Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats’ election victory

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China. Stand with Hong Kong!” Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.” On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of C


Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.
Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China.
Stand with Hong Kong!”
Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.”
On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of C
Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats’ election victory Cached Page below :
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Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats' election victory

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China.

It was the first time since August that the Civil Human Rights Front – organizer of million-strong marches earlier in the year that paralyzed the Asian finance center – had received authorities’ permission for a rally.

It estimated turnout of 800,000 while police said 183,000.

Chants of “Fight for freedom! Stand with Hong Kong!” echoed as demonstrators, from students to professionals and the elderly, marched from Victoria Park in the bustling shopping district toward the financial area.

As dark fell, some protesters spray-painted anti-Beijing graffiti on a Bank of China building. Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.”

The former British colony of 7.4 million people reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. It is governed under a “One Country, Two Systems” formula guaranteeing freedoms not allowed in mainland China, but many fear Beijing is tightening the screws.

“It’s Christmas time soon but we’re not in the mood to celebrate anymore,” said Lawrence, a 23-year-old student.

He held a poster saying: “My 2020 wish is universal suffrage,” a reference to demands for an open vote on the city leader, currently the unpopular Beijing-backed Carrie Lam.

China blames the six months of unrest on interference by foreign governments including the United States and Britain.

On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong were denied entry to the neighboring Chinese city of Macau, without explanation.


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Hong Kong police chief calls for peace ahead of big protest march

Hong Kong’s police chief has urged citizens to demonstrate peacefully ahead of what is expected to be a large-scale pro-democracy march on Sunday, an event planned amid a lull in violence in the Chinese-ruled city. Speaking to reporters before departing for a “courtesy visit” to Beijing, newly-installed police commissioner Chris Tang urged Hong Kongers to set a global example. “We hope our citizens can show the whole world (that) Hong Kong people are capable of holding a large scale rally in an


Hong Kong’s police chief has urged citizens to demonstrate peacefully ahead of what is expected to be a large-scale pro-democracy march on Sunday, an event planned amid a lull in violence in the Chinese-ruled city.
Speaking to reporters before departing for a “courtesy visit” to Beijing, newly-installed police commissioner Chris Tang urged Hong Kongers to set a global example.
“We hope our citizens can show the whole world (that) Hong Kong people are capable of holding a large scale rally in an
Hong Kong police chief calls for peace ahead of big protest march Cached Page below :
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Hong Kong police chief calls for peace ahead of big protest march

Hong Kong’s police chief has urged citizens to demonstrate peacefully ahead of what is expected to be a large-scale pro-democracy march on Sunday, an event planned amid a lull in violence in the Chinese-ruled city.

Police on Thursday gave a rare green light to the demonstration, organized by the Civil Human Rights Front, the group that called the million-strong marches in the summer. Sunday’s march is a key gauge of the pro-democracy movement’s support following its sweeping victory in local elections.

Speaking to reporters before departing for a “courtesy visit” to Beijing, newly-installed police commissioner Chris Tang urged Hong Kongers to set a global example.

“We hope our citizens can show the whole world (that) Hong Kong people are capable of holding a large scale rally in an orderly and peaceful manner,” he said. “We urge the organizer to assist the police on maintaining the order.”

Tang was traveling to meet with senior officials from the ministry of public security in Beijing and is expected to return to Hong Kong on Sunday.

The unrest in Hong Kong is the biggest popular challenge to Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012.


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Hong Kong is open to more economic support after launching its fourth stimulus package in four months, says official

The Hong Kong government is keeping an open mind to additional measures that will help support the city’s economy, Edward Yau, the city’s secretary for commerce and economic development, said on Thursday. “Hong Kong is of course hit doubly by a sort of twin cycle — U.S.-China trade war and also the local unrest; I think the enterprises are hard hit,” Yau told CNBC’s “Street Signs.” Yau added that the Hong Kong government has been rolling out support measures for businesses even before the social


The Hong Kong government is keeping an open mind to additional measures that will help support the city’s economy, Edward Yau, the city’s secretary for commerce and economic development, said on Thursday.
“Hong Kong is of course hit doubly by a sort of twin cycle — U.S.-China trade war and also the local unrest; I think the enterprises are hard hit,” Yau told CNBC’s “Street Signs.”
Yau added that the Hong Kong government has been rolling out support measures for businesses even before the social
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Hong Kong is open to more economic support after launching its fourth stimulus package in four months, says official

The Hong Kong government is keeping an open mind to additional measures that will help support the city’s economy, Edward Yau, the city’s secretary for commerce and economic development, said on Thursday.

“Hong Kong is of course hit doubly by a sort of twin cycle — U.S.-China trade war and also the local unrest; I think the enterprises are hard hit,” Yau told CNBC’s “Street Signs.”

Yau added that the Hong Kong government has been rolling out support measures for businesses even before the social unrest started this year to help enterprises cope with the fallout of the U.S.-China trade war.

“In addition to these, I think we are having an open mind and we will constantly talk to various trades and see how best we can soldier on and ride our storm,” Yau added.

The Hong Kong government on Wednesday announced an additional 4 billion Hong Kong dollars ($511 million) in economic stimulus, bringing the total relief offered to 25 billion Hong Kong dollars (about $3.2 billion).

It was the city’s fourth economic support package, much of which goes to help the tourism, retail and transport industries.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: huileng tan
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Hong Kong retail sales post worst slump on record as protests take toll

People run into a shopping mall after police fired tear gas in the Central district of Hong Kong on November 11, 2019. Hong Kong’s retail sales in October fell by their steepest on record, as ongoing anti-government protests that have gripped the Chinese-ruled city for nearly six months scared off tourists and hit spending. Retail operators, from prime shopping malls to family-run businesses, have been forced to close for multiple days over the past few months. Retail sales fell to HK$30.1 billi


People run into a shopping mall after police fired tear gas in the Central district of Hong Kong on November 11, 2019.
Hong Kong’s retail sales in October fell by their steepest on record, as ongoing anti-government protests that have gripped the Chinese-ruled city for nearly six months scared off tourists and hit spending.
Retail operators, from prime shopping malls to family-run businesses, have been forced to close for multiple days over the past few months.
Retail sales fell to HK$30.1 billi
Hong Kong retail sales post worst slump on record as protests take toll Cached Page below :
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Hong Kong retail sales post worst slump on record as protests take toll

People run into a shopping mall after police fired tear gas in the Central district of Hong Kong on November 11, 2019.

Hong Kong’s retail sales in October fell by their steepest on record, as ongoing anti-government protests that have gripped the Chinese-ruled city for nearly six months scared off tourists and hit spending.

Retail sales in October fell 24.3% from a year earlier, government data showed on Monday, against a revised 18.2% drop in September and a 23% fall in August, as violent clashes spread across shopping districts and took a heavy toll on malls and restaurants.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam renewed her appeals for peace in the Chinese-ruled city but failed to offer any concessions to anti-government protesters despite a resounding victory for pro-democracy parties in local elections.

Protests have sprung up on an almost daily basis since June, with crowds gathering with little notice, at times forcing the government, businesses, schools and even the international airport to close.

Market analysts say the outlook is overshadowed by the protests and a weak Chinese yuan that translates into weaker spending.

Retail operators, from prime shopping malls to family-run businesses, have been forced to close for multiple days over the past few months.

Retail sales fell to HK$30.1 billion ($3.85 billion) in October, a ninth consecutive month of decline. In volume terms, retail sales in October fell 26.2%, compared with a revised 20.3% drop in September.

“The local social incidents with increasing violence depressed consumption sentiment and severely disrupted tourism- and consumption-related activities,” a government spokesman said.

The government will monitor the implications for the labor market and the economy, he added.


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Economist tells newspaper he was forced out from Chinese bank because he’s a Hong Konger

Buildings along Victoria Harbor at night in Hong Kong, on April 29, 2019. Law Ka-chung stepped down as chief economist at the Hong Kong unit of a Chinese state-owned bank and has alleged he was forced to do so because he is a native of Hong Kong, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday. Law spent 14 years at the Bank of Communications before being forced to resign in October, the article said. “They don’t think it’s appropriate for a Hong Kong guy to speak on behalf of a Chinese bank,” Law told


Buildings along Victoria Harbor at night in Hong Kong, on April 29, 2019.
Law Ka-chung stepped down as chief economist at the Hong Kong unit of a Chinese state-owned bank and has alleged he was forced to do so because he is a native of Hong Kong, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.
Law spent 14 years at the Bank of Communications before being forced to resign in October, the article said.
“They don’t think it’s appropriate for a Hong Kong guy to speak on behalf of a Chinese bank,” Law told
Economist tells newspaper he was forced out from Chinese bank because he’s a Hong Konger Cached Page below :
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Economist tells newspaper he was forced out from Chinese bank because he's a Hong Konger

Buildings along Victoria Harbor at night in Hong Kong, on April 29, 2019.

Law Ka-chung stepped down as chief economist at the Hong Kong unit of a Chinese state-owned bank and has alleged he was forced to do so because he is a native of Hong Kong, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.

Law spent 14 years at the Bank of Communications before being forced to resign in October, the article said.

“They don’t think it’s appropriate for a Hong Kong guy to speak on behalf of a Chinese bank,” Law told the newspaper. The report noted it was his first interview with an international English-language media organization since being asked to resign.

The Bank of Communications did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment.


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‘Very hard to imagine’ that Hong Kong tourist arrivals, retail sales will improve in November, economist says

Pedestrians cross Russell Street in front of the Times Square shopping mall, operated by Wharf (Holdings) Ltd., in the Causeway Bay shopping district of Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong’s tourist arrivals and retail sales figures are unlikely to be any better in November after their dismal showing in October, an economist said on Tuesday. In October, retail sales fell 24.3% from a year ago, according to preliminary Hong Kong government data. Tourist arrivals slumped 43.7% in October from year ago to


Pedestrians cross Russell Street in front of the Times Square shopping mall, operated by Wharf (Holdings) Ltd., in the Causeway Bay shopping district of Hong Kong, China.
Hong Kong’s tourist arrivals and retail sales figures are unlikely to be any better in November after their dismal showing in October, an economist said on Tuesday.
In October, retail sales fell 24.3% from a year ago, according to preliminary Hong Kong government data.
Tourist arrivals slumped 43.7% in October from year ago to
‘Very hard to imagine’ that Hong Kong tourist arrivals, retail sales will improve in November, economist says Cached Page below :
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'Very hard to imagine' that Hong Kong tourist arrivals, retail sales will improve in November, economist says

Pedestrians cross Russell Street in front of the Times Square shopping mall, operated by Wharf (Holdings) Ltd., in the Causeway Bay shopping district of Hong Kong, China.

Hong Kong’s tourist arrivals and retail sales figures are unlikely to be any better in November after their dismal showing in October, an economist said on Tuesday.

“It’s very hard to imagine that the retail sales numbers and tourist arrival numbers will be any better in November given how much of a step-up in protest and violence that happened during that time,” said Martin Rasmussen, China economist at Capital Economics.

Hong Kong, a former British colony that returned to Chinese rule in 1997, has seen widespread demonstrations since June, some of which have led to violent clashes between protesters and the police. The protests were initially sparked by a proposed law that would have allowed extradition to mainland China, but the unrest later morphed into broader anti-government demonstrations that include demands such as greater democracy and universal suffrage.

In October, retail sales fell 24.3% from a year ago, according to preliminary Hong Kong government data. The city’s government said that slump is the worst on record.

Tourist arrivals slumped 43.7% in October from year ago to 3.31 million, according to the Hong Kong Tourism Board. That’s a sharper drop than the 34.2% decline in September. Mainland Chinese visitors fell 45.9% in October from a year ago.

“The Chinese tourists, we don’t think that they will feel welcomed in the city again anytime soon especially given the big step-up in state media on the mainland regarding the Hong Kong situation,” Rasmussen told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

The Hong Kong government has pushed out stimulus to support the city’s economy. But the Hong Kong dollar is pegged to the U.S. dollar, which Rasmussen said leaves little space for the government to adjust monetary conditions, although they could step up fiscal spending to boost the economy.

Last week, U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law two bills supporting Hong Kong protesters. China subsequently suspended U.S. military visits to Hong Kong and sanctioned several U.S. non-government organizations.

Rasmussen said, however, the upside of that development is that Beijing appears to want to contain the fallout of the act to Hong Kong and not link it to trade talks — a positive for the U.S.-China relationship.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: huileng tan
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Investors fear another December sell-off if Trump lets tariffs take effect Dec. 15

Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods would go into effect, and economists have viewed these tariffs as potentially the most damaging, since they directly target consumer goods. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Tuesday that Trump would be willing to leave tariffs in effect if he doesn’t get the deal he wants. He also said no high-level talks are scheduled, and the situation in Hong Kong has been a factor. Trump signed legislation last week supportin


Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods would go into effect, and economists have viewed these tariffs as potentially the most damaging, since they directly target consumer goods.
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Tuesday that Trump would be willing to leave tariffs in effect if he doesn’t get the deal he wants.
He also said no high-level talks are scheduled, and the situation in Hong Kong has been a factor.
Trump signed legislation last week supportin
Investors fear another December sell-off if Trump lets tariffs take effect Dec. 15 Cached Page below :
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Investors fear another December sell-off if Trump lets tariffs take effect Dec. 15

Investors have been awaiting Dec. 15 as a pivot point for the stock market, with expectations the U.S. and China would agree to a first phase trade deal and stocks would then glide higher, capping a strong year with some late December gains.

But comments Tuesday from President Donald Trump that he could wait until after next year’s election for a deal added to a growing unease as trade talks showed no new signs of progress. Stocks were hit hard Tuesday, with the Dow down 278 points, or 1% to 27,503, on top of a 268-point drop Monday.

Dec. 15 is the date when tariffs on another $156 billion in Chinese goods would go into effect, and economists have viewed these tariffs as potentially the most damaging, since they directly target consumer goods.

“I think investors are using Dec. 15 as a barometer. It’s probably the purest, simplest barometer, to see if progress is being made. If it isn’t, we’ll probably limp in the rest of the year,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at Cresset Wealth Advisors.

Some traders viewed Trump’s comments as a bargaining ploy. However, the president’s actions over the past few days have sent a harsh reminder that he intends to play hardball on trade, not just with China but with other trading partners, after his threat of new tariffs on Brazil, Argentina and France.

“I think the jury is still out on that, and that’s why the market is beginning to reset expectations,” said Daniel Deming, managing director at KKM Financial. “Is this just another one of those ploys or is this something they’re going to stand fast on?”

Expectations in the final days of November had been high that the deal would get done, and the market would add to the year-to-date gain of 25%. December is often positive for stocks, but last year the market lost about 9 percent in the month.

“It seemed phase one might get done. In the last couple of days, that mindset has been challenged in the market, and that’s what you’re seeing. …Then you get the psychological impact of last year coming into people’s minds.,” Deming said. “You’re seeing some repositioning of exposure, and they’ve had a great year. Why not take some chips off the table?”

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Tuesday that Trump would be willing to leave tariffs in effect if he doesn’t get the deal he wants. He also said no high-level talks are scheduled, and the situation in Hong Kong has been a factor. Trump signed legislation last week supporting Hong Kong protesters.

“The new variable is the Hong Kong situation. That’s complicated life for President Xi [Jinping]. They got somewhat upset when the president signed that bill,” said Ross, adding the bill would have been veto proof because of its wide support in the Senate.


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China suspends US military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions US-based NGOs

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019. China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.” China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democr


Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019.
China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.”
China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democr
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China suspends US military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions US-based NGOs

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China November 27, 2019.

China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organisations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.”

The measures were announced by China’s Foreign Ministry in response to U.S. legislation passed last week supporting anti-government protesters. It said it had suspended taking requests for U.S. military visits indefinitely, and warned of further action to come.

“We urge the U.S. to correct the mistakes and stop interfering in our internal affairs. China will take further steps if necessary to uphold Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity and China’s sovereignty,” said ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing in Beijing.

China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act,” which supports anti-government protesters in Hong Kong and threatens China with potential sanctions.

There are fears that the row over Hong Kong could impact efforts by Beijing and Washington to reach preliminary deal that could de-escalate a prolonged trade war between the two countries.

The U.S.-headquartered NGOs targeted by Beijing include the National Endowment for Democracy, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, the International Republican Institute, Human Rights Watch, and Freedom House.

“They shoulder some responsibility for the chaos in Hong Kong and they should be sanctioned and pay the price,” said Hua.

In more normal times, several U.S. naval ships visit Hong Kong annually, a rest-and-recreation tradition that dates back to the pre-1997 colonial era which Beijing allowed to continue after the handover from British to Chinese rule.

Visits have at times been refused amid broader tensions and two U.S. ships were denied access in August.

The USS Blue Ridge, the command ship of the Japanese-based Seventh Fleet, stopped in Hong Kong in April – the last ship to visit before mass protests broke out in June.

Foreign NGOs are already heavily restricted in China, and have previously received sharp rebukes for reporting on rights issues in the country including the mass detention of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.


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Hundreds march in Hong Kong against use of tear gas; city braces for further protests

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong. Hundreds of protesters in Hong Kong, including many families with children, marched on Sunday in protest against police use of tear gas as the Asian financial hub geared up for further anti-government demonstrations following a week of calm. Carrying yellow balloons and waving banners that read “No tear gas, save our children”, the protesters streamed through the city’s central bu


Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong.
Hundreds of protesters in Hong Kong, including many families with children, marched on Sunday in protest against police use of tear gas as the Asian financial hub geared up for further anti-government demonstrations following a week of calm.
Carrying yellow balloons and waving banners that read “No tear gas, save our children”, the protesters streamed through the city’s central bu
Hundreds march in Hong Kong against use of tear gas; city braces for further protests Cached Page below :
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Hundreds march in Hong Kong against use of tear gas; city braces for further protests

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong.

Hundreds of protesters in Hong Kong, including many families with children, marched on Sunday in protest against police use of tear gas as the Asian financial hub geared up for further anti-government demonstrations following a week of calm.

Carrying yellow balloons and waving banners that read “No tear gas, save our children”, the protesters streamed through the city’s central business district towards government headquarters on the main Hong Kong island. Three marches are planned for Sunday and all have been approved by authorities.

On Saturday, secondary school students and retirees joined forces to protest against what they called police brutality and unlawful arrests.

Activists have pledged to maintain the momentum of the movement that has roiled the China-ruled territory for nearly six months.

Holding umbrellas to shield themselves from the sun, many people were seen pushing their children in strollers, while one man with a balloon festooned to his wheelchair also joined the procession.

“We want the police to stop using tear gas,” said a woman surnamed Wong, who was marching with her husband and five year old son.

“It’s not a good way to solve the problem. The government needs to listen to the people. It is ridiculous.”

Police have fired around 10,000 rounds of tear gas since June, the city’s Secretary for Security, John Lee, said this week.

Anti-government protests have rocked the former British colony since June, at times forcing government offices, businesses, schools and even the international airport to shut.

However, there has been relative calm since local elections last Sunday delivered an overwhelming victory to pro-democracy candidates.

Sunday’s marches came as a top Hong Kong official said the government was looking into setting up an independent committee to review the handling of the crisis, in which demonstrations have become increasingly violent.


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Hong Kong police fire tear gas as thousands take to the streets in fresh protests

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong. Police fired tear gas to disperse thousands of anti-government protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday, ending a rare lull in violence, as residents took to the streets chanting “revolution of our time” and “liberate Hong Kong”. Police made several arrests as the tear gas sent hundreds fleeing toward the harbor. Hong Kong, a major financial hub, had enjoyed relative calm for the past we


Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong.
Police fired tear gas to disperse thousands of anti-government protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday, ending a rare lull in violence, as residents took to the streets chanting “revolution of our time” and “liberate Hong Kong”.
Police made several arrests as the tear gas sent hundreds fleeing toward the harbor.
Hong Kong, a major financial hub, had enjoyed relative calm for the past we
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Hong Kong police fire tear gas as thousands take to the streets in fresh protests

Pro-democracy protesters take part in a Thanksgiving Day rally at Edinburgh Place on November 28, 2019 in Hong Kong.

Police fired tear gas to disperse thousands of anti-government protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday, ending a rare lull in violence, as residents took to the streets chanting “revolution of our time” and “liberate Hong Kong”.

The protest in the busy shopping district of Tsim Sha Tsui followed a march by hundreds of people to the U.S. consulate to show “gratitude” for U.S. support for the demonstrations that have agitated the Chinese-ruled city for six months.

Shops and businesses in the area closed early as police sprayed volleys of tear gas at protesters, including some elderly residents and others with their pets, as they marched past the city’s Kowloon waterfront, home to luxury hotels and shopping malls.

Police made several arrests as the tear gas sent hundreds fleeing toward the harbor.

Hong Kong, a major financial hub, had enjoyed relative calm for the past week since local elections last Sunday delivered an overwhelming victory to pro-democracy candidates.

Activists pledged, however, to maintain the momentum of the anti-government movement. Protests in the former British colony since June have at times forced the closure of government offices, businesses, schools and even the international airport.

Waving posters that read “Never forget why you started” and black flags with the logo “Revolution now”, protesters occupied several main roads on Sunday, with young residents and families with children filling the nearby streets.

“We had demonstrations, peaceful protests, lobbying inside the council, a lot of things we have done but they all failed,” said Felix, a 25-year-old university graduate.

“There are still five demands,” he said, referring to protesters’ calls that include an independent inquiry into police behavior and the implementation of universal suffrage.

Some black-clad protesters wearing gas masks built barricades and blocked roads near luxury stores, including Armani, while others headed toward Hung Hom, a district near the ruined campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

The campus turned into a battleground in mid-November when protesters barricaded themselves in and faced off riot police in violent clashes of petrol bombs, water cannon and tear gas.

About 1,100 people were arrested last week, some while trying to escape.

Police withdrew from the university on Friday after collecting evidence and removing dangerous items including thousands of petrol bombs, arrows and chemicals that had been strewn around the site.

By Sunday night, the crowds of protesters had diminished and some roads reopened to traffic. Police said hundreds of “rioters” had hurled smoke bombs, “stirring up public fear and causing chaos” which forced them to fire tear gas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roads, protesters, kong, gas, fresh, residents, including, hundreds, streets, protests, tear, thousands, bombs, hong


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