Why Planters killed off Mr. Peanut

VaynerMedia also handled Planters’ Super Bowl spot last year. Pierantozzi said with Mr. Peanut the shop wondered, “What would happen and how would the world react if he passed away?” “It’s with heavy hearts that we confirm Mr. Peanut has passed away at 104 years old,” Samantha Hess, Planters brand manager at Kraft Heinz, said in a statement. Part of the buzz, Pierantozzi said, stems from the fact that Planters has built up Mr. Peanut so much, along with his “Nutmobile.” The specifics of what wil


VaynerMedia also handled Planters’ Super Bowl spot last year.
Pierantozzi said with Mr. Peanut the shop wondered, “What would happen and how would the world react if he passed away?”
“It’s with heavy hearts that we confirm Mr. Peanut has passed away at 104 years old,” Samantha Hess, Planters brand manager at Kraft Heinz, said in a statement.
Part of the buzz, Pierantozzi said, stems from the fact that Planters has built up Mr. Peanut so much, along with his “Nutmobile.”
The specifics of what wil
Why Planters killed off Mr. Peanut Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planters, world, killed, bowl, peanut, twitter, brands, pierantozzi, spot, super


Why Planters killed off Mr. Peanut

Kraft Heinz ‘s Planters on Tuesday released a cryptic tweet with a link to a video showing Mr. Peanut sacrificing himself to save actors Wesley Snipes and Matt Walsh by plunging to his death. On Wednesday, the brand shared the video , which as of Thursday morning had nearly 1.5 million views on YouTube.

It turns out killing off the iconic 104-year-old nut had to do with the phenomenon of how people mourn the deaths of fictional characters, such as Iron Man, according to a creative leader behind the campaign.

The spot, done with VaynerMedia, will appear before Super Bowl kickoff during the pregame show. Then, during the third quarter of the game, the brand promises to “broadcast Mr. Peanut’s funeral, so the world can mourn the loss of the beloved legume together.”

VaynerMedia also handled Planters’ Super Bowl spot last year. Mike Pierantozzi, group creative director at Planters’ agency VaynerMedia, said that put the agency in the position of needing to come up with something that would top last year. He said the agency was looking to see how Planters could really line up with culture in a way that would explode.

“We started talking about how the internet treats when someone dies — specifically, we were thinking about fictional characters, [like when] Iron Man died,” Pierantozzi said, referring to the death of the Marvel character in last year’s “Avengers: Endgame.”

“When Iron Man died, we saw an incredible reaction on Twitter and on social media. It’s such a strange phenomenon,” Pierantozzi said.

Pierantozzi said with Mr. Peanut the shop wondered, “What would happen and how would the world react if he passed away?” He said the idea surfaced last summer.

“We did the unthinkable: we created a program and an idea where Mr. Peanut dies, and dies specifically sacrificing himself for his friends, which has always been a tenet of who he is and what he does — he always puts others first,” Pierantozzi said.

Super Bowl teasers are meant to generate some buzz for a brand’s in-game spot, often starting a story or introducing a theme or characters to get consumers excited before the full commercial airs. But this one seemed to be especially successful. By comparison, Hyundai’s teaser on YouTube had about 73,000 views and Olay’s had nearly 17,000 Thursday afternoon. Doritos, which released its teaser last week with a spoken-word rendition of “Old Town Road,” has racked up nearly 4 million views on YouTube, while a teaser for Cheetos’ spot with MC Hammer from last week has nearly 3 million.

“It’s with heavy hearts that we confirm Mr. Peanut has passed away at 104 years old,” Samantha Hess, Planters brand manager at Kraft Heinz, said in a statement. “He will be remembered as the legume who always brought people together for nutty adventures and a good time. We encourage fans to tune in to Mr. Peanut’s funeral during the third quarter of the Super Bowl to celebrate his life.”

Of course, some brands have gone the death route for the Super Bowl and failed, the Wall Street Journal’s CMO Today pointed out Thursday morning. Nationwide’s 2015 ad that showed a boy who had died and could never grow up weirded out viewers. (The company’s CMO left shortly after.) And a spot now known as the “robot suicide ad” from General Motors was later changed after sparking criticism, including from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Pierantozzi said with such a serious subject, creatives have to toe a certain line and approach it with empathy. He said it needs to hit the right note between humor and solemnity.

“You have to strike the perfect tone on this, or you really could end up with a problem,” he said. “So we definitely considered that. We’re very happy with the response we’re getting. We feel like we nailed the tone.”

He said there’s been positive feedback and an “outpouring of emotion” from onlookers.

Mr. Peanut’s social channels have been renamed with “The Estate of Mr. Peanut” with a graphic of a crying monocle, and his Twitter account asked users to “pay respects” with the hashtag, #RIPeanut. Other brands, including Skippy peanut butter, Budweiser, Syfy, Shake Shack and more, did just that. Pierantozzi said other Kraft Heinz brands did know about the effort, but to his knowledge some of the other brands weighing in did so organically.

In terms of the parsing out of information and the phony “leak” of the Super Bowl ad that transpired on Tuesday, Pierantozzi said, “We’re trying to keep this as close to reality as possible. I think we looked at Twitter and how things sometimes find their way onto Twitter, and we kind of tapped into those things.” The brand then sent out a press release confirming the death.

“I think it was written beautifully and struck the right tone,” Pierantozzi said.

Part of the buzz, Pierantozzi said, stems from the fact that Planters has built up Mr. Peanut so much, along with his “Nutmobile.”

“I think they made it really easy for people to get involved with the idea,” he said. “It was in the language of something people already understood in the world of Twitter and in the world of Facebook. It was very simple for people to get involved.”

The specifics of what will happen in Planters’ actual Super Bowl spot aren’t clear, and conspiracy theories on Twitter are abounding. But Pierantozzi says this much is true: “There will be a funeral, and an opportunity for hundreds of millions of people who love Mr. Peanut to pay their respects,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-23  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planters, world, killed, bowl, peanut, twitter, brands, pierantozzi, spot, super


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China says virus that killed 4 can spread between people. Here’s what we know about the outbreak

The outbreak of a new coronavirus stemming from Wuhan, China has killed four people with confirmed cases totaling more than 200 ahead of the massive Lunar New Year holiday during which hundreds of millions of people are expected to travel. As of Monday evening, the number of confirmed cases in China stood at 218 — with 198 in Wuhan — and four known deaths. SARS, a severe epidemic which emerged in China in 2002, killed nearly 800 people worldwide. “I remember the SARS outbreak very, very clearly


The outbreak of a new coronavirus stemming from Wuhan, China has killed four people with confirmed cases totaling more than 200 ahead of the massive Lunar New Year holiday during which hundreds of millions of people are expected to travel.
As of Monday evening, the number of confirmed cases in China stood at 218 — with 198 in Wuhan — and four known deaths.
SARS, a severe epidemic which emerged in China in 2002, killed nearly 800 people worldwide.
“I remember the SARS outbreak very, very clearly
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: weizhen tan
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China says virus that killed 4 can spread between people. Here's what we know about the outbreak

The outbreak of a new coronavirus stemming from Wuhan, China has killed four people with confirmed cases totaling more than 200 ahead of the massive Lunar New Year holiday during which hundreds of millions of people are expected to travel. Late Monday, China’s authorities confirmed that the virus can pass from person to person. The outbreak could hit the economy, experts warned as they called back to the fallout from the deadly Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) crisis in 2003.

The Wuhan virus — what it is and where it started

The coronavirus, which causes a type of pneumonia, was thought to have first originated at a wholesale seafood market in the Chinese city of Wuhan. It was first reported in late December. The World Health Organization said it appears the outbreak began in an animal source. On Sunday, China’s National Health Commission said the source of the virus remains unknown and that its transmission path hasn’t been completely traced. As of Monday evening, the number of confirmed cases in China stood at 218 — with 198 in Wuhan — and four known deaths. Authorities also confirmed five cases in Beijing, and one case in Shanghai, and 14 in the Guangdong province. Cases have also been reported in Thailand, South Korea and Japan. Symptoms include a fever and difficulty in breathing, and there is no vaccine for this new virus yet. The outbreak comes ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday period this week, when millions of Chinese will travel domestically and overseas — heightening the risk of more transmissions. The WHO said it will convene an emergency committee on the virus on Wednesday.

Comparison with SARS

The outbreak has sparked alarm because the disease is in the same family of viruses as SARS. SARS, a severe epidemic which emerged in China in 2002, killed nearly 800 people worldwide. It hit Asian cities such as Hong Kong, Singapore, Taipei and Beijing the hardest and triggered a severe downturn in the region. “I remember the SARS outbreak very, very clearly and the impact it had. These things have an enormous hit on economies,” said Rob Carnell, Dutch bank ING’s chief economist, adding that some countries even slipped into recession. “It is not inconceivable that if Wuhan becomes more widely spread, and starts to claim more lives, that it will result in a similar response,” added Carnell.

At the time, the rapid spread of SARS was blamed on a lack of transparency by the Chinese authorities. In an opinion editorial published Sunday, state tabloid Global Times wrote, “In the early moments of SARS, there was concealment in China. This must not be repeated.” This time, however, experts say China has moved more rapidly to deal with the crisis and also said that the virus appears to be less fatal than SARS. Chinese President Xi Jinping said on Monday that containing the spread of the coronavirus should be a “top priority,” according to state media. “Government and World Health Organization reports indicate that the virus is both less virulent and less deadly than SARS. The response from Beijing is also far faster this time than it was in 2002-04,” said Rory Green, economist for China and South Korea at research firm TS Lombard.

Impact on economy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: weizhen tan
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CDC confirms first US case of coronavirus that has killed 6 in China

Public health officials have confirmed the first U.S. case of a mysterious coronavirus that has already killed at least six people and sickened hundreds of others in China, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. A male traveler from China has been diagnosed in Snohomish County, Washington State with the Wuhan coronavirus, according to the CDC. “CDC will be working closely with the state health department on the particulars of this patient’s care.” CDC officials said they co


Public health officials have confirmed the first U.S. case of a mysterious coronavirus that has already killed at least six people and sickened hundreds of others in China, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.
A male traveler from China has been diagnosed in Snohomish County, Washington State with the Wuhan coronavirus, according to the CDC.
“CDC will be working closely with the state health department on the particulars of this patient’s care.”
CDC officials said they co
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
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CDC confirms first US case of coronavirus that has killed 6 in China

Public health officials have confirmed the first U.S. case of a mysterious coronavirus that has already killed at least six people and sickened hundreds of others in China, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

A male traveler from China has been diagnosed in Snohomish County, Washington State with the Wuhan coronavirus, according to the CDC.

Officials said the sick male, in his 30s, is “very healthy.” He is currently being isolated at a medical center in the state “out of caution” and “poses little risk” to the public, they said. The CDC said the male reached out to local health authorities on Jan. 15 once he started experiencing pneumonia-like symptoms.

“We’re being proactive at all levels,” Nancy Messonnier, CDC’s director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said on a conference call with reporters Tuesday. “CDC will be working closely with the state health department on the particulars of this patient’s care.”

Public health officials have confirmed more than 300 cases of the illness, which has evoked memories of the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, in China. Health officials have also confirmed cases in Thailand, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan.

CDC officials said they continue to believe the risk of it spreading to the American public is “low.” This weekend, the CDC and Homeland Security began screening people traveling to major airports in California and New York from Wuhan, China, where the outbreak is believed to have started. Health officials said Tuesday they will begin screenings at airports in Chicago and Atlanta. So far, they have screened more than 1,200 passengers.

“We hope over the next couple of days” the situation “will become clearer,” Messonnier said.

The World Health Organization is expected to convene a panel of experts in Geneva, Switzerland, on Wednesday to consider whether the illness should be a global health emergency.

The last time WHO declared a global health emergency was in 2019 for the Ebola outbreak in eastern Congo that killed more than 2,000 people. The agency also declared global emergencies for the 2016 Zika virus, the 2009 H1N1 swine flu and the 2014 polio and Ebola outbreaks.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that usually infect animals but can sometimes evolve and spread to humans. Symptoms in humans include fever, coughing and shortness of breath, which can progress to pneumonia.

Chinese authorities say many of the patients with the new illness had come into contact with seafood markets, suggesting the virus is spreading from animals to people. However, health officials say some “limited human-to-human transmission” occurred between close contacts.

In addition to the health concerns, some experts worried about the economic consequences if the new coronavirus evolves into a pandemic. They pointed to the fallout from the deadly SARS crisis in 2003. SARS, which emerged in China in 2002 and was identified in 2003, killed nearly 800 people worldwide. It hit Asian cities such as Hong Kong, Singapore, Taipei and Beijing the hardest and triggered a severe downturn in the region.

Fears that the coronavirus could disrupt travel and commerce, and slow economic growth sent a chill through global risk markets, hitting Asian stocks hard, depressing copper and oil prices, and sending investors into safe havens, like U.S. Treasurys and German bunds.

People can protect themselves from the virus by washing their hands with soap and water, avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth and keeping away from sick people, according to the CDC. Many people in China have purchased face masks to protect themselves from the outbreak.

—CNBC’s Weizhen Tan contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
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CDC to announce first US case of Chinese coronavirus that has killed 6, CNN reports

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.


This is breaking news.
Please check back for updates.
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CDC to announce first US case of Chinese coronavirus that has killed 6, CNN reports

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.


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US service members treated for concussions after Iranian missile strikes

Several U.S. service members were treated for concussions after Iran launched ballistic missiles earlier this month in Iraq in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian commander, the Pentagon said Thursday. “While no U.S. service members were killed in the Jan. 8 Iranian attack … several were treated for concussion symptoms from the blast and are still being assessed,” Capt. In the days after the attack, 11 service members have been transported to two hospitals, in Germany and Kuwait,


Several U.S. service members were treated for concussions after Iran launched ballistic missiles earlier this month in Iraq in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian commander, the Pentagon said Thursday.
“While no U.S. service members were killed in the Jan. 8 Iranian attack … several were treated for concussion symptoms from the blast and are still being assessed,” Capt.
In the days after the attack, 11 service members have been transported to two hospitals, in Germany and Kuwait,
US service members treated for concussions after Iranian missile strikes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: phil helsel
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US service members treated for concussions after Iranian missile strikes

A picture taken on January 13, 2020 during a press tour organised by the US-led coalition fighting the remnants of the Islamic State group, shows a view of the damage at Ain al-Asad military airbase housing US and other foreign troops in the western Iraqi province of Anbar.

Several U.S. service members were treated for concussions after Iran launched ballistic missiles earlier this month in Iraq in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian commander, the Pentagon said Thursday.

“While no U.S. service members were killed in the Jan. 8 Iranian attack … several were treated for concussion symptoms from the blast and are still being assessed,” Capt. Bill Urban, spokesman for U.S. Central Command, said in a statement.

“All personnel in the vicinity of a blast are screened for traumatic brain injury, and if deemed appropriate are transported to a higher level of care,” Urban said.

In the days after the attack, 11 service members have been transported to two hospitals, in Germany and Kuwait, for follow-up screening, Urban said.

He said that the service members were expected to return to Iraq following screening.

The day after the missile strikes, President Donald Trump said that no American or Iraqi lives were lost because of precautions that had been taken, the dispersal of forces “and an early warning system that worked very well.” The president also said then that no Americans were harmed.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that while some symptoms of traumatic brain injury, which include concussions, can appear right away, others may not be noticed for days or months after the injury.

Iran launched ballistic missiles against two bases in Iraq that house U.S. forces, including the Ain al-Asad base about 110 miles northwest of Baghdad, on Jan. 8 as retaliation for a drone strike that killed Gen. Qassem Soleimani, commander of Iran’s secretive Quds Force, and another man who is said to be the deputy of militias in Iraq.

Hours after the ballistic missile launch in Iraq, Iran’s military unintentionally shot down a Ukrainian passenger jet that had taken off from Tehran’s airport.

All 176 people aboard Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 were killed, including many Iranians and Canadians.

Iranian officials blamed “human error,” and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has called it a “disastrous mistake.”

Initially, Iranian officials soon said that mechanical failure was suspected. Iran’s foreign minister this week acknowledged that people “were lied to” for days.

The shootdown sparked protests in Iran.

Iran’s judiciary said this week that an undisclosed number of suspects involved in the accidental downing of the plane had been arrested.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: phil helsel
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Iraq now has an opportunity to create more independence from Iran, Atlantic Council says

“I think the Iraq situation…is maybe the most underestimated of all the things we’re looking at,” Frederick Kempe, president and CEO of the Atlantic Council, said on CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Monday. “There’s actually an opening for Iraq to create more independence for itself, from Iran,” he said. His comments came amid heightened tensions in the Middle East following an American airstrike in Iraq that killed Iran’s top commander Qasem Soleimani. Tehran retaliated by attacking U.S. target


“I think the Iraq situation…is maybe the most underestimated of all the things we’re looking at,” Frederick Kempe, president and CEO of the Atlantic Council, said on CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Monday.
“There’s actually an opening for Iraq to create more independence for itself, from Iran,” he said.
His comments came amid heightened tensions in the Middle East following an American airstrike in Iraq that killed Iran’s top commander Qasem Soleimani.
Tehran retaliated by attacking U.S. target
Iraq now has an opportunity to create more independence from Iran, Atlantic Council says Cached Page below :
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Iraq now has an opportunity to create more independence from Iran, Atlantic Council says

The death of Iran’s top general has created a chance for Iraq to gain more independence from Tehran, the chief executive of a think tank told CNBC this week.

“I think the Iraq situation…is maybe the most underestimated of all the things we’re looking at,” Frederick Kempe, president and CEO of the Atlantic Council, said on CNBC’s “Capital Connection” on Monday.

“There’s actually an opening for Iraq to create more independence for itself, from Iran,” he said. “That’s what I’d be watching.”

His comments came amid heightened tensions in the Middle East following an American airstrike in Iraq that killed Iran’s top commander Qasem Soleimani. Tehran retaliated by attacking U.S. targets in Iraq, but both sides now appear to have backed away from military actions.

“If you listen to some members of the U.S. government, they believe that Iraq over time has fallen more and more under the sway of Iran,” he said. America has been trying to push Iraq toward being more energy independent, but faced opposition from two individuals, he added.

“One of them was named Soleimani, one of them was named Muhandis,” he said, referring to Iraqi militia leader Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis who was killed in the same airstrike. “They’re both gone.”

“(The infrastructure and militia forces are) still all there, but the leadership that was so crucial is gone,” he said.

The prospect of Iraq shaking off Iranian influence would decrease, however, if U.S. forces leave, he predicted. Iraq’s prime minister last week asked the United States to start working on withdrawing troops from the country.

Kempe said that isn’t want President Donald Trump would want, and would not happen “overnight” or “at all.”

“I do think that it would be unfortunate because that, of course, would open the way for Iran to take even more control, at a point where the deaths of these two individuals could create more independence for Iraq from Iran.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: abigail ng
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Iran is closer ‘than ever before’ to regime collapse, says former Obama security advisor

Asked about the possibility of regime collapse, General James Jones, who was Obama’s national security advisor in 2009 and 2010, said the risk for Tehran cannot be ignored. “I think it’s clear that the regime in Iran has had a very bad couple of weeks,” Jones said. Crumbling economyIran’s economy has been buckling under increasingly heavy U.S. sanctions imposed after the Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal. While the Trump administration is encouraging the protesters, region


Asked about the possibility of regime collapse, General James Jones, who was Obama’s national security advisor in 2009 and 2010, said the risk for Tehran cannot be ignored.
“I think it’s clear that the regime in Iran has had a very bad couple of weeks,” Jones said.
Crumbling economyIran’s economy has been buckling under increasingly heavy U.S. sanctions imposed after the Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal.
While the Trump administration is encouraging the protesters, region
Iran is closer ‘than ever before’ to regime collapse, says former Obama security advisor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: natasha turak
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Iran is closer 'than ever before' to regime collapse, says former Obama security advisor

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Iran has had a turbulent past week, marked by more than a hundred Iranian deaths and dramatically increased tensions with the U.S. As it enters into the third day of protests fueled by popular anger over the government’s handling of a downed passenger jet, some observers argue this is the most vulnerable the Islamic Republic’s regime has been since its founding in 1979. Asked about the possibility of regime collapse, General James Jones, who was Obama’s national security advisor in 2009 and 2010, said the risk for Tehran cannot be ignored. “I think the needle is moved more in that direction in the last year towards that possibility than ever before with a combination of the sanctions, relative isolation of the regime, and then some catastrophic decisions have been made — assuming that we weren’t going to respond, which turned out to be a very, very bad decision,” Jones told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Atlantic Council Global Energy Forum in Abu Dhabi on Sunday. The response Jones referred to was the U.S. drone strike that killed top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani on Jan. 3, a move that shocked the region and prompted a response from Iran in the form of missiles strikes on two military bases in Iraq that housed U.S. forces. No one was killed in the strikes. Washington says the strike was in response to the storming by Iranian-backed Iraqi militias of the U.S. embassy in Baghdad and purported threats cited by the White House of impending attacks on Americans.

“I think it’s clear that the regime in Iran has had a very bad couple of weeks,” Jones said. “And one of the things that people don’t talk about too much is the degree of unrest that there is in the country, which I think is significant.” “So you take the removal of Soleimani, you take the accidental downing of the civilian aircraft coupled with the amount of popular unrest — the needle towards possible collapse of a regime has to be something that people think about. It’s probably not politically correct to talk about it, but you have to think about it.” The Trump administration denies its goal with “maximum pressure” through sanctions is regime change, but its officials have admitted they don’t expect Tehran to change its “malign behavior” anytime soon and some current and former administration officials have espoused regime change in past years.

‘Death, death to the dictator’

More than a million people are estimated to have marched in the streets in Iran for three days of mourning over Soleimani, who was the architect behind Iran’s expansion of influence in countries like Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Yemen through proxy forces. It appeared to be a time of unity for many Iranians in support of their government and against the U.S. That appears to have been reversed after Iran had to admit its military accidentally shot down a Ukrainian passenger jet that killed 176 people, most of whom were Iranian, after several days of official denials. Iran’s military said the “human error” happened amid “high tensions” as Iran was anticipating U.S. retaliation over its missile volley toward American targets in Iraq.

An Iranian man holds-up a placard as he attends in front of a University to mark the memory of the victims of the Ukraine Boeing 737 passenger plane in Tehrans business district on January 11, 2020. Morteza Nikoubazl | NurPhoto | Getty Images)

Thousands of Iranians are estimated to have protested the regime for the past three days and are now being met with live ammunition and tear gas from Iranian security forces, videos circulating online and verified by the Associated Press show. The protesters chants include “They are lying that our enemy is America, our enemy is right here” and “death, death to the dictator,” in an apparent reference to Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Jones says that this, in addition to years of worsening economic conditions, exposes major weaknesses for the regime. November saw street protests in Iran in response to the government dramatically raising fuel prices, which ultimately saw a brutal crackdown with hundreds of protesters killed by security forces.

Crumbling economy

Iran’s economy has been buckling under increasingly heavy U.S. sanctions imposed after the Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal. Inflation has surpassed 40%, according to the Statistical Center of Iran, unemployment is high and the economy is expected to contract more than 8% in the financial year 2019/20. But the control the state holds over the country remains high. Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and its paramilitary force, Basij, numbers around 250,000 and law enforcement personnel constitute an additional half million across the country, bolstering coercive power. These bodies were instrumental in putting down Iran’s 2009 Green Movement, a student-led political revolt that saw scores killed by government forces. While the Trump administration is encouraging the protesters, regional watchers warn that rather than the government backing down, yet more violence toward civilians could ensue.

Anger toward the government among many in Iran far pre-dates the Trump administration. Beyond sanctions, Iran’s economy is further handicapped by its own authorities, who have allowed gaping infrastructure deficiencies, a weak banking sector and widespread corruption. But some former security officials doubt the Trump narrative that maximum pressure will neuter the regime through internal discontent and unrest. Two former Middle East advisors under the Obama administration wrote in in Foreign Policy last month: “The biggest immediate risk is to the Iranian people themselves. Iran’s history and its actions during the current crisis leave little doubt that the regime will stop at virtually nothing to remain in power.”

Killing Soleimani ‘a powerful step’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: natasha turak
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It isn’t over — Iran’s promise of revenge could take months or years to play out, analysts say

The U.S. and Iran appear to have taken a step back from escalating hostilities triggered by the U.S. killing of top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani — but analysts warn “Iran is not finished with its retaliation.” They say Iran’s vow to retaliate could take years to play out. Tensions ratcheted up this week, following an airstrike ordered by President Donald Trump that killed Soleimani in Baghdad on Friday. Iran retaliated on Wednesday and blasted missiles at two Iraqi bases where U.S. soldiers w


The U.S. and Iran appear to have taken a step back from escalating hostilities triggered by the U.S. killing of top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani — but analysts warn “Iran is not finished with its retaliation.”
They say Iran’s vow to retaliate could take years to play out.
Tensions ratcheted up this week, following an airstrike ordered by President Donald Trump that killed Soleimani in Baghdad on Friday.
Iran retaliated on Wednesday and blasted missiles at two Iraqi bases where U.S. soldiers w
It isn’t over — Iran’s promise of revenge could take months or years to play out, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, months, say, analysts, killed, iran, end, revenge, white, trump, president, week, play, isnt, soleimani, promise, warn, irans


It isn't over — Iran's promise of revenge could take months or years to play out, analysts say

The U.S. and Iran appear to have taken a step back from escalating hostilities triggered by the U.S. killing of top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani — but analysts warn “Iran is not finished with its retaliation.”

They say Iran’s vow to retaliate could take years to play out.

Tensions ratcheted up this week, following an airstrike ordered by President Donald Trump that killed Soleimani in Baghdad on Friday. Iran retaliated on Wednesday and blasted missiles at two Iraqi bases where U.S. soldiers were housed — no Americans were killed in the attacks.

After the attacks, Trump said on Twitter: “All is well!” He later spoke from the grand foyer of the White House, and said Iran “appears to be standing down” and even suggested that the U.S. was open to negotiations with Tehran.

“Since there were no casualties, President Trump seems to be taking the opportunity to say this is the end of this round. That’s a hopeful sign, (but) it doesn’t mean this is the end of this conflict,” said Daniel Shapiro, who was the U.S. ambassador to Israel between 2011 and 2017.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, months, say, analysts, killed, iran, end, revenge, white, trump, president, week, play, isnt, soleimani, promise, warn, irans


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Cowen downgrades Boeing shares: ‘Turnaround will take time’

Cowen on Wednesday lowered its rating of Boeing stock to market perform from outperform, citing the extended 737 Max crisis for piling on the company’s costs and delaying production. The note did not mention the crash of a Boeing 737-800 in Iran that killed all 176 people on board. Cowen’s downgrade comes a few weeks after Boeing replaced CEO Dennis Muilenburg with David Calhoun, a person who Cowen said is “a good choice for CEO.” However, the firm said it believes Boeing’s “turnaround will take


Cowen on Wednesday lowered its rating of Boeing stock to market perform from outperform, citing the extended 737 Max crisis for piling on the company’s costs and delaying production.
The note did not mention the crash of a Boeing 737-800 in Iran that killed all 176 people on board.
Cowen’s downgrade comes a few weeks after Boeing replaced CEO Dennis Muilenburg with David Calhoun, a person who Cowen said is “a good choice for CEO.”
However, the firm said it believes Boeing’s “turnaround will take
Cowen downgrades Boeing shares: ‘Turnaround will take time’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aircraft, 737, turnaround, downgrades, boeing, worldwideboeing, working, shares, cowen, ceo, crash, max, killed


Cowen downgrades Boeing shares: 'Turnaround will take time'

Cowen on Wednesday lowered its rating of Boeing stock to market perform from outperform, citing the extended 737 Max crisis for piling on the company’s costs and delaying production.

The note did not mention the crash of a Boeing 737-800 in Iran that killed all 176 people on board. That aircraft was not a 737 Max model and operator Ukraine International Airlines said the cause of the crash was not immediately known.

Cowen’s downgrade comes a few weeks after Boeing replaced CEO Dennis Muilenburg with David Calhoun, a person who Cowen said is “a good choice for CEO.” However, the firm said it believes Boeing’s “turnaround will take time,” as the company is working to recertify its 737 Max aircraft. Two 737 Max crashes within five months killed 346 people, resulting in the aircraft being grounded worldwide.

Boeing shares slipped 1.8% in trading Wednesday to close at $331.37.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, aircraft, 737, turnaround, downgrades, boeing, worldwideboeing, working, shares, cowen, ceo, crash, max, killed


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35 killed in stampede at funeral for slain general, Iran state TV says

A stampede erupted Tuesday at a funeral procession for a top Iranian general killed in a U.S. airstrike last week, killing 35 people and injuring 48 others, state television reported. According to the report, the stampede took place in Kerman, the hometown of Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, as the procession got underway. Iranian state TV gave the casualty toll in its online report, without saying where it obtained the information. Pirhossein Koulivand, the head of Iran’s emergency me


A stampede erupted Tuesday at a funeral procession for a top Iranian general killed in a U.S. airstrike last week, killing 35 people and injuring 48 others, state television reported.
According to the report, the stampede took place in Kerman, the hometown of Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, as the procession got underway.
Iranian state TV gave the casualty toll in its online report, without saying where it obtained the information.
Pirhossein Koulivand, the head of Iran’s emergency me
35 killed in stampede at funeral for slain general, Iran state TV says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, killed, slain, general, slaying, tehran, kerman, irans, iran, procession, state, soleimani, funeral, stampede, iranian


35 killed in stampede at funeral for slain general, Iran state TV says

Iranian people attend a funeral procession for Iranian Major-General Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, and Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, who were killed in an air strike at Baghdad airport, in Tehran, Iran January 6, 2020.

A stampede erupted Tuesday at a funeral procession for a top Iranian general killed in a U.S. airstrike last week, killing 35 people and injuring 48 others, state television reported.

According to the report, the stampede took place in Kerman, the hometown of Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, as the procession got underway. Initial videos posted online showed people lying lifeless on a road, others shouting and trying to give help them.

Iranian state TV gave the casualty toll in its online report, without saying where it obtained the information. Pirhossein Koulivand, the head of Iran’s emergency medical services, earlier spoke by telephone to state TV and confirmed the stampede took place.

“Unfortunately as a result of the stampede, some of our compatriots have been injured and some have been killed during the funeral processions,” he said.

A procession in Tehran on Monday drew over 1 million people in the Iranian capital, crowding both main thoroughfares and side streets in Tehran.

The leader of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard threatened on Tuesday to “set ablaze” places supported by the United States over the killing of a top Iranian general in a U.S. airstrike last week, sparking cries from the crowd of supporters of “Death to Israel!”

Hossein Salami made the pledge before a crowd of thousands gathered in a central square in Kerman, the hometown of the slain Gen. Qassem Soleimani. His vow mirrored the demands of top Iranian officials — from Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to others — as well as supporters across the Islamic Republic, demanding retaliation against America for a slaying that’s drastically raised tensions across the Middle East.

Mourners in Kerman dressed in black carried posters bearing the image of Soleimani, a man whose slaying prompted Iran’s supreme leader to weep over his casket on Monday as a crowd said by police to be in the millions filled Tehran streets. Although there was no independent estimate, aerial footage and Associated Press journalists suggested a turnout of at least 1 million, and the throngs were visible on satellite images of Tehran taken Monday.

The outpouring of grief was an unprecedented honor for a man viewed by Iranians as a national hero for his work leading the Guard’s expeditionary Quds Force. The U.S. blames him for the killing of American troops in Iraq and accused him of plotting new attacks just before his death Friday in a drone strike near Baghdad’s airport. Soleimani also led forces in Syria backing President Bashar Assad in a long war, and he also served as the point man for Iranian proxies in countries like Iraq, Lebanon and Yemen.

His slaying already has pushed Tehran to abandon the remaining limits of its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers as his successor and others vow to take revenge. In Baghdad, the parliament has called for the expulsion of all American troops from Iraqi soil, something analysts fear could allow Islamic State militants to mount a comeback.

Soleimani’s remains and those of the others killed in the airstrike were brought to a central square in Kerman, a desert city surrounded by mountains that dates back to the days of the Silk Road.

Speaking in Kerman, Salami praised Soleimani’s exploits, describing him as essential to backing Palestinian groups, Yemen’s Houthi rebels and Shiite militias in Iraq and Syria. As a martyr, Soleimani represented an even greater threat to Iran’s enemies, Salami said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, killed, slain, general, slaying, tehran, kerman, irans, iran, procession, state, soleimani, funeral, stampede, iranian


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