India’s semi high-speed train breaks down a day after its launch

India’s first locally built semi high-speed train broke down early on Saturday on its way back to New Delhi from Varanasi in northern Uttar Pradesh, a day after its inauguration by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The Vande Bharat Express can run up to a maximum speed of 160 km/hour.


India’s first locally built semi high-speed train broke down early on Saturday on its way back to New Delhi from Varanasi in northern Uttar Pradesh, a day after its inauguration by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The Vande Bharat Express can run up to a maximum speed of 160 km/hour.
India’s semi high-speed train breaks down a day after its launch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: roslan rahman, afp, getty images, str
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uttar, breaks, highspeed, semi, train, pradesh, way, indias, varanasi, prime, speed, run, vande, day, launch


India's semi high-speed train breaks down a day after its launch

India’s first locally built semi high-speed train broke down early on Saturday on its way back to New Delhi from Varanasi in northern Uttar Pradesh, a day after its inauguration by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

The Vande Bharat Express can run up to a maximum speed of 160 km/hour.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: roslan rahman, afp, getty images, str
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uttar, breaks, highspeed, semi, train, pradesh, way, indias, varanasi, prime, speed, run, vande, day, launch


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Apple targeting April launch for video service

While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year. Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video servic


While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year. Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video servic
Apple targeting April launch for video service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: alex sherman, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, cut, targeting, launch, apple, wall, video, content, hbo, revenue, reported, service


Apple targeting April launch for video service

While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year.

Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video service through its streaming service, three of the people said. Currently, Apple takes a 15 percent cut on revenue from customers that sign up to HBO Now, Netflix, and other streaming apps through the App Store, two people said.

Netflix and Hulu aren’t part of Amazon Prime Video Channels and aren’t expected to be a part of Apple’s product either, according to people familiar with the matter.

Spokespeople at Apple, CBS, HBO, Hulu, Netflix, Starz and Viacom declined to comment.

Apple has jostled with traditional media companies for years over getting access to their content. CEO Tim Cook previewed Apple’s new offering on the company’s earnings conference call last month.

“We see huge changes in customer behavior taking place now and we think that it will accelerate as the year goes by with the breakdown of the cable bundle. I think that it’ll likely take place at a much faster pace this year,” Cook said. “We will participate in the original content world. We have signed a multi-year partnership with Oprah, but today I’m not really ready to extend that conversation beyond that point. We’ve hired some great people that we have a super amount of confidence in, and we’ll have something to say more on that later.”

Apple’s deal with Oprah Winfrey and other big entertainment names like Reese Witherspoon and Steven Spielberg will give Apple device owners access to both film and TV content for no additional charge. Apple is planning to offer its original content free to device users, CNBC first reported in October. Apple planned to spend about $1 billion on originals last year, the Wall Street Journal reported. Apple has agreed to a number of movies and series already, including animated features, comedies, reality shows and dramas, most of which were compiled by Macworld here.

WATCH: Goldman’s Rod Hall: Apple has its work cut out for it in services


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: alex sherman, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, cut, targeting, launch, apple, wall, video, content, hbo, revenue, reported, service


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Apple targeting April launch for video service

While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year. Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video servic


While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year. Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video servic
Apple targeting April launch for video service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: alex sherman, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, cut, targeting, launch, apple, wall, video, content, hbo, revenue, reported, service


Apple targeting April launch for video service

While the exact disagreement between Apple and HBO isn’t known, media companies have been concerned about data sharing and revenue splits as Apple tries to aggregate existing services in new ways. For instance, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Apple is pushing to take nearly 50 percent of revenue derived from a new subscription news service it’s planning to launch later this year.

Apple is pushing for a 30 percent cut on every customer that subscribes to an over-the-top video service through its streaming service, three of the people said. Currently, Apple takes a 15 percent cut on revenue from customers that sign up to HBO Now, Netflix, and other streaming apps through the App Store, two people said.

Netflix and Hulu aren’t part of Amazon Prime Video Channels and aren’t expected to be a part of Apple’s product either, according to people familiar with the matter.

Spokespeople at Apple, CBS, HBO, Hulu, Netflix, Starz and Viacom declined to comment.

Apple has jostled with traditional media companies for years over getting access to their content. CEO Tim Cook previewed Apple’s new offering on the company’s earnings conference call last month.

“We see huge changes in customer behavior taking place now and we think that it will accelerate as the year goes by with the breakdown of the cable bundle. I think that it’ll likely take place at a much faster pace this year,” Cook said. “We will participate in the original content world. We have signed a multi-year partnership with Oprah, but today I’m not really ready to extend that conversation beyond that point. We’ve hired some great people that we have a super amount of confidence in, and we’ll have something to say more on that later.”

Apple’s deal with Oprah Winfrey and other big entertainment names like Reese Witherspoon and Steven Spielberg will give Apple device owners access to both film and TV content for no additional charge. Apple is planning to offer its original content free to device users, CNBC first reported in October. Apple planned to spend about $1 billion on originals last year, the Wall Street Journal reported. Apple has agreed to a number of movies and series already, including animated features, comedies, reality shows and dramas, most of which were compiled by Macworld here.

WATCH: Goldman’s Rod Hall: Apple has its work cut out for it in services


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: alex sherman, brendan mcdermid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, cut, targeting, launch, apple, wall, video, content, hbo, revenue, reported, service


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket one year later business case

A year ago SpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy rocket for the first time. Yet, even after Falcon Heavy succeeded, critics focused on the market for the massive rocket’s services. Department of Defense applications of Falcon Heavy were apparent. “The lone test flight was incredible but not enough to prove for someone to put an expensive payload on board,” Autry said of Falcon Heavy. “There’s a recurring pattern here,” Anderson said, “It’s the same tired, old arguments we’re seeing applied to Falcon


A year ago SpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy rocket for the first time. Yet, even after Falcon Heavy succeeded, critics focused on the market for the massive rocket’s services. Department of Defense applications of Falcon Heavy were apparent. “The lone test flight was incredible but not enough to prove for someone to put an expensive payload on board,” Autry said of Falcon Heavy. “There’s a recurring pattern here,” Anderson said, “It’s the same tired, old arguments we’re seeing applied to Falcon
SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket one year later business case Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: michael sheetz, joe skipper
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, missions, case, market, later, falcon, million, rockets, spacex, business, space, launch, heavy, rocket


SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket one year later business case

A year ago SpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy rocket for the first time. Millions tuned in as Elon Musk’s space company moved to number one on the list of the world’s most powerful rockets.

Falcon Heavy’s maiden launch was nearly flawless. The only blemish was when one of its three boosters crashed into the ocean, rather than gently coming to a landing on a company barge.

Yet, even after Falcon Heavy succeeded, critics focused on the market for the massive rocket’s services. Department of Defense applications of Falcon Heavy were apparent. But even the prospect of lucrative military contracts was not enough to convince some within the space industry that Falcon Heavy would generate solid revenue for SpaceX.

Skeptics pointed to the slowing market for large communication satellites and the need for U.S. Air Force certification to fly national security missions. They said these were two reasons SpaceX would not be able to fill Falcon Heavy’s manifest.

With the test flight under its belt, the rocket needed “to get some commercial customers,” Dr. Greg Autry told CNBC. Autry is a professor at USC’s Marshall School of Business, as well as the director of the Southern California Commercial Spaceflight Initiative.

“The lone test flight was incredible but not enough to prove for someone to put an expensive payload on board,” Autry said of Falcon Heavy. “SpaceX needs to prove it’s a reliable vehicle.”

Orders did arrive in the past year and, even before a second flight, Air Force certification came with them. The manifest for Falcon Heavy has grown to five contracted missions, including three commercial missions. While only one has a known price tag – a $130 million contract to launch the Air Force Space Command-52 satellite – the rocket’s manifest is worth somewhere between $500 million and $750 million, given the price range per launch.

That means Falcon Heavy has enough contracts to cover the cost of its development, which was more than $500 million, Musk noted last year, with the all funding coming from inside SpaceX.

Chad Anderson, CEO of Space Angels, which invests in space projects, told CNBC some people in the industry doubted the concept of reusability, or launching, landing and launching again, which has become a trademark for SpaceX. Last year, SpaceX became the first company to launch and land the same orbital rocket three times. That’s in part due to the increased power and reliability of the company’s evolved Falcon 9 rocket, which Musk said is “capable of at least 100 flights.”

And the criticisms of Falcon Heavy are starting to sound familiar. “There’s a recurring pattern here,” Anderson said, “It’s the same tired, old arguments we’re seeing applied to Falcon Heavy.”

The lack of competitive rockets is also a boon for Falcon Heavy. The only operational rocket that compares is United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV Heavy and it’s retiring soon. NASA’s Space Launch System (or SLS) and Blue Origin’s New Glenn are possible new entrants in the market of heavy lift vehicles but neither rocket is expected to launch before 2021. The Ariane 6 rocket is supposed to launch next year but a French auditor published a blistering assessment of the European rocket that found Ariane 6 will not be a competitive or sustainable option.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: michael sheetz, joe skipper
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, missions, case, market, later, falcon, million, rockets, spacex, business, space, launch, heavy, rocket


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Pentagon inspector will review Air Force’s certification process for SpaceX rockets

The Pentagon’s inspector general filed a notice on Monday that it will began evaluating the Air Force’s certification process for SpaceX’s Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets. Addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, the memo said the Pentagon will look at “whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class” SpaceX rockets. Reusing rockets is a key advantage fo


The Pentagon’s inspector general filed a notice on Monday that it will began evaluating the Air Force’s certification process for SpaceX’s Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets. Addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, the memo said the Pentagon will look at “whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class” SpaceX rockets. Reusing rockets is a key advantage fo
Pentagon inspector will review Air Force’s certification process for SpaceX rockets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, review, falcon, spacex, process, force, certification, rockets, inspector, eelv, pentagons, launch, rocket, pentagon, forces


Pentagon inspector will review Air Force's certification process for SpaceX rockets

The Pentagon’s inspector general filed a notice on Monday that it will began evaluating the Air Force’s certification process for SpaceX’s Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets.

The review will begin this month at the Space and Missile Systems Center in Los Angeles. Addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, the memo said the Pentagon will look at “whether the U.S. Air Force complied with the Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide when certifying the launch system design for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class” SpaceX rockets. The Pentagon’s Michael Roark, who is serves as Deputy Inspector General for Intelligence and Special Program Assessments, signed the letter.

SpaceX declined CNBC’s request for comment.

The letter does not explain why the Pentagon is performing this review. The Launch Services New Entrant Certification Guide was created more than six years ago “to reintroduce competition” into the Air Force’s Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program.

The Air Force started EELV in 1995, to give military and intelligence contracts to reliable launch companies. However, in 2006 the only two EELV contractors — Boeing and Lockheed Martin — consolidated their launch businesses into a single joint venture called United Launch Alliance (ULA).

SpaceX sued the Air Force in 2014 for the right to compete with ULA, arguing that the joint venture had a monopoly on national security launches. Reusing rockets is a key advantage for SpaceX, which the Air Force sought to understand and adapt to through its certification guide. SpaceX dropped that lawsuit in January 2015 and won Air Force certification for its Falcon 9 rocket later that same year.

Since then, SpaceX has won six EELV missions, including certification for its Falcon Heavy rocket to launch a $130 million Air Force satelliteinto orbit. Elon Musk’s rocket company completed its first EELV mission in December, when a Falcon 9 rocket launched a new GPS satellite for the Air Force.

SpaceX has also completed two Department of Defense missions, launching a satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office as well as an experimental spacecraft called X-37B.

The Pentagon’s evaluation could look to the Air Force’s certification of SpaceX as a matter of precedent. In October, the Air Force announced about $2 billion in awards to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman and ULA for further development of U.S. based heavy rockets. As these three companies’ rockets come online in the years ahead, the Air Force will need to certify them if they are to compete for national security launch contracts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, review, falcon, spacex, process, force, certification, rockets, inspector, eelv, pentagons, launch, rocket, pentagon, forces


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

A major port operator is planning to launch its first hyperloop for cargo in India

DP World, one of the world’s largest port operators, is launching its first hyperloop project in India, its chairman told CNBC Sunday. Last year, DP World, UAE’s state-owned port operator, signed a partnership with Virgin Hyperloop One to develop a cargo transporter. Now it’s revealed its first project destination will be in the world’s largest democracy. “The first project will be in India, we signed an agreement and we are looking at how to test the project,” company Chairman Sultan Ahmed bin


DP World, one of the world’s largest port operators, is launching its first hyperloop project in India, its chairman told CNBC Sunday. Last year, DP World, UAE’s state-owned port operator, signed a partnership with Virgin Hyperloop One to develop a cargo transporter. Now it’s revealed its first project destination will be in the world’s largest democracy. “The first project will be in India, we signed an agreement and we are looking at how to test the project,” company Chairman Sultan Ahmed bin
A major port operator is planning to launch its first hyperloop for cargo in India Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-10  Authors: natasha turak, source, virgin hyperloop
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cargo, largest, major, worlds, launch, operator, told, port, world, india, planning, project, sulayem, hyperloop, signed


A major port operator is planning to launch its first hyperloop for cargo in India

DP World, one of the world’s largest port operators, is launching its first hyperloop project in India, its chairman told CNBC Sunday.

Last year, DP World, UAE’s state-owned port operator, signed a partnership with Virgin Hyperloop One to develop a cargo transporter. Now it’s revealed its first project destination will be in the world’s largest democracy.

“The first project will be in India, we signed an agreement and we are looking at how to test the project,” company Chairman Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem told CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal at the World Government Summit in Dubai.

The company is “eager now today to go on the next step,” bin Sulayem said, adding that “we are investing in something we believe is going to add value.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-10  Authors: natasha turak, source, virgin hyperloop
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cargo, largest, major, worlds, launch, operator, told, port, world, india, planning, project, sulayem, hyperloop, signed


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Richard Branson talks small rockets with the Air Force, which has ‘huge money to invest’ in space

The U.S. military is more interested than ever before in stepping up investment in space startups, especially with the number of private companies building small rockets. Last month, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson met with Air Force leadership to discuss the capabilities of Branson’s small rocket builder, Virgin Orbit. “I am very excited about small launch,” Roper said on Wednesday. Typically priced between $3 million and $10 million per launch, small rockets provide a direct method of


The U.S. military is more interested than ever before in stepping up investment in space startups, especially with the number of private companies building small rockets. Last month, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson met with Air Force leadership to discuss the capabilities of Branson’s small rocket builder, Virgin Orbit. “I am very excited about small launch,” Roper said on Wednesday. Typically priced between $3 million and $10 million per launch, small rockets provide a direct method of
Richard Branson talks small rockets with the Air Force, which has ‘huge money to invest’ in space Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07  Authors: michael sheetz, amanda macias, virgin orbit
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launch, talks, money, huge, orbit, roper, rocket, invest, virgin, richard, force, small, air, space, rockets, companies, branson


Richard Branson talks small rockets with the Air Force, which has 'huge money to invest' in space

The U.S. military is more interested than ever before in stepping up investment in space startups, especially with the number of private companies building small rockets.

Last month, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson met with Air Force leadership to discuss the capabilities of Branson’s small rocket builder, Virgin Orbit. The meeting between Branson and Secretary Heather Wilson, the Air Force’s top civilian, took place on Jan. 17, the Air Force told CNBC. Branson also met with Dr. Will Roper, the Air Force’s acquisition head.

“I am very excited about small launch,” Roper said on Wednesday. “I think small launch is going to be a big deal.”

Typically priced between $3 million and $10 million per launch, small rockets provide a direct method of sending inexpensive payloads into orbit. Small rockets also can save customers months of time getting to orbit, which Roper said is a key advantage for the Air Force’s needs.

“If you lose a satellite, put another one up at the time you need it,” Roper said.

Roper described the space industry as a “ripe area” for the Air Force, especially “with companies that hope to be selling satellites to commercial providers.”

Roper said he wants to approach it the way a venture capital firm or business developer would, to better understand the needs of private space companies. “If we can understand what a company needs to get from being that entrant – at 10 people with an idea and designs – to getting to that first product that they can go sell or pitch … we’ve got huge money to invest in this,” Roper said.

A growing number of companies, including Virgin Orbit, are looking to seize upon the small rocket market. Virgin Orbit is currently deep into testing its LauncherOne rocket, which the company plans to launch from a modified Boeing 747 jet named “Cosmic Girl.” This horizontal method, rather than the more common vertical launch approach, gives Virgin Orbit more flexibility for when and where the company launches its rockets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-07  Authors: michael sheetz, amanda macias, virgin orbit
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launch, talks, money, huge, orbit, roper, rocket, invest, virgin, richard, force, small, air, space, rockets, companies, branson


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

NBC Sports borrows from Amazon Prime to launch new GolfPass subscription service

GolfPass, which NBC is officially launching on Tuesday, will cost $9.99 per month or $99 per year. It’s designed for people who already play golf but could use additional incentive to hit the links. It’s NBC’s latest effort to seek revenue beyond the traditional pay-TV bundle by experimenting with a direct-to-consumer subscription. While GolfPass has Netflix-like elements, it’s a closer parallel to Amazon Prime, said Will McIntosh, Golf Channel’s executive vice president, at a press briefing in


GolfPass, which NBC is officially launching on Tuesday, will cost $9.99 per month or $99 per year. It’s designed for people who already play golf but could use additional incentive to hit the links. It’s NBC’s latest effort to seek revenue beyond the traditional pay-TV bundle by experimenting with a direct-to-consumer subscription. While GolfPass has Netflix-like elements, it’s a closer parallel to Amazon Prime, said Will McIntosh, Golf Channel’s executive vice president, at a press briefing in
NBC Sports borrows from Amazon Prime to launch new GolfPass subscription service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: alex sherman, keyur khamar, getty images, us pga tour
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, launch, service, nbc, borrows, golfpass, mcilroy, prime, subscription, resorts, amazon, round, month, golf, additional, discounts


NBC Sports borrows from Amazon Prime to launch new GolfPass subscription service

NBC Sports’ Golf Channel is partnering with four-time major champion Rory McIlroy to debut a subscription service that will give customers one round of golf a month, more than 4,000 hours of instructional videos and discounts at resorts and clubs.

GolfPass, which NBC is officially launching on Tuesday, will cost $9.99 per month or $99 per year. It’s designed for people who already play golf but could use additional incentive to hit the links.

It’s NBC’s latest effort to seek revenue beyond the traditional pay-TV bundle by experimenting with a direct-to-consumer subscription. While GolfPass has Netflix-like elements, it’s a closer parallel to Amazon Prime, said Will McIntosh, Golf Channel’s executive vice president, at a press briefing in New York on Monday. The purpose is to encourage hobbyists to play more golf as well as giving them additional viewing options.

“It’s sort of like, for me, like Golf Channel 2.0,” McIlroy said at a press briefing Monday. “If you’re going to start a golf business, you probably wouldn’t do a 24-7 TV station or network like what happened 25 years ago.”

Included in the package is a round of golf each month at one of 7,000 global golf courses that partner with online booking company GolfNow, which is also owned by NBCUniversal. They’ll receive a dozen golf balls from TaylorMade, a provider of equipment for McIlroy, and a variety of discounts on golf resorts, apparel and accessories.

While no live events will be broadcast on the GolfPass app, archived rounds and more than 4,000 on-demand instruction videos, including several from McIlroy and his coach, Michael Bannon, will be available to subscribers,

A premium membership, GolfPass+, costs $199 per year and includes additional benefits such as waived booking fees, cancellation protection and extra discounts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: alex sherman, keyur khamar, getty images, us pga tour
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, launch, service, nbc, borrows, golfpass, mcilroy, prime, subscription, resorts, amazon, round, month, golf, additional, discounts


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tesla shorts who take aerial pictures of parking lots launch web site

Others provide theories about what’s observable in the photos when considered along with Tesla’s own claims and disclosures. Tesla declined comment, but the site is likely to annoy Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has recently sparred with short sellers and the media. The Tesla CEO reportedly phoned Montana Skeptic’s employer and told the blogger he would potentially take legal action in response to his posts. The Tesla CEO also sounded off on Twitter at mainstream media organizations throughout 2018, a


Others provide theories about what’s observable in the photos when considered along with Tesla’s own claims and disclosures. Tesla declined comment, but the site is likely to annoy Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has recently sparred with short sellers and the media. The Tesla CEO reportedly phoned Montana Skeptic’s employer and told the blogger he would potentially take legal action in response to his posts. The Tesla CEO also sounded off on Twitter at mainstream media organizations throughout 2018, a
Tesla shorts who take aerial pictures of parking lots launch web site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, parking, twitter, media, short, pictures, lots, site, launch, shorts, web, aerial, musk, ceo, montana, rates, photos


Tesla shorts who take aerial pictures of parking lots launch web site

Elon Musk: Demand for Model 3 is ‘insanely high,’ but cost is too high 12:22 PM ET Thu, 31 Jan 2019 | 01:40

Some contributors tally up the cars that they can count in the images. Others provide theories about what’s observable in the photos when considered along with Tesla’s own claims and disclosures.

Tslaq.org makes all the photos and videos featured on the site available under a creative commons license, meaning other independent bloggers or mainstream media outlets don’t have to seek permission before re-publishing them.

Tesla declined comment, but the site is likely to annoy Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has recently sparred with short sellers and the media.

Last year, Musk shut up one of his most vocal critics, a short seller who used the handle “Montana Skeptic” on Twitter and wrote bearish analysis of the company on SeekingAlpha. The Tesla CEO reportedly phoned Montana Skeptic’s employer and told the blogger he would potentially take legal action in response to his posts.

The Tesla CEO also sounded off on Twitter at mainstream media organizations throughout 2018, and said he plans to start an organization that rates reporters.

WATCH: Why this analyst rates Tesla a sell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, parking, twitter, media, short, pictures, lots, site, launch, shorts, web, aerial, musk, ceo, montana, rates, photos


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Morgan Stanley says Spaceflight Industries is ‘entirely’ disrupting the rocket launch market

The rocket launch business is expensive and risky, and then there are the technical requirements: Launch providers have to ensure a customer’s delicate and expensive spacecraft survives the trip to orbit. But Seattle-based Spaceflight Industries is showing things can be done differently, according to Morgan Stanley analysts Adam Jonas and Armintas Sinkevicius. The company packed a record-breaking 64 satellites on a SpaceX rocket in December for a mission known as Spaceflight SSO-A. Morgan Stanle


The rocket launch business is expensive and risky, and then there are the technical requirements: Launch providers have to ensure a customer’s delicate and expensive spacecraft survives the trip to orbit. But Seattle-based Spaceflight Industries is showing things can be done differently, according to Morgan Stanley analysts Adam Jonas and Armintas Sinkevicius. The company packed a record-breaking 64 satellites on a SpaceX rocket in December for a mission known as Spaceflight SSO-A. Morgan Stanle
Morgan Stanley says Spaceflight Industries is ‘entirely’ disrupting the rocket launch market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morgan, industries, entirely, disrupting, rocket, youre, launch, spaceflight, market, satellites, satellite, expensive, model, stanley


Morgan Stanley says Spaceflight Industries is 'entirely' disrupting the rocket launch market

The rocket launch business is expensive and risky, and then there are the technical requirements: Launch providers have to ensure a customer’s delicate and expensive spacecraft survives the trip to orbit.

But Seattle-based Spaceflight Industries is showing things can be done differently, according to Morgan Stanley analysts Adam Jonas and Armintas Sinkevicius. In a note to investors Friday, they said that the company “is disrupting this model entirely” by applying the ride sharing concept to satellites.

The company packed a record-breaking 64 satellites on a SpaceX rocket in December for a mission known as Spaceflight SSO-A. Morgan Stanley called it “a significant milestone for the company.”

The practice of satellite “ridesharing” has become more commonplace, in part thanks to Spaceflight. As technological advancements have led to smaller satellites, that means more of them can be loaded onto rockets as secondary payloads – hitchhiking on launches like SpaceX’s Falcon 9 as they bring larger satellites to orbit.

That makes it less expensive for satellite operators and fills space in what otherwise would have been empty payload for rocket launchers. “Spaceflight is significantly driving down the cost of launch with its ride sharing model, allowing smaller satellite companies to launch more cost efficiently and launch operators to fill excess capacity,” Morgan Stanley said. “Spaceflight is able to provide customers with flexibility by virtue of having capacity with many different launch providers.”

Curt Blake, the CEO of Spaceflight launch services, told CNBC, “Rideshare applies across the board and the whole idea of flexibility, and how crucial that is, as it brings the airline model to space. That is huge. We’re moving rapidly toward a model where you’re not buying a spot on a specific launch vehicle – you’re buying the ability to get to a destination.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, morgan, industries, entirely, disrupting, rocket, youre, launch, spaceflight, market, satellites, satellite, expensive, model, stanley


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post