North Korea remains open to dialogue with the US, South Korea’s Moon says

President Donald Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un stand on North Korean soil while walking to South Korea in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019, in Panmunjom, Korea. South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday it was too early to be pessimistic about stalled denuclearisation dialogue between the United States and North Korea, adding that Pyongyang has not yet shut the door to more talks. “Some were concerned about a new round of provocations just in time for Chairman


President Donald Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un stand on North Korean soil while walking to South Korea in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019, in Panmunjom, Korea.
South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday it was too early to be pessimistic about stalled denuclearisation dialogue between the United States and North Korea, adding that Pyongyang has not yet shut the door to more talks.
“Some were concerned about a new round of provocations just in time for Chairman
North Korea remains open to dialogue with the US, South Korea’s Moon says Cached Page below :
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North Korea remains open to dialogue with the US, South Korea's Moon says

President Donald Trump and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un stand on North Korean soil while walking to South Korea in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019, in Panmunjom, Korea.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday it was too early to be pessimistic about stalled denuclearisation dialogue between the United States and North Korea, adding that Pyongyang has not yet shut the door to more talks.

Moon said U.S. President Donald Trump’s recent letter to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un was a good sign that underscores his commitment to negotiations. Moon was speaking at a news conference at the presidential Blue House.

“Some were concerned about a new round of provocations just in time for Chairman Kim’s birthday,” Moon said. “Instead, President Trump sent him birthday wishes to stress his willingness to talk. It was a great idea.”

On Friday, a South Korean official said Trump had asked the South Koreans to pass on birthday greetings to North Korea.

Over the weekend, however, North Korea released a statement saying it had already directly received a letter from Trump and ridiculed South Korea for trying to “meddle” in U.S.-North Korea relations.


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US reportedly wants to resume talks with North Korea

The United States is said to have reached out to North Korea to restart diplomatic talks that stalled last October, news website Axios reported. Both countries have made little progress in their talks to dismantle North Korea’s nuclear and missile program. His threat came after he said the U.S. did not respond to North Korea’s repeated calls for concessions to reopen negotiations before the end of 2019. In November, North Korea fired two short-range projectiles into the sea off its east coast. R


The United States is said to have reached out to North Korea to restart diplomatic talks that stalled last October, news website Axios reported.
Both countries have made little progress in their talks to dismantle North Korea’s nuclear and missile program.
His threat came after he said the U.S. did not respond to North Korea’s repeated calls for concessions to reopen negotiations before the end of 2019.
In November, North Korea fired two short-range projectiles into the sea off its east coast.
R
US reportedly wants to resume talks with North Korea Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
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US reportedly wants to resume talks with North Korea

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un before a meeting with US President Donald Trump on the south side of the Military Demarcation Line that divides North and South Korea, in the Joint Security Area (JSA) of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019.

The United States is said to have reached out to North Korea to restart diplomatic talks that stalled last October, news website Axios reported.

Washington wants to get negotiations with Pyongyang “back on track” and implement leader Kim Jong Un’s “commitment” to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien told Axios.

O’Brien expressed cautious optimism about the fact that Kim hasn’t yet delivered his promised “Christmas gift” that many expected to be a nuclear weapons test, Axios said.

Both countries have made little progress in their talks to dismantle North Korea’s nuclear and missile program.

Kim said in December he will continue developing his country’s nuclear deterrent and introduce a new strategic weapon in the near future, according to state-run media KCNA. His threat came after he said the U.S. did not respond to North Korea’s repeated calls for concessions to reopen negotiations before the end of 2019.

The North Korean leader said in April he would wait until the end of 2019 for Washington to change its approach to denuclearization talks with Pyongyang — but it has been status quo since then and analysts warned that Kim could stay “true to his pledges.”

U.S. President Donald Trump sent birthday greetings to the North Korean leader last week, but the country’s foreign ministry advisor said Kim’s personal feelings were insufficient to return to past diplomacy, NBC News reported.

In November, North Korea fired two short-range projectiles into the sea off its east coast.

Under Kim, the reclusive state has conducted its most powerful nuclear test, launched its first-ever intercontinental ballistic missile and threatened to send missiles to the waters near Guam.

Read Axios report about U.S. plans to restart talks with North Korea here.

— CNBC’s Amanda Macias contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un warns of ‘shocking’ action, new strategic weapon

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Wednesday he will continue developing his country’s nuclear deterrent and introduce a new strategic weapon in the near future, according to the North’s state-run media KCNA. Kim’s remarks came after the United States missed a year-end deadline for a restart of denuclearization talks. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he hoped North Korea would “choose peace.” “We will reliably put on constant alert the powerful nuclear deterrent capable of containing t


North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Wednesday he will continue developing his country’s nuclear deterrent and introduce a new strategic weapon in the near future, according to the North’s state-run media KCNA.
Kim’s remarks came after the United States missed a year-end deadline for a restart of denuclearization talks.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he hoped North Korea would “choose peace.”
“We will reliably put on constant alert the powerful nuclear deterrent capable of containing t
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un warns of ‘shocking’ action, new strategic weapon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: amanda macias
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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un warns of 'shocking' action, new strategic weapon

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un before a meeting with US President Donald Trump on the south side of the Military Demarcation Line that divides North and South Korea, in the Joint Security Area (JSA) of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Wednesday he will continue developing his country’s nuclear deterrent and introduce a new strategic weapon in the near future, according to the North’s state-run media KCNA.

Kim’s remarks came after the United States missed a year-end deadline for a restart of denuclearization talks.

The White House and the Pentagon did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he hoped North Korea would “choose peace.”

“So, seeing that reporting publicly, it remains the case that we hope that Chairman Kim will take a different course,” Pompeo told Fox News in an interview. “We’re hopeful that … Chairman Kim will make the right decision – he’ll choose peace and prosperity over conflict and war.”

Kim convened a rare four-day meeting of the ruling Workers’ Party’s policy-making committee since Saturday as the United States had not responded to his repeated calls for concessions to reopen negotiations, dismissing the deadline as artificial.

Kim had warned he might have to seek a “new path” if Washington fails to meet his expectations. U.S. military commanders said Pyongyang’s actions could include the testing of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which it has halted since 2017, alongside nuclear warhead tests.

There were no grounds for North Korea to be bound any longer by the self-declared nuclear and ICBM test moratorium as the United States continued joint military drills with South Korea, adopted cutting-edge weapons and imposed sanctions while making “gangster-like demands”, Kim said, according to KCNA.

He pledged to further develop North Korea’s nuclear deterrent but left the door open for dialogue, saying the “scope and depth” of that deterrent will be “properly coordinated depending on” the attitude of the United States.

“The world will witness a new strategic weapon to be possessed by the DPRK in the near future,” Kim said, using the acronym for North Korea’s official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

“We will reliably put on constant alert the powerful nuclear deterrent capable of containing the nuclear threats from the U.S. and guaranteeing our long-term security.”

The announcement comes a week after the world braced for a “Christmas gift” that Kim promised to send to the United States. Trump downplayed Kim’s cryptic message and said that rather than a missile test, “maybe it’s a nice present.”

“Maybe it’s a present where he sends me a beautiful vase as opposed to a missile test,” Trump said. “I may get a vase. I may get a nice present from him. You don’t know. You never know.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-31  Authors: amanda macias
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All the missiles and nukes North Korea has tested in one chart

This undated picture released from North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 5, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un inspecting the defence detachment on Jangjae Islet and the Hero Defence Detachment on Mu Islet. WASHINGTON — North Korea, the only nation to test nuclear weapons this century, spent most of President Donald Trump’s first year in office tuning up its nuclear arsenal. Under third-generation North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the reclusive state has conducte


This undated picture released from North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 5, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un inspecting the defence detachment on Jangjae Islet and the Hero Defence Detachment on Mu Islet.
WASHINGTON — North Korea, the only nation to test nuclear weapons this century, spent most of President Donald Trump’s first year in office tuning up its nuclear arsenal.
Under third-generation North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the reclusive state has conducte
All the missiles and nukes North Korea has tested in one chart Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-29  Authors: amanda macias nate rattner, amanda macias, nate rattner
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All the missiles and nukes North Korea has tested in one chart

This undated picture released from North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 5, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un inspecting the defence detachment on Jangjae Islet and the Hero Defence Detachment on Mu Islet.

WASHINGTON — North Korea, the only nation to test nuclear weapons this century, spent most of President Donald Trump’s first year in office tuning up its nuclear arsenal.

Under third-generation North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the reclusive state has conducted its most powerful nuclear test, launched its first-ever intercontinental ballistic missile and threatened to send missiles into the waters near Guam.

Last week, the world braced for Kim’s “Christmas gift” to the United States, a promise the reclusive leader made if the Trump administration did not work to salvage stalemated nuclear negotiations. Trump downplayed Kim’s cryptic message and said that the — rather than a missile test.

“Maybe it’s a nice present. Maybe it’s a present where he sends me a beautiful vase as opposed to a missile test,” Trump said. “I may get a vase. I may get a nice present from him. You don’t know. You never know.”

And although Kim’s Christmas gift did not manifest, the North’s state-run media said earlier this year that a “very important” test was carried out at a rocket testing ground. Trump responded to the report by tweeting that .

“Kim Jong Un is too smart and has far too much to lose, everything actually, if he acts in a hostile way. He signed a strong Denuclearization Agreement with me in Singapore,” Trump wrote on Twitter, referring to his historic summit with Kim in 2018.

On the heels of the test, North Korea’s ambassador to the United Nations said and lengthy talks with Washington were no longer needed.

Since 2011, Kim has launched more than 100 missiles and conducted four nuclear weapons tests, which is more than what his father, Kim Jong Il, and grandfather, Kim Il Sung, launched over a period of 27 years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-29  Authors: amanda macias nate rattner, amanda macias, nate rattner
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Japan’s NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean ‘Christmas gift’ news

The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017. The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory. NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given t


The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017.
The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory.
NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given t
Japan’s NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean ‘Christmas gift’ news Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27
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Japan's NHK apologizes for erroneous North Korean 'Christmas gift' news

The North Korean flag is seen at mast past the barbed wire fencing of the North Korean embassy in Malaysia on March 27, 2017.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK on Friday sent a news bulletin that incorrectly reported had launched a missile that fell into waters east of the Japanese archipelago, issuing an apology hours later explaining it was a media training alert.

The news alert came as the United States and its East Asian allies have been on tenterhooks after Pyongyang’s warning this month of a possible in what experts took to mean a possible long-range missile test.

The NHK bulletin, sent out 22 minutes after midnight on its website, read: “North Korean missile seen as having fallen into seas about 2,000 km east of Hokkaido’s Cape Erimo”, suggesting a flight path over Japanese territory.

At 2:28 a.m., NHK issued an apology on its website, explaining that the text was meant for training purposes and was “not true”.

“We apologize to our viewers and the public,” NHK said.

Warning citizens about disasters and security threats is one of the mandates for the publicly funded broadcaster, whose news casters regularly and frequently hold drills for earthquakes and other disaster coverage.

When North Korea did launch missiles that flew over , warnings spread through sirens and government-issued “J-alerts” on millions of cell phones throughout Japan, jolting some out of sleep.

NHK had also sent an erroneous news alert about a North Korean missile in error in January of last year.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had given the United States until the end of the year to propose new concessions in talks over his country’s nuclear arsenal and reducing tensions between the adversaries.

Its last test of an intercontinental ballistic missile was in November 2017 when it fired a Hwasong-15, the largest missile it has ever tested. Pyongyang said the missile was capable of reaching all of the United States.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-27
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Christmas Day passes with no sign of ‘gift’ that North Korea warned of

Christmas Day came and went with no sign of the “gift” that North Korea warned could come. “South Korea and the U.S. are continuously monitoring and tracking down on North Korean movements based on a close collaboration between South Korea and the U.S. intelligence offices,” South Korea’s defense spokesperson Choi Hyun Soo said in a briefing Thursday. More recently, Kim has said that North Korea could seek a “new path” if the U.S. persists with sanctions and pressure against the North. As a resu


Christmas Day came and went with no sign of the “gift” that North Korea warned could come.
“South Korea and the U.S. are continuously monitoring and tracking down on North Korean movements based on a close collaboration between South Korea and the U.S. intelligence offices,” South Korea’s defense spokesperson Choi Hyun Soo said in a briefing Thursday.
More recently, Kim has said that North Korea could seek a “new path” if the U.S. persists with sanctions and pressure against the North.
As a resu
Christmas Day passes with no sign of ‘gift’ that North Korea warned of Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: rachel elbaum
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Christmas Day passes with no sign of 'gift' that North Korea warned of

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un before a meeting with US President Donald Trump on the south side of the Military Demarcation Line that divides North and South Korea, in the Joint Security Area (JSA) of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized zone (DMZ) on June 30, 2019.

Christmas Day came and went with no sign of the “gift” that North Korea warned could come.

Earlier this month, Pyongyang set an year-end deadline for the U.S. to make new concessions in talks over the country’s nuclear arsenal.

And amid fears that North Korea was expanding a factory linked to the production of long-range nuclear missiles, the U.S. flew several spy planes over the Korean Peninsula during the holiday, according to South Korean media, citing military aircraft tracker Aircraft Spots.

It was the second time this week that the U.S. has monitored the secretive regime, after it flew four spy planes over the peninsula earlier this week, the news agency reported.

The Pentagon has not responded to NBC News requests for comment on the South Korean reports.

“South Korea and the U.S. are continuously monitoring and tracking down on North Korean movements based on a close collaboration between South Korea and the U.S. intelligence offices,” South Korea’s defense spokesperson Choi Hyun Soo said in a briefing Thursday.

“In addition, our military is resolutely maintaining standing military preparedness in case of the diverse military situation as well as work together with the U.S. through cooperation,” she added.

This followed the president playing down North Korea’s warnings, saying on Tuesday that he could receive a “nice present instead.”

“Maybe it’s a present where he sends me a beautiful vase as opposed to a missile test. Right? I may get a vase, I may get a nice present from him, you don’t know. You never know,” the president quipped to reporters after Christmas Eve video conference with U.S. troops from his Florida home.

According to an analysis of satellite photos provided to NBC News earlier this month, North Korea has expanded a factory linked to the production of long-range nuclear missiles.

“There is activity at a number of locations indicating that North Korea is laying the groundwork for an expansion of their ICBM program — more systems, more buildings, more capabilities,” wrote Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, in the analysis, using the acronym for intercontinental ballistic missiles.

The U.S. relationship with North Korea has been on a roller coaster ride under President Donald Trump, who has made diplomacy with Pyongyang a centerpiece of his foreign policy efforts.

In 2017, after a ratcheting up of North Korean saber-rattling, the president warned of “fire and fury like the world has never seen” if Pyongyang continued to threaten the U.S.

Following rounds of diplomacy, Trump became the first U.S. president to meet with his North Korean counterpart at a summit in Singapore in 2018. Trump said at the time that the pair had “developed a very special bond,” and described Kim as “a very talented man.”

February’s talks in Hanoi between the two men abruptly broke down, but were followed by another historic meeting in June, when the president took an unprecedented step into North Korea. But an October meeting between their negotiators in Sweden broke down.

More recently, Kim has said that North Korea could seek a “new path” if the U.S. persists with sanctions and pressure against the North. It has also threatened to lift a self-imposed moratorium on nuclear and long-range missile tests and resume launches over Japan.

Former National Security Adviser John Bolton, who Trump fired in September, warned this week that the North still posed a threat to the U.S. and said that the Trump administration’s approach to North Korea is more of a “rhetorical policy” than a “real policy.”

“The risk to U.S. forces and our allies is imminent and more effective policy is required before [North Korea] has the technology to threaten the American homeland,” he tweeted on Monday.

As a result, Trump may be forced to admit that his approach to North Korea has failed, he said.

“The idea that we are somehow exerting maximum pressure on North Korea is just unfortunately not true,” he said in an interview with Axios published on Sunday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-26  Authors: rachel elbaum
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South Korea, Japan and China to work together to promote dialogue between North Korea and the US

(Photo by Wang Zhao-Pool/Getty Images)China, Japan and South Korea have agreed to work together to promote dialogue between the United States and North Korea, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday following a summit between the three countries in China. North Korean leader have met three times since June 2018, but there has been no substantive progress in dialogue while the North demanded crushing international sanctions be lifted first. “South Korea, China, Japan, the three countri


(Photo by Wang Zhao-Pool/Getty Images)China, Japan and South Korea have agreed to work together to promote dialogue between the United States and North Korea, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday following a summit between the three countries in China.
North Korean leader have met three times since June 2018, but there has been no substantive progress in dialogue while the North demanded crushing international sanctions be lifted first.
“South Korea, China, Japan, the three countri
South Korea, Japan and China to work together to promote dialogue between North Korea and the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24
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South Korea, Japan and China to work together to promote dialogue between North Korea and the US

China’s Premier Li Keqiang (C) speaks at a joint press conference with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) and South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in (L) at the 8th trilateral leaders’ meeting between China, South Korea and Japan in Chengdu, in southwest China’s Sichuan province on December 24, 2019. (Photo by Wang Zhao-Pool/Getty Images)

China, Japan and South Korea have agreed to work together to promote dialogue between the United States and North Korea, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said on Tuesday following a summit between the three countries in China.

for the United States to change what it says is a policy of hostility amid a stalemate in efforts to make progress on their pledge to end the North’s nuclear program and establish lasting peace.

North Korean leader have met three times since June 2018, but there has been no substantive progress in dialogue while the North demanded crushing international sanctions be lifted first.

Speaking in the southwestern Chinese city of Chengdu following a meeting with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Moon said the three countries agreed on the need for close communication.

“South Korea, China, Japan, the three countries, agreed to continue close communication and cooperation towards and lasting peace on the Korean Peninsula,” Moon said at a joint news conference.

“We shared a view that peace on the Korean Peninsula is in the common interest of the three countries, and decided to work together to ensure that denuclearization and peace continue through prompt North Korea-U.S. dialogue,” he added.

Li said that the three leaders reaffirmed the need to seek a resolution to the North Korean issue via dialogue and for the three to cooperate in this regard.

China is North Korea’s most important economic and diplomatic backer, though Beijing has been angered by Pyongyang’s repeated missile and nuclear tests.

U.S. special envoy for North Korea Stephen Biegun met with two senior Chinese diplomats during his two-day visit to Beijing last week, following similar meetings in South Korea and Japan days earlier, as diplomats make last-ditch attempts to prevent new confrontation.

Beijing, together with Russia, proposed last week that the United Nations Security Council lift some sanctions in what it calls an attempt to break the current deadlock and seek to build support.

But it is unclear whether Beijing can convince Seoul and Tokyo to break ranks with Washington, which has made its opposition clear and can veto any resolution.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-24
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Satellite photos show work on North Korean site linked to long-range missiles

North Korea has expanded the March 16 Factory in Pyongsong, a facility associated with the production and modification of ICBM launchers. “There is activity at a number of locations indicating that North Korea is laying the groundwork for an expansion of their ICBM program — more systems, more buildings, more capabilities,” he said. When North Korea conducted a series of long-range missile tests in 2017, Trump threatened the nation with “fire and fury.” North Korea, under the leadership of Kim J


North Korea has expanded the March 16 Factory in Pyongsong, a facility associated with the production and modification of ICBM launchers.
“There is activity at a number of locations indicating that North Korea is laying the groundwork for an expansion of their ICBM program — more systems, more buildings, more capabilities,” he said.
When North Korea conducted a series of long-range missile tests in 2017, Trump threatened the nation with “fire and fury.”
North Korea, under the leadership of Kim J
Satellite photos show work on North Korean site linked to long-range missiles Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-22  Authors: ken dilanian
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Satellite photos show work on North Korean site linked to long-range missiles

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un smiles as he guides missile testing at an unidentified location in North Korea, in this undated image provided by KCNA on August 7, 2019.

North Korea has expanded a factory linked to the production of long-range nuclear missiles, according to a new analysis of satellite photos provided to NBC News that bolsters a growing expectation the country soon will resume testing a capability that threatens the United States.

Commercial satellite images from Planet Labs show a temporary structure at the site to accommodate the raising of a launcher arm, according to Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies.

“We believe North Korea erects this structure when the facility is involved in producing or modifying ICBM launchers,” Lewis concluded in a written analysis, using the acronym for intercontinental ballistic missiles.

North Korea has expanded the March 16 Factory in Pyongsong, a facility associated with the production and modification of ICBM launchers. The March 16 Factory produces both military and civilian vehicles. Russian truck maker KamAZ began participated in a joint venture from November 2006-2010 at the facility to produce to produce civilian vehicles.

This is one of many pieces of evidence pointing in one direction, Lewis added in an interview with NBC News.

“There is activity at a number of locations indicating that North Korea is laying the groundwork for an expansion of their ICBM program — more systems, more buildings, more capabilities,” he said.

The new evidence comes as U.S. military and intelligence officials are increasingly concerned that North Korea is poised to conduct a long-range missile test in the next few days or weeks, an act that would signal the final breakdown of diplomatic talks that President Donald Trump has hailed as a signature foreign policy achievement.

Kim Jong Un’s regime has recently warned of an imminent “Christmas gift,” to the United States, and the U.S. Air Force’s top general in the Asia-Pacific region said last week he believes that “gift” could be the test of a long-range ballistic missile.

Commercial imagery taken by Planet Labs shows that North Korea began expanding the site shortly after Kim’s visit in June, including constructing a new building that is connected to the one where Kim Jong Un witnessed preparations for the Hwasong-15 launch in 2017.

The country halted nuclear and long-range missiles tests in 2017 in the wake of diplomatic talks with the United States that included two summit meetings between Kim and Trump. But in recent months no progress has been apparent.

“What I would expect is some kind of long-range ballistic missile would be the ‘gift,'” Gen. Charles Brown, head of Pacific Air Forces, told reporters Dec. 17. “Does it come on Christmas Eve? Does it come on Christmas Day? Does it come after the new year? One of my responsibilities is to pay attention to that.”

The Air Force will be prepared to respond to a missile launch, Brown said, without being specific. “There’s a lot of stuff we did in 2017 that we can dust off fairly quickly and be ready to use,” he said.

The facility flagged by Lewis and his team is known as the March 16 Factory, and it produces both military and civilian vehicles. Russian truck maker KamAZ began participating in a joint venture at the facility to produce to produce civilian vehicles from November 2006 to 2010, Lewis said.

Kim Jong Un visited the facility in August 2017. Although North Korea presented the trucks he viewed as civilian vehicles, the same type of trucks were seen in military parades in 2017 and 2018 transporting ICBMs, Lewis said.

Kim visited the factory again in December 2017 to watch preparations for the launch of a Hwasong-15 ICBM. North Korean tests of mobile missiles tend to be conducted from factories involved in the production of the launcher.

Kim appears to have visited part of the facility a third time in June 2019, Lewis says, and commercial imagery taken by Planet Labs shows that North Korea began expanding the site shortly after that visit. Among the additions was a new building that is connected to the one where Kim witnessed preparations for the Hwasong-15 launch in 2017.

“An expansion of the plant increases its capability to produce trucks for both civilian and military use,” Lewis wrote. “Until now, North Korea’s limited ability to produce heavy-duty vehicle chassis has been a constraint on the development of a survivable intercontinental-range ballistic missile program. The expansion of this facility may represent an increase in North Korea’s ability to produce domestic missile launchers and expand it ICBM force.”

When North Korea conducted a series of long-range missile tests in 2017, Trump threatened the nation with “fire and fury.” If it resumes the tests, Trump will find himself, as every recent president has, with no palatable choices. A military strike against the North risks a war that could cost hundreds of thousands of South Korean lives.

“The only option is to accept the reality that North Korea is a nuclear-armed state that holds the U.S. at risk,” Lewis said. “The Trump administration had an opportunity, and I think they’ve blown it.”

Kim was never willing to disarm, Lewis said, but he may have been prepared to “have those weapons recede from view, stop testing, stop showing them off at parades, stop threatening people with them.”

But Trump insisted that North Korea would have to give up its weapons entirely, something the U.S. intelligence community has assessed as extremely unlikely.

Trump appeared to make a direct appeal to Kim earlier this month, when he tweeted: “Kim Jong Un is too smart and has far too much to lose, everything actually, if he acts in a hostile way. He does not want to void his special relationship with the President of the United States or interfere with the U.S. Presidential Election in November. North Korea, under the leadership of Kim Jong Un, has tremendous economic potential, but it must denuclearize as promised.”

Trump’s special envoy, Stephen Biegun, on a visit to South Korea this month urged the North back to the negotiating table.

“Let me speak directly to our counterparts in North Korea,” he said. “It is time for us to do our jobs. Let’s get this done. We are here, and you know how to reach us.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-22  Authors: ken dilanian
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lewis, missile, satellite, linked, korea, facility, site, missiles, korean, produce, trump, photos, work, kim, north, longrange, military


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North Korea says it conducted another crucial test at satellite launch site: KCNA

North Korea said it had conducted another test at a satellite launch site on Friday to bolster its strategic nuclear deterrence, North Korean state media outlet KCNA reported on Saturday. The test was conducted at the Sohae satellite launch site, KCNA said, citing a spokesman for North Korea’s Academy of Defense Science, without specifying what sort of testing occurred. KCNA on Sunday said that North Korea had carried out a “very important” test on Dec. 7 at the Sohae satellite launch site, a ro


North Korea said it had conducted another test at a satellite launch site on Friday to bolster its strategic nuclear deterrence, North Korean state media outlet KCNA reported on Saturday.
The test was conducted at the Sohae satellite launch site, KCNA said, citing a spokesman for North Korea’s Academy of Defense Science, without specifying what sort of testing occurred.
KCNA on Sunday said that North Korea had carried out a “very important” test on Dec. 7 at the Sohae satellite launch site, a ro
North Korea says it conducted another crucial test at satellite launch site: KCNA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, korea, crucial, launch, conducted, seoul, satellite, korean, kcna, south, site, north


North Korea says it conducted another crucial test at satellite launch site: KCNA

People watch a TV broadcast showing file footage for a news report on North Korea firing two projectiles, possibly missiles, into the sea between the Korean peninsula and Japan, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019.

North Korea said it had conducted another test at a satellite launch site on Friday to bolster its strategic nuclear deterrence, North Korean state media outlet KCNA reported on Saturday.

The test was conducted at the Sohae satellite launch site, KCNA said, citing a spokesman for North Korea’s Academy of Defense Science, without specifying what sort of testing occurred.

It was the second such test at the facility in the last week.

KCNA on Sunday said that North Korea had carried out a “very important” test on Dec. 7 at the Sohae satellite launch site, a rocket-testing facility that U.S. officials once said North Korea had promised to close.

That KCNA report called that event a “successful test of great significance.” South Korea’s defense minister Jeong Keong-doo said it was an engine test.

The reported tests come ahead of a year-end deadline North Korea has put forth for the United States to drop its insistence on unilateral denuclearization.

Pyongyang has warned it could take a “new path” amid the stalled talks with the United States. The top U.S envoy for North Korea is set to arrive in Seoul on Sunday for meetings with South Korean officials.

Tension has been rising in recent weeks as Pyongyang has conducted weapons tests and waged a war of words with U.S. President Donald Trump, stoking fears that tensions between the two countries could return.

Stephen Biegun, U.S. special envoy for North Korea, will arrive in South Korea on Sunday, Seoul and Washington said on Friday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, korea, crucial, launch, conducted, seoul, satellite, korean, kcna, south, site, north


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This 5,000-year-old Korean secret to success and happiness can make you richer—here’s how

While I was born in the United States and raised in an English-speaking household, some Korean words were impossible to escape. Nunchi in a negotiationTake Thea, for example: Thea met with her boss to ask for a salary increase. An experienced negotiator might tell Thea to find out what range her boss has in mind before they start talking numbers. So Thea sat down with him and simply said, “I’d like to discuss a pay raise to accompany my recent promotion.” And because her boss had shown his hand,


While I was born in the United States and raised in an English-speaking household, some Korean words were impossible to escape.
Nunchi in a negotiationTake Thea, for example: Thea met with her boss to ask for a salary increase.
An experienced negotiator might tell Thea to find out what range her boss has in mind before they start talking numbers.
So Thea sat down with him and simply said, “I’d like to discuss a pay raise to accompany my recent promotion.”
And because her boss had shown his hand,
This 5,000-year-old Korean secret to success and happiness can make you richer—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: euny hong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, say, 5000yearold, thats, tell, thea, happiness, richerheres, raise, nunchi, success, korean, boss, pay, secret, silent


This 5,000-year-old Korean secret to success and happiness can make you richer—here's how

While I was born in the United States and raised in an English-speaking household, some Korean words were impossible to escape. One of the first words I learned as a child was “nunchi” (pronounced noon-chee), which literally translates as “eye-measure.” The 5,000-year-old art of nunchi involves sensing what other people are thinking and feeling. A person with “quick” nunchi can rapidly assess the overall mood and nature of relationships and hierarchies within any given social setting — and know how to respond appropriately.

Using nunchi to earn more money

In Korea, nunchi is a superpower. Not only is it the secret to living a happier life, but it can also help you perform better at your job, enjoy it more, keep it longer and continue getting the pay raises you deserve. The wonderful thing about nunchi is that you don’t have to be born with it. It can be honed by following a set of rules — such dropping your preconceptions (in order to observe your environment with discernment) and reading between the lines (because people don’t always say what they’re thinking out loud). But there’s one rule that’s especially important if you want to make more money: Never miss a good opportunity to shut up. Why? Because if you wait long enough, most of your questions will be answered — without your having to say a word.

If what one has to say is not better than silence, then one should keep silent. Confucius

This may sound odd to many people, given that loudness is valorized in modern society, particularly in the West. I find this funny, since we also celebrate the stereotype of the “strong, silent” type, like cowboys or steely military leaders. But any skilled negotiator will tell you that being silent can put you in a highly advantageous position.

Nunchi in a negotiation

Take Thea, for example: Thea met with her boss to ask for a salary increase. She’d been offered a promotion already, but her new salary had not yet been decided. An experienced negotiator might tell Thea to find out what range her boss has in mind before they start talking numbers. This follows the nunchi rule of never passing up a good opportunity to shut up; if you keep listening, the other party will tell you everything you need to know before you even ask. Thea knew from previous observation that her boss has a tendency to get chatty and ramble. (If a room ever got too quiet, he’d often respond by filling it with sound of his own voice.) So Thea sat down with him and simply said, “I’d like to discuss a pay raise to accompany my recent promotion.” Then she left a silence that her boss felt obliged to fill. “I’m guessing you’re cheesed off that we didn’t give you the 3% increase last year,” he said. Thea was surprised; she wasn’t aware she had been due a raise. Still, she didn’t say anything. This of course made her boss talk even more. “OK, that’s understandable,” he said. “Two years’ worth of salary increases would be a 6% bump, but beyond that? Hmm…” Again, not a word from Thea. Her boss continued: “I mean, we can’t pay you six figures. That’s 25% higher than the highest-ranking member of your team.” And there it was! The answer Thea was looking for. Without realizing it, her boss had given her the exact range of what she should be requesting. Lower limit: a 6% increase on her current salary. Upper limit: $80,000 (a.k.a. Thea’s estimated salary of the highest-ranking member of her team, based on the “six figures” — meaning $100,000 — that her boss blurted out.) Thea knew the company would come with a lower but probably acceptable counteroffer, which they did. She ended up getting a 20% raise. And because her boss had shown his hand, Thea had the satisfaction of knowing she didn’t shortchange herself. It is said that a fair negotiation does not start until at least one party is offended by the other’s offer. If your boss is shocked by your number, do not cower. It means you did the right thing.

A small victory is still a victory


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: euny hong
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, say, 5000yearold, thats, tell, thea, happiness, richerheres, raise, nunchi, success, korean, boss, pay, secret, silent


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