Dow futures give back gains on fading hopes of aggressive easing from the Fed

The new 2020 C8 Corvette Stingray guns for Ferrari with first… The base version of the sports car will punch out 495 horsepower, 40 more than the seventh-generation car and enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in “less than three seconds”…Autosread more


The new 2020 C8 Corvette Stingray guns for Ferrari with first… The base version of the sports car will punch out 495 horsepower, 40 more than the seventh-generation car and enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in “less than three seconds”…Autosread more
Dow futures give back gains on fading hopes of aggressive easing from the Fed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firstthe, stingray, secondsautosread, dow, gains, guns, futures, fading, seventhgeneration, launch, car, easing, hopes, aggressive, horsepower, version, punch, fed


Dow futures give back gains on fading hopes of aggressive easing from the Fed

The new 2020 C8 Corvette Stingray guns for Ferrari with first…

The base version of the sports car will punch out 495 horsepower, 40 more than the seventh-generation car and enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in “less than three seconds”…

Autos

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firstthe, stingray, secondsautosread, dow, gains, guns, futures, fading, seventhgeneration, launch, car, easing, hopes, aggressive, horsepower, version, punch, fed


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Facebook’s David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch

Facebook’s David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch3 Hours AgoCNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on Facebook’s David Marcus and his testimony before the House Financial Services Committee ahead of the launch of Libra.


Facebook’s David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch3 Hours AgoCNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on Facebook’s David Marcus and his testimony before the House Financial Services Committee ahead of the launch of Libra.
Facebook’s David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, david, mui, testimony, services, ylan, reports, facebooks, address, marcus, regulator, launch, concerns, libra


Facebook's David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch

Facebook’s David Marcus: We will address regulator concerns before launch

3 Hours Ago

CNBC’s Ylan Mui reports on Facebook’s David Marcus and his testimony before the House Financial Services Committee ahead of the launch of Libra.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, david, mui, testimony, services, ylan, reports, facebooks, address, marcus, regulator, launch, concerns, libra


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Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon’s business practices in days

The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case. The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party mercha


The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case. The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party mercha
Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon’s business practices in days Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, office, probe, business, investigation, vestagers, european, reportedly, reported, vestager, preliminary, practices, amazon, major, launch, amazons, europe, data


Europe will reportedly launch a major probe into Amazon's business practices in days

The European Union’s antitrust chief is planning to open a formal investigation into Amazon in coming days, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the case.

The investigation itself does not come as a surprise, as EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager had already launched a preliminary probe into Amazon in September and was expected to announce whether a full probe would take place. The preliminary investigation focused on how Amazon uses data on its third-party merchants that sell through Amazon.

Vestager explained the key questions she had about Amazon’s business model in a September interview with CNBC.

“They host a lot of little guys, and at the same time, they’re a big guy in the same market,” Vestager said. “So how do they treat the data that they get from the little guy? Does that give them an advantage that cannot be matched?”

The probe follows a crackdown on Big Tech under Vestager’s time in office. During her term, the European Commission has slapped Google with a combined $9.5 billion in antitrust fines since 2017 and authorities across the region have scrutinized Apple and Facebook for their competition and data practices. The reported Amazon investigation follows news that Vestager’s office plans to fine Qualcomm more than $1 billion for allegedly trying to prevent other chipmakers from gaining business from Apple, according to Bloomberg.

A spokesperson for the European Commission declined to comment. Amazon and did not immediately return a request for comment.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: An inside look at how Amazon Prime Now delivers food and household items in less than two hours


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, days, office, probe, business, investigation, vestagers, european, reportedly, reported, vestager, preliminary, practices, amazon, major, launch, amazons, europe, data


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These are the best places to launch a small business in America

They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Abundant talentStates with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. 1


They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Abundant talentStates with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. 1
These are the best places to launch a small business in America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elaine pofeldt, susan caminiti
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, strong, tech, business, states, florida, capital, technology, places, america, talent, university, launch, small, best


These are the best places to launch a small business in America

Richard Cummins | Getty Images

Alec Manfre co-founded the tech start-up Bractlet as a student in Atlanta where he went to college, then ran it from an incubator in Santiago, Chile. But it was Texas where he and his two co-founders ultimately put down roots. They got hooked on doing business in the state after moving the start-up to Houston to participate in an accelerator there. Bractlet makes a technology that helps commercial real estate owners evaluate their buildings’ energy infrastructure. The entrepreneurs were excited about the deep expertise in energy that existed in the city. Twenty-person Bractlet has since moved to Austin, where its lead investor, a venture capital firm, is located. Thanks to the presence of schools such as University of Texas, the company has been able to find plentiful skilled talent, both within Austin and from cities such as Dallas, Houston and San Antonio, says Manfre. Adding to the lure of doing business in Austin, he says, is the active start-up crowd; community groups centered on energy efficiency; and events like the movie, music and tech festival SXSW.

Alec Manfre co-founded Bractlet and moved the start-up to Texas to tap the state’s talent pool. Shlomo Morgulis

“There are always connections to be made and communities being built — and there’s a strong emphasis on technology and investment,” says Manfre. “That’s a really powerful combination for us.” Oh, and the active outdoor culture doesn’t hurt, either. “Yesterday we were doing wakeboarding on a recreational lake 15 minutes away,” he says. It’s not surprising that Manfre has found a lot to love about doing business in Texas — which finished second in CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business ranking. Known for its low-tax environment — there’s no personal income tax or corporate income tax — business-friendly regulatory climate and innovation-focused economy, Texas has many champions in the business community. “It’s simply easier to do business in Texas than any other state,” says Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the Greater Houston Partnership, an economic development organization. But it’s not solely a low-tax, low-regulation environment that makes a state great for business. Some states have a completely different playbook for success that works for them. High-tax, highly regulated environments haven’t kept California’s Silicon Valley, the Rte. 128 Tech Corridor in Massachusetts or New York’s Silicon Alley from spawning innovation or attracting venture capital. These states owe their economic health to other factors, like excellent access to capital for their start-ups and dominance in particular industries. California, for instance, has its thriving film and aerospace industries. “California gets away with a horrible business climate because it’s got such strong industries,” says Steve King, a partner at Emergent Research, which studies small business trends out of Lafayette, California. Recognizing there’s no magic formula for building a thriving business community, CNBC’s 2019 America’s Top States for Business scores the states on 64 metrics across 10 main categories: their economy, workforce, infrastructure, cost of doing business, quality of life, education, technology and innovation, business friendliness, access to capital and cost of living. Here is a look at some of the qualities that are helping states foster entrepreneurial business growth.

Abundant talent

States with a strong university system have an edge in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. Florida (No. 12 on the list), for instance, has more than 60 universities around the state churning out well-educated graduates, among them the University of Florida, University of Central Florida and University of South Florida. The strong talent bench is fueling the growth of sectors such as cybersecurity, technology and finance and attracting venture capital, according to Craig Richard, president and CEO of the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corp. “They are cranking out a lot of innovation and patents around cybersecurity,” says Richard. “That’s one of our fastest-growing tech sectors.” It’s not the only technology niche where Florida’s economy is percolating, thanks to the state’s deep pool of STEM-educated talent. Luminar Technologies, a fast-growing Silicon Valley-based start-up backed by Peter Thiel makes lidar-based sensors for vehicles. It established its R&D and manufacturing base in Orlando last year — and now about 265 of its roughly 370 employees work out of Orlando, according to the company’s chief business officer, Scott Faris.

Luminar’s co-founder Jason Eichenholz knew there was a concentration of specialized engineering talent in the area as an alum of the University of Central Florida’s Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers. Many engineers in the state’s aerospace industry had already worked on similar technology for laser-guided missiles. The company wanted to take advantage of that knowledge base. “There is no place in the universe where you have the density of talent in the lidar and sensing space that you do in Orlando,” says Faris. “It’s got a rich history and density of people who understand all aspects of this. We’re able to attract those folks into the organization.”

Quality of life

With unemployment at record lows and the talent wars accelerating, many business leaders realize it’s easier to recruit if they open their offices in places where workers want to live because of fantastic schools, a great arts scene, hot restaurants or easy access to parks and outdoor activities. “More companies are looking at the quality of life and eco-friendliness,” says attorney Andrew Sherman, a partner in Seyfarth Shaw in Washington, D.C., who advises both entrepreneurs and corporate businesses and is author of many books on entrepreneurship. “The state of Washington, for instance, has done a nice job of marketing their assets to small and midsize businesses, saying, ‘Not only do we have good universities and human capital but we have beautiful cities with access to the Pacific. ” Similarly, employers in Colorado have found that it’s not hard to entice recruits from other states to move to up-and-coming outdoor-oriented cities such as Denver, Colorado Springs, and Boulder, known for its thriving tech and natural-foods industries.

Denver’s economy is solid, and it has a strong, educated workforce. It also has the nation’s fourth-largest concentration of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) employees. photoquest7 | iStock | Getty Images

“I think our quality of life is an important contributor,” says Dirk Draper, president and CEO of the Colorado Springs Chamber and EDC. “Entrepreneurs and innovators may be working on their own or in small groups where they can make a decision more on a quality of life factor that adds spice to our community mix. They come here for the lifestyle.”

Taxes

A favorable regulatory environment

As technology upends many industries, a regulatory climate that allows for innovation is essential, say many business leaders. Tim Giuliani, president and CEO of the Orlando Economic Partnership, points to the bill Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed in June on autonomous vehicles. It allows the Florida Turnpike Enterprise to fund, construct and operate test facilities to advance autonomous and connected transportation technology. That will be a big advantage for businesses in this field, he believes. “It sends a signal that Florida is willing to continue to change its regulatory environment to adapt to new technologies,” says Giuliani.

TriggerPhoto | iStock Unreleased | Getty Images

That’s not to say that the business community wants a zero-regulation environment. “Sometimes government regulation can be a positive — but if it’s done too much, I’d be concerned,” says Elie Rieder, founder and CEO of Castle Lanterra Properties, a firm in Suffern, New York, that invests in multifamily real estate around the country and is affected by regulations such as rent stabilization laws.

Infrastructure


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elaine pofeldt, susan caminiti
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, strong, tech, business, states, florida, capital, technology, places, america, talent, university, launch, small, best


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Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane

Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch. Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight. Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beac


Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch. Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight. Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beac
Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgin, orbit, airplane, rocket, company, satellites, test, key, richard, space, gets, system, plans, launching, bransons, closer, step, launch


Richard Branson's Virgin Orbit gets one step closer to launching satellites from a 747 airplane

Virgin Orbit drops a Launcher One rocket from under the wing of its modified Boeing 747 in a key test before the company’s first launch.

Sir Richard Branson’s other space company Virgin Orbit completed a key test of its Boeing 747-based launch system on Wednesday.

Virgin Orbit flew its modified aircraft above the Mojave Desert in California and dropped a dummy rocket from tens of thousands of feet in the air, to test one of the key parts of its launch system. The company plans to use the rocket to launch satellites to space, with the “air launch” system giving a schedule flexibility that Virgin Orbit touts over more common ground-based launch systems like those of SpaceX and Rocket Lab.

“This drop test is the final major demonstration in a development program that’s been going on for four and a half years,” CEO Dan Hart told CNBC before the test. “It’s a huge deal … separating developmental work from the beginning of operations for us and getting to orbit.”

Instead of a payload, the rocket for the drop test has a hunk of metal in its nose. And, instead of fuel, the test rocket is carrying a load of water and antifreeze to simulate weight.

Hart said that the first rocket the company plans to launch to space is undergoing final checks at Virgin Orbit’s factory in Long Beach, California. With checks on that rocket will take place in the weeks following the drop test in the desert, with Hart forecasting Virgin Orbit’s first launch “hopefully will be before the end of the summer.”

“We’re poised to be able to launch our next rocket, which would be our first paying customer, two months, maybe 10 weeks, after the first flight,” Hart added.

Virgin Orbit is a spin-off of Branson’s space tourism company Virgin Galactic. While both of the companies launch spacecraft from the air – rather than the ground – that’s where the similarities end. Virgin Orbit uses a former commercial jet and will launch satellites the size of refrigerators to orbit, while Virgin Galactic has a one-of-a-kind aircraft and plans to send paying tourists on 10 minute rides at the edge of space.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virgin, orbit, airplane, rocket, company, satellites, test, key, richard, space, gets, system, plans, launching, bransons, closer, step, launch


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AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, ‘Friends’ and more

AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO. NBC’s streaming service is launchi


AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO. NBC’s streaming service is launchi
AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, ‘Friends’ and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, rolls, shows, att, supercharged, include, launch, hbo, service, movies, friends, tv, content, streaming


AT&T rolls out a new, super-charged streaming service with HBO shows, 'Friends' and more

AT&T’s WarnerMedia announced on Tuesday that its new streaming service will be called HBO Max. As the name implies, it includes a lot more than just content from HBO.

HBO Max will include shows and movies from Warner Bros., New Line, DC Entertainment, CNN, TNT, TBS, truTV, The CW, Turner Classic Movies, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Crunchyroll, Rooster Teeth, Looney Tunes and other content providers. It also includes exclusive rights to stream all 236 episodes of the TV show “Friends.”

The service is expected to launch in beta later this year. AT&T has not said how much it will cost. HBO Max will launch publicly in the spring of 2020 and will include 10,000 hours of content, the company said.

Netflix recently spent $80 million to keep “Friends” through 2019, according to Vulture. Netflix will also lose “The Office” in 2021, when NBC will offer it as part of its $10 per month streaming TV service. Both shows are thought to be two of the most popular on Netflix, which means the company will have to continue funding new programming in order to find another new hit to keep subscribers engaged.

Other popular TV shows coming to HBO Max include “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Pretty Little Liars” and “Batwoman.” HBO Max will include original shows created specifically for the new streaming service, in addition to shows that will launch on HBO.

The service is just one of many new streaming products set to launch in the coming months, and consumers probably won’t be able to subscribe to all of them.

Disney’s $6.99 monthly plan, Disney+, will launch this November and will include 18 of Pixar’s 21 movies, Marvel films, 30 seasons of “The Simpsons,” Disney animated movies and the Star Wars franchise of films. NBC’s streaming service is launching next year. Apple+ will launch this fall.

WATCH: Record 19.3 million viewers watched HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’ finale


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, rolls, shows, att, supercharged, include, launch, hbo, service, movies, friends, tv, content, streaming


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Starbucks is planning to launch a Tie-Dye Frappuccino this week

Starbucks is launching its latest successor to the Unicorn Frappuccino on Wednesday: the Tie-Dye Frappuccino. The limited-time drink will only be in stores for five days — or as long as supplies last. Business Insider first reported Starbucks’ plans to sell the Tie-Dye Frappuccino and its launch date. The Instagram friendly Tie-Dye Frappuccino has already surfaced on the social media website as baristas post photos of their practice versions. One Starbucks employee who has been trained to make i


Starbucks is launching its latest successor to the Unicorn Frappuccino on Wednesday: the Tie-Dye Frappuccino. The limited-time drink will only be in stores for five days — or as long as supplies last. Business Insider first reported Starbucks’ plans to sell the Tie-Dye Frappuccino and its launch date. The Instagram friendly Tie-Dye Frappuccino has already surfaced on the social media website as baristas post photos of their practice versions. One Starbucks employee who has been trained to make i
Starbucks is planning to launch a Tie-Dye Frappuccino this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trained, website, told, week, taffy, planning, starbucks, tiedye, versions, unicorn, tastes, launch, frappuccino


Starbucks is planning to launch a Tie-Dye Frappuccino this week

Starbucks is launching its latest successor to the Unicorn Frappuccino on Wednesday: the Tie-Dye Frappuccino.

The limited-time drink will only be in stores for five days — or as long as supplies last.

Business Insider first reported Starbucks’ plans to sell the Tie-Dye Frappuccino and its launch date.

The Instagram friendly Tie-Dye Frappuccino has already surfaced on the social media website as baristas post photos of their practice versions. One Starbucks employee who has been trained to make it told CNBC that it tastes similar to the banana flavor of Laffy Taffy candy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trained, website, told, week, taffy, planning, starbucks, tiedye, versions, unicorn, tastes, launch, frappuccino


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Electronic Arts shares tumble after Apex Legends season 2 launch

China says there will be no trade deal unless tariffs are… The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday. Marketsread more


China says there will be no trade deal unless tariffs are… The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday. Marketsread more
Electronic Arts shares tumble after Apex Legends season 2 launch Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: jesse pound, annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, launch, tumble, season, apex, unless, placed, goods, thursdaymarketsread, lift, trade, legends, arts, electronic, shares, tariffs, deal, ministry


Electronic Arts shares tumble after Apex Legends season 2 launch

China says there will be no trade deal unless tariffs are…

The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday.

Markets

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: jesse pound, annie pei
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commerce, launch, tumble, season, apex, unless, placed, goods, thursdaymarketsread, lift, trade, legends, arts, electronic, shares, tariffs, deal, ministry


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Apple may launch new MacBook Air with a new keyboard that doesn’t stick, top analyst says

Apple may replace the controversial butterfly mechanism keyboards that it has used in all modern MacBook, MacBook Pro and MacBook Air computers introduced since 2015, according to a note from top Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Kuo said Apple will launch a MacBook Air with a new scissor-style keyboard this year, followed by a new MacBook Pro with the updated keyboard in 2020. “The cost of a butterfly keyboard is much higher (by 250–350%) than that of a general notebook keyboard because of low produc


Apple may replace the controversial butterfly mechanism keyboards that it has used in all modern MacBook, MacBook Pro and MacBook Air computers introduced since 2015, according to a note from top Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Kuo said Apple will launch a MacBook Air with a new scissor-style keyboard this year, followed by a new MacBook Pro with the updated keyboard in 2020. “The cost of a butterfly keyboard is much higher (by 250–350%) than that of a general notebook keyboard because of low produc
Apple may launch new MacBook Air with a new keyboard that doesn’t stick, top analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, butterfly, macbook, pro, mechanism, users, apple, launch, doesnt, stick, keyboards, scissor, keyboard, replace, analyst


Apple may launch new MacBook Air with a new keyboard that doesn't stick, top analyst says

Apple may replace the controversial butterfly mechanism keyboards that it has used in all modern MacBook, MacBook Pro and MacBook Air computers introduced since 2015, according to a note from top Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

The keyboard, which Apple has tried to keep improving, is known for sticking or creating multiple keypresses and has been a problem for some users. Apple has said that only a fraction of users have problems with their keyboards, but it’s widespread enough that the company began fixing all laptops with the butterfly keyboards for free in May.

Kuo said Apple will launch a MacBook Air with a new scissor-style keyboard this year, followed by a new MacBook Pro with the updated keyboard in 2020. It might also help Apple increase margins. “The cost of a butterfly keyboard is much higher (by 250–350%) than that of a general notebook keyboard because of low production yields,” Kuo said.

Kuo said Apple is turning to a scissor mechanism to replace the butterfly mechanism, which was created to help keep MacBooks as thin as possible.

“There have been successful developments in the new scissor keyboard,” Kuo said. “The new keyboard could improve the typing experience by offering longer key travel and durability by adopting glass fiber to reinforce the keys’ structure.”

Apple said a new keyboard design in the latest MacBook Pro, launched in May, would improve reliability by employing new materials. However, the design of the keys remains the same, and they may still stick.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, air, butterfly, macbook, pro, mechanism, users, apple, launch, doesnt, stick, keyboards, scissor, keyboard, replace, analyst


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Janelle Monae grew up working class and her parents encouraged her to “be better”

Academy Award-nominated director Ava Duvernay and Emmy-winner Lena Waithe helped her grow in the industry and launch Wondaland, Monáe’s own multimedia company. Monáe, 33, grew up working class in Kansas City, Kansas: Her mother was a janitor, her biological father was a garbage man and her stepfather still works as a postal worker. Monáe helped pay for college by working at Blockbuster, Foot Locker and as a maid. “I saw my parents living check to check, putting on their uniforms every day, worki


Academy Award-nominated director Ava Duvernay and Emmy-winner Lena Waithe helped her grow in the industry and launch Wondaland, Monáe’s own multimedia company. Monáe, 33, grew up working class in Kansas City, Kansas: Her mother was a janitor, her biological father was a garbage man and her stepfather still works as a postal worker. Monáe helped pay for college by working at Blockbuster, Foot Locker and as a maid. “I saw my parents living check to check, putting on their uniforms every day, worki
Janelle Monae grew up working class and her parents encouraged her to “be better” Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, mone, mones, grew, encouraged, monae, janelle, helped, community, class, better, kansas, working, launch


Janelle Monae grew up working class and her parents encouraged her to

In a nondescript room in the middle of the Shed, a cultural center in New York City’s new Hudson Yards development, singer, actress and producer Janelle Monáe is telling CNBC Make It about the many women who have mentored her over the years.

Academy Award-nominated director Ava Duvernay and Emmy-winner Lena Waithe helped her grow in the industry and launch Wondaland, Monáe’s own multimedia company. Ariel Investments’s Mellody Hobson helped her fine-tune her finances.

But just before the launch party for her limited-edition “A Beautiful Future” Belvedere Vodka, the Grammy nominee says that it’s her parents who have had the most influence throughout her life.

Monáe, 33, grew up working class in Kansas City, Kansas: Her mother was a janitor, her biological father was a garbage man and her stepfather still works as a postal worker. Monáe helped pay for college by working at Blockbuster, Foot Locker and as a maid.

“I saw my parents living check to check, putting on their uniforms every day, working hard,” says Monáe. “There were moments when my lights were cut off.”

All along, she says, there was no pretense of perfection. Her parents encouraged her to learn from them and, hopefully, do better.

“I did see them make mistakes, and they were very open about how important education was,” she says. “They always encouraged us to just be better than them.”

But her parents also instilled in her an appreciation of a supportive community, which is at the heart of Monáe’s many artistic and business ventures. With her mentors and many other collaborators, she is always working to create something greater than herself.

“Without your community, without your family, you couldn’t survive,” she says.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parents, mone, mones, grew, encouraged, monae, janelle, helped, community, class, better, kansas, working, launch


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