Malaysia rejects call to free Vietnamese woman accused of killing Kim Jong Un’s brother

Huong and Siti Aisyah were charged with killing Kim Jong Nam by smearing his face with VX poison, a banned chemical weapon, at Kuala Lumpur airport in February 2017. The trial featured airport video recordings of two women allegedly assaulting Kim Jong Nam while he prepared to check in for a flight. Defence lawyers have maintained the women were pawns in an assassination orchestrated by North Korean agents. Kim Jong Nam was living in exile in Macau before the killing, having fled his homeland af


Huong and Siti Aisyah were charged with killing Kim Jong Nam by smearing his face with VX poison, a banned chemical weapon, at Kuala Lumpur airport in February 2017. The trial featured airport video recordings of two women allegedly assaulting Kim Jong Nam while he prepared to check in for a flight. Defence lawyers have maintained the women were pawns in an assassination orchestrated by North Korean agents. Kim Jong Nam was living in exile in Macau before the killing, having fled his homeland af
Malaysia rejects call to free Vietnamese woman accused of killing Kim Jong Un’s brother Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: manan vatsyayana, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, trial, kim, court, woman, korean, free, brother, uns, vietnamese, malaysia, nam, killing, thi, rejects, siti, jong


Malaysia rejects call to free Vietnamese woman accused of killing Kim Jong Un's brother

Malaysia’s attorney-general on Thursday rejected Vietnam’s request to free a woman accused of the murder of Kim Jong Nam, the half-brother of North Korea’s leader, and a court set April 1 for her trial to resume.

Vietnam’s call had followed Monday’s release, at Indonesia’s request, of an Indonesian woman, who had been accused along with the Vietnamese, Doan Thi Huong.

Huong and Siti Aisyah were charged with killing Kim Jong Nam by smearing his face with VX poison, a banned chemical weapon, at Kuala Lumpur airport in February 2017.

“It’s our complaint that the public prosecution has not acted fairly and justly to Doan Thi Huong,” her lawyer Hisyam Teh, who asked for an adjournment on the grounds that his client was unwell.

Teh told the court the rejection of Vietnam’s request was “perverse”, and a case of discrimination, as the attorney-general had favored one party over another, since the court had ordered both to enter their defense.

Vietnam’s ministers of justice and foreign affairs are communicating with their Malaysian counterparts to secure his client’s release, Teh added.

Prosecutors had sprung a surprise on Monday by asking the court to drop the charge against Siti Aisyah and free her. The Indonesian embassy flew her to Jakarta the same day.

The trial featured airport video recordings of two women allegedly assaulting Kim Jong Nam while he prepared to check in for a flight.

In one, a woman identified as Huong puts her hands on Kim’s face, while a blurry image shows someone the prosecution identified as Siti Aisyah hurrying away.

Teh rejected speculation that Siti Aisyah’s release was due to a lack of video evidence against her, saying the court had already established a case against both.

“So it makes no difference whatsover if Doan’s image was caught on the CCTV camera, none at all,” he said after the hearing.

Defence lawyers have maintained the women were pawns in an assassination orchestrated by North Korean agents. The North Korean embassy in Kuala Lumpur was defaced with graffiti just hours before the trial was to resume.

Interpol had issued a red notice for four North Koreans identified as suspects by Malaysian police who had left the country hours after the murder.

After the ruling, Huong was seen sobbing as she spoke with Vietnamese embassy officials, before being whisked away by police.

In Vietnam, Huong’s stepmother, Nguyen Thi Vy, said the decision saddened her.

“I don’t understand why the other girl was released, but not my daughter,” Vy told Reuters after the decision. “They were charged with the same thing, it’s such an injustice.”

Kim Jong Nam was living in exile in Macau before the killing, having fled his homeland after his half-brother Kim Jong Un became North Korea’s leader in 2011 following their father’s death.

Some South Korean lawmakers said the North Korean regime had ordered the assassination of Kim Jong Nam, who had been critical of his family’s dynastic rule. Pyongyang has denied this.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: manan vatsyayana, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, trial, kim, court, woman, korean, free, brother, uns, vietnamese, malaysia, nam, killing, thi, rejects, siti, jong


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Suspect freed after Malaysia drops murder charge in killing of Kim Jong Un’s brother

An Indonesian woman held two years on suspicion of killing the North Korean leader’s half brother was freed from custody Monday after a Malaysian judge discharged the murder charge against her. The murder trial of Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong was put on hold after the surprise development. They were the only suspects in custody after four North Korean suspects fled the country the same morning Kim was killed. Intent to kill is crucial to a murder charge under Malaysian law. He had been living abroa


An Indonesian woman held two years on suspicion of killing the North Korean leader’s half brother was freed from custody Monday after a Malaysian judge discharged the murder charge against her. The murder trial of Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong was put on hold after the surprise development. They were the only suspects in custody after four North Korean suspects fled the country the same morning Kim was killed. Intent to kill is crucial to a murder charge under Malaysian law. He had been living abroa
Suspect freed after Malaysia drops murder charge in killing of Kim Jong Un’s brother Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: mohd rasfan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, malaysia, told, charge, jong, killing, north, korean, suspect, uns, trial, murder, freed, suspects, malaysian, drops, kill, kim, women


Suspect freed after Malaysia drops murder charge in killing of Kim Jong Un's brother

An Indonesian woman held two years on suspicion of killing the North Korean leader’s half brother was freed from custody Monday after a Malaysian judge discharged the murder charge against her.

The judge discharged Siti Aisyah without an acquittal after prosecutors said they wanted to withdraw the charge. They did not give a reason.

She was quickly ushered out of the courtroom and into a waiting car. An emotional Aisyah told reporters she had only learned Monday morning that she would be freed. “I am surprised and very happy.”

The murder trial of Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong was put on hold after the surprise development. She was to have begun giving her defense in Monday’s court session, after months of delay.

Indonesian Ambassador Rusdi Kirana said he was thankful to the Malaysian government.

The two young women were accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim’s face in an airport terminal in Kuala Lumpur on Feb. 13, 2017. They have said they thought they were taking part in a prank for a TV show. They were the only suspects in custody after four North Korean suspects fled the country the same morning Kim was killed.

Salim Bashir, a lawyer for Huong, said previously she was prepared to testify under oath for her defense.

“She is confident and ready to give her version of the story. It is completely different from what the prosecutors had painted. She was filming a prank and had no intention to kill or injure anyone,” he told the AP.

Lawyers for the women have previously said they were pawns in a political assassination with clear links to the North Korean embassy in Kuala Lumpur, and that the prosecution failed to show the women had any intention to kill. Intent to kill is crucial to a murder charge under Malaysian law.

Malaysian officials have never officially accused North Korea and have made it clear they don’t want the trial politicized.

Kim Jong Nam was the eldest son in the current generation of North Korea’s ruling family. He had been living abroad for years but could have been seen as a threat to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s rule.

Murder carries a mandatory sentence of hanging, but Malaysia’s government plans to abolish the death penalty and has put all executions on hold until the laws are changed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: mohd rasfan, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, malaysia, told, charge, jong, killing, north, korean, suspect, uns, trial, murder, freed, suspects, malaysian, drops, kill, kim, women


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Trump says North Korea can be a ‘great’ economic power, but experts say it’s uninvestable

With U.S. President Donald Trump declaring repeatedly that North Korea can become “one of the great economic powers” in the world, risk consultancy Verisk Maplecroft tested that claim and found that the rogue state ranks as the least investable country in the world. Other experts have also stressed that even if sanctions on Pyongyang were to be removed some day, risks for investors remain very high, as it is extremely unlikely that North Korea will overhaul itself politically and economically. E


With U.S. President Donald Trump declaring repeatedly that North Korea can become “one of the great economic powers” in the world, risk consultancy Verisk Maplecroft tested that claim and found that the rogue state ranks as the least investable country in the world. Other experts have also stressed that even if sanctions on Pyongyang were to be removed some day, risks for investors remain very high, as it is extremely unlikely that North Korea will overhaul itself politically and economically. E
Trump says North Korea can be a ‘great’ economic power, but experts say it’s uninvestable Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: weizhen tan, saul loeb, afp, getty images, -anwita basu, the economist intelligence unit
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, experts, korea, trump, state, think, kim, uninvestable, talks, great, summit, power, say, verisk, economic


Trump says North Korea can be a 'great' economic power, but experts say it's uninvestable

With U.S. President Donald Trump declaring repeatedly that North Korea can become “one of the great economic powers” in the world, risk consultancy Verisk Maplecroft tested that claim and found that the rogue state ranks as the least investable country in the world.

Despite the president’s claims, “Kim Jong-un’s authoritarian regime has been classified as the world’s most perilous investment destination for business,” Verisk Maplecroft said in a report published before the talks began.

Other experts have also stressed that even if sanctions on Pyongyang were to be removed some day, risks for investors remain very high, as it is extremely unlikely that North Korea will overhaul itself politically and economically.

Ahead of the failed summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which ended on Thursday without a deal, Trump had dangled the prospect of a stronger economy for the impoverished state — tweeting repeatedly on the topic. Experts say that was part of a negotiating tactic.

Even after talks ended abruptly, the president continued to tout the possibility of the reclusive country becoming “an absolute economic power.”

“I think he’s got a chance to have one of the most successful countries — rapidly too — on Earth,” Trump said of Kim, at a press conference on Thursday at the end of the summit. “There is tremendous potential in North Korea, and I think he’s going to lead it to a very important thing, economically. I think it’s going to be an absolute economic power.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: weizhen tan, saul loeb, afp, getty images, -anwita basu, the economist intelligence unit
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, experts, korea, trump, state, think, kim, uninvestable, talks, great, summit, power, say, verisk, economic


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South Korea may be the biggest loser in failed talks at the Trump-Kim summit

South Korea — and its President Moon Jae-in — may be the biggest losers after a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un ended without a deal, analysts said. The summit was cut short on the final day after both sides failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang. “South Korea loses the most from the Hanoi summit ending without agreement,” according to Alison Evans, deputy head of Asia Pacific country risk at consul


South Korea — and its President Moon Jae-in — may be the biggest losers after a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un ended without a deal, analysts said. The summit was cut short on the final day after both sides failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang. “South Korea loses the most from the Hanoi summit ending without agreement,” according to Alison Evans, deputy head of Asia Pacific country risk at consul
South Korea may be the biggest loser in failed talks at the Trump-Kim summit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: yen nee lee, antonio masiello, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, trumpkim, korea, support, sanctions, loser, moons, failed, president, talks, kim, biggest, moon, hanoi, summit, south


South Korea may be the biggest loser in failed talks at the Trump-Kim summit

South Korea — and its President Moon Jae-in — may be the biggest losers after a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un ended without a deal, analysts said.

Trump and Kim met in Hanoi, Vietnam for a two-day meeting that ended Thursday. The summit was cut short on the final day after both sides failed to agree on denuclearizing North Korea and lifting economic sanctions on Pyongyang.

“South Korea loses the most from the Hanoi summit ending without agreement,” according to Alison Evans, deputy head of Asia Pacific country risk at consultancy IHS Markit.

For Seoul, Thursday’s developments dimmed prospects of re-starting inter-Korean projects that have been stalled by sanctions, Evans wrote in a Thursday note. Political support for Moon could also fall further, she added.

“Importantly, Moon’s support rating has fallen steadily … Without progress on North Korea, Moon’s domestic agenda becomes his only metric of success for voters, who have already criticised his administration for failing to deliver on economic metrics such as unemployment,” she added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: yen nee lee, antonio masiello, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, north, trumpkim, korea, support, sanctions, loser, moons, failed, president, talks, kim, biggest, moon, hanoi, summit, south


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Otto Warmbier’s parents blame Kim Jong Un, push back on Trump

Before departing from Hanoi, Trump was asked whether he raised the issue of Warmbier’s captivity and death with Kim. Stung by the criticism and the statement from Warmbier’s family, Trump pushed back in a pair of tweets Friday afternoon. Trump’s clarification did not address the question of whether he believed Kim himself knew about Warmbier’s imprisonment at the time. In Warmbier’s case, Trump again this week sought to blame the circumstances, and not the people in power. Nonetheless, he said,


Before departing from Hanoi, Trump was asked whether he raised the issue of Warmbier’s captivity and death with Kim. Stung by the criticism and the statement from Warmbier’s family, Trump pushed back in a pair of tweets Friday afternoon. Trump’s clarification did not address the question of whether he believed Kim himself knew about Warmbier’s imprisonment at the time. In Warmbier’s case, Trump again this week sought to blame the circumstances, and not the people in power. Nonetheless, he said,
Otto Warmbier’s parents blame Kim Jong Un, push back on Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: christina wilkie, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, knew, trump, president, push, intelligence, death, jong, otto, blame, parents, warmbiers, kim, world, north


Otto Warmbier's parents blame Kim Jong Un, push back on Trump

The parents of Otto Warmbier, who died of injuries sustained in prison in North Korea, issued a stinging rebuke to President Donald Trump for saying he believed North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s claim that he was unaware of the brutal conditions under which their son was being held, or the abuse he suffered during his captivity.

“We have been respectful during this summit process. Now we must speak out. Kim and his evil regime are responsible for the death of our son Otto,” Fred and Cindy Warmbier said in a statement Friday. “Kim and his evil regime are responsible for unimaginable cruelty and inhumanity. No excuses or lavish praise can change that.”

The statement came a day after Trump returned from a nuclear summit with Kim in Hanoi, Vietnam, which failed to make any progress on denuclearizing North Korea.

Before departing from Hanoi, Trump was asked whether he raised the issue of Warmbier’s captivity and death with Kim. Trump said he had.

“Some really bad things happened to Otto — some really, really bad things,” Trump said, “but [Kim] tells me that he didn’t know about it, and I will take him at his word.”

Trump added that Kim “felt very badly about it,” and that the dictator “knew the case very well but he knew it later,” implying that Kim somehow only learned of his American prisoner’s situation after he was released and died of the injuries he suffered at the hands of Kim’s government.

Warmbier, 22, was arrested in Pyongyang in 2016 for removing a banner from a hotel. He was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor. He was released in June 2017 but returned to the United States in a coma and died just days after he landed on U.S. soil.

Foreign policy experts were quick to contradict Trump’s claim that Kim was unaware of Warmbier’s situation.

“It is inconceivable that such a high profile American prisoner like Otto Warmbier, that Kim Jong Un would not know,” Bill Richardson, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations who was deeply involved in back-channel negotiations to obtain Warmbier’s release, told MSNBC on Thursday.

And on CNN, Richardson said: “The president should know better. And what should happen is a full accounting. Kim Jong Un should say, to his intelligence people, ‘Let’s tell the truth on this.’ But they’re not going to do it.”

Stung by the criticism and the statement from Warmbier’s family, Trump pushed back in a pair of tweets Friday afternoon.

“Of course I hold North Korea responsible for Otto’s mistreatment and death,” Trump said in the tweets, after noting: “Remember I got Otto out along with three others.”

Trump’s clarification did not address the question of whether he believed Kim himself knew about Warmbier’s imprisonment at the time.

This is not the first time that Trump has taken the word of an autocratic leader over the conclusions of his own intelligence services.

In 2017, at a summit in Helsinki with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump publicly accepted Putin’s denial that Russia had interfered in the U.S. presidential election in 2016. This came despite a unanimous assessment by U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies that Russia did, indeed, try to sway the election in Trump’s favor.

“I have great confidence in my intelligence people, but I will tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial today,” Trump said during a joint press conference with Putin.

The following year, Trump again accepted Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman’s denial that he had anything to do with the murder of journalist and Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi, who was killed in October after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

“I hate the crime, I hate the cover-up. But I will tell you this: The crown prince hates it more than I do, and they have vehemently denied it,” Trump told reporters in November, more than a month after Khashoggi was slain and mutilated.

Asked who should be held accountable for Khashoggi’s death, Trump replied, that “maybe the world should be held accountable because the world is a vicious place. The world is a very, very vicious place.”

In Warmbier’s case, Trump again this week sought to blame the circumstances, and not the people in power.

“Those prisons are rough, they’re rough places and bad things happened,” Trump said of North Korea’s notoriously brutal prison system. Nonetheless, he said, “I don’t believe [Kim] knew about it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: christina wilkie, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, knew, trump, president, push, intelligence, death, jong, otto, blame, parents, warmbiers, kim, world, north


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North Korea spent most of Trump’s first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal. Here is a timeline

“It’s a good thing that they aren’t testing right now but it doesn’t mean that they can’t advance their program in other ways or continue to add warheads to their arsenal or missiles to their delivery system stockpiles,” said Alexandra Bell, senior policy director at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation. “The lack of testing just means that they are comfortable with the designs they have,” Bell told CNBC. Under the third-generation North Korean leader, the reclusive state has conduc


“It’s a good thing that they aren’t testing right now but it doesn’t mean that they can’t advance their program in other ways or continue to add warheads to their arsenal or missiles to their delivery system stockpiles,” said Alexandra Bell, senior policy director at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation. “The lack of testing just means that they are comfortable with the designs they have,” Bell told CNBC. Under the third-generation North Korean leader, the reclusive state has conduc
North Korea spent most of Trump’s first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal. Here is a timeline Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: amanda macias, saul loeb, afp, getty images, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, trumps, office, korea, missiles, nuclear, launched, il, yearsstarting, north, arsenal, testing, timeline, perfecting, kim, bell, weapons


North Korea spent most of Trump's first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal. Here is a timeline

“It’s a good thing that they aren’t testing right now but it doesn’t mean that they can’t advance their program in other ways or continue to add warheads to their arsenal or missiles to their delivery system stockpiles,” said Alexandra Bell, senior policy director at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation. “The lack of testing just means that they are comfortable with the designs they have,” Bell told CNBC.

Under the third-generation North Korean leader, the reclusive state has conducted its most powerful nuclear test, launched its first-ever intercontinental ballistic missile and threatened to send missiles into the waters near Guam.

Since 2011, Kim has fired more than 85 missiles and four nuclear weapons tests, which is more than what his father, Kim Jong Il, and grandfather, Kim Il Sung, launched over a period of 27 years.

Starting with the most recent, here is a look at North Korea’s defiant rocket launches in 2017, which often provoked angry responses from Trump:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: amanda macias, saul loeb, afp, getty images, kcna
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spent, trumps, office, korea, missiles, nuclear, launched, il, yearsstarting, north, arsenal, testing, timeline, perfecting, kim, bell, weapons


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Trump-Kim summit was cut short after North Korea demanded an end to sanctions, Trump says

U.S. President Donald Trump said Thursday he cut short his nuclear summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un because the two sides could not agree on sanctions. “It wasn’t a good thing to be signing anything,” Trump said during a post-summit news conference. The president said he had not committed to a third summit with Kim. Still, Trump described the talks as “productive,” and highlighted his relationship with his North Korean counterpart — “I think we’ll end up being very good friends.” “Bas


U.S. President Donald Trump said Thursday he cut short his nuclear summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un because the two sides could not agree on sanctions. “It wasn’t a good thing to be signing anything,” Trump said during a post-summit news conference. The president said he had not committed to a third summit with Kim. Still, Trump described the talks as “productive,” and highlighted his relationship with his North Korean counterpart — “I think we’ll end up being very good friends.” “Bas
Trump-Kim summit was cut short after North Korea demanded an end to sanctions, Trump says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: everett rosenfeld, jorge silva, linh pham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, sanctions, trumpkim, short, north, demanded, president, summit, end, options, korean, korea, walk, wanted, cut, kim


Trump-Kim summit was cut short after North Korea demanded an end to sanctions, Trump says

U.S. President Donald Trump said Thursday he cut short his nuclear summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un because the two sides could not agree on sanctions.

“It wasn’t a good thing to be signing anything,” Trump said during a post-summit news conference. “We had some options, and at this time we decided not to do any of the options, and we’ll see where that goes.”

“Sometimes you have to walk, and this was just one of those times,” he added.

The president said he had not committed to a third summit with Kim. Still, Trump described the talks as “productive,” and highlighted his relationship with his North Korean counterpart — “I think we’ll end up being very good friends.”

At the end of the day, though, Trump said he “would not have been happy about” any deal he saw on the table for Thursday’s talks.

“Basically, they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety and we couldn’t do that,” Trump said. “They were willing to de-nuke a large portion of the areas that we wanted, but we couldn’t give up all of the sanctions for that. So we continue to work and we’ll see, but we had to walk away from that particular suggestion. We had to walk away from that.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: everett rosenfeld, jorge silva, linh pham, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, sanctions, trumpkim, short, north, demanded, president, summit, end, options, korean, korea, walk, wanted, cut, kim


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Vietnamese tanker bound for North Korea with gasoline cargo as Trump, Kim meet in Hanoi

A Vietnamese tanker was bound for North Korea carrying 2,000 tonnes of gasoline, Refinitiv shipping data showed, just as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump prepared for key talks on security and cooperation in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi. Under sanctions imposed by the United Nations, North Korea is heavily restricted in its imports of crude oil and refined petroleum products. The Viet Tin 01’s previous stops were Taiwan, Singapore and Bangladesh. She said the compa


A Vietnamese tanker was bound for North Korea carrying 2,000 tonnes of gasoline, Refinitiv shipping data showed, just as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump prepared for key talks on security and cooperation in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi. Under sanctions imposed by the United Nations, North Korea is heavily restricted in its imports of crude oil and refined petroleum products. The Viet Tin 01’s previous stops were Taiwan, Singapore and Bangladesh. She said the compa
Vietnamese tanker bound for North Korea with gasoline cargo as Trump, Kim meet in Hanoi Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: wang di, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, shipping, hanoi, gasoline, cargo, north, registered, meet, tanker, ships, viet, korea, kim, data, tin, vietnamese


Vietnamese tanker bound for North Korea with gasoline cargo as Trump, Kim meet in Hanoi

A Vietnamese tanker was bound for North Korea carrying 2,000 tonnes of gasoline, Refinitiv shipping data showed, just as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump prepared for key talks on security and cooperation in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi.

The vessel, the Viet Tin 01, arrived just outside the harbor of Nampo on North Korea’s western coast on Feb. 25 carrying 2,000 tonnes of gasoline, according to the data compiled by Refinitiv. The data tracks ships’ movements as well as providing details of their cargoes and official destinations as registered by shippers.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether the tanker unloaded cargo at Nampo.

Under sanctions imposed by the United Nations, North Korea is heavily restricted in its imports of crude oil and refined petroleum products.

Trump and Kim began a second day of talks on Thursday, with both sides expressing hope for progress on improving relations and the key issue of denuclearization in the pair’s second summit meeting.

The 5,000 deadweight tonne tanker – small by industry standards – was scheduled to deliver the fuel to Daesan in South Korea, according to its official destination registered in the shipping data. The vessel still showed Daesan as its destination as of Feb. 28, according to the data.

The Viet Tin 01’s previous stops were Taiwan, Singapore and Bangladesh. It was not immediately clear where the ship loaded the gasoline.

An official for the ship’s registered owner, Ho Chi Minh City-based Viet Trust Shipping Corp., said she was not aware of the ship’s whereabouts. She said the company owned two ships, the Viet Tin 01, and the Viet Tin Lucky, which is currently off the west coast of Thailand.

The Vietnamese foreign ministry did not respond to a request for comment.

News outlet NK Pro, which monitors North Korea developments, said in a report on Thursday “the transfer would likely push against U.N. resolutions” under which its fuel imports are restricted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: wang di, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, shipping, hanoi, gasoline, cargo, north, registered, meet, tanker, ships, viet, korea, kim, data, tin, vietnamese


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Even Democrats in Congress are cheering Trump for walking away from talks with Kim Jong Un

Congressional leaders — including Democrats — broadly praised President Donald Trump for walking away from his second summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un on Thursday. “President Trump did the right thing by walking away and not cutting a poor deal for the sake of a photo op. So we continue to work and we’ll see, but we had to walk away from that particular suggestion. He added that the “president should be commended for walking away when it became clear insufficient progress has been m


Congressional leaders — including Democrats — broadly praised President Donald Trump for walking away from his second summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un on Thursday. “President Trump did the right thing by walking away and not cutting a poor deal for the sake of a photo op. So we continue to work and we’ll see, but we had to walk away from that particular suggestion. He added that the “president should be commended for walking away when it became clear insufficient progress has been m
Even Democrats in Congress are cheering Trump for walking away from talks with Kim Jong Un Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walking, democrats, trump, president, deal, jong, korea, walk, congress, away, kim, talks, north, sanctions, cheering


Even Democrats in Congress are cheering Trump for walking away from talks with Kim Jong Un

Congressional leaders — including Democrats — broadly praised President Donald Trump for walking away from his second summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un on Thursday.

Talks in Vietnam between Trump and Kim abruptly ended Thursday before a planned lunch and signing ceremony for some kind of agreement. Trump said he cut the summit short because the sides could not come to terms on whether to remove sanctions on North Korea as they seek a path to Pyongyang’s denuclearization.

“Sometimes you have to walk, and this was just one of those times,” the U.S. president said during a news conference following the summit.

Congressional leaders largely cheered Trump for backing out of talks instead of agreeing to unfavorable terms. Democrats in particular said they had worried about the president striking an inadequate deal — in part to alleviate pressure created by his former lawyer Michael Cohen’s explosive Capitol Hill testimony on Wednesday.

“I was pleased to see the president recognize North Korea’s unwillingness to strike a comprehensive deal,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said on the Senate floor Thursday. “President Trump did the right thing by walking away and not cutting a poor deal for the sake of a photo op. … I’ve always been concerned about the possibility of a bad deal, especially with the other pressures currently on the president.”

While House Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared Kim “the big winner” for getting two face-to-face meetings with the U.S. president, she praised Trump for walking away on Thursday. The California Democrat told reporters “it’s good that the president did not give him anything for the little that he was proposing.”

Trump has pushed North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons, touting the economic benefits the repressive country could see if the U.S. and international community ease sanctions. Kim is reluctant to give up nuclear weapons and the leverage they give him.

Trump hopes to notch a signature foreign policy achievement by pushing North Korea to denuclearize. He also wants to show he could accomplish what his predecessor President Barack Obama could not. Trump has repeatedly claimed the U.S. was on the brink of war with Pyongyang before he took office, although Obama administration veterans dispute this characterization.

But Trump’s clamoring for a deal did not drive him to accept one Thursday. The president said he “would not have been happy about” any agreement that would have come out of the leaders’ second summit.

“Basically, they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety and we couldn’t do that,” Trump said. “They were willing to denuke a large portion of the areas that we wanted, but we couldn’t give up all of the sanctions for that. So we continue to work and we’ll see, but we had to walk away from that particular suggestion. We had to walk away from that.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called it “smart” to meet Kim in Singapore and in Vietnam to show him the “economic prosperity” possible if North Korea abandons its nuclear and missile programs. He added that the “president should be commended for walking away when it became clear insufficient progress has been made on denuclearization.”

In a tweeted statement, Trump confidant Sen. Lindsey Graham said “it’s better to walk away than sign a bad deal.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-28  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, walking, democrats, trump, president, deal, jong, korea, walk, congress, away, kim, talks, north, sanctions, cheering


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Trump meets Vietnam officials, previews summit with Kim: ‘We’ll see what happens’

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are set to face each other this week for their second summit in less than a year. But first, Trump attended a raft of events with officials from Vietnam, which is playing host to the U.S.-North Korean talks for two days. The American president kicked off his Wednesday schedule with a visit to the Presidential Palace in Hanoi, where he met with Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong for a photo op and bilateral talks. During that meet


U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are set to face each other this week for their second summit in less than a year. But first, Trump attended a raft of events with officials from Vietnam, which is playing host to the U.S.-North Korean talks for two days. The American president kicked off his Wednesday schedule with a visit to the Presidential Palace in Hanoi, where he met with Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong for a photo op and bilateral talks. During that meet
Trump meets Vietnam officials, previews summit with Kim: ‘We’ll see what happens’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: everett rosenfeld, evan vucci, ap photo, chery kang, -tong zhao, fellow, carnegie-tsinghua center for global policy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nguyen, meets, korean, officials, set, trump, president, north, vietnam, previews, vietnams, kim, summit, talks, happens, vietnamese


Trump meets Vietnam officials, previews summit with Kim: 'We'll see what happens'

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are set to face each other this week for their second summit in less than a year.

But first, Trump attended a raft of events with officials from Vietnam, which is playing host to the U.S.-North Korean talks for two days.

The American president kicked off his Wednesday schedule with a visit to the Presidential Palace in Hanoi, where he met with Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong for a photo op and bilateral talks. During that meeting, Trump praised Vietnam’s “thriving” economy, and said the country is “an example as to what can happen with good thinking.”

Those compliments were set against the backdrop of Trump saying in a morning Twitter post that North Korea’s economy could do as well as Vietnam’s if Kim agreed to give up his nation’s nuclear weapons.

After his time with the Vietnamese president, Trump headed to meetings with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-27  Authors: everett rosenfeld, evan vucci, ap photo, chery kang, -tong zhao, fellow, carnegie-tsinghua center for global policy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nguyen, meets, korean, officials, set, trump, president, north, vietnam, previews, vietnams, kim, summit, talks, happens, vietnamese


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