle child, Kimbal, started farm-to-table restaurants and is teaching children to build fruit and vegetable gardens in underserved schools. I tell them I did it by teaching them about hard work and letting them follow their interests. Put your kids to work at an early ageI became a single mother of three when I was 31. When Kaye and I were 12, we started working in the clinic as receptionists. My kids benefited because they saw me work hard just to put a roof over our heads, put food in our


My middle child, Kimbal, started farm-to-table restaurants and is teaching children to build fruit and vegetable gardens in underserved schools.
I tell them I did it by teaching them about hard work and letting them follow their interests.
Put your kids to work at an early ageI became a single mother of three when I was 31.
When Kaye and I were 12, we started working in the clinic as receptionists.
My kids benefited because they saw me work hard just to put a roof over our heads, put food in our
Elon Musk’s mom on raising successful kids: ‘I didn’t treat them like babies or scold them’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: maye musk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, kids, scold, didnt, hard, musks, tosca, started, babies, successful, dad, raising, kaye, children, work, teaching, elon, mom, treat


Elon Musk's mom on raising successful kids: 'I didn't treat them like babies or scold them'

I love my kids and I’m very proud of everything they’ve accomplished My oldest child, Elon, is making electric cars to save the environment and launching rockets. My middle child, Kimbal, started farm-to-table restaurants and is teaching children to build fruit and vegetable gardens in underserved schools. And Tosca, my youngest, is producing and directing films through her own entertainment company. People often ask me how I raised such successful kids. I tell them I did it by teaching them about hard work and letting them follow their interests.

Put your kids to work at an early age

I became a single mother of three when I was 31. I never felt guilty about working full-time, because I didn’t have a choice. Taking care of my children was the top priority; I worked hard to keep a roof over our heads, food in our stomach, and basic clothes on our back. I started working for my dad when I was eight years old. We lived next door to his chiropractic, where my mom helped him, too. My twin sister Kaye and I were paid 5 cents an hour to help him mail out his monthly bulletin.

Teach your children good manners. But let them decide what they want.

My dad would dictate the bulletin to my mom, who wrote it in shorthand and then typed it up. After Kaye and I made copies of the stencils, we would sit on the living room floor, fold the bulletin into three, seal it in an envelope and put the stamp on. We made about 1,000 of these every month. When Kaye and I were 12, we started working in the clinic as receptionists. We would take turns signing in patients, making them tea, developing X-rays and keeping them company until our dad was ready to see them. My parents treated us like adults who could be trusted, and their influence is evident in how I raised my children. From a young age, my kids helped me with my nutrition business. Tosca would go into my office and type up letters to doctors on a word processor. Elon was very good at helping to explain the word processor functions to me. Kimbal was always helpful, too.

My kids benefited because they saw me work hard just to put a roof over our heads, put food in our stomachs and purchase secondhand clothes.

When we were living in Bloemfontein, I put Tosca to work at the modeling and image school I was running. Imagine an eight-year-old teaching students how to walk, choreographing runway shows and running etiquette classes. I even made her the dresser for all my shows.

Let your kids decide what they want


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: maye musk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, kids, scold, didnt, hard, musks, tosca, started, babies, successful, dad, raising, kaye, children, work, teaching, elon, mom, treat


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