This major tax deadline is today. What you need to know

FatCamera | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July


FatCamera | E+ | Getty ImagesIf you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July
This major tax deadline is today. What you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, filers, know, extension, taxpayers, major, return, 2018, need, youre, tax, deduction, deadline, irs


This major tax deadline is today. What you need to know

FatCamera | E+ | Getty Images

If you asked the IRS for six more months to work on your 2018 tax return, you’re about to run out of time. This spring, about 15 million taxpayers asked the IRS for an extension on their 2018 tax return. While those filers had to pay their projected taxes by April 15, they had to until Oct. 15 to complete and submit their returns. Procrastinators take heed: If you miss this deadline, you’re on the hook for a 5% failure to file penalty. Even with the extra time, accountants are still contending with last-minute filers and additional complexity from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which went into effect in 2018.

“We are getting through extension season — a nightmare,” said Dan Herron, CPA and principal of Elemental Wealth Advisors in San Luis Obispo, California. “We have a long way to go in terms of understanding tax reform.” Changes stemming from the new tax code include the elimination of personal exemptions and the near-doubling of the standard deduction. Certain itemized deductions are now subject to new limitations, as well. For instance, the state and local tax deduction is now capped at $10,000. Here’s what taxpayers should know if they’re about to hit that extension deadline.

A new tax break

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There are several reasons why filers sought more time. For instance, investors in partnerships awaited Schedule K-1 forms from those businesses. These documents spell out the investor’s share of income from the partnership, and they often don’t arrive until late spring. In addition, small-business owners — including the people who owned those partnerships — were trying to determine whether they qualified for the new 20% qualified business income deduction. More than 15 million taxpayers took this deduction on their 2018 tax return as of July 25, the IRS found. The rules around the so-called QBI deduction were still in flux for most of 2018 and part of 2019. This was a case where it was better to wait for certainty, accountants said. “While we have an idea on a client’s situation as to whether they’re a trade or business, we were waiting until later for additional guidance,” said Chris Hesse, CPA and chair of the American Institute of CPAs’ tax executive committee. “We think your risk goes down if we wait as long as possible to file,” he said.

Next year’s blueprint


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, today, filers, know, extension, taxpayers, major, return, 2018, need, youre, tax, deduction, deadline, irs


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With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now

Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week. Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while. “I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. “If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both


Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week. Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while. “I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. “If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both
With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubt, earnings, trade, think, experts, deal, global, agreement, know, going, share, bit, probably, china, watch


With trade agreement in doubt, five experts share what to watch now

Stocks are in a holding pattern to begin the week as doubts are raised over how much progress was made between the U.S. and China on Friday.

Chinese officials are reportedly seeking further discussions with the U.S. on trade before they sign “phase one” of a deal announced last week.

Five experts weigh in on what they’re watching right now.

Simeon Hyman, global investment strategist at ProShares Advisors, says trade progress could be the last bit of good news for a while.

“I think the trade deal is probably the only real source of upside in the near term because I don’t think we’re going to have a great earnings season. We have banks reporting this week. You know, it’s been a tough environment for banks — deal volume is slowing a little bit, and the yield curve was inverted up until just a week or so ago — so I don’t think you’re going to get a big impetus from the earnings side. But we certainly know politically, a win on that front sometime as we approach more of the height of the election season is not a terrible thing to bank on.”

William Foster of Moody’s Investors Service says this gave the U.S. and China some breathing room before they move forward.

“It’s a step forward, but it’s, you know, we can’t expect too much, and obviously you’re seeing that right now from China. This basically buys more time for the two sides to try to come to some kind of agreement on some of the core issues, and that will just give the market more time to kind of digest.”

Sameer Samana, senior global market strategist at Wells Fargo Investment Institute, is playing it cautiously for the rest of the year.

“If you look at this trade deal, it’s probably a political win for both sides, which were in need of such a win. Unfortunately, it just doesn’t mean a whole lot for S&P earnings. It probably doesn’t mean a lot for economic data, at least not over the coming months. So from our standpoint, you know, you’ve got good gains in calendar year 2019 even though if you stretch back to Q4 last year they’re not spectacular. We’re still playing it pretty cautiously, so we are underweight small caps, they tend to be lower quality and tend to have fewer levers to pull. We’re also underweight high yield. We think credits are probably a little bit overdone, spreads are very tight. You’re just not getting paid to take that risk. We would take some of those dollars and put them in large caps, because again those are the companies that have probably the most, you know, flexibility in terms of navigating this global environment.”

Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, is skeptical much progress was made at all.

“It’s all blue smoke and mirrors. There’s nothing substantive there. I mean, I admire Treasury Secretary [Steven] Mnuchin, and he’s talking about intellectual properties and whatnot. I’m getting different signals from China. They don’t look like they want that to be part of a plan, and they indicate they’re going to take care of it locally. Secondarily, so tomorrow the tariffs were supposed to be raised. If I’m a business, I’ve already traded against that. I knew they were coming up. I bought whatever I wanted back before they were going to get raised, so the impacts are not very strong here.”

Gabriela Santos, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management, says it makes sense to keep expectations in check.

“It’s an agreement to postpone the escalation that was planned for tomorrow and to continue talking over the next few weeks. So for us, I think it’s right to temper the enthusiasm a little bit after such a huge rally we had on Friday. It’s not locked down. No. 2, even if we end up having a ‘phase one’ written-down truce, it doesn’t remove the uncertainty cloud going into the election. And No. 3, we have also some late-cycle concerns to think about which should come to the forefront as earnings season picks back up this week.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doubt, earnings, trade, think, experts, deal, global, agreement, know, going, share, bit, probably, china, watch


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We really don’t know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says

ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?” Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for


ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services. Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?” Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for
We really don’t know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: emma graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, dont, kurdish, united, syria, militia, group, forces, turkey, know, really, saudi, turkish, prince


We really don't know where the US is on Syria, Saudi prince says

ABU DHABI — The foreign policy of the United States in places like Syria has been “contradictory” for several years, according to the former chief of Saudi Arabia’s intelligence services.

Speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in Abu Dhabi Saturday, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal said: “The situation in Syria, we really don’t know where the United States is, for example, is it in or is it out?”

Trump recently announced that U.S. forces in northeastern Syria would move aside, clearing the way for a Turkish offensive that is now in its fourth day. The Turkish operation is aimed at moving the U.S.-backed Kurdish militia, the People’s Protection Units (YPG), away from its southern border with Syria.

Ankara views the group as terrorists and stresses the YPG’s ties to a separatist Kurdish group in Turkey, the PKK, which has carried out a decades-long violent insurgency against the Turkish state. Nonetheless, Kurdish forces were a strategic partner to the U.S. and played a crucial role in defeating the so-called Islamic State.

Trump’s controversial move has received widespread criticism in the international community. The U.S. administration has also been accused of sending mixed messages by, at times, distancing itself from the Kurdish militia but also preparing sanctions on Turkey if it steps over the line.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: emma graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, dont, kurdish, united, syria, militia, group, forces, turkey, know, really, saudi, turkish, prince


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Do you know what a recession is? Here’s how we’ll know when the next one hits

Trump administration clears the way for sanctions on TurkeyTrump signed an order clearing the way for sanctions, though the U.S. will not move yet to punish Turkey after the country’s offensive in northern Syria. Politicsread more


Trump administration clears the way for sanctions on TurkeyTrump signed an order clearing the way for sanctions, though the U.S. will not move yet to punish Turkey after the country’s offensive in northern Syria. Politicsread more
Do you know what a recession is? Here’s how we’ll know when the next one hits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: marilyn haigh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sanctions, order, know, signed, punish, turkey, hits, recession, heres, way, turkeytrump, syriapoliticsread, offensive, trump


Do you know what a recession is? Here's how we'll know when the next one hits

Trump administration clears the way for sanctions on Turkey

Trump signed an order clearing the way for sanctions, though the U.S. will not move yet to punish Turkey after the country’s offensive in northern Syria.

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: marilyn haigh
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Optimism is rising that some sort of US-China trade deal is coming — here’s what we know

The U.S. and China appear close to a limited trade deal, leaving more controversial issues for later negotiations. The trade talks, which President Donald Trump said were “going really well,” extended into the second day on Friday. Trump again gave an optimistic read on the talks on Friday, saying in a tweet “Good things are happening at China Trade Talk Meeting. Day two of the talks now includes a key meeting between Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, which is scheduled to take place at 2:4


The U.S. and China appear close to a limited trade deal, leaving more controversial issues for later negotiations. The trade talks, which President Donald Trump said were “going really well,” extended into the second day on Friday. Trump again gave an optimistic read on the talks on Friday, saying in a tweet “Good things are happening at China Trade Talk Meeting. Day two of the talks now includes a key meeting between Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, which is scheduled to take place at 2:4
Optimism is rising that some sort of US-China trade deal is coming — here’s what we know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, optimism, sort, talks, trade, issues, uschina, agriculture, heres, deal, coming, meeting, trump, scheduled, delay, buying, china, rising, know


Optimism is rising that some sort of US-China trade deal is coming — here's what we know

The U.S. and China appear close to a limited trade deal, leaving more controversial issues for later negotiations.

The trade talks, which President Donald Trump said were “going really well,” extended into the second day on Friday. A slew of media reports overnight suggest that the world’s two largest economies could agree to a partial agreement on issues such as currency and agriculture buying, and it could also include a delay in the tariff hike scheduled for next week.

Trump again gave an optimistic read on the talks on Friday, saying in a tweet “Good things are happening at China Trade Talk Meeting. Warmer feelings than in recent past.”

Day two of the talks now includes a key meeting between Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, which is scheduled to take place at 2:45 p.m. ET. The additional meeting renewed hopes for positive trade progress as past meetings between the two have yielded a delay in tariffs and agriculture buying.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, optimism, sort, talks, trade, issues, uschina, agriculture, heres, deal, coming, meeting, trump, scheduled, delay, buying, china, rising, know


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Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Federal Reserve wants to know

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve wants to know what the internet is worth to you. In a speech this week, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell raised the possibility that the problem is with the data itself. GDP measures the value of products and services that are bought and sold. “Good decisions require good data, but the data in hand are seldom as good as we woul


Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve wants to know what the internet is worth to you. In a speech this week, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell raised the possibility that the problem is with the data itself. GDP measures the value of products and services that are bought and sold. “Good decisions require good data, but the data in hand are seldom as good as we woul
Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Federal Reserve wants to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 17000, economy, data, internet, valued, services, euros, google, federal, gdp, wants, powell, value, median, reserve, know


Would you give up Google for $17,000 a year? The Federal Reserve wants to know

Jerome Powell, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks during the NABE annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019.

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve wants to know what the internet is worth to you.

The answer could help the central bank solve one of the most puzzling paradoxes of the modern economy: The current expansion is the longest in history, yet productivity gains are weak and GDP growth, while steady, is far from stellar.

In a speech this week, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell raised the possibility that the problem is with the data itself. GDP measures the value of products and services that are bought and sold. But many of the greatest technological innovations of the internet age are free. Search engines, e-mail, GPS, even Facebook — the official economic statistics are not designed to capture the benefits they generate for businesses and consumers.

“Good decisions require good data, but the data in hand are seldom as good as we would like,” Powell said.

Instead, Powell cited recent work by MIT economist Erik Brynjolfsson, one of the leading academics on the intersection of technology and the economy. In a paper with Avinash Collis of the National Bureau of Economic Research and Felix Eggers of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the authors conducted massive surveys to estimate the monetary value that users place on the tools of modern life.

The results? The median user would need about $48 to give up Facebook for one month. The median price of giving up video streaming services like YouTube for a year is $1,173. To stop using search engines, consumers would need a median $17,530, making it the most valuable digital service.

The authors also conducted more limited surveys with students in Europe on other popular platforms. One month of Snapchat was valued at about 2.17 euros. LinkedIn was just 1.52 euros. But giving up WhatsApp? That would require a whopping 536 euros. Twitter, however, was valued at zero euros.

“Over time, we’re spending more and more of our waking hours interacting with the internet or using those services on our mobile phones,” Brynjolfsson told CNBC. “A bigger share of our economy is being missed by GDP.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ylan mui
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 17000, economy, data, internet, valued, services, euros, google, federal, gdp, wants, powell, value, median, reserve, know


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It’s been a crazy day for US-China trade news — here’s what we know

Investors’ heads are spinning because of a slew of conflicting headlines related to the U.S.-China trade talks. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures dropped more than 300 points overnight at one point. Stocks jumped Thursday morning after President Donald Trump said in a tweet: “Big day of negotiations with China. The sharp moves came as Wall Street braced for the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks, which were set to begin Thursday. What set off the volatile swings overnight was a report say


Investors’ heads are spinning because of a slew of conflicting headlines related to the U.S.-China trade talks. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures dropped more than 300 points overnight at one point. Stocks jumped Thursday morning after President Donald Trump said in a tweet: “Big day of negotiations with China. The sharp moves came as Wall Street braced for the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks, which were set to begin Thursday. What set off the volatile swings overnight was a report say
It’s been a crazy day for US-China trade news — here’s what we know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, volatile, wall, trade, vice, day, white, set, uschina, negotiations, heres, morning, overnight, crazy, know


It's been a crazy day for US-China trade news — here's what we know

Investors’ heads are spinning because of a slew of conflicting headlines related to the U.S.-China trade talks.

Dow Jones Industrial Average futures dropped more than 300 points overnight at one point. By Thursday morning, however, the Dow was up more than 150 points.

Stocks jumped Thursday morning after President Donald Trump said in a tweet: “Big day of negotiations with China. They want to make a deal, but do I? I meet with the Vice Premier tomorrow at The White House.”

The sharp moves came as Wall Street braced for the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks, which were set to begin Thursday. What set off the volatile swings overnight was a report saying the much-anticipated negotiations might end earlier than expected.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, volatile, wall, trade, vice, day, white, set, uschina, negotiations, heres, morning, overnight, crazy, know


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Can you get sued over a negative Yelp review? Here’s what you need to know

So what happens if you post a negative review of a business and the business-owner tries to fight back, or even tries to silence you with a lawsuit? In July, a Yelp user in Florida named Tom Lloyd told “CBS This Morning” that he was left with more than $25,000 in legal bills after a veterinary practice sued him for defamation over a negative Yelp review. In the review, Lloyd recounted how his dog died at the animal hospital waiting for a surgeon who never showed up. “Most Americans don’t realize


So what happens if you post a negative review of a business and the business-owner tries to fight back, or even tries to silence you with a lawsuit? In July, a Yelp user in Florida named Tom Lloyd told “CBS This Morning” that he was left with more than $25,000 in legal bills after a veterinary practice sued him for defamation over a negative Yelp review. In the review, Lloyd recounted how his dog died at the animal hospital waiting for a surgeon who never showed up. “Most Americans don’t realize
Can you get sued over a negative Yelp review? Here’s what you need to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, negative, yelp, review, business, legal, heres, sued, businesses, know, consumers, lawsuit, reviews, need, online


Can you get sued over a negative Yelp review? Here's what you need to know

Small businesses often live or die by word-of-mouth, as roughly 86% of U.S. consumers consult online reviews before patronizing a local business, according to a BrightLocal survey. So what happens if you post a negative review of a business and the business-owner tries to fight back, or even tries to silence you with a lawsuit? It’s a trend that’s become more common as more and more people share their opinions in online forums and discussion boards, from Yelp (which features over 100 million reviews from users) to the comments sections of businesses’ social media pages. In July, a Yelp user in Florida named Tom Lloyd told “CBS This Morning” that he was left with more than $25,000 in legal bills after a veterinary practice sued him for defamation over a negative Yelp review. In the review, Lloyd recounted how his dog died at the animal hospital waiting for a surgeon who never showed up. And Lloyd is not alone. In 2018, a tourist attraction in Branson, Missouri called Bigfoot on the Strip sued a Kansas man and his daughter over a relatively tepid review posted on TripAdvisor (the man initially gave the business a rating of three out of five stars). The lawsuit sought at least $25,000 and legal costs from the Kansas man, but he was granted a summary judgement in August 2019, which terminated the lawsuit, according to court records. And in 2015, a Colorado couple reportedly racked up $65,000 in legal fees (including a $15,000 settlement payment) fighting a defamation lawsuit brought by a flooring company the couple negatively reviewed on Yelp. “Most Americans don’t realize they can be sued for writing an online review,” says Evan Mascagni, an attorney who currently serves as Policy Director at the Public Participation Project, a nonprofit group that advocates for First Amendment rights. “With the rise of user-generated [review] content sites like Yelp, TripAdvisor, Google, we’ve really seen a shift where folks are being sued for their speech online,” Mascagni tells CNBC Make It. With so many consumers posting online reviews of businesses, it’s not surprising that some business-owners might take exception to the occasional negative review, says Carl Settlemeyer, an attorney in the Federal Trade Commission’s bureau of consumer protection. “Sometimes [a consumer’s review] may go too far, sometimes a business may be trying to throw its weight around and trying to silence a consumer,” Settlemeyer tells CNBC Make It. Mascagani goes as far as to say some people are trying to “hijack our judicial system to silence, intimidate and harass critics of theirs.”

Are reviewers protected?

While Settlemeyer notes that businesses suing consumers over negative online reviews is far from an everyday occurrence across the country, it’s become enough of an issue that Congress felt the need to pass a law in 2016, called the Consumer Review Fairness Act (CRFA), to protect consumers’ ability to leave an honest online review of a business without being punished. The CRFA banned the use by businesses of non-disparagement clauses in any contracts that aren’t reasonably open to negotiation. It’s opened the door for the government to crack down on businesses trying to use the threat of a lawsuit, and the associated legal fees, to strong-arm consumers into either avoiding writing negative reviews or taking them down after they’ve been written. The FTC has used the law to issue complaints against businesses (from an HVAC repair company to a vacation rental business) that the agency alleged have used non-disparagement clauses in contracts to sue consumers who left honest reviews online, “with different language that ranged from a strong confidentiality restriction that would cover posting reviews to outright ‘Don’t leave me any review less than five stars or I’m going to sue you for $25,000,'” Settlemeyer says. “The bottom line is the businesses aren’t allowed to use those provisions … and they have to notify customers that those non-disparagement provisions are void and that they can’t enforce them and that they’re free to post their honest reviews of their interactions with the business.” If you are sued by a business that claims to have a non-disparagement provision, you can report the lawsuit on the FTC website, says Settlemeyer, who adds that each state’s attorney general also has the power to enforce the CRFA. And there are other laws on the books in most U.S. states aimed at protecting people from frivolous lawsuits that infringe on their First Amendment rights. As Mascagni points out, 29 states currently have anti-SLAPP statutes, which aim to make it easier for defendants to seek dismissal of a meritless lawsuit (such as a business suing a consumer over an honest review) and can even impose financial penalties on plaintiffs who lose an anti-SLAPP motion. But in states without anti-SLAPP laws, consumers may be more exposed, Mascagni says. “Oftentimes, in those states, what you’ll see is people just censoring themselves: taking the review down, apologizing, editing the review, retracting, those sorts of things,” he says. If a consumer finds themselves hit with a lawsuit stemming from an honest review, Mascagni recommends contacting an attorney. He says his organization, the Public Participation Project, and other First Amendment advocates, can help consumers find attorneys with anti-SLAPP experience in their area. Some review websites also take steps to make sure users know their First Amendment rights, and a Yelp spokesperson tells CNBC Make It the site issues “legal threat alerts” to warn against businesses that have potentially tried to stifle users’ free speech online. “Yelp regularly engages in advocacy work to protect the First Amendment rights of consumers because we believe in the ability for consumers to share their experiences online,” the Yelp spokesperson tells CNBC Make It.

Could it still cost you money to fight?

If a business sues you for an honest review and loses due to anti-SLAPP laws, you could be due reimbursement for legal fees. However, in states without anti-SLAPP statutes, even if you successfully get a lawsuit dismissed, there could still be attorney’s fees you have to pay. “This being America, and anybody can file a lawsuit, and legal costs are not cheap even if you do have strong footing, I don’t want to encourage anybody to go broke fighting over this. And, I can understand why somebody would decide they don’t want to fight,” Settlemeyer says.

What you need to remember when reviewing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, states, negative, yelp, review, business, legal, heres, sued, businesses, know, consumers, lawsuit, reviews, need, online


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‘How do you know we’re not investigating?’ California attorney general says after sitting out multistate Google probe

When attorneys general from 50 states and territories announced a joint antitrust investigation into Google, many were left with one big question: Why isn’t California investigating? On Thursday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra answered that question with one of his own: “How do you know we’re not investigating?” Google and Facebook are both headquartered in California, and a state-sponsored investigation could add much-needed resources to the effort to take on Big Tech. Becerra said


When attorneys general from 50 states and territories announced a joint antitrust investigation into Google, many were left with one big question: Why isn’t California investigating? On Thursday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra answered that question with one of his own: “How do you know we’re not investigating?” Google and Facebook are both headquartered in California, and a state-sponsored investigation could add much-needed resources to the effort to take on Big Tech. Becerra said
‘How do you know we’re not investigating?’ California attorney general says after sitting out multistate Google probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, probe, attorney, know, becerra, sitting, big, saying, tech, resources, google, states, general, investigation, announced, california, state, multistate, investigating


'How do you know we're not investigating?' California attorney general says after sitting out multistate Google probe

When attorneys general from 50 states and territories announced a joint antitrust investigation into Google, many were left with one big question: Why isn’t California investigating?

On Thursday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra answered that question with one of his own: “How do you know we’re not investigating?”

Google and Facebook are both headquartered in California, and a state-sponsored investigation could add much-needed resources to the effort to take on Big Tech. States generally have far fewer resources than federal regulators to take on big investigations, but California’s population and tax base are significant enough to make a difference.

Alabama was the only other state that sat out.

Becerra said his department does not comment on investigations, declining to confirm or deny any probe but saying, “stay tuned.” The public knows little more about the announced probes than about what could be happening within the California AG’s office, Becerra told reporters at a news conference announcing draft rules for California’s landmark privacy act.

“What do you know about the investigation that was announced?” Becerra asked of the multistate probe. “We could make a lot of announcements. We get results. We’re going to get things done.”

Becerra hinted that anti-competitive issues among tech companies are on his radar, pointing to the proposed regulations he announced Thursday.

“We’re fully aware of what’s going on in this digital economy and we are cognizant of the need to provide consumers with true protections,” Becerra said. “We will continue to do what we must to protect the people of our state and we will certainly act on any leads.”

Becerra said he recognizes the desire for Californians to understand whether his office is looking into highly publicized issues like tech, saying it can seem “a little harsh” to not make an announcement, particularly if the department were to choose to close a case without any action.

“We’re looking at that to see if we can give Californians the kind of information they’re entitled to,” he said.

WATCH: How US antitrust law works, and what it means for Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, probe, attorney, know, becerra, sitting, big, saying, tech, resources, google, states, general, investigation, announced, california, state, multistate, investigating


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The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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