If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users


While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app. High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free. The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. While users
If you are a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


If you are a 'Game of Thrones' fan, this app will teach you how to speak in High Valyrian

“Skorverdon zaldrīzoti Daenerys ēza?”

Translation: How many dragons does Daenerys have? It’s not a ridiculous question if you’re a fan of the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” which returns for its eighth and final season on Sunday. The language? It’s called High Valyrian, the tongue of the ruined Valyrian Freehold empire, and it’s one of four languages created by linguist David J. Peterson spoken on the show.

While only one character can speak native High Valyrian on “Game of Thrones,” viewers nationwide are picking up a few words and phrases from an unlikely source: Duolingo, the free language-learning app.

Duolingo first offered lessons in High Valyrian in 2017 and, since then, 1.2 million people have started the course. In the last two weeks leading up to the premier of the final season, Duolingo has seen a near 65% increase in people taking the course, said Sam Dalsimer, a spokesman for Duolingo.

High Valyrian isn’t the only fictional language Duolingo has to offer. Star Trek fans can find Klingon, a language constructed by Marc Okrand and centered around spacecraft, warfare and weaponry.

To offer languages on Duolingo, the company usually relies on hundreds of volunteers and employees to develop course material and monitor users’ experiences. That’s not the case when it comes to High Valyrian, where Peterson is a contributor and develops the courses for free.

“We teach over 30 languages and most have thousands of people who speak them and are capable of helping us teach them.” Dalsimer said. “There’s only one person on planet Earth who knows the language, and that’s David Peterson.”

The origins of High Valyrian come from the book that inspired the show, written by George R.R. Martin. Peterson won a contest to develop the more common language used on “Game of Thrones” called Dothraki but was asked to build High Valyrian later in the series. His goal was to create a classic language that could give birth to many others, similar to Romance languages, and Peterson noted it had to fit with the names Martin created for the book, such as Daenerys, Viserys and Rhaella.

There are now 824 words of High Valyrian that users can learn on Duolingo, and that number continues to grow. Peterson said there are now 2,000 words in the full version of the language he maintains.

“With every single language I create I keep working on it for the rest of my life or until I’m not happy with it,” said Peterson, who has created more than 50 languages. “It will basically just be another one of my languages, it’s not like it’s going to get any special treatment.”

When Peterson first encountered Duolingo, he felt it could revolutionize the way people learned languages. It had a great interface, it was free and, as a linguist, it’s the dream for people like him to create languages people would have access to, although he didn’t foresee how popular High Valyrian would become.

Today, High Valyrian has 822,000 active learners, or those who have used the course in the last 12 months. That’s more than Czech, Norwegian, Vietnamese and Hungarian.

“I imagined it would attract casual interest, but I never imagined there would be that many people who would actually be interested in taking the course,” Peterson said.

There is one statistic Peterson is particularly proud of: 44% of users who came to Duolingo to learn High Valyrian went on to practice other languages. While users may not perfect High Valyrian, Peterson sees the language as a “gateway drug” to learners discovering other cultures.

“As we become more economically focused, people view language as a tool as opposed to an art piece in and of itself or cultural history,” Peterson said.

More than 40% of the world speaks one of eight languages, although there are more than 7,000 worldwide. UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has labeled 2,680 languages in danger as it celebrates the International Year of Indigenous Languages, designed to raise awareness to disappearing languages.

“It’s nice that the UN is putting this emphasis on indigenous languages because people need to start addressing this issue,” Peterson said. “We’re losing them and we’re losing them quickly, and once they’re lost, they’re lost.”

Duolingo has worked with communities and volunteers like Peterson to develop courses in endangered languages, such as offering lessons in Hawaiian, Irish and Navajo, Dalsimer said.

“Those courses are driven entirely by volunteer contributors and for them it’s more about a desire to preserve their language and their culture because they see it as being endangered, and it is,” Dalsimer said. “Languages die every year and Duolingo can help them preserve it.”

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“I remember thinking that if David Peterson ever taught the ‘Game of Thrones’ language I would definitely check it out,” said Andrew Feinberg, a volunteer for Duolingo who has used the app since its beta version nearly seven years ago.

Except when Duolingo announced it would offer High Valyrian courses, Feinberg thought it was a joke. He helped Duolingo develop its Norwegian and Japanese platforms, and he’s witnessed the company’s pranks in the past, like when it offered pirate and zombie languages.

But Feinberg noticed the only contributor to the course was Peterson. That’s when he realized it wasn’t a joke.

Peterson, dubbed by the Los Angeles Times as “Hollywood’s go-to language guy” has created languages for many film and television projects, including the movies “Thor: The Dark World” and “Doctor Strange.”

“I had sort of stalked him on YouTube and watched all those videos on how he created those languages,” Feinberg said. “I was really excited for it. I knew that he was a serious linguist who had complimented Duolingo before.”

Now Feinberg manages learning groups on Facebook for Japanese, Chinese, Norwegian and, a day after its introduction, High Valyrian, which has amassed over 200 members learning alongside Peterson himself, who encourages people to use and develop the language in conversation with each other even if that means moving beyond what he imagined.

“It’s always a little different since I did create High Valyrian and, in a sense, there is an arbiter to determine what is right and what is wrong,” Peterson said. “But as long as I’m here I feel like not only do I want to, but I should be there to try to help people out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, source, george kavallines
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, course, valyrian, thrones, speak, peterson, game, teach, created, develop, app, high, feinberg, fan, duolingo, language, languages


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Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other


Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other
Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month.

Demand for German speakers peaked just before the Brexit referendum in June 2016, according to the data.

The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period.

However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. According to the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics, net migration from the EU is now at its lowest level in a decade, which could signal a reduction in the talent pool when it comes to European language skills.

“Many U.K. employers who require multilingual staff are becoming increasingly unsettled as a perfect storm brews — fewer and fewer linguists are emerging from our education system just as Brexit uncertainty looks to be deterring workers relocating here from the EU,” Bill Richards, U.K. managing director of Indeed, said in a press release.

“English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other languages. While the U.K. market clearly continues to offer many opportunities for those with additional language skills, there is a danger of a shortfall emerging as insufficient supply butts up against rising demand,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


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China says it welcomes delay on US tariff hike

China said on Saturday that it welcomed the release of language from the United State Trade Representative’s office (USTR) delaying a scheduled hike in U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. In a statement posted on the website of the Ministry of Commerce, citing an unidentified official at China’s State Council Tariff Commission, China said that it was aware of the USTR’s announcement to maintain tariffs at 10 percent until further notice, and welcomed the step. The USTR released


China said on Saturday that it welcomed the release of language from the United State Trade Representative’s office (USTR) delaying a scheduled hike in U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. In a statement posted on the website of the Ministry of Commerce, citing an unidentified official at China’s State Council Tariff Commission, China said that it was aware of the USTR’s announcement to maintain tariffs at 10 percent until further notice, and welcomed the step. The USTR released
China says it welcomes delay on US tariff hike Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-02  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delay, welcomes, china, ustr, hike, tariff, welcomed, scheduled, notice, trade, state, tariffs, language


China says it welcomes delay on US tariff hike

China said on Saturday that it welcomed the release of language from the United State Trade Representative’s office (USTR) delaying a scheduled hike in U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods.

In a statement posted on the website of the Ministry of Commerce, citing an unidentified official at China’s State Council Tariff Commission, China said that it was aware of the USTR’s announcement to maintain tariffs at 10 percent until further notice, and welcomed the step.

The USTR released language to delay a scheduled hike in tariffs on Chinese goods from 10 percent to 25 percent on Friday, ahead of the publication of a notice next Tuesday.

President Donald Trump had announced the delay on Sunday as trade talks between the two sides had made progress.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-02  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delay, welcomes, china, ustr, hike, tariff, welcomed, scheduled, notice, trade, state, tariffs, language


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How Google’s ‘best app of 2018’ was built off the back of a failed project

In 2018, language learning app Drops was named Google’s “best app of 2018,” surpassed 10 million downloads, and saw revenue increase fivefold. The app claims users can learn a new language — it currently offers more than 30 — with minimal time and commitment. “Being European I realized quickly that speaking more than one language was the key to the global marketplace,” the Hungarian entrepreneur said. Users of Drops learn by associating images with words in a gaming format, but the platform does


In 2018, language learning app Drops was named Google’s “best app of 2018,” surpassed 10 million downloads, and saw revenue increase fivefold. The app claims users can learn a new language — it currently offers more than 30 — with minimal time and commitment. “Being European I realized quickly that speaking more than one language was the key to the global marketplace,” the Hungarian entrepreneur said. Users of Drops learn by associating images with words in a gaming format, but the platform does
How Google’s ‘best app of 2018’ was built off the back of a failed project Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, 2018, learn, failed, really, trying, farkas, app, language, decided, users, built, googles, realized, project, drops


How Google's 'best app of 2018' was built off the back of a failed project

In 2018, language learning app Drops was named Google’s “best app of 2018,” surpassed 10 million downloads, and saw revenue increase fivefold.

The app claims users can learn a new language — it currently offers more than 30 — with minimal time and commitment.

But according to co-founder and CEO Daniel Farkas, it took a huge failure to put him on the right track to building a successful platform.

“Being European I realized quickly that speaking more than one language was the key to the global marketplace,” the Hungarian entrepreneur said.

Farkas’ idea for an app stemmed from his own experience of trying to learn a language as quickly as possible, when he noticed a gap in the market for a quick-fix solution. Eventually, he and co-founder Mark Szulyovszky developed LearnInvisible — but although the app had all the tools required to learn a new language, users were bored and didn’t commit for long enough to learn anything.

“We had to learn the hard way that our first baby was a bit ugly. It was really hard,” Farkas told CNBC. “But we’re really conscious of our mistakes and have spent a lot of time analyzing what went wrong — we realized that effectiveness alone is not enough. With LearnInvisible, people just didn’t come back after trying it. So we decided to start from scratch.”

The co-founders decided to incorporate all of the educational effectiveness of Learn Invisible with a more engaging concept, and launched Drops in 2015.

“We basically decided to build a game, but this is a game with a more noble purpose,” Farkas said. “Boredom is the learner’s enemy, so we have a lot of focus on visuals — we are obsessed with design and wanted to build a beautiful design.”

They were also mindful of knowing an app’s limitations. Users of Drops learn by associating images with words in a gaming format, but the platform doesn’t delve into the complicated depths of individual languages.

“Drops focuses on vocabulary because we want to do one thing really well — we don’t offer a whole menu of language knowledge, such as grammar,” Farkas explained. “We do not believe an app is able to get you to fluency — acquiring all of that knowledge best done by practicing with a teacher. And we are not filling the teacher’s role.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, 2018, learn, failed, really, trying, farkas, app, language, decided, users, built, googles, realized, project, drops


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6 common body language mistakes to avoid in your next job interview

Most of us prepare for job interviews the same way: Research the company, Google “how to answer common interview questions,” practice answering them out loud and then hope for the best. But rarely do we think about how we present ourselves to our potential future employers. Body language is a large indicator of your confidence and comfort level in any given situation, and it can make or break your chances of landing the job. Here are six common body language mistakes to avoid in your next interv


Most of us prepare for job interviews the same way: Research the company, Google “how to answer common interview questions,” practice answering them out loud and then hope for the best. But rarely do we think about how we present ourselves to our potential future employers. Body language is a large indicator of your confidence and comfort level in any given situation, and it can make or break your chances of landing the job. Here are six common body language mistakes to avoid in your next interv
6 common body language mistakes to avoid in your next job interview Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: debcarreau, guest contributor, orangedukeproductions, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mistakes, language, common, situation, way, research, interview, body, think, job, questions, rarely, avoid


6 common body language mistakes to avoid in your next job interview

Most of us prepare for job interviews the same way: Research the company, Google “how to answer common interview questions,” practice answering them out loud and then hope for the best. But rarely do we think about how we present ourselves to our potential future employers.

Body language is a large indicator of your confidence and comfort level in any given situation, and it can make or break your chances of landing the job. Here are six common body language mistakes to avoid in your next interview:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: debcarreau, guest contributor, orangedukeproductions, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mistakes, language, common, situation, way, research, interview, body, think, job, questions, rarely, avoid


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Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder

Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision. “I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It. “I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial fil


Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision. “I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It. “I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial fil
Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -eric gnock fah, co-founder, chief operations officer of klook, -craig dixon, program manager at accelerating asia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, told, language, cofounder, gnock, linkedin, way, wanted, tech, helped, profiles, klook, friend, entrepreneur, fah


Klook entrepreneur says LinkedIn helped him find start-up co-founder

Gnock Fah was then a 26-year-old Hong Kong-based investment analyst with big plans to shake-up the travel industry. He already had a co-founder in fellow financier and long-time friend Ethan Lin, but the pair had one major problem: They needed a tech brain to execute their vision.

“I didn’t know anything about tech back then from my finance background,” Gnock Fah told CNBC Make It.

Not one to let that stand in his way, Gnock Fah consulted a U.S. tech friend to find out the most useful coding language — which, in 2014, he was told, was PHP — and got stalking.

“I probably read through at least 500 profiles,” said the Klook co-founder, who used the language as an initial filter. He then honed in on the most built-out profiles, reasoning that they would be most likely to respond.

“It was determination, I would say. We knew we wanted to be (a) tech-plus-travel (business).”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -eric gnock fah, co-founder, chief operations officer of klook, -craig dixon, program manager at accelerating asia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, told, language, cofounder, gnock, linkedin, way, wanted, tech, helped, profiles, klook, friend, entrepreneur, fah


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Here’s the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume

But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t. If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume. Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine. For positions where a secondary lang


But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t. If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume. Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine. For positions where a secondary lang
Here’s the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: ruth umoh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, ask, augustine, speak, language, job, career, youd, role, youre, heres, resume


Here's the only time you should put a foreign language on your resume

In today’s global economy, speaking a second language is highly prized. But if you’re tempted to add a language to your resume that you haven’t spoken since the seventh grade, here’s a word of advice: don’t.

If you’re not a native speaker and it’s not something you’ve been building on for your specific career, “I don’t think it belongs [on your resume],” Amanda Augustine, a TopResume career advice expert, tells CNBC Make It.

To determine your level of proficiency, Augustine says to ask yourself: Could I travel to a country that only speaks this language and hold fluent conversations without any outside assistance?

If your answer is no, remove the language from your resume.

Granted, being bilingual or multilingual is incredibly marketable, says Augustine, but the costs can outweigh the benefits if you’re not as proficient as you claim to be.

“It really depends on if it’s important to your role,” says the career expert. If you’re fairly proficient in a language but it has no bearing on the job to which you are applying, don’t bother adding it to your resume, says Augustine.

Be mindful that the interviewer might speak the language and want to test your fluency, especially for common languages like Spanish. An inability to communicate clearly could end up making you look deceitful, casting doubt on the rest of your resume, says Augustine.

If you’re hired without a test, your company might eventually expand to another country or conduct business with clients who speak a different language. As a result, your employer will quickly learn that you fibbed, a risk you shouldn’t take when the role likely didn’t require a foreign language in the first place.

For positions where a secondary language is desirable or crucial to the role, ask yourself whether you’d feel comfortable holding the entire interview in that language, says Augustine. She recommends that you also ask yourself if you’d be able to conduct business deals in that second language.

For native speakers, there’s no downside to disclosing a foreign language. But do remember that you have limited space on your resume so you should still prioritize any job-related skills.

If you still want to include a language, provide context. Augustine suggests explaining whether you speak fluently or conversationally, for instance. Understand, however, that such descriptions are highly subjective and could create confusion.

No matter what you do, if you pretend you have a higher level of proficiency than you have, “you’re probably not going to land the job,” says Augustine.

“You need to sell yourself,” she says. “If it doesn’t help your candidacy, eliminate it.”

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Don’t miss: Hiring managers share the No. 1 resume lie that could cost you the job


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: ruth umoh
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, foreign, ask, augustine, speak, language, job, career, youd, role, youre, heres, resume


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Here’s the mental trick this introverted Duolingo exec uses to lead effectively

The app, which provides free language education through games and interactive lessons, is the largest language learning platform and most downloaded education app worldwide, according to the company. In 2017, the company said revenue grew by 1,300 percent to $13 million, according to CNBC, and this year, it projects that revenue will hit between $30 million and $40 million. It’s current valuation is $700 million, according to Pitchbook, and it has attracted high-profile investors like Ashton Kut


The app, which provides free language education through games and interactive lessons, is the largest language learning platform and most downloaded education app worldwide, according to the company. In 2017, the company said revenue grew by 1,300 percent to $13 million, according to CNBC, and this year, it projects that revenue will hit between $30 million and $40 million. It’s current valuation is $700 million, according to Pitchbook, and it has attracted high-profile investors like Ashton Kut
Here’s the mental trick this introverted Duolingo exec uses to lead effectively Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: sarah berger, source, jorge mazal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uses, according, shell, effectively, app, exec, introverted, trick, lead, duolingo, million, leader, company, heres, mazal, think, revenue, language, mental


Here's the mental trick this introverted Duolingo exec uses to lead effectively

Since its launch in 2011, language-learning app Duolingo has been busy.

The app, which provides free language education through games and interactive lessons, is the largest language learning platform and most downloaded education app worldwide, according to the company. In 2017, the company said revenue grew by 1,300 percent to $13 million, according to CNBC, and this year, it projects that revenue will hit between $30 million and $40 million. It’s current valuation is $700 million, according to Pitchbook, and it has attracted high-profile investors like Ashton Kutcher and Tim Ferriss.

Helping lead the company to such success is vice president of product Jorge Mazal. As a leader at Duolingo, it’s part of his job to interact with all kinds of people, but Mazal considers himself an introvert. So he has a mental trick he uses.

“I think there are unique challenges to being introverted as a leader, and what motivates me to get out of my shell, to talk to people, is I try to be a leader that serves,” Mazal tells CNBC Make It.

“I think about what their needs are, what I can do to help them be successful in their job…it helps me knowing that I’m not thinking about myself or being selfish, helps me get out and be helpful to others.

“And that’s my approach to leadership: Find a purpose or a mission that will inspire you enough to make you come out of your shell,” he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: sarah berger, source, jorge mazal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uses, according, shell, effectively, app, exec, introverted, trick, lead, duolingo, million, leader, company, heres, mazal, think, revenue, language, mental


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China’s Baidu challenges Google with A.I. that translates languages in real-time

Baidu trained its AI on two million pairs of English and Chinese sentences, Liang Huang, principal scientist at Baidu, told CNBC by phone on Wednesday. This has allowed Baidu’s digital interpreter to do near real-time translation from two languages that have very different sentence structures. Baidu used the example of this sentence in its blog post on Wednesday: “President Bush meets with Russian President Putin in Moscow.” But when translated into English, it becomes the third word in the sent


Baidu trained its AI on two million pairs of English and Chinese sentences, Liang Huang, principal scientist at Baidu, told CNBC by phone on Wednesday. This has allowed Baidu’s digital interpreter to do near real-time translation from two languages that have very different sentence structures. Baidu used the example of this sentence in its blog post on Wednesday: “President Bush meets with Russian President Putin in Moscow.” But when translated into English, it becomes the third word in the sent
China’s Baidu challenges Google with A.I. that translates languages in real-time Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: arjun kharpal, vcg, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, translation, word, data, languages, chinas, president, ai, english, google, translates, huang, challenges, language, baidu, lag, sentence, realtime, chinese


China's Baidu challenges Google with A.I. that translates languages in real-time

AI tools require huge amounts of data sets to learn.

Baidu trained its AI on two million pairs of English and Chinese sentences, Liang Huang, principal scientist at Baidu, told CNBC by phone on Wednesday. This has allowed Baidu’s digital interpreter to do near real-time translation from two languages that have very different sentence structures.

Baidu used the example of this sentence in its blog post on Wednesday: “President Bush meets with Russian President Putin in Moscow.”

In Chinese, the verb “meets” is at the end of the sentence. But when translated into English, it becomes the third word in the sentence, as is appropriate in that language. Thanks to the training with the data sets, Baidu’s tool is able to predict the word that comes in the English sentence, even before the word is spoken.

“We train our system to predict the English side given the Chinese side prefix,” Huang told CNBC.

“You learn from that data that if Bush or any U.S. president is ever in Moscow, he is likely meeting with somebody,” the scientist added.

This would not be a problem for non-simultaneous translation as the time lag allows for assessing the sentence structure before making the translation. But with real-time interpretation, there cannot be a delay.

The translation tool can also be adjusted for latency, which means a user can set how much lag there is between a word being spoken and its translation. The higher the lag, the better the translation for some languages.

It currently supports Chinese to English, but Huang said it is “language neutral” and will eventually be able to translate other language pairs too.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: arjun kharpal, vcg, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, translation, word, data, languages, chinas, president, ai, english, google, translates, huang, challenges, language, baidu, lag, sentence, realtime, chinese


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Treasury yields tick higher after Fed hikes rates, removes ‘accommodative’ language from statement

Rates dropped late in the session after Fed Chair Jerome Powell said he does not see a buildup in fundamental inflation and does not anticipate prices surprising to the upside. “The main thing where we might need to move along a little bit quicker if inflation surprises to the upside. Fed members also decided to drop language saying that “the stance of monetary policy remains accommodative,” a signal to some traders that the Fed considers itself closer to being done with regular rate hikes. Comi


Rates dropped late in the session after Fed Chair Jerome Powell said he does not see a buildup in fundamental inflation and does not anticipate prices surprising to the upside. “The main thing where we might need to move along a little bit quicker if inflation surprises to the upside. Fed members also decided to drop language saying that “the stance of monetary policy remains accommodative,” a signal to some traders that the Fed considers itself closer to being done with regular rate hikes. Comi
Treasury yields tick higher after Fed hikes rates, removes ‘accommodative’ language from statement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27  Authors: thomas franck, alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rates, session, little, trump, removes, yields, tick, hikes, higher, rate, point, president, powell, inflation, need, language, fed, treasury, statement


Treasury yields tick higher after Fed hikes rates, removes 'accommodative' language from statement

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) hiked its benchmark interest rate by a quarter point yesterday and announced that an additional hike was projected by year-end, while three more were penciled in for 2019.

Rates dropped late in the session after Fed Chair Jerome Powell said he does not see a buildup in fundamental inflation and does not anticipate prices surprising to the upside.

“The main thing where we might need to move along a little bit quicker if inflation surprises to the upside. We don’t see that,” Powell told reporters during his quarterly news conference Wednesday.

Fed members also decided to drop language saying that “the stance of monetary policy remains accommodative,” a signal to some traders that the Fed considers itself closer to being done with regular rate hikes.

Markets had been watching closely to see whether the Fed would ditch the language, which was originally introduced years ago as the central bank lowered rates in an attempt to help pull the economy out of the financial crisis.

“The removal of ‘accommodative,’ on its face value may be a little puzzling because the Fed funds rate is still pretty low, around where inflation is,” said James Kahn, a former vice president of the New York Fed and now chair of the economics department at Yeshiva University.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if they pause at some point if things start to look a little more volatile. At least three increases next year will bring them close to 3 percent,” Kahn added.

The Treasury Department auctioned $31 billion in seven-year notes at a high yield of 3.034 percent. The bid-to-cover ratio, an indicator of demand, was 2.45. Indirect bidders, which include major central banks, were awarded 62 percent. Direct bidders, which includes domestic money managers, bought 12.8 percent.

Coming up Thursday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell is set to appear at Senator Reed’s Rhode Island Business Leaders Day in Washington, DC.

Elsewhere, Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan is expected to participate in moderated Q&A session on “What You Really Need to Lead” at the third annual banking and the economy forum for minorities in banking, which takes place in Charlotte, North Carolina.

In politics, President Donald Trump accused China of intending to interfere in November’s congressional elections. He added, without providing evidence, that Beijing didn’t want the Republican party to perform well.

This prompted an immediate rejection from the Chinese government, which said it didn’t intrude on another country’s domestic matters, Reuters reported.

Elsewhere, Trump criticized Canada for the slow pace of discussions concerning the overhaul of NAFTA.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-27  Authors: thomas franck, alexandra gibbs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rates, session, little, trump, removes, yields, tick, hikes, higher, rate, point, president, powell, inflation, need, language, fed, treasury, statement


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