JetBlue appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic

JetBlue Airways appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic as soon as Wednesday, an expansion that the New York-based carrier views an an opportunity to undercut entrenched rivals with its cheaper business-class service. A save-the-date email announcing the April 10 event featured a background pattern similar to upholstery on London’s subway. Buttons featuring JetBlue’s logo and iconic London sights of Big Ben and the London Eye were sent to JetBlue offices, according to on


JetBlue Airways appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic as soon as Wednesday, an expansion that the New York-based carrier views an an opportunity to undercut entrenched rivals with its cheaper business-class service. A save-the-date email announcing the April 10 event featured a background pattern similar to upholstery on London’s subway. Buttons featuring JetBlue’s logo and iconic London sights of Big Ben and the London Eye were sent to JetBlue offices, according to on
JetBlue appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: leslie josephs, mark kauzlarich, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routes, london, announce, transatlantic, york, appears, mint, service, atlantic, jetblues, gearing, statement, think, jetblue


JetBlue appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic

JetBlue Airways appears to be gearing up to announce service across the Atlantic as soon as Wednesday, an expansion that the New York-based carrier views an an opportunity to undercut entrenched rivals with its cheaper business-class service.

The low-cost airline is scheduled to hold an “all hands” meeting with staff at John F. Kennedy Airport along with “viewing parties” at some of its main hubs around the U.S. on Wednesday afternoon, according to a company invitation obtained by CNBC. A save-the-date email announcing the April 10 event featured a background pattern similar to upholstery on London’s subway. Buttons featuring JetBlue’s logo and iconic London sights of Big Ben and the London Eye were sent to JetBlue offices, according to one employee.

The company’s shares jumped by about 4% in after-hours trading on the news.

JetBlue may add service to London but its plans could include other routes to European cities from its New York and Boston hubs.

JetBlue declined to confirm whether it would make an announcement Wednesday but said in a statement, “Potential routes to Europe could provide us an opportunity to grow our focus cities of Boston and New York as we consider the best use of our aircraft from a margin perspective in those cities.”

The move would pit the low-cost carrier against large international airlines like Delta, American, United and their European partners who dominate trans-Atlantic travel. A key part of JetBlue’s strategy in serving Europe would be its popular Mint business class, which features lie-flat seats and some suites with sliding doors as well as premium meals.

“When we think about trans-Atlantic, we do think we can disrupt largely around a Mint-like product because we’ve been so successful on flying to the West Coast with Mint,” Joanna Geraghty, JetBlue’s president and COO said last September.

The trans-Atlantic market, “especially in the premium category, suffers from the same lack of competition and high fares that [transcontinental] routes in the U.S. saw before JetBlue introduced Mint,” JetBlue’s statement said Tuesday.

A long-range variant of the Airbus A321 plane would likely be used to help JetBlue fly across the Atlantic and the airline said it would make a decision on that plane this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: leslie josephs, mark kauzlarich, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routes, london, announce, transatlantic, york, appears, mint, service, atlantic, jetblues, gearing, statement, think, jetblue


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Southwest cuts revenue outlook on Boeing 737 Max groundings

Southwest Airlines trimmed its revenue forecast Wednesday, citing the grounding of its Boeing 737 Max planes. The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes earlier this month following two fatal crashes. Investigators have noted “clear similarities” between an Ethiopian Airlines crash of a 737 Max on March 10 and another deadly crash of that model of plane in Indonesia in October. Southwest operates an all-Boeing 737 fleet, and has 34 737 Max 8 planes in its fleet of about 7


Southwest Airlines trimmed its revenue forecast Wednesday, citing the grounding of its Boeing 737 Max planes. The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes earlier this month following two fatal crashes. Investigators have noted “clear similarities” between an Ethiopian Airlines crash of a 737 Max on March 10 and another deadly crash of that model of plane in Indonesia in October. Southwest operates an all-Boeing 737 fleet, and has 34 737 Max 8 planes in its fleet of about 7
Southwest cuts revenue outlook on Boeing 737 Max groundings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: leslie josephs, mike blake
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, earlier, revenue, quarter, expects, planes, crash, cuts, forecast, outlook, southwest, groundings, boeing, max


Southwest cuts revenue outlook on Boeing 737 Max groundings

Southwest Airlines trimmed its revenue forecast Wednesday, citing the grounding of its Boeing 737 Max planes.

The Dallas-based airline expects its revenue per available seat mile, a key industry metric of how much an airline generates for each seat it flies a mile, to grow 2 to 3 percent compared with an earlier forecast of as much as 4 percent.

Southwest shares were up 1.5 percent in late-morning trading.

The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing 737 Max planes earlier this month following two fatal crashes. Investigators have noted “clear similarities” between an Ethiopian Airlines crash of a 737 Max on March 10 and another deadly crash of that model of plane in Indonesia in October.

Southwest operates an all-Boeing 737 fleet, and has 34 737 Max 8 planes in its fleet of about 750 aircraft. The carrier said it expects to have canceled 9,400 flights in the first quarter, 2,800 of them because of the grounded Max planes.

Southwest said its operating costs, excluding fuel, in the quarter will likely rise 10 percent from a year ago, up from a previous forecast of a 6 percent year-over-year increase.

The airline said it expects to lose $150 million in revenue in the first quarter of 2019, up from a February estimate of $60 million, due to weather-related cancellations, maintenance issues, weak leisure-travel demand and the Max groundings.

It’s a small amount compared with the $5.3 billion in revenue analysts expect Southwest to generate in the first three months of 2019, but investors are focused on how the suspension of the 737 Max planes will financially impact airlines.

American Airlines earlier this week said it planned to cancel about 90 flights a day through April 24 due to the Max grounding. That period encompasses the busy Easter and Passover travel period.

Boeing is scheduled on Wednesday morning to outline the changes to a piece of software that Indonesian investigators have indicated played a role in the Lion Air crash in October.

“Due to the current uncertainty regarding the duration of the Max groundings and any requirements for reinstatement of the aircraft into service, it is difficult for the company to forecast the impact of the MAX groundings beyond first quarter 2019,” Southwest said.

As of March 13, Southwest said it had 41 deliveries of Max planes scheduled for this year.

Southwest reports first-quarter earnings in late April.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: leslie josephs, mike blake
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, earlier, revenue, quarter, expects, planes, crash, cuts, forecast, outlook, southwest, groundings, boeing, max


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Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes

The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model. The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. The FAA said it is in


The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model. The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. The FAA said it is in
Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leslie josephs, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recent, returned, unrelated, max, type, 737, faa, makes, southwest, takeoff, flight, landing, passengers, issue, shortly, orlando, engine


Southwest Boeing 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando; FAA cites engine issue unrelated to recent crashes

The crew of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max declared an emergency shortly after takeoff and returned to Orlando’s main airport on Tuesday after reporting an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The FAA grounded this type of aircraft earlier this month following two fatal crashes of the popular model.

Airlines aren’t allowed to fly passengers under the FAA’s order. The Southwest plane, which was not carrying passengers, was bound for Victorville, Calif., where the carrier is storing the aircraft in a facility in the western Mojave Desert.

The FAA on March 13 joined dozens of other countries in grounding the planes, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8. All 157 passengers on board were killed and investigators said the crash had “clear similarities” with a Lion Air flight in October, operated by the same type of plane, plunged into the Java Sea in Indonesia, killing the 189 people on board.

The FAA said it is investigating the Southwest incident on Tuesday and that the issue was not related to other concerns about the 737 Max that led the agency to ground the plane.

Southwest Flight 8701, the ferry flight, returned to Orlando International Airport shortly before 3 p.m. EDT after the pilots “reported a performance issue with one of the engines shortly after takeoff,” Southwest said in a statement. “The crew followed protocol and safely landed back at the airport.”

CNBC’s Phil LeBeau contributed to this report.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: leslie josephs, joe raedle, getty images
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Airlines warn of cancellations as Boeing readies 737 Max software fix

Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane. Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines


Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane. Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines
Airlines warn of cancellations as Boeing readies 737 Max software fix Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: leslie josephs, ralph freso, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulators, crash, changes, max, readies, warn, cancellations, airlines, renton, software, planes, fix, boeing, 737


Airlines warn of cancellations as Boeing readies 737 Max software fix

Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane.

Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines that fly the 737 Max — also met with Boeing officials about the software changes and additional pilot training.

The U.S. government ordered airlines to suspend flights using the Boeing 737 Max plane, joining dozens of other countries in taking that step amid concerns about the similarities between the March 10 crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max and a Lion Air crash in October, which together killed 346 people.

Boeing late Sunday said it invited more than 200 airline pilots and regulators to Renton last Wednesday to “share more details about our plan for supporting the safe return of the 737 MAX to commercial service.”

The Federal Aviation Administration expects to get a look at the software early in the week, according to a person familiar with the matter. The agency needs to certify Boeing’s changes before it can be added to the aircraft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: leslie josephs, ralph freso, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulators, crash, changes, max, readies, warn, cancellations, airlines, renton, software, planes, fix, boeing, 737


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Boeing CEO restates ‘relentless commitment’ to safety

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months. Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boe


Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months. Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boe
Boeing CEO restates ‘relentless commitment’ to safety Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: leslie josephs, joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commitment, boeing, relentless, planes, air, max, lion, restates, ceo, safety, flight, ethiopian, 737


Boeing CEO restates 'relentless commitment' to safety

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months.

The executive said that Boeing will maintain its “relentless commitment to make safe airplanes even safer.”

“We also understand and regret the challenges for our customers and the flying public caused by the fleet’s grounding,” Muilenburg added.

His comments come after French and Ethiopian investigators said data extracted from the black boxes of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed March 10 showed “clear similarities” with a deadly Lion Air flight that plunged into the Java Sea in October.

Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board.

Boeing and Muilenburg are under increased scrutiny following the two crashes, which killed 346 people. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boeing added to the 737 Max planes. That system causes the nose of the plane to point downward, the way airplanes can recover from a stall, but can have catastrophic results if the planes’ sensors receive erroneous information.

Many pilots were not aware the system existed until after the Lion Air crash and said they did not receive in-depth training to transition to the Boeing 737 Max from older models of the plane.

Boeing last week said it was working on a software fix for the planes as well as updated pilot training and manuals.

The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous people familiar with the matter, reported Sunday that a grand jury issued a subpoena to “at least one person” involved in the development of the plane. It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. It was also confirmed by a source to CNBC.

The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes.

More than 370 of the Boeing 737 Max planes are in airline fleets worldwide and Boeing has more than 4,600 on order.

Shares of Boeing, a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, edged lower by 0.25 percent in after-hours trading. The stock fell 1.8 percent Monday to close at $372.28, sharply lower than the 52-week high of $446.01 it reached at the beginning of March.

Read the full statement below.

We know lives depend on the work we do, and our teams embrace that responsibility with a deep sense of commitment every day. Our purpose at Boeing is to bring family, friends and loved ones together with our commercial airplanes—safely. The tragic losses of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and Lion Air Flight 610 affect us all, uniting people and nations in shared grief for all those in mourning. Our hearts are heavy, and we continue to extend our deepest sympathies to the loved ones of the passengers and crew on board. Safety is at the core of who we are at Boeing, and ensuring safe and reliable travel on our airplanes is an enduring value and our absolute commitment to everyone. This overarching focus on safety spans and binds together our entire global aerospace industry and communities. We’re united with our airline customers, international regulators and government authorities in our efforts to support the most recent investigation, understand the facts of what happened and help prevent future tragedies. Based on facts from the Lion Air Flight 610 accident and emerging data as it becomes available from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accident, we’re taking actions to fully ensure the safety of the 737 MAX. We also understand and regret the challenges for our customers and the flying public caused by the fleet’s grounding. Work is progressing thoroughly and rapidly to learn more about the Ethiopian Airlines accident and understand the information from the airplane’s cockpit voice and flight data recorders. Our team is on-site with investigators to support the investigation and provide technical expertise. The Ethiopia Accident Investigation Bureau will determine when and how it’s appropriate to release additional details. Boeing has been in the business of aviation safety for more than 100 years, and we’ll continue providing the best products, training and support to our global airline customers and pilots. This is an ongoing and relentless commitment to make safe airplanes even safer. Soon we’ll release a software update and related pilot training for the 737 MAX that will address concerns discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident. We’ve been working in full cooperation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Transportation and the National Transportation Safety Board on all issues relating to both the Lion Air and the Ethiopian Airlines accidents since the Lion Air accident occurred in October last year. Our entire team is devoted to the quality and safety of the aircraft we design, produce and support. I’ve dedicated my entire career to Boeing, working shoulder to shoulder with our amazing people and customers for more than three decades, and I personally share their deep sense of commitment. Recently, I spent time with our team members at our 737 production facility in Renton, Wash., and once again saw firsthand the pride our people feel in their work and the pain we’re all experiencing in light of these tragedies. The importance of our work demands the utmost integrity and excellence—that’s what I see in our team, and we’ll never rest in pursuit of it. Our mission is to connect people and nations, protect freedom, explore our world and the vastness of space, and inspire the next generation of aerospace dreamers and doers—and we’ll fulfill that mission only by upholding and living our values. That’s what safety means to us. Together, we’ll keep working to earn and keep the trust people have placed in Boeing.

— CNBC’s Phil LeBeau contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: leslie josephs, joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commitment, boeing, relentless, planes, air, max, lion, restates, ceo, safety, flight, ethiopian, 737


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French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer


It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer
French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investigator, older, boeing, clear, plane, max, lion, justice, similarities, transportation, journal, french, system, crashes, 737


French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous people familiar with the matter, reported Sunday that a grand jury issued a subpoena to “at least one person” involved in the development of the plane. It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Indonesia investigators have indicated that as a possible factor in the Lion Air crash in October.

Pilots said they were not informed about the new system until after the Lion Air crash. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer, a Boeing 737 pilot and spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, which represents American Airlines pilots.

Boeing shares were down more than 2.6 percent in afternoon trading Monday, shaving nearly 60 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as the day’s biggest loser in the index.

The FAA, Justice Department and the Transportation Department’s Office of Inspector General declined to comment. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Why Boeing and Airbus dominate 99% of the large plane market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
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After two fatal Boeing plane crashes, the world turned on the US

China moved first. By midday Wednesday more than 30 countries and airlines from India to Italy had banned Boeing 737 Max jets from their skies after a second fatal crash of one of the planes brought the death toll to 346 people. The deadly crashes raised concerns around the world that they may have both been caused by software Boeing added to the modern version of its workhorse jet. But the U.S. aviation regulator repeatedly stood by the American-made plane, even as close allies like the Europea


China moved first. By midday Wednesday more than 30 countries and airlines from India to Italy had banned Boeing 737 Max jets from their skies after a second fatal crash of one of the planes brought the death toll to 346 people. The deadly crashes raised concerns around the world that they may have both been caused by software Boeing added to the modern version of its workhorse jet. But the U.S. aviation regulator repeatedly stood by the American-made plane, even as close allies like the Europea
After two fatal Boeing plane crashes, the world turned on the US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-17  Authors: leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, crashes, turned, workhorse, unprecedented, version, fatal, toll, plane, aviation, union, unfamiliar, world


After two fatal Boeing plane crashes, the world turned on the US

China moved first. Indonesia followed. Then Singapore and Australia.

By midday Wednesday more than 30 countries and airlines from India to Italy had banned Boeing 737 Max jets from their skies after a second fatal crash of one of the planes brought the death toll to 346 people. The deadly crashes raised concerns around the world that they may have both been caused by software Boeing added to the modern version of its workhorse jet.

But the U.S. aviation regulator repeatedly stood by the American-made plane, even as close allies like the European Union decided to suspend the plane from operating there.

It left the Federal Aviation Administration, which has presided over an unprecedented period of commercial airline safety at home, in an unfamiliar state: alone.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-17  Authors: leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
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US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.


That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max. United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights.
US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flights, 737, airlines, planes, cancel, grounds, travelers, passengers, rebook, boeing, jets, faa, order, max


US airlines cancel flights after FAA grounds Boeing 737 Max jets

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday joined dozens of other countries’ regulators in ordering airlines to ground new Boeing 737 Max planes, citing evidence linking a deadly crash of one of them in Ethiopia over the weekend to a similar fatal flight in Indonesia in October. (You can find more detail on why the planes were grounded here.)

That has left airlines scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. The three U.S. airlines — United, American and Southwest — that have recently added the planes to their fleets, and have more on order, said they will rebook or waive ticket-change fees and fare differences for travelers affected by the FAA’s order, which went into immediate effect.

American Airlines, which has 24 Boeing 737 Max planes in its fleet of nearly 1,000 aircraft, said it was ferrying those planes to be parked until the FAA order is lifted. It operates about 85 flights out its 6,700 flights a day using the Max.

Routes with multiple flights each day, where passengers can more easily be rebooked to another time, are likely to take the biggest hit. Travelers who aren’t booked on the Max may also be affected as airlines deploy their planes to cover other routes with less frequent service.

United Airlines has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s, a larger model, in its fleet. The airline said it expects minimal disruptions from the issue, but it will work with customers if their flights are canceled.

Southwest Airlines flies 34 Boeing 737 8s that service about 4 percent of its daily flights. The carrier does not charge travelers to change their trips, but said passengers booked on canceled Boeing Max flights won’t have to pay the difference in fares to change their dates if it’s within two weeks of their original departure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: leslie josephs, shannon stapleton
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Canada to ban 737 Max 8 and Max 9 aircraft from flying in Canadian airspace

The Canadian government said Wednesday it is temporarily grounding Boeing 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes and barring them from the country’s airspace, joining dozens of nations suspending service after the second fatal crash of the planes in less than five months. Canada’s transportation ministry said it’s immediately restricting all Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 aircraft “from arriving, departing, or overflying Canadian airspace.” The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 came less than five months after


The Canadian government said Wednesday it is temporarily grounding Boeing 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes and barring them from the country’s airspace, joining dozens of nations suspending service after the second fatal crash of the planes in less than five months. Canada’s transportation ministry said it’s immediately restricting all Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 aircraft “from arriving, departing, or overflying Canadian airspace.” The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 came less than five months after
Canada to ban 737 Max 8 and Max 9 aircraft from flying in Canadian airspace Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, daniel slim, afp, getty images
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Canada to ban 737 Max 8 and Max 9 aircraft from flying in Canadian airspace

The Canadian government said Wednesday it is temporarily grounding Boeing 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes and barring them from the country’s airspace, joining dozens of nations suspending service after the second fatal crash of the planes in less than five months.

“The advice the experts have provided is based on the information they have been receiving; the requirements for new procedures and training for Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 flight crews they have already put in place; and the latest information available from the incidents,” Canadian Transport Minister Marc Garneau said in a statement.

Canada’s decision made the United States a notable holdout for allowing the Boeing planes to fly as investigators seek clues as to what brought down an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 shortly after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday reiterated its stance on the plane, saying it saw no reason to order the jets be taken out of service.

Canada’s transportation ministry said it’s immediately restricting all Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 aircraft “from arriving, departing, or overflying Canadian airspace.”

Dozens of countries and airlines spanning from China to Mexico and Europe have grounded the planes this week.

The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 came less than five months after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea minutes into the flight, killing all 189 people on board.

Both planes were new, delivered from Boeing just months before their doomed flights.

Air Canada has 24 Boeing 737 Max 8 planes in its fleet and said it would waive cancellation and ticket-change fees for customers affected by the government order. It warned travelers that its Boeing 737 Max planes carry on average 9,000 to 12,000 passengers daily so “customers can expect delays in rebooking and in reaching Air Canada call centres and we appreciate our customers’ patience.

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week with shares sliding 11 percent from $422.54 Friday to $375.41 at Tuesday’s close. The drop cut the company’s market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday. Its stock was up 0.1 percent in Wednesday afternoon trading.

-CNBC’s Jessica Bursztynsky contributed to this report.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: leslie josephs, daniel slim, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, flight, airlines, 737, canada, boeing, customers, order, aircraft, max, canadian, billion, planes, airspace, flying


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Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A


Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A
Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday's 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia.

Boeing’s shares slid 11 percent from $422.54 Friday to $375.41 at Tuesday’s close before turning positive Wednesday morning. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico.

Its shares were up by less than 1 percent Wednesday.

Edward Jones downgraded Boeing’s stock to hold from buy, noting a possible “delay in orders.”

Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 crashed in Indonesia, killing all 189 people aboard. The cause of the Ethiopian Airlines plane is under investigation.

The U.S. is increasingly alone in defending the American-made jets since the Federal Aviation Administration deemed the 737 Max to be “airworthy” earlier this week. The aircraft hasn’t been grounded in the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


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