The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson on the lesson he learned as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Falcons

According to ESPN , Watson spent the summer before his freshman year of high school working at the Falcons’ practice facility, which was just 10 minutes away from his childhood home in Georgia. As a young teen, Watson picked up footballs during practice, took care of the team’s equipment and folded towels. Before becoming the 12th overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, Houston Texans star quarterback Deshaun Watson got a head start on his football career as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Atlanta Fa


According to ESPN , Watson spent the summer before his freshman year of high school working at the Falcons’ practice facility, which was just 10 minutes away from his childhood home in Georgia. As a young teen, Watson picked up footballs during practice, took care of the team’s equipment and folded towels. Before becoming the 12th overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, Houston Texans star quarterback Deshaun Watson got a head start on his football career as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Atlanta Fa
Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson on the lesson he learned as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Falcons Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, players, football, deshaun, watson, texans, young, nfl, learned, quarterback, hes, houston, boy, falcons, practice, 14yearold, ball, lesson


Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson on the lesson he learned as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Falcons

That experience, Watson added, “taught me how to really work hard.” He explained that as a young kid who always hoped to play in the NFL, his job as a ball boy showed him what was possible for his future if he remained determined and focused on his goals.

According to ESPN , Watson spent the summer before his freshman year of high school working at the Falcons’ practice facility, which was just 10 minutes away from his childhood home in Georgia. As a young teen, Watson picked up footballs during practice, took care of the team’s equipment and folded towels. “Anything that the players needed,” he said, “we took care of.”

Before becoming the 12th overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, Houston Texans star quarterback Deshaun Watson got a head start on his football career as a 14-year-old ball boy for the Atlanta Falcons.

Deshaun Watson #4 of the Houston Texans looks to pass in the first half against the Jacksonville Jaguars at NRG Stadium on September 15, 2019 in Houston, Texas.

“I always think about it,” Watson, now 24, said. “That’s something that helped change my life. Especially during the times off the field … the way I was raised and the environment I was living in. It helped me see another side of what I can be and what I can become.”

In an essay for The Players’ Tribune, Watson talked about his rough upbringing in a single-parent home, where his mom worked multiple jobs to take care of her four kids. “For most of my childhood, we lived in government housing in Gainesville, Georgia, where I always played pickup football and basketball with the older kids, some of them drug dealers and gang members,” he wrote.

Watson said he and his family’s life changed for the better when he was 11. His mom, who worked as a volunteer building homes with Habitat for Humanity, finally qualified for a new home of her own. “We moved into a brand-new Habitat home that had been furnished by Falcons running back Warrick Dunn, through his charity,” Watson wrote.

As a ball boy for the Falcons, the young quarterback shared how he built a close relationship with many of the players and detailed how some even came to his high school football games to see him play.

“S—, I knew he was a hell of a quarterback,” said wide receiver Julio Jones, who was drafted by the Falcons one year after Watson started working at the practice facility. “I tried to get him to go to Alabama.”

Watson, who attended Clemson University instead, emphasized that this Sunday’s game, Oct. 6 against the Falcons, will be a full-circle moment for him. Already, he said, he’s looking forward to seeing Kenny Osuwah, who is still the team’s equipment manager, and he’s looking forward to speaking with Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan at some point on game day.

“I know a lot of those guys sit there and watch him,” Falcons former receivers coach Terry Robiskie told ESPN, “and, like me, they’re just amazed at how far he’s come and where it all came from and where it all started.”

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Don’t miss: Why NFL star Michael Bennett skips direct deposit and keeps his checks ‘until the end of the season’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, players, football, deshaun, watson, texans, young, nfl, learned, quarterback, hes, houston, boy, falcons, practice, 14yearold, ball, lesson


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Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here’s how to turn that into a money lesson

But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your


But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Show them where the money goesOpen a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your
Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here’s how to turn that into a money lesson Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, makes, almonte, savings, kids, parents, lesson, heres, bank, allowance, teach, 1500, money, turn, kid, financial, save


Your kid makes $1,500 a year in allowance. Here's how to turn that into a money lesson

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Children are pocketing an average of $30 a week in allowance — enough to rack up around $1,500 in a year. But most of them won’t be able to make a big buy with allowance money. Only 3% of parents say their kids primarily save their cash, according to a new telephone survey from the American Institute of CPAs. The organization polled 1,002 adults from Aug. 22 to Aug. 28. Of these, 273 identified as a parent or guardian of at least one child aged 25 or younger who is living at home. “Once you put money in someone’s hands, it feels like it’s just burning a hole there and they have to do something about it,” said David Almonte, CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission.

Close to half of the parents said their children’s allowances go toward outings with friends, while 37% said their kids spend the money on digital devices or downloads. A third of parents said their kids use the cash to buy toys. “We as parents have to teach them what’s in it for them [to save],” Almonte said “Why shouldn’t they buy that toy today? Whats the benefit of waiting?” Three out of four adults say the most important purpose of an allowance is to teach children the value of money and financial responsibility. Here are some tips on how to do that.

Make them earn it

SDI Productions | E+ | Getty Images

Nothing is free — not even that weekly allowance. “If you just give someone money, you help them resolve a short-term need,” Almonte said. “If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life.” One way to do this is through chores. This teaches children the real world lesson that, “if you don’t show up and put in the effort, you don’t get a paycheck,” Almonte said. Another option is to reward them for saving by matching dollars for dollars — this allows them to turn $20 of savings, for example, into $40.

Show them where the money goes

Open a bank account with your child so they see where their money ends up. Bring your kids to the bank and explain to them what happens to their money when they keep it in a savings account instead of spending it. “It’s really hard for someone to be like ‘here’s $10 for your allowance,’ then take it back to put it into savings,” Almonte said. “As a kid, you’re like ‘where did my money go?”

If you teach someone to earn money, you set them up for financial success for the rest of their life. David Almonte CPA and member of the American Institute of CPAs’ financial literacy commission

Because a lot of banking is now done digitally, this can also be done online. Cristina Guglielmetti, a certified financial planner and founder of Future Perfect Planning in New York, does this with her 9-year-old son. “I log into the bank and show him ‘this is where our interest is, this is how much we had last month and this is how much we have this month,'” Guglielmetti said. Seeing and understanding bank statements can help children track the increase in their savings and the decrease in their spending. Another way to show them where their money goes is to tell them that for every dollar they save, you’ll donate 10% to an organization of their choice. You and your child can hand-deliver the donation, Almonte said.

Talk about money early and often

kate_sept2004 | E+ | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: mallika mitra, jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, makes, almonte, savings, kids, parents, lesson, heres, bank, allowance, teach, 1500, money, turn, kid, financial, save


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After being forced to cut prices in China, Apple still hasn’t learned its lesson

Tim Cook announces the iPhone 11 at a launch event in Cupertino, Calif on Sept. 10, 2019. In the second quarter, its China market share dipped to its lowest level in a year, according to Counterpoint Research. But Apple’s new iPhone 11 range still has a hefty price tag in China. No 5G iPhoneApple’s iPhone 11 series did not have a phone capable of connecting to 5G networks. Apple was not expected to release a 5G iPhone this year but some predict the company may do so in 2020.


Tim Cook announces the iPhone 11 at a launch event in Cupertino, Calif on Sept. 10, 2019. In the second quarter, its China market share dipped to its lowest level in a year, according to Counterpoint Research. But Apple’s new iPhone 11 range still has a hefty price tag in China. No 5G iPhoneApple’s iPhone 11 series did not have a phone capable of connecting to 5G networks. Apple was not expected to release a 5G iPhone this year but some predict the company may do so in 2020.
After being forced to cut prices in China, Apple still hasn’t learned its lesson Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesson, market, premium, prices, china, pro, learned, apple, forced, research, networks, iphone, cut


After being forced to cut prices in China, Apple still hasn't learned its lesson

Tim Cook announces the iPhone 11 at a launch event in Cupertino, Calif on Sept. 10, 2019. Source: Apple

Apple released a new range of iPhones on Tuesday — but none of them had 5G capabilities. That, together with a hefty premium that Chinese users must pay for the latest iPhone 11 series, could hurt the U.S. technology giant’s performance in China, analysts told CNBC. The world’s second-largest economy is a crucial market for Apple but it has struggled in recent times. In the second quarter, its China market share dipped to its lowest level in a year, according to Counterpoint Research. Shipments of iPhones also declined, the analysis showed. One of the problems Apple had with the last iPhone series — the XR, XS and XS Max — was the premium pricing which put off some Chinese consumers. But Apple’s new iPhone 11 range still has a hefty price tag in China. Compared to the prices in the U.S., Chinese consumers have to pay a premium that’s between 10.5% and 12.5% for the iPhone 11, and 18.6% to 23% more for the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max, according to an analysis by CNBC.

Compared to last year’s XR — the equivalent of the new iPhone 11 and the cheapest of the range, the premium was 28%. So that has come down significantly. But the premium for last year’s XS and XS Max was around 26% — not too much higher than the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max.

Prices slashed

In January, retailers in China cut the prices of last year’s iPhone models. Months later, Apple announced its official price slash. Analysts say that it appears Apple hasn’t learned its lesson. “Apple, after ten years of operations in China with local manufacturing, still commands a ~20% premium which is quite high for a market less developed in terms of per capita spend than U.S.,” Neil Shah, research director at Counterpoint Research, told CNBC. However, the iPhone 11 might find some love in China, given the premium is lower than the Pro and Pro Max and compared to the XR.

The price “might not matter as much for the high-end models, since those buyers tend to be hardcore fans and status-conscious users who will buy them anyway,” Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research at IDC, told CNBC. “The more important one to look at is the 11 (XR replacement), which is reasonably priced for the market. I would think that Apple focused its pricing strategy on that model too.” Daniel Ives, managing director of equity research at Wedbush Securities, said he believes roughly 60 million to 70 million Apple users are due for an upgrade in China. Of course, not all of them will choose to upgrade to the newer phones. Still, Shah of Counterpoint Research, said he expects Apple shipment volumes to “barely cross” 30 million units this year, down from the 65 million at its peak in 2015. “So while the market has grown, Apple’s share has been declining and the user base is stagnant coming from new phone additions. Most additions are from refurb, second hand or used phones in circulation,” Shah said, referring to refurbished phones.

No 5G iPhone

Apple’s iPhone 11 series did not have a phone capable of connecting to 5G networks. These are next-generation mobile networks that promise super-fast data speeds with the ability to support technologies like driverless cars. 5G networks are slowly being rolled out around the world and in China they are slated to come online as early as this year.

While I didn’t expect it, I think the lack of a … 5G modem option will hurt sales in China. Patrick Moorhead Moor Insights & Strategy

Apple’s rival Huawei will have two 5G smartphones on the market in China this year, while Xiaomi also currently has one on sale. Apple was not expected to release a 5G iPhone this year but some predict the company may do so in 2020. However, with 5G networks being built in China and the Chinese consumer known for looking for cutting-edge features, Apple could be at a disadvantage against local rivals.

“While I didn’t expect it, I think the lack of a … 5G modem option will hurt sales in China,” Patrick Moorhead, founder of Moor Insights & Strategy, said in a note on Tuesday. 5G networks take time to roll out and widespread coverage is not instant. But over the next few years, they will offer a wider area of coverage and reliability. Apple is waiting for this to happen, analysts said. “The lack of 5G is little surprise. Whilst it stands to impact Apple in key markets such as China, Apple has opted to echo its approach with 3G and 4G by waiting for networks to be established so it can deliver 5G at scale with maximum impact,” Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight, said in a note on Wednesday.

Trade war and Huawei

Apple is also facing some broader issues in China related to the trade war with the U.S. With Huawei in the crosshairs of the U.S. — and facing restricted access to American technology — the Chinese firm has increased focus on its domestic market. In the second quarter, Huawei upped its focus on China and saw shipments surge to record levels. Tariffs also continue to be a black cloud hanging over Apple given the fact that the majority of iPhone assembly takes place in China. Apple’s iPhone was bracing for a 10% tariff starting September 1, until President Donald Trump announced a delay. That tariff will now come into effect on December 15.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesson, market, premium, prices, china, pro, learned, apple, forced, research, networks, iphone, cut


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Kobe Bryant shares the No. 1 lesson he learned from Oprah, Tim Cook and other successful people

Kobe Bryant doesn’t hesitate to reach out to other successful people. He’s learned a lot from three people in particular, he told Alex Rodriguez and Dan Katz on a 2018 episode of “The Corp”: media mogul Oprah Winfrey, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Nike CEO Mark Parker. The key takeaway from his conversations with Winfrey, Cook and Parker is that even the most successful people trip up: “We tend to look at them and say, OK, they don’t make mistakes. “When I had the idea of first starting a studio, the f


Kobe Bryant doesn’t hesitate to reach out to other successful people. He’s learned a lot from three people in particular, he told Alex Rodriguez and Dan Katz on a 2018 episode of “The Corp”: media mogul Oprah Winfrey, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Nike CEO Mark Parker. The key takeaway from his conversations with Winfrey, Cook and Parker is that even the most successful people trip up: “We tend to look at them and say, OK, they don’t make mistakes. “When I had the idea of first starting a studio, the f
Kobe Bryant shares the No. 1 lesson he learned from Oprah, Tim Cook and other successful people Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, winfrey, parker, successful, bryant, tim, things, production, told, lesson, cook, learned, oprah, mistakes, kobe


Kobe Bryant shares the No. 1 lesson he learned from Oprah, Tim Cook and other successful people

Kobe Bryant doesn’t hesitate to reach out to other successful people. “What I love doing is cold-calling people,” the former NBA star told CNBC in 2016. “What did you read? What did you learn? How did you learn it? Those are the questions. ”

He’s learned a lot from three people in particular, he told Alex Rodriguez and Dan Katz on a 2018 episode of “The Corp”: media mogul Oprah Winfrey, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Nike CEO Mark Parker.

“Those three are the biggest ones that have had the most influence in what I’m currently building,” said Bryant, who retired from basketball in 2016 and is now focusing on growing his production company Granity Studios.

The key takeaway from his conversations with Winfrey, Cook and Parker is that even the most successful people trip up: “We tend to look at them and say, OK, they don’t make mistakes. They don’t make bad decisions. That couldn’t be any further from the truth. ”

Bryant heard about some of Winfrey’s missteps right before creating Granity. “When I had the idea of first starting a studio, the first person I called was Oprah Winfrey,” because she founded her own production company, Harpo Studios, in 1986, he recalled.

“We sat on the phone for about an hour and a half, two hours — went through the history of building Harpo and the things that she felt she did well and the things she felt like she didn’t do so well,” Bryant said. “She walked me through her journey to help me on mine.”

Talking with Cook and Parker reiterated that “we all make mistakes,” said Bryant. “We all make decisions. And you just continue to plow forward. You continue to figure it out.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shares, winfrey, parker, successful, bryant, tim, things, production, told, lesson, cook, learned, oprah, mistakes, kobe


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Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’

Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio knows plenty about success: He founded Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund with roughly $160 billion in assets. But he says there’s one lesson it took him decades to learn about how to be “truly successful.” That lesson has to do with surrounding yourself with people who are even more talented than yourself. The self-made billionaire explained the idea on Thursday in a post on Facebook. He says that, as a good manager, you should “hire someone


Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio knows plenty about success: He founded Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund with roughly $160 billion in assets. But he says there’s one lesson it took him decades to learn about how to be “truly successful.” That lesson has to do with surrounding yourself with people who are even more talented than yourself. The self-made billionaire explained the idea on Thursday in a post on Facebook. He says that, as a good manager, you should “hire someone
Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billionaire, better, hire, ray, truly, lesson, conductor, dalio, fund, hedge, successful, decades


Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be 'truly successful'

Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio knows plenty about success: He founded Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund with roughly $160 billion in assets. But he says there’s one lesson it took him decades to learn about how to be “truly successful.” That lesson has to do with surrounding yourself with people who are even more talented than yourself.

The self-made billionaire explained the idea on Thursday in a post on Facebook. He says that, as a good manager, you should “hire someone better than you,” and likens it to being an orchestra conductor.

“After decades of hiring, managing, and firing people, I understand that to be truly successful, I need to be like a conductor of people, many of whom (if not all) can play their instruments better than I can—and that if I was a really great conductor, I would also be able to find a better conductor than me and hire him or her,” Dalio writes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billionaire, better, hire, ray, truly, lesson, conductor, dalio, fund, hedge, successful, decades


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A key money lesson Alex Rodriguez taught his kids has ‘doubled their money, for sure’

Rodriguez, now 43, wants to make sure his two daughters, ages 11 and 14, have the right tools to make smart money decisions, so he turns car rides into money and business classes. One lesson in particular appears to be paying off: start investing young. After giving his kids money to invest in stock portfolios five years ago, “they have both doubled their money, for sure,” he told Sports Illustrated’s Ben Reiter for his cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod. That’s why Rodriguez also advises y


Rodriguez, now 43, wants to make sure his two daughters, ages 11 and 14, have the right tools to make smart money decisions, so he turns car rides into money and business classes. One lesson in particular appears to be paying off: start investing young. After giving his kids money to invest in stock portfolios five years ago, “they have both doubled their money, for sure,” he told Sports Illustrated’s Ben Reiter for his cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod. That’s why Rodriguez also advises y
A key money lesson Alex Rodriguez taught his kids has ‘doubled their money, for sure’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesson, doubled, baseball, smart, money, sure, kids, rodriguez, alex, told, youre, right, start, taught, key, young


A key money lesson Alex Rodriguez taught his kids has 'doubled their money, for sure'

Former baseball star Alex Rodriguez had to learn how to manage a lot of money from a young age: He went straight from high school to the big leagues and signed a three-year, $1.3-million contract with the Seattle Mariners after being drafted in 1993. He also got a $1-million signing bonus.

Earning so much as a teenager “was a culture shock,” he told The New York Times Magazine in a 2019 interview.

Rodriguez, now 43, wants to make sure his two daughters, ages 11 and 14, have the right tools to make smart money decisions, so he turns car rides into money and business classes.

One lesson in particular appears to be paying off: start investing young.

After giving his kids money to invest in stock portfolios five years ago, “they have both doubled their money, for sure,” he told Sports Illustrated’s Ben Reiter for his cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod. Rodriguez was suspended for the entire 2014 season for allegedly using performance-enhancing drugs. He retired from baseball in 2016 and is now the CEO of A-Rod Corp.

Investing is one of the most effective ways to build wealth, and the earlier you start, the more you’ll benefit in the long-term. That’s why Rodriguez also advises young professional athletes, who will likely earn most of their money in their twenties and thirties, to put their money to work right away. “You have an incredible opportunity if you’re frugal and you’re smart and you put your money away early,” he tells CNBC Make It, if you take advantage of the power of compound interest.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesson, doubled, baseball, smart, money, sure, kids, rodriguez, alex, told, youre, right, start, taught, key, young


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Texas jury teaches Huawei a ‘hard lesson,’ says US chip start-up cleared of trade secret theft

Huawei was “taught a hard lesson” after a federal jury in Texas ruled against the Chinese tech giant in a trade secrets case, Alan Armstrong, co-founder and CEO of U.S. chip designer CNEX Labs, told CNBC on Tuesday. Yiren Huang, who started CNEX with Armstrong, worked at Huawei immediately before launching the new company. In 2017, Huawei sued the California start-up, accusing Huang of breaching an employment contract and misappropriating trade secrets. Last Wednesday, jurors found that, while H


Huawei was “taught a hard lesson” after a federal jury in Texas ruled against the Chinese tech giant in a trade secrets case, Alan Armstrong, co-founder and CEO of U.S. chip designer CNEX Labs, told CNBC on Tuesday. Yiren Huang, who started CNEX with Armstrong, worked at Huawei immediately before launching the new company. In 2017, Huawei sued the California start-up, accusing Huang of breaching an employment contract and misappropriating trade secrets. Last Wednesday, jurors found that, while H
Texas jury teaches Huawei a ‘hard lesson,’ says US chip start-up cleared of trade secret theft Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: jesse pound, kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theft, texas, startup, secret, chinese, jury, think, hard, trump, lesson, cnex, huawei, secrets, armstrong, huang, teaches, trade


Texas jury teaches Huawei a 'hard lesson,' says US chip start-up cleared of trade secret theft

Huawei was “taught a hard lesson” after a federal jury in Texas ruled against the Chinese tech giant in a trade secrets case, Alan Armstrong, co-founder and CEO of U.S. chip designer CNEX Labs, told CNBC on Tuesday.

Yiren Huang, who started CNEX with Armstrong, worked at Huawei immediately before launching the new company. In 2017, Huawei sued the California start-up, accusing Huang of breaching an employment contract and misappropriating trade secrets. CNEX countersued, claiming Huawei had attempted to steal its technology.

Last Wednesday, jurors found that, while Huang had violated his employment agreement, it was Huawei that tried to steal trade secrets. The jury did not award damages to either party.

“I think Huawei was taught a hard lesson by the good people of Texas, and I think we were an easy fight to pick,” Armstrong said in a “Squawk Alley” interview. “Even though we’re small, we fought a hard fight. And we won. That’ll send a pretty strong message to Huawei.”

CNEX launched in 2013 and possesses a memory-control technology, which Huawei sued for the rights to. CNEX is backed by Dell and Microsoft.

Meanwhile, Huawei has been a focus of the ongoing U.S.-China trade war, with the Trump administration in May effectively banning U.S. companies from doing business with the Chinese telecom company, citing national security reasons. President Donald Trump agreed to soften the U.S. stance toward Huawei at Saturday’s meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit in Japan.

Armstrong declined to say whether he viewed Huawei as a national security threat, but he did say the issue of stealing intellectual property is a Huawei problem, not a China one.

“There’s great Chinese companies that we would love to do business with that act with integrity,” Armstrong said. “Huawei is a specific case, there may be others, but I don’t think this is a country issue.”

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: jesse pound, kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theft, texas, startup, secret, chinese, jury, think, hard, trump, lesson, cnex, huawei, secrets, armstrong, huang, teaches, trade


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Suzy Welch: The life-changing lesson I learned from Warren Buffett

In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says an experience she once had with Buffett changed her career “forever.” Legendary investor Warren Buffett is known not only for his sage investing advice but for his personal advice as well . “Warren Buffett is known to be very nice,” says Welch. “It’s a simple mind shift, but transformative in all the right ways — thank you, Warren Buffett.” Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted b


In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says an experience she once had with Buffett changed her career “forever.” Legendary investor Warren Buffett is known not only for his sage investing advice but for his personal advice as well . “Warren Buffett is known to be very nice,” says Welch. “It’s a simple mind shift, but transformative in all the right ways — thank you, Warren Buffett.” Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted b
Suzy Welch: The life-changing lesson I learned from Warren Buffett Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, warren, learned, suzy, lesson, buffett, lifechanging, timer, forget, feel, egg, welch


Suzy Welch: The life-changing lesson I learned from Warren Buffett

Welch tells CNBC Make It that she and Buffett were seated next to each other at a mutual friend’s dinner party. Though she had met him a few times before, Welch says she was still thrilled as she “imagined an evening listening to the ‘Oracle of Omaha’ opine away.”

In fact, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says an experience she once had with Buffett changed her career “forever.”

Legendary investor Warren Buffett is known not only for his sage investing advice but for his personal advice as well .

“But no,” she says. “Just as we were about to sit down, Warren looked at me slyly and pulled from his pocket an egg timer, which he dramatically set for 15 minutes.”

Placing the egg timer between the two of them, Welch says Buffett told her, “that’s how long I get to talk with you before I lose you to your partner on your left. And not a minute shorter!”

She says the two chatted until the buzzer sounded, signaling that it was time for them to turn to their other side. Then, when the 15-minute timer went off again, Welch says Buffett turned to her and said, “Goodie, you’re back.”

“Warren Buffett is known to be very nice,” says Welch. “He was also the most important person in that room — and yet, he made me feel like I mattered as much as he did.”

She says her “egg buzzer encounter” with Buffett reminded her of Maya Angelou’s famous quote: “People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Welch says that after the dinner, she started to think more about how she made people feel when she was in the “power seat.”

“Did they feel heard? Seen? Valued?” she asked herself. “It’s a galvanizing question, isn’t it? Even if you’re not the boss, entering a conversation with humility makes you more of a person, not less.”

She adds that it also makes you “more generous, more human, more understood — and more respected yourself.”

“It’s a simple mind shift, but transformative in all the right ways — thank you, Warren Buffett.”

And if you want to incorporate this habit into your own life, she says, “you don’t even need an egg timer to do it.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Beatriz Bajuelos Castillo

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More from Suzy Welch:

3 surefire ways to turn your summer internship into a full-time job

How to know if you’re being set up to fail at work

2 strategies for surviving a micromanager—and 1 that will get you fired


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youre, warren, learned, suzy, lesson, buffett, lifechanging, timer, forget, feel, egg, welch


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Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college


“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college
Lesson ‘Shark Tank’ star Kevin O’Leary learned from mom, gave to kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


Lesson 'Shark Tank' star Kevin O'Leary learned from mom, gave to kids

“She said to me, ‘The dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says. “I said, ‘What’s that mean, mom?’ She said, ‘It means no more checks.’

“I said, ‘Mom, that’s a great poem, but I need some cash here.’ She said, ‘No, no, no, no. I’ve done my work. Now you do yours.’

“And that was very important to me.”

Being on his own forced O’Leary to hustle to achieve success: In 1986, O’Leary founded software company Softkey Software Products in his basement with no cash but a lot of hard work. He ultimately built that company into a huge business, later called The Learning Company, which he and his co-founders sold to the Mattel Toy Company for $4.2 billion in 1999.

The value of making it on your own is now something O’Leary now preaches too.

O’Leary recalls that after he became successful, he asked his mom if he could pay her back for the financial support she had given him throughout high school and college.

“She said, ‘No, I owed you that. And you should think about that for your children. Pass it on and pass it forward. But when they finish college, tell them the same thing — the dead bird under the nest never learned how to fly,'” O’Leary says.

“And that’s exactly what I told my kids.”

Indeed, O’Leary famously made his kids fly coach while he flew business class when they were growing up, and he cut them off financially after college.

“And [my kids] said the same thing to me: ‘That sucks,'” O’Leary says. “But now they’re off on their own, and they’re figuring it out. And I’m so proud of what my mother taught me.”

Don’t miss: Kevin O’Leary on college admissions scandal: ‘I’ll tell you who you really screwed: Your kid’

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Disclosure: CNBC owns the exclusive off-network cable rights to “Shark Tank.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: sarah berger, courtesy of kevin oleary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, tell, learned, tank, kids, thing, thats, lesson, kevin, mom, work, company, software, oleary, theyre, fly, gave, shark


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