Drug kingpin El Chapo sentenced to life in prison, must forfeit $12.6 billion

Joaquin Guzman Loera, also known as ‘El Chapo’ is transported to Maximum Security Prison of El Altiplano in Mexico City, Mexico on January 08, 2016. The Mexican drug lord known as “El Chapo” was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison plus thirty years at a hearing where he accused the U.S. government of corruption and of torturing him during his confinement. El Chapo, whose real name is Joaquin Guzman Loera, also was ordered to forfeit $12.6 billion during his sentencing in U.S. District Court in


Joaquin Guzman Loera, also known as ‘El Chapo’ is transported to Maximum Security Prison of El Altiplano in Mexico City, Mexico on January 08, 2016. The Mexican drug lord known as “El Chapo” was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison plus thirty years at a hearing where he accused the U.S. government of corruption and of torturing him during his confinement. El Chapo, whose real name is Joaquin Guzman Loera, also was ordered to forfeit $12.6 billion during his sentencing in U.S. District Court in
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: tucker higgins dan mangan, tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, justice, forfeit, drug, cogan, according, mexico, billion, 126, trial, guzman, york, victims, chapo, prison, kingpin, el, life


Drug kingpin El Chapo sentenced to life in prison, must forfeit $12.6 billion

Joaquin Guzman Loera, also known as ‘El Chapo’ is transported to Maximum Security Prison of El Altiplano in Mexico City, Mexico on January 08, 2016.

The Mexican drug lord known as “El Chapo” was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison plus thirty years at a hearing where he accused the U.S. government of corruption and of torturing him during his confinement.

El Chapo, whose real name is Joaquin Guzman Loera, also was ordered to forfeit $12.6 billion during his sentencing in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, New York.

Judge Brian Cogan, who cited what he called Guzman’s “overwhelming evil” in announcing the mandated sentence, will determine later how much he must pay in restitution.

The kingpin, who had twice escaped maximum security prisons in Mexico, was convicted earlier this year of presiding over a vast criminal operation, the Sinaloa Cartel, which funneled immense quantities of narcotics, including heroin and methamphetamine, into the United States.

Guzman did not testify during the three-month trial, but broke his silence Wednesday.

He claimed, in a tear-choked statement, that he had been denied justice during his trial and confinement in New York City.

“Since the government will send me to a jail where my name will not ever be heard again, I take this opportunity to say: There was no justice here,” El Chapo told Cogan, according to the New York Daily News.

“I drink unsanitary water, no air or sunlight, and the air pumped in makes my ears and throat hurt. In order to sleep, I put toilet paper in my ears. My wife had not been allowed to visit, and I can’t hug my daughters,” he said, according to NBC News. “This has been psychological, emotional and mental torture 24 hours a day.”

“My case was stained and you denied me a fair trial when the world was watching. What happened here is the U.S. is not better than any other corrupt country,” Guzman added.

Guzman spoke in Spanish. His comments were translated by one of his lawyers.

The defense indicated to Cogan that they plan to appeal on the grounds of juror misconduct, according to Vice News, which was at the hearing.

A juror told that news outlet in February that jurors violated the judge’s orders barring them from following the case in the media.

“What occurred here was not justice. How we treat our most reviled is a measuring stick for our own society,” defense attorney Jeffrey Lichtman said, according to NBC News.

But prosecutors said that Guzman was “uniquely deserving” of the harsh sentence.

“There were countless victims of his orders to kill,” prosecutor Gina Parlovecchio said. “He has shown no remorse.”

One of Guzman’s alleged victims, Andrea Velez Fernandez, spoke at the sentencig.

“Today I come here a miracle of god,” Velez Fernandez said. “Mr. Guzman used me as bait to kidnap someone in Ecuador. He offered one million dollars to Hells Angels to end my life. Fortunately I found out and escaped with the help of the FBI.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: tucker higgins dan mangan, tucker higgins, dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, justice, forfeit, drug, cogan, according, mexico, billion, 126, trial, guzman, york, victims, chapo, prison, kingpin, el, life


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‘My life has no meaning.’ Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing

A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago. Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It fol


A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago. Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It fol
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, officials, house, crashes, aviation, man, flight, meaning, killed, slams, family, boeing, max, 737, crash, njoroge, life


'My life has no meaning.' Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing

Paul Njoroge, representing the families of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, testifies before a House Transportation and Infrastructure Aviation Subcommittee hearing on “State of Aviation Safety” in the aftermath of two deadly Boeing 737 MAX crashes since October, in Washington D.C., July 17, 2019.

A man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago.

Paul Njoroge lost his wife, three small children and his mother-in-law on Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a Boeing 737 Max 8 that crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board. It followed the crash of another Boeing 737 Max, Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia, in October. All 189 people on that flight were killed.

The twin crashes prompted aviation officials around the world to ground the jets in mid-March. Investigators have implicated an anti-stall system in both crashes. Boeing has developed a fix for the software to make it less aggressive and give pilots greater control of the aircraft, a newer version of Boeing’s workhorse 737 that’s been flying since the 1960s. Regulators have not said when they will allow the planes to fly again.

The House aviation panel is hearing from Njoroge as well as well as union officials representing pilots, mechanics and flight attendants at its third hearing on the 737 Max crashes.

“I miss their laughter, their playfulness, their touch,” Njoroge said of his family in written testimony. “I am empty. I feel that I should have been on that plane with them. My life has no meaning. It is difficult for me to think of anything else but the horror they must have felt.”

Lawmakers have not yet questioned Boeing officials, engineers or whistleblowers, and Njoroge urged the House panel to do so.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hearing, officials, house, crashes, aviation, man, flight, meaning, killed, slams, family, boeing, max, 737, crash, njoroge, life


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Recession fears rise for middle-class families

Middle-class Americans are less optimistic about their economic prospects than they were just six months ago, according to a new report from CUNA Mutual Group. A separate report by Allianz Life found that 48% said they fear a major recession, up from 46% in the first quarter of 2019 and 44% one year ago. “Americans keep hearing that this is the longest economic expansion in history,” said Steven Rick, CUNA Mutual’s chief economist. CUNA Mutual Group surveyed more than 1,200 adults with an annual


Middle-class Americans are less optimistic about their economic prospects than they were just six months ago, according to a new report from CUNA Mutual Group. A separate report by Allianz Life found that 48% said they fear a major recession, up from 46% in the first quarter of 2019 and 44% one year ago. “Americans keep hearing that this is the longest economic expansion in history,” said Steven Rick, CUNA Mutual’s chief economist. CUNA Mutual Group surveyed more than 1,200 adults with an annual
Recession fears rise for middle-class families Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allianz, yesterdaymiddleclass, families, polled, cuna, life, feel, fears, report, mutual, middleclass, economic, recession, adults, rise


Recession fears rise for middle-class families

The average family doesn’t feel as good today as yesterday.

Middle-class Americans are less optimistic about their economic prospects than they were just six months ago, according to a new report from CUNA Mutual Group.

Although the majority of those polled said they feel relatively stable overall, they graded their chances of achieving the American dream as a “C,” down from a “B-minus” in the fall, the insurance provider found. Close to half were increasingly concerned about an upcoming recession.

A separate report by Allianz Life found that 48% said they fear a major recession, up from 46% in the first quarter of 2019 and 44% one year ago.

“Americans keep hearing that this is the longest economic expansion in history,” said Steven Rick, CUNA Mutual’s chief economist.

“People’s expectations are that we are due” for a recession.

CUNA Mutual Group surveyed more than 1,200 adults with an annual income between $35,000 and $100,000 in May. Allianz Life polled more than 1,000 adults in the same month.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, allianz, yesterdaymiddleclass, families, polled, cuna, life, feel, fears, report, mutual, middleclass, economic, recession, adults, rise


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‘Strictly Dumpling’ YouTuber Mike Chen’s best and ‘most expensive’ food day ever

Food vlogger Mike Chen has had a lot of memorable meals — from an all-you-can-eat lobster buffet in Las Vegas to a massive, 5.5-pound gyoza dumpling in Tokyo. Chen, who started making YouTube food videos six years ago, actually runs six different YouTube channels, with more than 5 million followers overall, including “Beyond Science, ” where he explores “food, news, Chinese culture and mysterious phenomenons.” Chen tells CNBC Make It that he started making YouTube food videos in 2013, “because f


Food vlogger Mike Chen has had a lot of memorable meals — from an all-you-can-eat lobster buffet in Las Vegas to a massive, 5.5-pound gyoza dumpling in Tokyo. Chen, who started making YouTube food videos six years ago, actually runs six different YouTube channels, with more than 5 million followers overall, including “Beyond Science, ” where he explores “food, news, Chinese culture and mysterious phenomenons.” Chen tells CNBC Make It that he started making YouTube food videos in 2013, “because f
‘Strictly Dumpling’ YouTuber Mike Chen’s best and ‘most expensive’ food day ever Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: emma fierberg tom huddleston jr, emma fierberg, tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chen, life, chens, videos, ive, expensive, wagyu, best, day, meal, dumpling, mike, strictly, youtube, youtuber, food


'Strictly Dumpling' YouTuber Mike Chen's best and 'most expensive' food day ever

Food vlogger Mike Chen has had a lot of memorable meals — from an all-you-can-eat lobster buffet in Las Vegas to a massive, 5.5-pound gyoza dumpling in Tokyo. As the host of “Strictly Dumpling, ” the food reviews YouTube channel that has nearly 2.6 million subscribers, Chen, 38, regularly attracts millions of viewers per post with videos showing him trying foods around the world, from “legendary” ramen in Japan to McDonald’s in India or Vietnamese street food. Chen, who started making YouTube food videos six years ago, actually runs six different YouTube channels, with more than 5 million followers overall, including “Beyond Science, ” where he explores “food, news, Chinese culture and mysterious phenomenons.” Born in China but raised in the U.S., Chen is a former Morgan Stanley financial analyst who left that job after a year, in 2006. He now works for the non-profit media company NTD Television, where he serves as the head of digital strategy, according to his LinkedIn page. Chen tells CNBC Make It that he started making YouTube food videos in 2013, “because food is the love of my life.” “I’ve always felt that the best way to explore a new culture is taking a bite out of it,” Chen says. “Everywhere in the world food is both historical and modern and encompasses the people, the land and the essence of its cultural identity.”

Recently, Chen sat down with CNBC Make It to talk about his favorite hacks for finding great food while traveling, and the best and “most expensive food day” of his life in 2017, when he spent nearly $1,000. CNBC Make It: What’s the best meal you’ve ever had? Mike Chen: It’s the best meal I’ve ever had, it’s just purely because it was the first meal I’ve ever had of that particular dish. And it was so mind-blowingly good. I will never forget the day I had an A5-grade Wagyu steak in Kobe, Japan. I mean, I had that thing for lunch, and it changed my life. It changed my everything. I mean, my soul is like different now, because the Wagyu did stuff to it that is just miraculous. And then after lunch I said, “You know what? For dinner, I also want Wagyu.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: emma fierberg tom huddleston jr, emma fierberg, tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chen, life, chens, videos, ive, expensive, wagyu, best, day, meal, dumpling, mike, strictly, youtube, youtuber, food


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These are the best places to live in America in 2019

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being


Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being
These are the best places to live in America in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
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These are the best places to live in America in 2019

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If you could live anywhere in America, where would that be? By the numbers, these are the states that offer the best quality of life. That’s because they offer everything people yearn for: job opportunities, affordable housing, great schools, a low cost of living, affordable health care and a clean environment. Good quality of life is also good business. What better selling point could there be for a company looking to attract the best talent than to offer a great location for employees to settle down and raise a family. In this tight labor market, companies are increasingly realizing how important this is for their strategic growth plans. It is why Quality of Life is one of the key categories worth 300 out of 2,500 points in CNBC’s annual America’s Top States for Business 2019 rankings. We use hard data to evaluate all 50 states as places to live — factors including crime rates, local attractions, environmental quality and inclusiveness as measured by legal protections written into state laws.

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year.

10. Massachusetts

People running near Boston Harbor and Financial District at sunrise in Boston, Massachusetts. Prasit photo | Moment | Getty Images

Fewer than 3% of residents in the Bay State are without health insurance. That is the lowest uninsured rate in the nation, and it helps explain why this is one of America’s healthiest states. But that is not the only reason Massachusetts is a great place to live. Local attractions abound, from historic Boston and scenic Cape Cod in the east, to the beautiful Berkshires in the west. Boston prides itself as the Cradle of Liberty, and strong legal protections help ensure that freedom in Massachusetts applies to all. But Boston is also the cradle of some polluted air, hurting the state’s environmental quality. 2019 Quality of Life score: 217 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, attractions, inclusiveness

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 10

9. Utah

Hiker in Arches Park Moab, Utah. Sportstock | E+ | Getty Images

The Beehive State gets its nickname from the industriousness of its citizens. Utahans not only work hard, they apparently love their work. According to Gallup’s 2018 Wellbeing Index, nowhere in the continental United States do people feel better about their careers. As busy as people are in Utah, they still find time to take care of themselves. They exercise frequently, and obesity rates are low. But air quality leaves a bit to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, well-being

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 12

7. (tie) Montana

Trail running in Big Sky. Jordan Siemens | Taxi | Getty Images

They call Montana Big Sky Country because all those unobstructed views really do make the sky seem bigger. And it turns out that big sky — and everything beneath it — contains the cleanest air in the nation according to the American Lung Association. Montana is a healthy, inclusive state, and crime is low. The state is lacking somewhat in attractions, at least in terms of places frequented by tourists. But if you are looking for breathtaking views, majestic mountains and crystal-clear waters — oh, and that big sky — this may be the place for you. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Air quality, health

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 7

7. (tie) Colorado

Skiing the Rockies in Colorado Getty Images

The Centennial State is home to rich natural beauty, vibrant cities, and robust inclusiveness provisions firmly enshrined in state law. Coloradans are healthy. Only 22.6% of the population is obese, the lowest rate in the nation. Air quality could be better, and the crime rate is slightly worse than the national average. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 9

5. (tie) Washington

A couple enjoy an extended hike in the Pacific Northwest RyanJLane | E+ | Getty Images

The Evergreen State is among America’s healthiest states, and its people are the most physically active. Who would not want to get out and enjoy a state with such natural beauty and so much to do. Washington prides itself on inclusiveness, with strong protections built into state law. Crime is low, but air quality may leave something to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Health, inclusiveness, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

5. (tie) New Hampshire

White Mountains, New Hampshire Greg Dale | National Geographic Image Collection | Getty Images

With its famous motto, “Live Free or Die,” it stands to reason that the Granite State is among America’s most inclusive. Freedom also includes security. New Hampshire enjoys the third lowest violent crime rate in the nation. The state also boasts the nation’s lowest child poverty rate. On the other hand, air quality can suffer, partly due to the state’s proximity to Boston. And the quiet life here means New Hampshire can sometimes lack things to do. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, crime rate

Weaknesses: Air quality, attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

4. North Dakota

The International Peace Garden along the US-Canada border in North Dakota. The central division divides Canada (right) from the USA (left). Photo: Dig Deeper | Wikipedia

The Peace Garden State derives its nickname from the International Peace Garden straddling the U.S.-Canadian border, a project that has its roots at the International Gardeners Association convention exactly 90 years ago. But the term “peace garden” could also refer to the idyllic lifestyle in this state. The crime rate is low, the population is healthy and happy, and anti-discrimination laws are stronger than most. But other than the aforementioned International Peace Garden, attractions can be sparse. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)

Strengths: Well-being, air quality, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 4

3. Minnesota

Couple cross country skiing on a north woods trail. JMichl | iStock | Getty Images

One of the many features of the North Star state is what the locals call “Minnesota Nice,” which is exactly what it sounds like. Minnesotans are welcoming and inclusive, as evidenced by thorough legal protections against discrimination. Crime rates are low, the population is healthy, and the air is clean. We don’t factor weather into our rankings because it is too subjective. But it is worth pointing out that while winters can be brutal here, Minnesotans not only adapt to the frigid weather; they flourish in it. 2019 Quality of Life score: 259 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, air quality, crime rate

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 3

2. Vermont

Man hiking in Vermont during Autumn Getty Images

The Green Mountain State has the nation’s second-lowest crime rate, inclusive state laws, and a healthy population. Vermont rode those attributes to a first-place finish in Quality of Life in 2018. The state still offers an enviable quality of life, but it slipped just enough in terms of air quality and its citizens’ perceived well-being in 2019 to drop out of the top spot. Vermont’s one discernible weakness is the fact that it offers few popular tourist attractions, but many people here would consider that a positive. 2019 Quality of Life score: 262 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Crime rate, health, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 1

1. Hawaii

Woman Kayaking, Oahu, Hawaii darekm101 | RooM | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, best, states, crime, state, score, live, air, getty, places, america, life, 2019, points


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US life expectancy has been declining. Here’s why

The average life expectancy in the U.S. has been on the decline for three consecutive years. Before the recent decline, life expectancy had been steadily rising in the U.S. — which is to be expected of an advanced nation, particularly one that spends more money per citizen on health care than any other country. A study projected the U.K. lifespan will shorten by about five months. While life expectancy is still on the rise in France, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands, those countries have also


The average life expectancy in the U.S. has been on the decline for three consecutive years. Before the recent decline, life expectancy had been steadily rising in the U.S. — which is to be expected of an advanced nation, particularly one that spends more money per citizen on health care than any other country. A study projected the U.K. lifespan will shorten by about five months. While life expectancy is still on the rise in France, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands, those countries have also
US life expectancy has been declining. Here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decline, expected, lifespan, yearsa, health, worldwidebefore, life, declining, heres, expectancy, consecutive, world


US life expectancy has been declining. Here's why

The average life expectancy in the U.S. has been on the decline for three consecutive years.

A baby born in 2017 is expected to live to be 78.6 years old, which is down from 78.7 the year before, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

The last three years represent the longest consecutive decline in the American lifespan at birth since the period between 1915 and 1918, which included World War I and the Spanish Flu pandemic, events that killed many millions worldwide.

Before the recent decline, life expectancy had been steadily rising in the U.S. — which is to be expected of an advanced nation, particularly one that spends more money per citizen on health care than any other country.

The U.S. isn’t alone. A study projected the U.K. lifespan will shorten by about five months. While life expectancy is still on the rise in France, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands, those countries have also seen a sharp slowdown.

While there’s no single cause for the decline in the U.S., a report by the CDC highlights three factors contributing to the decline.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: uptin saiidi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decline, expected, lifespan, yearsa, health, worldwidebefore, life, declining, heres, expectancy, consecutive, world


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How student loans are making some people abandon their dreams

Every day the 27-year-old comes home from his job as a supervisor at a big-box retailer and heads right to his bedroom. He was thrilled — until he saw his monthly student loan bill. Instead of following his dreams, he now works as a supermarket manager (where he makes a higher salary than he would as a trainer) and lives at home. “He thinks his life is over,” O’Mara said. “He’s 27, and he thinks his life is over.”


Every day the 27-year-old comes home from his job as a supervisor at a big-box retailer and heads right to his bedroom. He was thrilled — until he saw his monthly student loan bill. Instead of following his dreams, he now works as a supermarket manager (where he makes a higher salary than he would as a trainer) and lives at home. “He thinks his life is over,” O’Mara said. “He’s 27, and he thinks his life is over.”
How student loans are making some people abandon their dreams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: annie nova
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How student loans are making some people abandon their dreams

Mary O’Mara is worried about her son.

Every day the 27-year-old comes home from his job as a supervisor at a big-box retailer and heads right to his bedroom. He doesn’t emerge until the morning. “He just sleeps,” O’Mara, 62, said. “He’s so depressed.”

That’s because his life wasn’t supposed to unfold this way.

At Rutgers University, he majored in marine science and minored in environmental protection policy. On internships, he traveled to Barbados and fought to protect turtles from poachers; in Key West, Florida, he nursed sick dolphins back to health. “From a child, he loved the ocean,” O’Mara said. “He’s a really smart kid.”

When he graduated college, he was offered a position in Florida, training dolphins. He was thrilled — until he saw his monthly student loan bill. It was more than $1,000.

Instead of following his dreams, he now works as a supermarket manager (where he makes a higher salary than he would as a trainer) and lives at home.

“He thinks his life is over,” O’Mara said. “He’s 27, and he thinks his life is over.”

Student loans are having a perverse effect: The very debt that’s taken on to allow someone to pursue their ambitions can later morph into a burden that requires them to ditch those plans and grab any job that will just pay the bills.

More than half of people who owe $55,000 or more in student debt say they took a job outside of their field, compared with 29% of those with no debt, according to new research by Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of SavingforCollege.com.

“It’s absolutely ironic,” Kantrowitz said. “You go to a more expensive college, supposedly the best in your field, but take on too much debt, so you can’t work in your field because of the need to repay the debt.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, abandon, job, kantrowitz, hes, dreams, loans, debt, life, field, thinks, student, florida, omara


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At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn’t have in his 20s

For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. If you don’t have your own metric of succe


For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. If you don’t have your own metric of succe
At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn’t have in his 20s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-06  Authors: marcel schwantes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learn, gates, wrote, success, life, asks, older, 63, assessment, 20s, bill, wouldnt, microsoft, questions


At 63, Bill Gates says he now asks himself these 3 questions that he wouldn't have in his 20s

We all have our own ways of measuring success in life, and they may shift as we grow older. For Bill Gates, it’s an “end-of-year assessment” of his personal and work life — a tradition that he says dates back to his childhood. “Some people think it is corny, but I like it,” the Microsoft co-founder wrote in a 2018 blog post. Gates also noted how different his assessment looks today, at age 63, than it did in his 20s. “Back then, an end-of-year assessment would amount to just one question: Is Microsoft software making the personal-computing dream come true?” he wrote. Of course, Gates still assesses the quality of his work, but he also asks himself a whole set of other questions about his life. “These would have been laughable to me when I was 25, but as I get older, they are much more meaningful.” Our year is more than halfway over, folks. Perhaps you’ve accomplished more than you expected to. Or maybe you feel you haven’t done enough, and would like to push yourself some more. No matter what your journey has been like, now is the perfect time to pause and reflect on how 2019 has shaped you so far. If you don’t have your own metric of success, it’s worth starting with the three questions Gates asked himself at the end of 2018:

1. ‘Did I devote enough time to my family?’

Money can buy you many things, but it can’t buy you an extra minute in the day. Even with a busy schedule, Gates makes time for his family. In an interview with The Cut, Gates’ wife Melinda revealed that she and her husband share a favorite pastime: Binge-watching PBS’ “Victoria” together. “If we’re in separate locales, we’ll agree to both watch the same episode at the same time so we’re caught up with each other,” she said. And earlier this year, Melinda told Business Insider’s editor-in-chief that back when her husband was CEO of Microsoft, he spent a few mornings each week driving their oldest daughter, Jennifer, to school. “Bill and the kids cherished those moments in the car,” she said. “Listening to music together, the conversations over many years that they had — it’s a side of him that they might not have seen otherwise. It would’ve been a missed opportunity.”

2. ‘Did I learn enough new things?’

Gates might have dropped out of Harvard in 1975, but he has still maintained an incredible appetite for learning. In an interview with The New York Times, Gates said that he reads up to 50 books each year: “It’s one of the chief ways that I learn, and has been since I was a kid.” He continued, “These days, I also like to visit interesting places, meet with scientists and watch a lot of lectures online. But reading is still the main way that I both learn new things and test my understanding.”

These [questions] would have been laughable to me when I was 25, but as I get older, they are much more meaningful. Bill Gates

Lifelong learning is essential for continuous growth, success and happiness — and there has never been a better time to practice it. As Gates wrote in a 2017 article for TIME, “When I wanted to learn something outside of school as a kid, cracking open my World Book encyclopedia was the best I could do. Today, all you have to do is go online.”

3. ‘Did I develop new friendships and deepen old ones?’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-06  Authors: marcel schwantes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learn, gates, wrote, success, life, asks, older, 63, assessment, 20s, bill, wouldnt, microsoft, questions


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What do 90-somethings regret most? Here’s what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life

What 90-somethings regret the mostI began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. How to live a happy and regret-free lifeThe lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you s


What 90-somethings regret the mostI began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. How to live a happy and regret-free lifeThe lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you s
What do 90-somethings regret most? Here’s what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: lydia sohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regret, heres, regrets, wish, live, love, 90somethings, regretfree, happy, regretted, man, children, crazy, life, work, learned


What do 90-somethings regret most? Here's what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life

My preconceptions about the elderly went out the window four years ago, when a woman in her early-80s came to me seeking pastoral care. She had been widowed for several years, but her distress didn’t come from the loss of her husband. Instead, it was because she had fallen in love with a married man who couldn’t return her affections. As she shared her story with me over some tea and a box of Kleenex, I was bewildered by the realization that people who are far past their 80s still experience the “butterflies-in-the-stomach” kind of love.

An age-old assumption

One of the wonderful and strange features of my job as a minister is that I get to be a confidant and advisor to people from all stages of life, though I primarily interact with those who are double — even triple — my age. I became a minister in 2015 thinking that I, a Korean-American woman in her mid-30s, wouldn’t be able to connect with a congregation of people from a completely different generation and across a variety of ethnic backgrounds. But my interactions with the widow and several others clued me in on how very wrong I was. Until recently, I generally associated deep yearnings and high ambitions with the energy and idealism of youth. I assumed that as we get older, we become more stoic and sage-like — or maybe even the exact opposite: Disillusioned by life and lacking vitality. My kernel of new insight launched me into a rapt curiosity about the internal lives of elderly people. I needed to know: What is life like for 90-year-olds? Do they still have vocational ambitions? Do they still crave love, sex and intimacy? What are their greatest fears, hopes and thoughts on aging? What do they regret most in life? I should note that I’m not a researcher, sociologist or psychologist, but I was determined to find answers. With a pen and paper in hand, I met with and interviewed the oldest people I know, including several congregants and their friends — all between the ages of 90 and 99.

What 90-somethings regret the most

I began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. Their responses abounded with self-blame and deep sorrow. They all expressed similar sentiments: “If only I had done this differently.” “If I could have seen this coming, maybe I would have done something differently to prevent this.” I was intrigued to learn that their biggest regrets had little to do with their careers, missed opportunities or things they didn’t achieve. Rather, their pain came from failures in their relationships. They regretted not cultivating closer relationships with their children. They regretted not putting their children on the right path in life. They regretted not taking risks to be more loving, such as being more open about their feelings for new people or more affectionate with those already in their lives. They regretted not being better listeners; they wish they had been more empathetic and considerate. They regretted not spending enough time with the people they loved.

The happiest moments of their lives

I then switched up the mood by asking them about their most joyful memories. Each and every person I spoke to cited a time when their spouses were still alive or their children were younger and living at home. I found this surprising, as their answers seemed to contradict the “U-bend of life” theory, which suggests that our happiness generally dips in our 30s and reaches a bottom in our mid-40s. Then, at 50, it rebounds and continues to increase years after. But the people I interviewed said they were the happiest from their late-20s to mid-40s, when they were raising kids and trying to figure out who they were — the exact phase of my life right now.

When I asked one man if he wishes he had accomplished more, he responded, ‘No, I wish I had loved more.’

As a young working mother, I frequently fantasize about the pleasures of retirement. But the conversations I had made me consider the possibility that I might one day look back at this hectic period of juggling potty-training, full-time work and little scraps of self-care as the most fulfilling time of my life.

How to live a happy and regret-free life

The lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. But if we take these fleeting moments for granted, we’ll regret it later on. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you spend with the people you love. Put another way, when I asked one man if he wishes he had accomplished more, he responded, “No, I wish I had loved more.”

Despite their deepest regrets, the elders I met still laugh like crazy, fall madly in love and fiercely pursue happiness.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: lydia sohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regret, heres, regrets, wish, live, love, 90somethings, regretfree, happy, regretted, man, children, crazy, life, work, learned


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Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says

Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:1. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on


Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:1. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on
Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: kabir sehgal, contributor deepak chopra, deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, science, young, wellbeing, live, unemployed, little, study, exercise, spend, life, free, longer, weekends, doing, happier, work, mental, things


Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says

Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. What you do choose to do with your free time is important; once you spend it, you can’t get it back. Frittering it away by binge-watching Netflix or scrolling through Instagram won’t bring you long-lasting happiness. Instead, it will likely leave you feeling languished or mired in mediocrity. The happiest and most successful people make the most out of their free time — on weekends, especially — by incorporating healthy habits that have been scientifically proven to improve our physical and mental well-being. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:

1. Spend time with friends and family

Weekends are the best days of the week — not just for the employed, but also for the unemployed, according to a 2014 study from Stanford University. Researchers found that emotional well-being increases by about 15% on weekends — and that number rises the more we spend time with family and friends. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. Social time is especially important for those who are unemployed, the researchers also noted. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. Often, their time might be spent doing household chores or watching daytime TV. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on Saturday and Sunday, other people are available to spend time with.”

2. Exercise

The world’s most successful business leaders, like Oprah Winfrey, Sheryl Sandberg and Bill Gates all make exercise a priority. Not only can a healthy cardiovascular system improve your memory and learning ability, it can also release endorphins that elicit a “feel-good” effect. A 2018 study, published in The Lancet, found that people who are physically active have a greater sense of well-being than those who are inactive. “Individuals who exercised had 43% fewer days of poor mental health in the past month than individuals who did not exercise,” according to the study. Social exercises (i.e., team sports and running with a friend) had higher positive effects, although cycling also ranked highly. This all leads to one simple reminder: Find out what form of physical activity motivates you most and make time for it. As the study’s authors wrote, “All exercise types were associated with a lower mental health burden.”

3. Meditate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: kabir sehgal, contributor deepak chopra, deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, science, young, wellbeing, live, unemployed, little, study, exercise, spend, life, free, longer, weekends, doing, happier, work, mental, things


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