73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey

This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day. The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%). With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information. If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for


This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day.
The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%).
With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information.
If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for
73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, rank, life, credit, survey, creditwise, card, youre, capital, finances, americans, according, score, users, stressed


73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey

If the state of your finances is stressing you out, you’re far from alone.

This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day. The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%).

Younger generations are even more stressed out about finances than older generations with the majority of Gen Z’ers (82%) and millennials (81%) saying finances are at least somewhat stressful.

The survey unsurprisingly found that major life events can trigger financial stress as well. More than half (62%) were stressed about their money in relationship to buying a house, 61% were stressed because of a car purchase.

Despite finances being a major cause of stress, respondents are optimistic about their financial future. Roughly two in five (42%) said they expect to be better off financially in a year from now.

However, they may not know how to achieve those goals. Only 16% of respondents are very familiar with how to improve their credit score, but more than half of the respondents (59%) are interested in learning more.

Capital One provides a free credit score and report dashboard, CreditWise. It’s free to use, and anyone can join — you don’t need to have a Capital One account.

With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information. There’s also a simulator feature that allows you to see how certain actions may impact your credit score, such as paying off debt, carrying a balance or applying for a loan. The simulator only provides estimates of the potential negative or positive impacts and the actual results may differ.

“There are millions of CreditWise users, and hundreds of thousands of those users who had a score of zero when they enrolled have since established a credit score,” Chris Gatz, head of CreditWise at Capital One, tells CNBC Select.

It can be smart to use a credit monitoring program to keep an eye on your credit score, as that three-digit number can have a big impact on the kind of credit cards you will qualify for. Typically, the higher your credit score, the better card offers you receive.

If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for the best rewards credit cards, such as the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, or a balance transfer credit card, such as the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, compared to someone who has bad credit.

If you’re credit is subpar, you’re not out of luck. Secured cards are a great way to build credit, and CNBC Select recommends the Discover it® Secured.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, rank, life, credit, survey, creditwise, card, youre, capital, finances, americans, according, score, users, stressed


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How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages

About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020. Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt. “Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate. Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your financesAny unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonu


About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020.
Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt.
“Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate.
Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your financesAny unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonu
How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alizah salario, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, money, life, stages, recession, mcbride, financial, recessionproof, ways, credit, unemployment, savings, control


How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages

About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020. But 40% of Americans aren’t financially ready for a downturn if one were to occur in the next six to 12 months, according to a new Bankrate survey of 2,605 adults. Three in 10 respondents (31%) said they have done nothing to prepare for a recession. Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt. “Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate. “We can’t control the economic environment, but we can take control of our finances.” Here’s how.

1. Add to your savings

Getting your finances recession-ready is an exercise in “getting back to the basics,” certified financial planner Shannah Compton Game, host of the Millennial Money podcast, told Grow earlier this year. Some of the key steps include building your cash reserves, getting your spending under control, and reviewing your investments. If your budget is really tight, you can still find creative ways to boost your savings, says McBride: “Any unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonus check, or something small, like a rebate, is money you can put into savings.” Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your finances

Any unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonus check, or something small, like a rebate, is money you can put into savings. Greg McBride Chief financial analyst, Bankrate.com

2. Manage your debt

Navigating a recession is tougher if you have debt payments to keep up with, like student loans, a mortgage, or credit card balances. Ahead of a downturn, it can help to focus on paying off high-interest debts and look into refinancing. You may also want to meet with a debt counselor if you’re struggling to come up with a repayment plan. Accelerating debt payments while the economy is still strong can also free up your borrowing capacity in case you’re really in a pinch if times get tough, says McBride. “If the savings are running low, and you still need money to get groceries or put gas in the car to go to a job interview, you’ll have the capacity [to use credit] for something that’s truly necessary.” Read more: 3 ways to manage your debt ahead of a possible recession

Comparing past recessions While the most recent recession was the longest since the Great Depression, a shorter one in the early ’80s saw higher unemployment rates. Recession length and peak unemployment rate since 1948 Social chart title Note: In some cases, the unemployment rate climbed higher after the recession officially ended. kiersten schmidt/grow National Bureau of Economic Research (recession duration); FactSet (unemployment rate)

3. Invest in your career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alizah salario, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, money, life, stages, recession, mcbride, financial, recessionproof, ways, credit, unemployment, savings, control


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High-tech firms aim to upend the insurance market — how to find if they’re the right fit for you

You need insurance for all types of things, from your health and life to your home and car. The new firms include Root, which uses smartphone technology in its car insurance business, and life-insurance company Ethos, which uses predictive analytics and data technology. Meanwhile, Lemonade, which specializes in renters and homeowners insurance, has raised $480 million so far, according to Crunchbase. Buying insurance online is the most popular method used by 18- to 25-year-olds, according to a S


You need insurance for all types of things, from your health and life to your home and car.
The new firms include Root, which uses smartphone technology in its car insurance business, and life-insurance company Ethos, which uses predictive analytics and data technology.
Meanwhile, Lemonade, which specializes in renters and homeowners insurance, has raised $480 million so far, according to Crunchbase.
Buying insurance online is the most popular method used by 18- to 25-year-olds, according to a S
High-tech firms aim to upend the insurance market — how to find if they’re the right fit for you Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seconds, theyre, technology, insurance, life, online, renters, uses, health, mobile, fit, upend, schreiber, aim, right, firms, market, hightech


High-tech firms aim to upend the insurance market — how to find if they're the right fit for you

You need insurance for all types of things, from your health and life to your home and car.

Yet wading through all your options could wind up leaving you thoroughly confused.

According to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) there were 5,964 insurers in the U.S. in 2018, with consumers paying $2.425 trillion in total premiums.

Among those insurers are new entrants, so-called disruptors — tech start-ups that have landed on the scene, promising an easier and faster process. The new firms include Root, which uses smartphone technology in its car insurance business, and life-insurance company Ethos, which uses predictive analytics and data technology. Both have both recently announced new rounds of funding.

Tech-centric Oscar Health, which started in 2012 and was No. 12 in CNBC’s 2018 Disruptor 50, has been slowly expanding offerings compliant with the Affordable Care Act. Meanwhile, Lemonade, which specializes in renters and homeowners insurance, has raised $480 million so far, according to Crunchbase.

“Consumers can buy insurance in a matter of seconds, on their smartphones, chatting to a chatbot,” Lemonade’s co-founder, Daniel Schreiber, told CNBC in May. The company, No. 37 on CNBC’s 2019 Disruptor 50 list, is powered by AI, chatbots and behavior economics.

“About a third of our claims are settled within about three or four seconds by a bot on your app,” Schreiber added.

It’s no surprise that more companies are going high-tech. Buying insurance online is the most popular method used by 18- to 25-year-olds, according to a September survey by Insurance.com.

Of the 500 people surveyed, 45% bought car insurance on a computer or mobile device, 59% went online to purchase health insurance, 54% got their renters insurance online and 46% bought life insurance on a computer or mobile device.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seconds, theyre, technology, insurance, life, online, renters, uses, health, mobile, fit, upend, schreiber, aim, right, firms, market, hightech


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Google appoints former Obama health official Karen DeSalvo to new chief health officer role

Google confirmed on Thursday that it’s hired Karen DeSalvo, a former health official in the Obama administration, as its first chief health officer. Google and parent company Alphabet are investing broadly in the health industry, from researching new drugs and devices to bolstering its cloud-computing business to serve more companies in the life sciences. Late last year, Google hired David Feinberg, who had served as CEO of Geisinger, to oversee its expansion in the $3 billion health care sector


Google confirmed on Thursday that it’s hired Karen DeSalvo, a former health official in the Obama administration, as its first chief health officer.
Google and parent company Alphabet are investing broadly in the health industry, from researching new drugs and devices to bolstering its cloud-computing business to serve more companies in the life sciences.
Late last year, Google hired David Feinberg, who had served as CEO of Geisinger, to oversee its expansion in the $3 billion health care sector
Google appoints former Obama health official Karen DeSalvo to new chief health officer role Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, appoints, division, role, karen, obama, officer, chief, medical, life, desalvo, hired, sciences, served, feinberg, health, google, official


Google appoints former Obama health official Karen DeSalvo to new chief health officer role

Google confirmed on Thursday that it’s hired Karen DeSalvo, a former health official in the Obama administration, as its first chief health officer.

The addition of DeSalvo, who’s spent the past two years teaching at the University of Texas at Austin’s Dell Medical School, comes weeks after Alphabet tapped former U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Robert M. Califf to lead the company’s health and strategy policy.

Both Califf and DeSalvo will start later this year.

Google and parent company Alphabet are investing broadly in the health industry, from researching new drugs and devices to bolstering its cloud-computing business to serve more companies in the life sciences. Late last year, Google hired David Feinberg, who had served as CEO of Geisinger, to oversee its expansion in the $3 billion health care sector.

Reporting to Feinberg, DeSalvo will advise Google on providers, doctors and nurses across the company’s cloud unit and Alphabet’s life sciences arm Verily, where she’s been on the advisory board. DeSalvo, who sits on a number of medical boards, previously served as assistant health secretary and national coordinator for health information technology in President Obama’s Health and Human Services department.

Feinberg has been consolidating teams across the company, including its hardware division and artificial intelligence division DeepMind, which announced its biggest breakthrough in health last month.

WATCH: The rise of deepfakes and what Facebook, Twitter and Google are doing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, appoints, division, role, karen, obama, officer, chief, medical, life, desalvo, hired, sciences, served, feinberg, health, google, official


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How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.” Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion. Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h


Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.
I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership.
“I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”
Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.
Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to h
How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


How Howard Schultz conquered self-doubt to build Starbucks into a $100 billion company

Despite having a net worth of more than $4 billion and being the driving force behind Starbucks for more than three decades, Howard Schultz says he’s just an average Joe, like you.

“I don’t have an MBA. I did not go to an Ivy League school,” Schultz tells Masterclass.com in 13-part series teaching business leadership. “I’m just a regular person just like you who had a dream to try and build a great, enduring company.”

Today, Starbucks has a market cap over $100 billion.

Schultz, who grew up poor and lived in public housing in Brooklyn, New York, bought the Seattle coffee franchise in 1987 for $3.8 million after finding investors (including Bill Gates’ dad) to help him out. He grew the company from 11 stores to more than 3,500 locations in over 75 countries.

Schultz, 66, who now serves as the Starbuck’s chairman emeritus after retiring as executive chairman in June of 2018, says the only difference between him and most people is that he fought off self-doubt and jumped in headfirst.

He says it’s okay to have self-doubt about your ability to succeed, raise money or even attract the right people at times. But under no circumstance can you ever have any self-doubt about “your commitment and conviction to do what you set out to do,” which for him was building Starbucks into an international brand.

Schultz goes on to say that there will be no “magical” moment, time or formula that will help you start your venture, you just have to do it “with great discipline and thoughtfulness.”

“There is no single textbook, there is no mentor, there is no primary tool to get you to jump in that pool other than your own courage and conviction of the idea and this moment in time for you and your family,” he tells Masterclass.com.

Schultz credits his success with Starbucks to his fierce determination and unwavering persistence.

“I willed it to happen,” Schultz writes in his memoir, “Pour Your Heart Into It.” “I took my life in my hands, learned from anyone I could, grabbed what opportunity I could, and molded my success step by step.”

Schultz does knowledge that entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone, but he still encourages people to live life to the fullest and not have any regrets.

“You’ve got to find your position in life. But if [entrepreneurship] is in your blood — and only you know if it is — then jump into the pool.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

Don’t miss: From summer janitor to CEO of Disney: What fueled Bob Iger’s rise to the top

Billionaire Tim Draper’s first job was selling apples for 5 cents—and it drove him to become a capitalist


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, build, selfdoubt, howard, life, schultz, help, grew, conquered, company, moment, 100, billion, success, jump, tells, starbucks


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Why Ali Wong says getting a prenup was ‘one of the greatest things that ever happened to me and my career’

Ali Wong doesn’t shy away from joking about how she “trapped” her husband. She’s joked onstage that, before getting married in 2014, she was forced by her husband’s family to sign a prenuptial agreement. (Hakuta grew up in a wealthy household and is the son of Japanese-American inventor and TV personality Ken Hakuta, also known as “Dr. “My father always praised ‘the gift of fear,'” she continues, “and that prenup scared the s— out of me. In the end, being forced to sign that prenup was one of


Ali Wong doesn’t shy away from joking about how she “trapped” her husband. She’s joked onstage that, before getting married in 2014, she was forced by her husband’s family to sign a prenuptial agreement. (Hakuta grew up in a wealthy household and is the son of Japanese-American inventor and TV personality Ken Hakuta, also known as “Dr. “My father always praised ‘the gift of fear,'” she continues, “and that prenup scared the s— out of me. In the end, being forced to sign that prenup was one of
Why Ali Wong says getting a prenup was ‘one of the greatest things that ever happened to me and my career’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, husband, hakuta, getting, wong, sign, things, greatest, happened, ali, prenup, career, living, life, forced, family, times


Why Ali Wong says getting a prenup was 'one of the greatest things that ever happened to me and my career'

Ali Wong doesn’t shy away from joking about how she “trapped” her husband. She talks about it at length in her 2016 debut Netflix special “Baby Cobra” and 2018 follow-up “Hard Knock Wife,” recounting how she met her husband, Justin Hakuta, at a friend’s wedding and proceeded to court the Fulbright scholar and Harvard Business School student while living in New York City.

The “trap” didn’t go off without a hitch, though. She’s joked onstage that, before getting married in 2014, she was forced by her husband’s family to sign a prenuptial agreement. (Hakuta grew up in a wealthy household and is the son of Japanese-American inventor and TV personality Ken Hakuta, also known as “Dr. Fad.”)

And as she reveals in her new book, it’s actually done wonders for her career.

“I was very motivated to make my own money because I signed a document specifically outlining how much I couldn’t depend on my husband,” she writes in “Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets and Advice for Living Your Best Life,” out Oct. 15. “My father always praised ‘the gift of fear,'” she continues, “and that prenup scared the s— out of me. In the end, being forced to sign that prenup was one of the greatest things that ever happened to me and my career.”

The 37-year-old entertainer’s memoir is written as a letter to her two young daughters, and she shares her thoughts on family, marriage, motherhood and the highs and lows of her career thus far. Her brutally honest brand of humor weaves in and out of stories that are at times laugh-out-loud funny, and other times vulnerable, as she imparts life lessons about growing up.

Jokes aside, Wong’s commitment to her work is underscored, as she tells stories about breaking into the San Francisco comedy scene, landing TV acting roles and joining “Fresh Off the Boat” as a staff writer in 2015.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, husband, hakuta, getting, wong, sign, things, greatest, happened, ali, prenup, career, living, life, forced, family, times


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Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B


In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B
Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

Police allow someone though the perimeter outside the Time Warner Center in New York City after a suspicious package was found inside CNN Headquarters, October 24, 2018.

Of all the brewing threats to America’s continuing economic prosperity, one of the most serious comes straight out of the police blotter. No, it’s not a rise in murders or other serious felonies. In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes.

And it could destroy the momentum for one of the country’s most powerful economic growth engines.

The trend started to take hold in New York in 2016, when the city council passed a law easing stricter arrest rules initiated during Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s administration in the 1990s. But these moves have now spread to cities like Seattle and Austin. And as many critics of the homeless crisis in Los Angeles and San Francisco will tell you, police in those cities have not been used to permanently crack down on the growing tent cities in those areas.

Relaxing arrest policies for minor offenses such as graffiti, petty vandalism, public urination and public transportation fare-beating are often seen as compassionate or cost-cutting. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? There are even a number of fair-minded arguments and studies that say easing up on minor misdemeanor arrests won’t spark new crime waves or lead to much more serious felony crimes.

Those arguments miss the point. Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. It’s about saving and resurrecting economic opportunity.

Opponents of these quality of life crackdowns point to the fact that arrests for these crimes disproportionately hit African-Americans and other minorities. This is a legitimate concern too often dismissed by conservatives and law-and-order types. In fact, they sometimes come off as only being interested in cleaning up inner-city areas so they and their families can feel safer once in a while when they decide to go downtown to see a show or visit a trendy restaurant.

Yet the critics of these policies from the left and the right frequently miss the fact that petty crime enforcement benefits minority communities much more than anyone else. It’s the black and Latino neighborhoods that are being vandalized by “broken window” crimes, not the more affluent parts of town or the richer suburbs. Yes, the people arrested for these crimes are likelier to be minorities, but the economic victims are even more likely to be minorities. In short, quality of life crime enforcement isn’t a war on America’s minorities. It’s a war for them.

The transformation of New York in the 1990s from a high-crime, high-homicide-rate locale is really a story about the changes in several individual neighborhoods once deemed to be off-limits to decent people and businesses alike. Remember that even during the worst of times, Midtown Manhattan, Wall Street and the fancy apartment towers of Park and 5th Avenues were still always valuable and desirable addresses.

But when Harlem, Hell’s Kitchen, Williamsburg, the Lower East Side, and Bedford-Stuyvesant started to become hot areas, it was clear the majority of the old fears had melted away. Each one of those neighborhoods had been written off for years as too dangerous to invest in despite their attractive proximity to the established money-making centers in Manhattan.

Quality of life and community policing transformed the image of those neighborhoods and helped prove to the business world that the old risks and fears weren’t as serious anymore. New York’s urban resurgence was not isolated in the 1990s. It was a major trend across the country and was a significant factor in that decade’s economic boom.

Here’s the kicker: the quality of life enforcement in those neighborhoods in the 1990s came mostly at the request of the local residents and remaining business owners. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police.

By contrast, New York’s economic and cultural decline began in the mid-1950s when then Mayor Robert Wagner relaxed police enforcement of quality of life crimes. As documented in the brilliant book “The Ungovernable City,” by Vincent Cannato, Wagner’s ill-advised withdrawal of police presence began on the city’s subways which serviced many of the above-named neighborhoods. This ended up importing more economically devastating crime to those areas.

Reopening these areas to more economic opportunity starts with instilling a new confidence for entrepreneurs considering moving into these areas. Economic growth occurs when money is made where it hadn’t been made before. There are still many crime-ridden areas blighted for years by fear and neglect in America. These places need more police attention and care, not less.

These facts shine a light on another cultural and economic misconception that may be at the root of these ill-advised leniency policies.

Many of us have been taught since birth that much of the reason for crime, terrorism, drug abuse, etc. is because of poverty. Poor people with few prospects are supposedly more likely to turn to crime to get by and as a way to lash out at their difficult lot in life.

But the truth is the exact opposite, and not just because we know that billionaires are often caught committing just as many serious crimes as poorer folks. Poor people are the most affected by crime because more crime occurs in their neighborhoods.

These Americans and their communities remain a largely untapped resource for the U.S. economy. It would be a shame to rob them of their rightful place in spurring more economic growth all because of misplaced and misapplied compassion.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


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100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals

The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals. To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financia


The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals. To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financia
100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: jim pavia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, meet, financial, clients, complicated, help, advisory, advisor, client, goals, firms, 100, advisors, life


100 top firms helping clients meet their financial goals

It’s evident that the financial advice business has evolved over the years. The industry continues to mature, and financial advisors are always finding ways to address and meet the demands of today’s investors.

In fact, given the increased complexity of everyone’s financial lives, investors are eager to seek some help and education regarding income investment planning and strategies. Obviously, advisors can play a key role in helping clients grow and protect their wealth. With that said, the CNBC FA 100 recognizes those advisory firms that continue to find ways to work closely with clients to help them mitigate risk and meet their financial goals.

To be sure, financial advisory firms face a great deal of competition, which makes it even more important for firms to focus on growing their client base. To remain competitive, financial advisory firms continue to develop strategies to consistently deliver a great client experience. From developing creative client segmentation practices to intergenerational engagement, which helps advisors serve their client’s children, savvy advisory firms are always looking to find client-focused strategies.

That’s good news for today’s investor who may be considering some professional financial guidance.

More from Financial Advisor 100:

CNBC FA 100 2019 list of top-rated financial advisory firms

What inspired top advisors to help others manage money

10 years on, ‘personal touch’ will dominate financial advice

You may be at the point in your life where you have started to accumulate a decent amount of money in a qualified retirement plan. Or, maybe your life has become a bit more complicated. As we get older, of course, the more complicated our financial lives become. Perhaps you are getting married, starting a family or looking to buy a home or you received an inheritance.

You’ll want to work with someone you can relate to and connect with, someone who understands you and is concerned about you and your life and money issues. A financial advisor can help you make sense of all of these issues. Financial advisors can holistically examine your financial situation and help you craft a plan to ensure you make decisions that are in line with your personal financial goals.

Finding that right advisor to help with your financial needs and goals can be complicated. There are so many variables to consider.

Many advisors may use a high assets under management metric as a selling point when marketing themselves to potential investors. However, AUM isn’t the whole story when a potential client is determining which financial advisory firm is right for them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: jim pavia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, helping, meet, financial, clients, complicated, help, advisory, advisor, client, goals, firms, 100, advisors, life


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From summer janitor to CEO of Disney: What fueled Bob Iger’s rise to the top

As CEO of Disney, Bob Iger has been sitting pretty for close to 15 years. Iger says he watched his dad bounce from job to job due to his troubles “regulating his moods.” And because of both his father’s encouragement and employment troubles, Iger started working many odd jobs at the age of 13 to jump-start his career. “I started working in eighth grade, shoveling snow and babysitting and working as a stock boy in a hardware store,” Iger says. Then at 15, he says he got a job as the summer janito


As CEO of Disney, Bob Iger has been sitting pretty for close to 15 years. Iger says he watched his dad bounce from job to job due to his troubles “regulating his moods.” And because of both his father’s encouragement and employment troubles, Iger started working many odd jobs at the age of 13 to jump-start his career. “I started working in eighth grade, shoveling snow and babysitting and working as a stock boy in a hardware store,” Iger says. Then at 15, he says he got a job as the summer janito
From summer janitor to CEO of Disney: What fueled Bob Iger’s rise to the top Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, fueled, father, gum, rise, igers, job, summer, work, disney, bob, iger, started, desks, working, ceo, janitor


From summer janitor to CEO of Disney: What fueled Bob Iger's rise to the top

As CEO of Disney, Bob Iger has been sitting pretty for close to 15 years.

Last year, he earned nearly $66 million — about 1,000 times more than his typical employee earns— which sparked some controversy about ballooning executive pay. What’s more, Forbes estimates his net worth at around $690 million.

But Iger, 68, wasn’t always part of the 1%; he had to start at the bottom just like most people, according to his new book, “The Ride of a Lifetime.”

Iger writes that he grew up in a small, mostly working-class town on Long Island, New York called Oceanside. His mother was a stay-at-home mom, while his dad worked in advertising. Iger says he watched his dad bounce from job to job due to his troubles “regulating his moods.” He was later diagnosed with manic depression.

“As I grew older, I became more aware of my father’s disappointment in himself. He’d led a life that was unsatisfying to him and was a failure in his own eyes. It’s part of why he pushed us to work so hard and be productive so that we might be successful in a way that he never was,” Iger writes.

As a child, Iger remembers his father passing his bedroom at night to make sure, he was “spending time productively,” as Iger says his father put it — that meant reading or doing homework or engaging in something that would “better” them in helping to reach their goals.

And because of both his father’s encouragement and employment troubles, Iger started working many odd jobs at the age of 13 to jump-start his career.

“I started working in eighth grade, shoveling snow and babysitting and working as a stock boy in a hardware store,” Iger says.

Then at 15, he says he got a job as the summer janitor in his school district. The position involved cleaning all the heaters and desks in every classroom. He says he had to make sure all the desks were gum-free before the school year started.

“Cleaning gum from the bottoms of a thousand desks can build character or at least tolerance for monotony, or something,” he writes.

(In fact, he’s not the only CEO to scrape gum: CEO and co-founder of private investment firm RSE Ventures Matt Higgins’ first job was scraping gum off the bottoms of chairs at McDonald’s, and he says it taught him about doing your best at everything.)

Later, while Iger attended Ithaca College in upstate New York, he spent nearly every weekend night his freshman and sophomore year making pizza at the local Pizza Hut.

During that time, Iger says, something clicked and he was determined to work harder than ever before, and learn as much as possible, so that he didn’t have the same sense of regrets that his father had around his career.

“I didn’t have a clear idea of what success meant, no specific vision of being wealthy or powerful, but I was determined not to live a life of disappointment,” he writes.

From that moment on, Iger told himself that whatever shape his life took, he was never going to toil in frustration or lack of fulfillment.

In 1974, at the age of 23, Iger started his career at ABC Television as a studio supervisor after being a weatherman and a feature news reporter at a tiny cable TV station in Ithaca.

Over the course of the next 31 years, he would hold more than 20 different positions at ABC before being named the CEO of The Walt Disney Corporation in 2005.

“I’ve been the lowliest crew member working on a daytime soap opera and run a network that produced some of the most innovative television (and one of the infamous flops) of all time. I’ve twice been on the side of the company being taken over, and I’ve acquired and assimilated several others, among them Pixar, Marvel, Lucas-film, and, most recently, 21st Century Fox,” he says.

And through it all, he credits his father the most, for encouraging him to work hard and stay productive in achieving his goals.

“I do know that so many of the traits that served me well in my career started with him. I hope that he understood, that, too.”

Don’t miss: Forget self-help: Some business execs are paying up to $1,000 an hour for hypnosis

Whole Foods CEO on plant-based meat boom: Good for the environment but not for your health


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, life, fueled, father, gum, rise, igers, job, summer, work, disney, bob, iger, started, desks, working, ceo, janitor


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This self-made millionaire says the key to his success is eating only fruit until noon

1 thing that has changed my life — and I know this sounds crazy — but I only eat fruit until noon every day,” Itzler tells CNBC Make It. Itzler says the book challenges the reader to only eat fruit until noon for 10 days and then on day 11 go back to your regular breakfast. There has been controversy over Diamond’s Fit for Life diet, especially around the idea of food combining and eating food on an empty stomach. “I would never recommend that my patients eat only fruit until noon. Apple co-foun


1 thing that has changed my life — and I know this sounds crazy — but I only eat fruit until noon every day,” Itzler tells CNBC Make It. Itzler says the book challenges the reader to only eat fruit until noon for 10 days and then on day 11 go back to your regular breakfast. There has been controversy over Diamond’s Fit for Life diet, especially around the idea of food combining and eating food on an empty stomach. “I would never recommend that my patients eat only fruit until noon. Apple co-foun
This self-made millionaire says the key to his success is eating only fruit until noon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eat, millionaire, food, jobs, key, life, diet, book, eating, fruit, itzler, success, noon, selfmade


This self-made millionaire says the key to his success is eating only fruit until noon

In 2008, he married Spanx founder and billionaire Sara Blakely and by 2015, the couple became co-owners of the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks. They also have four children together.

In his 30s, he became an entrepreneur and helped build Marquis Jets , one of the largest private jet leasing companies in the world, which he later sold to a unit of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway for an undisclosed amount. Itzler was also a partner in Zico Coconut Water, which was acquired by Coca-Cola in 2013 for an undisclosed sum.

When he was in his 20s, he was a successful rapper, who appeared frequently on MTV. (His first single, “Shake It Like A White Girl,” reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1991.)

Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx, and her husband Jesse Itzler attend the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference on July 9, 2015 in Sun Valley, Idaho.

But Itzler says none of those successes would have happened without the strict diet and wellness routine that he has been doing for 30 years.

“For me, the No. 1 thing that has changed my life — and I know this sounds crazy — but I only eat fruit until noon every day,” Itzler tells CNBC Make It.

Itzler says when he was 21, broke and living on his friends’ couches, he read a book called “Fit for Life” by Harvey Diamond.

“I was about to run my first marathon and I wasn’t a runner, so I looking for anything that would give me an edge,” he says.

Itzler says the book challenges the reader to only eat fruit until noon for 10 days and then on day 11 go back to your regular breakfast.

“So I did it, and on day 11, after 10 days of fruit, I went back to my regular breakfast, which was things like oatmeal, eggs, bagel and bacon and I felt terrible and that was it. I never went back,” Itzler says.

In “Fit for Life,” which was first published in 1985 and re-released in 2010, Diamond promotes a diet based on raw fruits and vegetables, with fruits to be only consumed on an empty stomach in the morning. The book also says animal protein should not be combined with complex carbohydrates such as beans or whole grains.

There has been controversy over Diamond’s Fit for Life diet, especially around the idea of food combining and eating food on an empty stomach. In a study published in the April 2000 issue of the International Journal of Obesity, researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland found that having a low-calorie diet with a mix of food is much more effective than eating foods in certain combinations.

And Erin FitzGerald, RD and assistant clinical nutrition manager at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City tells CNBC Make It that while it’s generally not harmful to only eat fruit until noon, she doesn’t recommend it.

“I would never recommend that my patients eat only fruit until noon. If anything, we need to ‘break’ our overnight fast with protein and/or healthy fat. Fruit can be a healthy part of our mornings, but eating a lot of fruit in the morning can potentially harm some individuals — in particular, those who have diabetes or who are at risk for diabetes,” FitzGerald says.

Still, Itzler says for him, when he eats only fruit until noon he experiences higher energy levels and thinks more clearly, because according to him it gives his digestive system a break. But there is no scientific research to back up what Itlzer says.

After 12 p.m, Itzler says he eats super clean meals that are 80% raw. But he does treat himself to an occasional pizza or sushi roll while eating with his wife and four kids.

Itzler isn’t the only entrepreneur, who has experimented with fruit-related diet.

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ was at times a frutarian, eating mostly fruit as well as some nuts, seeds and grains. Jobs’ was inspired to do a fruit-based diet after reading the book “Mucusless Diet Healing System” by Arnold Ehret in college, according to Walter Isaacson’s 2011 biography “Steve Jobs.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eat, millionaire, food, jobs, key, life, diet, book, eating, fruit, itzler, success, noon, selfmade


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