Stacey Abrams prepares push for a new Georgia governor vote

And some Democratic legal observers note Abrams would be dependent on statutes that set a high bar for the court to intervene. His campaign has called Abrams’ legal maneuvers so far a “disgrace to democracy” and an attempt to “count illegal votes.” Abrams and voting rights activists have argued for months that Kemp mismanaged the elections system as secretary of state, with Abrams often calling Kemp “an architect of suppression.” Under Georgia law, Abrams could file a challenge against Kemp or h


And some Democratic legal observers note Abrams would be dependent on statutes that set a high bar for the court to intervene. His campaign has called Abrams’ legal maneuvers so far a “disgrace to democracy” and an attempt to “count illegal votes.” Abrams and voting rights activists have argued for months that Kemp mismanaged the elections system as secretary of state, with Abrams often calling Kemp “an architect of suppression.” Under Georgia law, Abrams could file a challenge against Kemp or h
Stacey Abrams prepares push for a new Georgia governor vote Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: john bazemore, pool, getty images
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Stacey Abrams prepares push for a new Georgia governor vote

Top Stacey Abrams advisers outlined her prospective case to The Associated Press, stressing that the Democratic candidate hasn’t finalized a decision about whether to proceed once state officials certify Republican Brian Kemp as the victor. That could happen as early as Friday evening.

Allegra Lawrence-Hardy, Abrams’ campaign chairwoman, is overseeing a team of almost three-dozen lawyers who in the coming days will draft the petition, along with a ream of affidavits from voters and would-be voters who say they were disenfranchised. Abrams would then decide whether to go to court under a provision of Georgia election law that allows losing candidates to challenge results based on “misconduct, fraud or irregularities … sufficient to change or place in doubt the results.”

The legal team is “considering all options,” Lawrence-Hardy said, including federal court remedies. But the state challenge is the most drastic. And some Democratic legal observers note Abrams would be dependent on statutes that set a high bar for the court to intervene.

She already faces a narrow path to the governor’s mansion. Unofficial returns show Kemp with about 50.2 percent of more than 3.9 million votes. That puts him about 18,000 votes above the threshold required to win by a majority and avoid a Dec. 4 runoff. The Associated Press is not calling the race until state officials certify the results.

Abrams would assert that enough irregularities occurred to raise the possibility that at least 18,000 Georgians either had their ballots thrown out or were not allowed to vote.

Lawrence-Hardy told the AP that Abrams will weigh legal considerations alongside her belief that many of her backers — particularly minority and poorer voters who don’t regularly go to the polls — heeded her call to participate and ran into barriers.

“These stories to me are such that they have to be addressed,” said Lawrence-Hardy, who was among the army of lawyers who worked on the Bush v. Gore presidential election dispute in 2000. “It’s just a much bigger responsibility. I feel like our mandate has blossomed. … Maybe this is our moment.”

Kemp, who served as the state’s chief elections officer until two days after the election when he resigned as secretary of state and declared victory, has maintained that any uncounted ballots won’t change the outcome. His campaign has called Abrams’ legal maneuvers so far a “disgrace to democracy” and an attempt to “count illegal votes.”

The circumstances leave Abrams, a 44-year-old rising Democratic star, with a tough decision. The former state lawmaker became a national political celebrity with her bid to become the first black woman in American history to be elected governor. Her strategy of running as an unapologetic liberal who attracts new voters to the polls resonated in a rapidly changing state. Yet Abrams also must consider her own political future and the consequences of a protracted legal fight she might not win.

All of that is playing out against the backdrop of Kemp’s unabashed embrace of President Donald Trump’s nationalism.

Since Election Day, Abrams campaign workers have transitioned from get-out-the-vote efforts to helping voters determine whether their ballots were counted and documenting reported problems. The idea is to assemble a body of evidence to support the claim that the problems could account for Kemp’s 18,000-vote margin above the runoff trigger.

Affidavits from poll workers reviewed by the AP describe long lines that discouraged people from voting, poll workers failing to offer provisional ballots to people who didn’t show up on the rolls or were at the wrong polling place and election equipment that froze and had to be rebooted.

Cathy Cox, a Democrat who served as secretary of state from 1999 through 2007 and is now the dean of Mercer University’s law school, said Georgia law puts a heavy burden on candidates such as Abrams who ask a court to intervene.

“I would say with pretty great confidence there has probably never been an election … without some irregularity, where some poll worker did not make some mistake,” Cox said in an interview. The key, she said, is proving someone erred to the point that it could change the outcome.

Lawrence-Hardy agreed the law requires a quantitative analysis. She said Abrams’ team doesn’t have a list of 18,000 disenfranchised voters. The evidence, she said, would consist of hundreds, if not thousands of such examples, along with data analysis of projected lost votes based on other problems, such as a lack of paper ballots at precincts where voting machines broke down and voters left long lines.

Cox said courts must attempt to apply a nonpartisan standard of “doubt” to the election. “Would a reasonable person have a reason to doubt this election? Not would a hard-core partisan Democrat doubt a partisan Republican opponent,” she said.

Abrams and voting rights activists have argued for months that Kemp mismanaged the elections system as secretary of state, with Abrams often calling Kemp “an architect of suppression.”

Under Georgia law, Abrams could file a challenge against Kemp or his successor as the secretary of state. The challenge must be filed within five days of certification in a trial court of the county where the chosen defendant resides. The defendant has between five and 10 days to respond, and the presiding judge sets a hearing within 20 days after that deadline, a calendar that could push a dispute well beyond what would have been a Dec. 4 runoff.

If the judge determines the election is so defective that it casts doubt on the results, the judge can declare the election invalid and call a new vote among the same candidates. Cox called that “the real extreme remedy.”

A more “surgical” course, she said, would be to affirm irregularities but only order that certified results be reopened and recertified once those problems are remedied. The judge could then declare a winner or order a runoff if the results are close enough.

The judge could also declare a winner after hearing the evidence, but Cox said that’s unlikely because the case will probably hinge on uncounted votes and there’s no way to know before a count which candidate won those votes.

Once the judge rules, the loser has 10 days to appeal to the Georgia Supreme Court.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: john bazemore, pool, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, push, election, judge, days, stacey, law, voters, kemp, vote, georgia, abrams, court, legal, governor, prepares


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Stormy Daniels’ attorney Michael Avenatti arrested for alleged felony domestic violence

Stormy Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti has been arrested on suspicion of domestic violence, the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed Wednesday. The officials said officers in the West Los Angeles division took an incident report involving an allegation of domestic violence from an unidentified victim. In a statement from his law office, Avenatti denied ever being “physically abusive,” and called the felony allegation against him “completely bogus.” Avenatti’s wife, Lisa Storie-Avenatti, deni


Stormy Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti has been arrested on suspicion of domestic violence, the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed Wednesday. The officials said officers in the West Los Angeles division took an incident report involving an allegation of domestic violence from an unidentified victim. In a statement from his law office, Avenatti denied ever being “physically abusive,” and called the felony allegation against him “completely bogus.” Avenatti’s wife, Lisa Storie-Avenatti, deni
Stormy Daniels’ attorney Michael Avenatti arrested for alleged felony domestic violence Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: christine wang, jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, felony, avenatti, attorney, law, daniels, statement, michael, alleged, physically, arrested, incident, client, storieavenatti, stormy, domestic, violence


Stormy Daniels' attorney Michael Avenatti arrested for alleged felony domestic violence

Stormy Daniels’ lawyer Michael Avenatti has been arrested on suspicion of domestic violence, the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed Wednesday.

Avenatti’s arrest was on a felony allegation, multiple senior law enforcement officials told NBC News. The sources said they expect Avenatti to be booked into a local jail later Wednesday evening. The officials said officers in the West Los Angeles division took an incident report involving an allegation of domestic violence from an unidentified victim.

In a statement from his law office, Avenatti denied ever being “physically abusive,” and called the felony allegation against him “completely bogus.”

“I wish to thank the hard working men and woman of the LAPD for their professionalism they were only doing their jobs in light of the completely bogus allegations against me,” he said. “I have never been physically abusive in my life nor was I last night. Any accusations to the contrary are fabricated and meant to do harm to my reputation. I look forward to being fully exonerated.”

Avenatti’s wife, Lisa Storie-Avenatti, denied reports that the alleged domestic violence incident pertained to her in a statement to Buzzfeed from her lawyers.

“My client and I have reviewed the TMZ article alleging that my client, Lisa Storie-Avenatti, has been injured and that Michael Avenatti has been arrested as a result of some incident that occurred between them. This article is not true as it pertains to my client,” the statement said. “Ms. Storie-Avenatti was not subject to any such incident on Tuesday night. Further, she was not at Mr. Avenatti’s apartment on the date that this alleged incident occurred. My client states that there has never been domestic violence in her relationship with Michael and that she has never known Michael to be physically violent toward anyone.”

Avenatti has become one of President Donald Trump’s most vocal critics, gaining visibility by representing adult film star Stormy Daniels in her lawsuit against Trump over a 2016 hush money payment.

Daniels did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Amid his rising celebrity, Avenatti has also said he’s considered running for president against Trump in 2020. Avenatti, 47, has never held public office.

In August, Avenatti started The Fight PAC, a political action committee that he said would raise money to help fellow Democrats.

A representative for the PAC did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment regarding Avenatti’s arrest.

The lawyer’s presidential ambitions were tested in October amid a slew of troubling headlines. A judged ruled that Avenatti would have to pay his former law partner $4.5 million in back pay. He was also harshly criticized for remarks he made in a Time magazine profile in which he said the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee should be a white man.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, also referred Avenatti and one of his clients, Julie Swetnick, to the FBI for criminal prosecution. Grassley alleged that Avenatti and Swetnick made “materially false statements” about Brett Kavanaugh during the Senate confirmation hearing for the then-Supreme Court nominee.

Earlier Wednesday, The Seattle Times reported that the California State Bar recently cleared Avenatti of claims of professional misconduct during the period when the lawyer ran Tully’s, a Seattle-based coffee chain.

— CNBC’s Dan Mangan and Christina Wilkie contributed reporting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: christine wang, jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, felony, avenatti, attorney, law, daniels, statement, michael, alleged, physically, arrested, incident, client, storieavenatti, stormy, domestic, violence


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Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak’s 1MDB charges

Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister. Najib has been charged with money laundering offens


Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister. Najib has been charged with money laundering offens
Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak’s 1MDB charges Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yen nee lee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, najib, razaks, mahathir, judiciary, malaysia, law, wealth, charges, mohamad, fair, charged, prime, money, scandal, triali, 1mdb


Malaysia Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad on Najib Razak's 1MDB charges

Those charged with stealing money from sovereign wealth fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad will get a fair trial, including former leader Najib Razak, MalaysianPrime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Monday.

“We believe in the rule of law. Whatever the law says, we accept,” Mahathir told CNBC’s Sri Jegarajah in response to a question about whether Najib can be guaranteed a fair trial.

“I must admit that, in the previous regime, there is an attempt to fiddle with the judiciary. But we want a free judiciary and we hope that they will not be biased,” said the prime minister.

Najib has been charged with money laundering offenses in relation to the disappearance of billions of dollars from 1MDB. The person said to be at the center of the scandal, Malaysian financier Low Taek Jho, has not been located.

The scandal involved money being illegally transferred across shell companies and individual bank accounts in many countries. The U.S. Department of Justice previously alleged that Najib received $681 million from proceeds misappropriated from a bond issue arranged by Goldman Sachs in 2013.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: yen nee lee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, minister, najib, razaks, mahathir, judiciary, malaysia, law, wealth, charges, mohamad, fair, charged, prime, money, scandal, triali, 1mdb


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Gillum reverses course on conceding Florida governor race

Democrat Andrew Gillum has withdrawn his concession in the Florida gubernatorial race following a recount. Unofficial election results showed Republican former U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis ahead of Gillum by less than 0.5 percentage points. Under state law, such a margin requires a machine recount of ballots. Gillum had conceded the race to DeSantis on Tuesday night. DeSantis responded by saying the Florida election results are clear and he is moving forward as he prepares to be the state’s next gover


Democrat Andrew Gillum has withdrawn his concession in the Florida gubernatorial race following a recount. Unofficial election results showed Republican former U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis ahead of Gillum by less than 0.5 percentage points. Under state law, such a margin requires a machine recount of ballots. Gillum had conceded the race to DeSantis on Tuesday night. DeSantis responded by saying the Florida election results are clear and he is moving forward as he prepares to be the state’s next gover
Gillum reverses course on conceding Florida governor race Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: michele eve sandberg, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, concession, reverses, governor, conceding, race, desantis, state, course, gillum, law, florida, results, republican


Gillum reverses course on conceding Florida governor race

Democrat Andrew Gillum has withdrawn his concession in the Florida gubernatorial race following a recount.

“I am replacing my words of concession with an uncompromised and unapologetic call that we count every single vote,” Gillum said at a press conference in Tallahassee on Saturday.

Unofficial election results showed Republican former U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis ahead of Gillum by less than 0.5 percentage points. Under state law, such a margin requires a machine recount of ballots.

Gillum had conceded the race to DeSantis on Tuesday night.

DeSantis responded by saying the Florida election results are clear and he is moving forward as he prepares to be the state’s next governor.

“Those results are clear and unambiguous, just as they were on Election Night,” DeSantis, a former congressman, said in a video posted Saturday on YouTube by the Republican Party of Florida.

While DeSantis said it’s important to follow state law, he added, “With the election behind us, it’s now time to come together as a state as we prepare to serve all Floridians.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-10  Authors: michele eve sandberg, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, election, concession, reverses, governor, conceding, race, desantis, state, course, gillum, law, florida, results, republican


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This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives

Justin McCurry, a father of three based in Raleigh, North Carolina, quit his engineering job in 2013 and retired at age 33. His wife, Kaisorn, joined him in early retirement in 2016 at age 38. Their journey to early retirement began in 2004, when Justin graduated from law school and landed a job at an engineering consulting firm. Kaisorn was still in law school, meaning their combined annual income was Justin’s $48,000 salary. Over the next decade, thanks to incremental raises and careful saving


Justin McCurry, a father of three based in Raleigh, North Carolina, quit his engineering job in 2013 and retired at age 33. His wife, Kaisorn, joined him in early retirement in 2016 at age 38. Their journey to early retirement began in 2004, when Justin graduated from law school and landed a job at an engineering consulting firm. Kaisorn was still in law school, meaning their combined annual income was Justin’s $48,000 salary. Over the next decade, thanks to incremental raises and careful saving
This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family, the mccurry family, courtesy of root of good
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, salary, lives, saving, 30s, portfolio, million, kaisorn, living, retirement, retired, law, justin, couple, early, school


This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives

The typical American retires in their early 60s. Justin McCurry, a father of three based in Raleigh, North Carolina, quit his engineering job in 2013 and retired at age 33. His wife, Kaisorn, joined him in early retirement in 2016 at age 38.

“Neither of us ever reached a six figure salary, with my salary topping out at $69,000 and [Kaisorn’s] at $74,000,” Justin writes on his blog, Root of Good, which explains how he saved more than $1 million in 10 years to retire early.

“No winning lottery tickets or inheritances, either,” he says. “Just steady saving and investing in our low cost index fund portfolio year after year.”

Their journey to early retirement began in 2004, when Justin graduated from law school and landed a job at an engineering consulting firm. Kaisorn was still in law school, meaning their combined annual income was Justin’s $48,000 salary. They had a good bit in savings already: Between the two of them, they had accumulated $49,000 from investments during college and grad school.

Over the next decade, thanks to incremental raises and careful saving and investing, their portfolio grew to more than $1.3 million, enough to support their modest lifestyle in retirement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family, the mccurry family, courtesy of root of good
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UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities

The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint. It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007. The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial


The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint. It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007. The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial
UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, justice, sued, group, expects, sale, sought, bank, ubs, law, mortgage, department, crisisera, settled, securities


UBS expects to be sued by US Justice Department over crisis-era mortgage securities

UBS Group, Switzerland’s largest bank, said it expects to be sued by the U.S. Department of Justice as early as Thursday on civil charges related to the sale of mortgage-backed securities in the run-up to the 2008-2009 financial crisis, according to a company statement.

The bank said the claims were not supported by the facts or the law and it would contest any such complaint “vigorously.”

The U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

UBS said it had been advised by the Justice Department that the law enforcement agency intends to file the civil complaint.

It anticipates the Justice Department will seek unspecified monetary penalties regarding the mortgage securities, which date back to 2006 and 2007.

The lawsuit would be among the last actions over misconduct in the sale and pooling of mortgage securities which helped to cause the financial crisis.

The Department of Justice has settled similar claims with Citigroup, Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan Chase, Credit Suisse Group, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America and Barclays.

Barclays settled for $2 billion in March after resisting a penalty the U.S. government sought near the end of the Obama administration in 2016. Justice had sought a much higher fine at the time and, when the two sides could not come to terms, the department filed a lawsuit.

More recently, HSBC Holdings agreed to pay $765 million last month to settle with the Justice Department over its sale of defective mortgage securities before the crisis, while major player Royal Bank of Scotland Group reached a $4.9 billion deal in May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
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Supreme Court could make it harder to sue over issues like the gender pay gap

It has gotten harder for American workers to bring lawsuits against their employers in recent years. The Supreme Court will rule on a number of cases this term over whether workers can bring disputes against their employers in a court of law or if they will have to submit to arbitration behind closed doors. Arbitration proceedings are generally favored by employers because they can be more efficient and save money. It sounds technical, but the difference between a court hearing and an arbitratio


It has gotten harder for American workers to bring lawsuits against their employers in recent years. The Supreme Court will rule on a number of cases this term over whether workers can bring disputes against their employers in a court of law or if they will have to submit to arbitration behind closed doors. Arbitration proceedings are generally favored by employers because they can be more efficient and save money. It sounds technical, but the difference between a court hearing and an arbitratio
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-28  Authors: tucker higgins, jeff greenberg, universal images group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mccabe, harder, sue, gender, gap, business, employers, issues, court, law, particularly, arbitration, pay, money, workers, supreme, cases


Supreme Court could make it harder to sue over issues like the gender pay gap

It has gotten harder for American workers to bring lawsuits against their employers in recent years. It could get harder still.

The Supreme Court will rule on a number of cases this term over whether workers can bring disputes against their employers in a court of law or if they will have to submit to arbitration behind closed doors.

Arbitration proceedings are generally favored by employers because they can be more efficient and save money. Labor advocates say arbitration tilts in favor of big business and shields employers from having to make public embarrassing information about hostile work environments and pay disparities.

It sounds technical, but the difference between a court hearing and an arbitration matters. The average arbitration can be completed in six months, versus multiple years for a federal jury trial, according to Julianna Thomas McCabe, who heads the national class-action practice group at the law firm Carlton Fields.

More than half of nonunion private-sector employers now use mandatory arbitration procedures — and the rate is even higher as the size of the business increases.

“The major driving force behind arbitration agreements is an effort to reduce the cost of litigation, and particularly with class actions,” said Lauren Novak, who specializes in labor and employment issues and is a partner at the law firm Schiff Hardin.

In three cases, including two set for argument on Monday, the justices will decide when exactly employees can be forced into arbitration. Having three cases on the docket suggests “the court is extremely interested in this issue,” McCabe said.

The cases are being closely watched by big business as well as worker advocates. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a conservative business group that spent more money on lobbying this cycle than any other organization in the country, has filed briefs in each of the cases calling on the court to side in favor of forced arbitration.

Observers largely expect that business will continue its string of victories at the court, given the deference the justices under Chief Justice John Roberts have shown toward employers. In a particularly dramatic illustration in May, the court handed down a landmark 5-4 ruling deciding that employers can force workers to sign agreements compelling them to handle disputes through arbitration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-28  Authors: tucker higgins, jeff greenberg, universal images group, getty images
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Person in custody in connection with mail bomb probe

Investigators were examining a white van plastered with stickers carrying Trump’s name and the presidential seal, according to MSNBC. Trump, during a speech Friday afternoon, said, “I am pleased to inform you that law enforcement has apprehended the suspect and taken him into custody.” “It’s an incredible job by law enforcement, and we have carried out a far-reaching federal and local and state investigation to find the person or persons responsible for the events,” the president said. I have in


Investigators were examining a white van plastered with stickers carrying Trump’s name and the presidential seal, according to MSNBC. Trump, during a speech Friday afternoon, said, “I am pleased to inform you that law enforcement has apprehended the suspect and taken him into custody.” “It’s an incredible job by law enforcement, and we have carried out a far-reaching federal and local and state investigation to find the person or persons responsible for the events,” the president said. I have in
Person in custody in connection with mail bomb probe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: dan mangan, cnn handout
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, york, waters, law, custody, rightwing, authorities, place, enforcement, probe, connection, responsible, person, mail, bomb, packages


Person in custody in connection with mail bomb probe

Investigators were examining a white van plastered with stickers carrying Trump’s name and the presidential seal, according to MSNBC. The network said authorities were looking at “right-wing paraphernalia” found at the scene.

Trump, during a speech Friday afternoon, said, “I am pleased to inform you that law enforcement has apprehended the suspect and taken him into custody.”

“It’s an incredible job by law enforcement, and we have carried out a far-reaching federal and local and state investigation to find the person or persons responsible for the events,” the president said.

“These terrorizing acts are despicable, and have no place in our country. No place. I have instructed authorities to spare no resource or expense in finding those responsible, and bringing them to swift and certain justice.”

The first mail bomb was discovered Monday in the mailbox at the Westchester County, New York, home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros, who is a frequent subject of right-wing conspiracy theories.

Since then, authorities have said suspicious packages have been found addressed to Obama, Clinton, ex-Vice President Joe Biden, former CIA Director John Brennan, former national intelligence chief James Clapper, former Attorney General Eric Holder, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., and actor Robert De Niro.

Biden and Waters were sent two such packages.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: dan mangan, cnn handout
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Florida man Cesar Sayoc charged with five federal crimes in bomb threats to Obama, Clinton and others

The complaint filed against Sayoc charges him with with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communications and assaulting current and former federal officers. Senior law enforcement sources told NBC News that Sayoc denied conducting the bomb campaign when he was initially questioned by law enforcement. He was spoken to under the national security exception, which allows autho


The complaint filed against Sayoc charges him with with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communications and assaulting current and former federal officers. Senior law enforcement sources told NBC News that Sayoc denied conducting the bomb campaign when he was initially questioned by law enforcement. He was spoken to under the national security exception, which allows autho
Florida man Cesar Sayoc charged with five federal crimes in bomb threats to Obama, Clinton and others Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: dan mangan, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, charged, schultz, political, law, enforcement, interstate, crimes, obama, man, sayoc, threats, cesar, packages, national, miranda, complaint, federal, florida, clinton


Florida man Cesar Sayoc charged with five federal crimes in bomb threats to Obama, Clinton and others

Sayoc, a 56-year-old old with a lengthy criminal record, was taken into custody Friday morning near his white van, which was covered in political messages supportive of Trump and images critical of CNN, the news agency that the president often accuses of airing “fake news.”

CNN’s New York headquarters, and the rest of the Time Warner Center in Manhattan, was evacuated Wednesday after a bomb was found in a package addressed to former CIA chief John Brennan in care of CNN.

The complaint filed against Sayoc charges him with with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communications and assaulting current and former federal officers.

He faces up to 48 years in prison if convicted.

The complaint noted that his Twitter feed, which uses the name Cesar Altieri, contains posts with misspellings consistent with those found on the bombs’ packages, such as “Hilary,” for Hillary Clinton, and “Shultz,” for Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.

Each of the packages used to send the bombs had the name and address of ex-Democratic National Committee chairwoman Schultz as the purported sender of the packages.

Senior law enforcement sources told NBC News that Sayoc denied conducting the bomb campaign when he was initially questioned by law enforcement. He was spoken to under the national security exception, which allows authorities to ask questions of a person without notifying them of their Miranda rights.

Sources said that once Sayoc was read his Miranda rights, he said he wanted a lawyer and refused to answer questions.

“This is a law-and-order administration,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a press conference after the arrest. “We will not tolerate such lawlessness, especially not political violence.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: dan mangan, jonathan ernst
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, charged, schultz, political, law, enforcement, interstate, crimes, obama, man, sayoc, threats, cesar, packages, national, miranda, complaint, federal, florida, clinton


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Trump says ‘Americans must unify’ after Florida man arrested in bomb plot targeting Democrats

President Donald Trump on Friday called on Americans to come together shortly after a Florida man was arrested in connection with a dozen mail bombs sent to an array of the president’s public foils. “The bottom line is that Americans must unify,” Trump said. “We must show the world that we are united together in peace and love and harmony as fellow American citizens. “These terrorizing acts are despicable and have no place in our country,” Trump said. Trump congratulated law enforcement for doin


President Donald Trump on Friday called on Americans to come together shortly after a Florida man was arrested in connection with a dozen mail bombs sent to an array of the president’s public foils. “The bottom line is that Americans must unify,” Trump said. “We must show the world that we are united together in peace and love and harmony as fellow American citizens. “These terrorizing acts are despicable and have no place in our country,” Trump said. Trump congratulated law enforcement for doin
Trump says ‘Americans must unify’ after Florida man arrested in bomb plot targeting Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arrested, targeting, president, plot, trump, law, incredible, world, man, democrats, sayoc, united, americans, bomb, florida, country, unify


Trump says 'Americans must unify' after Florida man arrested in bomb plot targeting Democrats

President Donald Trump on Friday called on Americans to come together shortly after a Florida man was arrested in connection with a dozen mail bombs sent to an array of the president’s public foils.

“The bottom line is that Americans must unify,” Trump said. “We must show the world that we are united together in peace and love and harmony as fellow American citizens. There is no country like our country.”

Cesar Sayoc, 56, of Aventura, Florida, was taken into custody earlier in the day and is expected to face federal criminal charges in the matter, according to NBC News.

The president said he instructed authorities to spare no expense in prosecuting “them, him, her, whoever it may be to the fullest extent of the law.” The remark prompted laughter from the audience.

“These terrorizing acts are despicable and have no place in our country,” Trump said.

The president did not mention Sayoc by name Friday. The Justice Department said that more information would be made available at an afternoon news conference.

Trump congratulated law enforcement for doing an “incredible, incredible job.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-26  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arrested, targeting, president, plot, trump, law, incredible, world, man, democrats, sayoc, united, americans, bomb, florida, country, unify


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