This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping

You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker. If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy. “For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says. Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean. App


You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker.
If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy.
“For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says.
Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean.
App
This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lisa ferber, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, expert, maker, good, stains, help, sofa, cleaning, towel, works, stain, dont, upholstery, easy, save, skill, life, housekeeping, clean


This easy life skill can help you save money, says expert at Good Housekeeping

A cotton shirt at the Gap runs about $50, while a sofa at Ikea can easily cost $400. Carpet your living room with a $2.59 per square foot variety from Home Depot, and materials could run $800. You don’t want these items ruined by a careless tip of a wine glass or a rogue child with a marker. Becoming a whiz at stain removal and prevention helps you stretch the life of those items and avoid spending money on a replacement, says Carolyn Forte, director of the home appliances and cleaning products lab at Good Housekeeping magazine. “Maintenance cleaning” helps too, she says: It’s “going to prolong your investment.” If picking up this life skill means you can replace fewer shirts, skip a few trips to the dry cleaner, or avoid buying a slipcover for your sofa, you can save $150 a year, easy. Here are some expert tips:

For your clothing

Limit the stain’s power. Cleaning expert Melissa Maker, host of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube, says the important thing is to start working on a stain as early as possible, which can help curb the damage. “You want to remove whatever you can,” says Maker. For example, use the dull edge of a knife to scrape off cheese, wax, or peanut butter. For the leftover stain, “take a paper towel and press, but not rub, and move the towel a few times so you get a clean area.” Know your stain type. The best way to treat a stain depends on the substance that caused it. Stains fall into three main categories, Maker says: There’s oil/fat (like butter or olive oil), protein (like milk or blood), and tannins (like juice and wine). “For a tannin stain, hot water works very well, but if it’s a fat or a protein, use cold water,” she says. Find the right stain remover. Maker likes to use a high-quality eucalyptus essential oil called Thursday Plantation. “This will work on almost any material. Not silk, but any cotton or polyester,” she says. “It’s a solvent and it will help remove stains. Throw it into the wash and it should come out clean. If not, you can do it a second time.” OxiClean Versatile and OxiClean Baby can also combat several stain types across the three categories. And Maker says a good dish soap, such as Dawn, works well too. Be prepared to experiment. “People can get discouraged when they don’t get something out the first time,” says Maker. “But I’ve gone back and then a stain comes right out, so be patient.”

For your upholstery

Stop stains before they happen. Upholstery stains can be trickier than clothes, because they can soak through to areas that are tough to clean. Unless your couch cushions have removable covers, for example, you can’t toss them in the washing machine. “What I would focus on is preventative treatments,” says Maker. “If you are having people over where you know there might be food passed around, you might want to take some blankets that are nice enough and casually drape them over the upholstery. That way you have a layer to absorb any drops, and the sofa can be safe. So it’s a nice, cozy solution.”

People can get discouraged when they don’t get something out the first time. But I’ve gone back and then a stain comes right out, so be patient. Melissa Maker host of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube

This also goes for any potentially messy activities, like letting your kids make an art project or bringing in a pro to give the living room a fresh coat of paint. “I paint my nails on the sofa, and I set up a towel,” she says. “Just make sure you have something that you don’t care about and use that as prevention. It’s always easier to prevent than to fix.” Test cleaning methods before you commit. Before you attack a stain on your upholstery directly, “you have to test it in a hidden area first to make sure it works with your particular fabric,” Maker says. Otherwise you risk that the treatment will create more noticeable damage than the stain. “Mix dish soap and hydrogen peroxide in equal parts, and apply to the surface,” she says. “Use a very small amount, and once you blot it out you need a very thin amount on the stain.” Apply the solution with a small, clean toothbrush, and use the mixture sparingly to avoid a leftover ring of product.

For your carpet

Stain protection starts at your front door. Forte says you should do whatever you can to keep outside dirt from touching your carpet: “Mats on the doors in and out. Shoes at the doors work great,” she says. “When you think about what’s on the bottom of your shoes, you don’t want that in your house.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lisa ferber, michelle gielan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, expert, maker, good, stains, help, sofa, cleaning, towel, works, stain, dont, upholstery, easy, save, skill, life, housekeeping, clean


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When Caitlin Boston paid off $222,000 in student loans, more than 935,000 people watched her celebrate

Caitlin Boston finished paying off her $222,817 student loan debt on August 6, 2019, which would have been her late father’s 72nd birthday. The video, which runs for three minutes and 44 seconds, went viral: More than 935,000 people watched it. “I find it really amazing being able to work with, particularly women, to take control of their finances,” she says. Through research and determination, Boston paid off all her student loans. Back at work, Boston asked a male coworker what he earned, and


Caitlin Boston finished paying off her $222,817 student loan debt on August 6, 2019, which would have been her late father’s 72nd birthday.
The video, which runs for three minutes and 44 seconds, went viral: More than 935,000 people watched it.
“I find it really amazing being able to work with, particularly women, to take control of their finances,” she says.
Through research and determination, Boston paid off all her student loans.
Back at work, Boston asked a male coworker what he earned, and
When Caitlin Boston paid off $222,000 in student loans, more than 935,000 people watched her celebrate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: lisa ferber, berna anat, joe saul-sehy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boston, 222000, video, pay, debt, work, caitlin, women, celebrate, really, loans, going, 935000, watched, student, paid


When Caitlin Boston paid off $222,000 in student loans, more than 935,000 people watched her celebrate

Caitlin Boston finished paying off her $222,817 student loan debt on August 6, 2019, which would have been her late father’s 72nd birthday. The journey took 10 years, and to celebrate its ending the New York City tech worker posted a video of herself dancing to Lizzo while wearing a crown and a shiny purple catsuit. The video, which runs for three minutes and 44 seconds, went viral: More than 935,000 people watched it. Since then, strangers and friends alike have reached out to Boston for career and financial advice. Boston enjoys the new opportunity to offer empowerment. “I find it really amazing being able to work with, particularly women, to take control of their finances,” she says. Boston, now 34, owed $147,602 before interest for an undergrad and graduate school degree. Some of her loans had over 10% interest rates. She couldn’t turn to her parents for money or assistance: “I knew that if something happened to me, I could not ask anyone for help,” she says. “It was either I was going to fix this or I was going to be homeless and broke.” Through research and determination, Boston paid off all her student loans. Here’s how she did it.

The strategy: Get a higher salary

Boston and her female colleagues were out one night commiserating about being unable to get a raise. They discovered that even with varying experience levels, they all made the same amount. Back at work, Boston asked a male coworker what he earned, and he seemed hesitant to share. “I needed to make him more comfortable,” she says. “I asked him, ‘If I throw out a number, can you tell me if you’re making over or under this number?’ And he kind of relaxed and he said, ‘Oh yeah, I can do that.'” After a few rounds of over/under, Boston realized she and her colleagues earned at least $20,000 less. “And we were all doing the same work. We all had the same title. There’s no difference in our backgrounds. So I was pretty livid at that point.”

Photo by Apollo Baldoz

Boston sought resume help from a friend with human resources experience and started her job search. While waiting to discuss salaries for a few positions, she reached out via LinkedIn to people with similar jobs and learned what kind of salary to ask for. “I was putting a number out there. I was like, ‘This is the minimum number that you’re going to get me for.'” She accepted a job as a user experience researcher, “and I ended up making a 41% pay increase via that negotiation.” This allowed her to double what she could pay toward her debt, and she finally finished paying it off.

The celebration: A video watched by more than 935,00 people

Boston’s video started as a playful personal project. When Boston was a few months away from her final payment, she and her boyfriend were watching a moment on the Netflix show “Patriot Act” where a couple dances to Pharrell’s “Happy” for a few seconds after paying off $100,000 in debt. “I got really, like, ‘Oh my god, that’s it? That’s all you did?'” she says. “I think some people, when they have student loans, it’s a foregone conclusion that they’re going to pay them off, whereas for so many years I just thought I was going to die with these loans hung around my neck.” An image came into her head and she shared it with her boyfriend. “I was like, ‘I’m going to get a spandex purple catsuit and I’m going to wear this Korean crown that’s usually associated with marriage for women, and I’m going to reclaim this crown, and I’m gonna make it for my debt payoff,” she says. “‘And I’m gonna dance around to it, and it’s gonna be awesome.’ And he looked at me … and he’s like, ‘OK, that sounds reasonable.'”

Boston felt that the video was about more than this particular debt. “I feel really strongly that women are not expected or allowed to celebrate accomplishments that are not based around relationships or family,” she says. “So I really wanted to make something that was able to communicate that it’s OK, and it’s actually amazing, for women to be able to celebrate themselves when they achieve something that is just for themselves. I wanted to make this about how a woman defeated her finances. And I didn’t get married and have someone pay off my loans for me.” She captioned the video with encouragement for others to ask the “over/under” question, and with a dedication to her father, who died from suicide in 2013. “I wanted to honor that memory, and honor who he was as a person and that it was through his sacrifices that I got to go as far as I have,” she says. “His work ethic totally influences me even to this day, and also I just want us to be free of this thing. I want to be able to say, ‘I know you died in debt, but I’m not. I’m fine.'”

The opportunity: Saving, investing, and health care


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: lisa ferber, berna anat, joe saul-sehy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boston, 222000, video, pay, debt, work, caitlin, women, celebrate, really, loans, going, 935000, watched, student, paid


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3 expert tips on how to work successfully with friends

The good news is you can protect your business as well as your friendship if you heed some expert advice. “Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths. I think that’s really important in a business,” Rosario says. Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths. Leslie Valdivia Vive CosmeticsPut it all in writing


The good news is you can protect your business as well as your friendship if you heed some expert advice.
“Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths.
I think that’s really important in a business,” Rosario says.
Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths.
Leslie Valdivia Vive CosmeticsPut it all in writing
3 expert tips on how to work successfully with friends Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: lisa ferber, vicki salemi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valdivia, strengths, business, friends, tips, expert, work, better, really, vive, thats, successfully, different, friendship, think


3 expert tips on how to work successfully with friends

In the new film “Like a Boss,” Tiffany Haddish and Rose Byrne play friends who run a cosmetics company. When they get into debt, a mogul (Salma Hayek) buys a large share of their company and aims to reshape it to her liking, which threatens their friendship. Laughs aside, the story highlights the inherent risk of doing business with a friend. According to the Small Business Administration, fewer than 80% of businesses survive after their first year, and only around 50% survive five years or longer. So if you’re working with a friend, you not only have to navigate the challenges of running a business, you have to figure out whether the friendship can survive even if the business doesn’t. Certified financial planner Lazetta Rainey Braxton, founder and CEO of Financial Fountains, says that forming a business is comparable to getting married. So get to know your partner first. “You have to think about the time of dating to have a better idea of what that potential partner’s objectives are, and where they are in their career and entrepreneurial spirit.” The good news is you can protect your business as well as your friendship if you heed some expert advice.

Look for complementary skills and lay out clear expectations

Joanna Rosario and Leslie Valdivia launched Vive Cosmetics in 2017, a few years after meeting through their husbands. The company nods to Hispanic culture via lip shades named for legendary artists like Rocío Dúrcal and Selena Quintanilla-Pérez and with colors such as Villana and La Patrona. If you’re thinking of going into business with a friend, really evaluate their skills and how those could complement your own, Valdivia suggests. “Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths. Joanna does different things than I do,” she says. “And you do different parts of business with a different type of brain.”

From left: Joanna Rosario and Leslie Valdivia of Vive Cosmetics. Courtesy Vive Cosmetics

Braxton refers to this as “the yin and the yang,” and says: “Maybe somebody is better in marketing and the other person is better with finances. Somebody might be better with compliance, and the other maybe fits better with operation.” The sum is better than the parts this way, she says. And this is the beauty of bringing your authentic self to work. “You can feel really great and bring what you do well, and what you don’t do well, the other person has your back,” says Braxton.

Plan for the worst, and focus on your mission

Braxton says it’s important to figure out what you would do if the business doesn’t work out. “That’s scary for people, but you have to think about it. Are you willing to jeopardize your friendship? Do you have another stream of income or other talent that you’ll still be OK?” Focus on everyone’s ultimate goal, Valdivia suggests. “What’s the North Star for everybody on the team? Make sure that’s the guiding light.” And, as much as possible, take out the personal part: “Sometimes you have to remove yourself from the feelings and think about what’s the end goal here,” she says. When necessary, make sure to voice your concerns to your partner, and share your ideas. “We have really good communication. I think that’s really important in a business,” Rosario says.

Think about what are your strengths, and find someone who has different strengths. Leslie Valdivia Vive Cosmetics

Put it all in writing


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-24  Authors: lisa ferber, vicki salemi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valdivia, strengths, business, friends, tips, expert, work, better, really, vive, thats, successfully, different, friendship, think


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Does your FSA have an extension? Here’s how to make the most of your money

If your flexible spending account from last year extends into the new year, you’ve still got time to spend the money left in it wisely. Here are some expert tips for getting the most out of your 2019 FSA dollars before they expire. “Not only does the extension period allow more time to spend last year’s FSA contributions on qualified expenses, those costs also count toward this year’s deductible,” says Neeleman. You might need a prescription or letter of medical necessity to use your FSA on cert


If your flexible spending account from last year extends into the new year, you’ve still got time to spend the money left in it wisely.
Here are some expert tips for getting the most out of your 2019 FSA dollars before they expire.
“Not only does the extension period allow more time to spend last year’s FSA contributions on qualified expenses, those costs also count toward this year’s deductible,” says Neeleman.
You might need a prescription or letter of medical necessity to use your FSA on cert
Does your FSA have an extension? Here’s how to make the most of your money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, products, fsa, heres, etienne, neeleman, health, items, extension, spend, does, money, care


Does your FSA have an extension? Here's how to make the most of your money

If your flexible spending account from last year extends into the new year, you’ve still got time to spend the money left in it wisely. Unlike the rollover, in which a set amount is available indefinitely, an extension means the entire amount is available to you until a certain date. This period frequently runs 75 days, or until March 15. Here are some expert tips for getting the most out of your 2019 FSA dollars before they expire.

Book helpful appointments

Steve Neeleman, founder and vice chair of health savings trustee HealthEquity, says the first three months are a great opportunity to set yourself up for the rest of the year. “This is a good time to get with your primary care doctor and schedule your visit,” he says. Neeleman notes that if you get in early, you can benefit from having the money to pay for procedures your insurance doesn’t handle. “They might say, ‘We want to order some labs that aren’t covered under your preventive care.’ Some preventive care might cover things like if you’re 50 and it’ll cover a colonoscopy, but if you need a polyp removed, it might not cover that.” Jina Etienne, CPA member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission, cites the positive effect a new year may have on someone striving for a healthy change. “We all make New Year’s resolutions and we tend not to keep them. In January, you are more likely to keep that appointment and follow up on any advice you got from that appointment.” Spending your leftover FSA dollars at the beginning of the year can set you up to save later. This is true whether you have the rollover or the extension. “Not only does the extension period allow more time to spend last year’s FSA contributions on qualified expenses, those costs also count toward this year’s deductible,” says Neeleman. Etienne says if you’ve always wanted to stop smoking, you can seize this opportunity to sign up for a smoking cessation plan. “Or if you have back problems and always wanted to try acupuncture, it doesn’t hurt to dabble in January,” she says.

Check out these FSA-eligible items

Many seemingly unconventional items are available for you to buy using your FSA dollars. Look for items that are evergreen, Etienne says, so you don’t end up with a heap of expired products. You might need a prescription or letter of medical necessity to use your FSA on certain items of services. This is true for items ranging from the quirkier products to the downright everyday products, such as aspirin. Etienne says it can be easy for people to miss that an FSA covers your overall health needs, including anything important to your medical care, your dental care, or your vision. “They don’t see it as the broad spectrum of the things we spend money on to maintain our health,” she says. “It’s not just, ‘I have to get a Band-Aid.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, products, fsa, heres, etienne, neeleman, health, items, extension, spend, does, money, care


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5 things you might not know about your FSA

And it comes with some benefits you might not yet know about. You have access to the full balance right away”One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately,” says Etienne. You can get a rollover or an extension on your moneyIf you didn’t use up your entire FSA in one calendar year, you may have some options. One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately. Sydney Myers, merchandising specialist for t


And it comes with some benefits you might not yet know about.
You have access to the full balance right away”One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately,” says Etienne.
You can get a rollover or an extension on your moneyIf you didn’t use up your entire FSA in one calendar year, you may have some options.
One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately.
Sydney Myers, merchandising specialist for t
5 things you might not know about your FSA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, think, dont, qualifying, know, fsa, things, etienne, thing, spend, rollover, money


5 things you might not know about your FSA

Your health flexible spending account, or FSA, saves you money by putting a selected amount of your pretax income toward medical, dental, and vision expenses, along with other health-related products and services. And it comes with some benefits you might not yet know about. Here’s the inside scoop.

If you missed open enrollment, you may still be able to sign up

As a new employee, you have 30 days from the date of hire to enroll in an FSA, says Jina Etienne, a certified public accountant and member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission. So you don’t have to do everything when you’re just getting settled. Even if you missed your company’s enrollment deadline, you may still be allowed to make changes during a qualifying life event. “Something can trigger eligibility where you weren’t eligible before,” says Etienne. These events can include “annulment, spouse death, legal separation, and birth, death, adoption,” says Steve Neeleman, founder and vice chair of health savings trustee HealthEquity. “If you have a change that qualifies under your summary plan, you can go in and make any change consistent with the allowed amount.” “For qualifying events, employers can allow their employees to either change the amount they are contributing to their FSAs, or to begin or stop contributing to FSAs,” he says. “If you have a qualifying event, it’s a good idea to call your employer to get clarification on their policy.”

You have access to the full balance right away

“One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately,” says Etienne. “This is because the IRS requires employers to make the total amount you elected to contribute for the year available ‘at any time during the coverage period,’ even if you haven’t actually contributed the full amount yet.” Said another way, even though you’ll put in a little of money with each paycheck throughout the year, you can spend it as soon as you need it come January 1. But there’s a flip side: “If you leave a job, you lose it,” says Neeleman. “For the employer, the fact that there will be a proportion of people who will use it early and leave, that’s balanced by people who leave early and don’t use it, and people that don’t use all their money even if they have a rollover, and put in more money than they expect to.” He suggests you ask yourself if there is a chance you will be leaving your job and look at your near-term expenses before making your decision.

You can get a rollover or an extension on your money

If you didn’t use up your entire FSA in one calendar year, you may have some options. You might have a grace period in which you can spend that prior year’s money, or you may get to roll over some funds to use throughout the coming year. “Companies need to choose an extension, up to 75 days, or a rollover up to $500,” says Neeleman. “Anyone should ask how much is going to be rolled over, and the nice thing is there is no deadline on that.” If you have the extension, think about what kinds of appointments you may want to set up for the start of the year. Want to stop smoking? You can seize this opportunity to sign up for a smoking cessation plan as part of your plan for the new year. “Or if you have back problems and always wanted to try acupuncture, it doesn’t hurt to dabble in January,” she says.

One thing people don’t always know is that they can use 100% of their annual amount immediately. Jina Etienne CPA member of the AICPA Financial Literacy Commission

You can spend your FSA dollars on more than you think

“We all think of medicine as ‘I need to take a cough drop or an Advil,’ the way we’ve always done it, and we think of doctors and ‘I need to get XYZ done,'” says Etienne. “This is an opportunity to think about how to put together a 360-degree view of your life in terms of medical-related stuff.” Sydney Myers, merchandising specialist for the FSA Store, which sells 4,000 FSA-eligible products, says that you have a lot more options than you might realize. “One popular category is drug-free pain relief, which includes acupressure mats that go on the floor,” Myers says. “They fall into the ‘surprisingly eligible’ category. People will come in looking for a brace and find something like KT tape or cold packs.” You can check out the company’s other products such as a peanut alert allergy bracelet, a pillow to help with nightime acid-reflux relief, and a light therapy system to help with acne.

You might need a prescription or doctor’s note


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-08  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, think, dont, qualifying, know, fsa, things, etienne, thing, spend, rollover, money


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Don’t get your boss a gift, says Mister Manners, but put on your game face for Secret Santa

Workplace gift exchanges like Secret Santas, though, are a different story. Don’t feel that you need to be giving a present to the boss. What kinds of workplace gifts might be inappropriate? My concern is you are opening up a Pandora’s box and making many of the people you’re giving gifts to feel guilty. Thomas Farley Mister MannersSo although your motivations may be pure and thoughtful, you may unwittingly be giving a gift that is problematic.


Workplace gift exchanges like Secret Santas, though, are a different story.
Don’t feel that you need to be giving a present to the boss.
What kinds of workplace gifts might be inappropriate?
My concern is you are opening up a Pandora’s box and making many of the people you’re giving gifts to feel guilty.
Thomas Farley Mister MannersSo although your motivations may be pure and thoughtful, you may unwittingly be giving a gift that is problematic.
Don’t get your boss a gift, says Mister Manners, but put on your game face for Secret Santa Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, gifts, presents, youre, santa, present, gift, boss, workplace, face, giving, manners, personal, secret, dont, mister


Don't get your boss a gift, says Mister Manners, but put on your game face for Secret Santa

Americans plan to spend an average total of $35 on holiday gifts for coworkers this year, up from last year’s $26, according to the National Retail Federation. If you’re lucky enough to have a great team of coworkers, you might consider them friends or even something like family. But when it comes to gift-giving, think twice before treating them that way and getting everyone a present. That’s according to etiquette expert Thomas Farley, aka Mister Manners, whose clients range from JP Morgan Chase to the United States Army. “I highly recommend not going down that rabbit hole, to the extent you can avoid it,” he says. “It gets very complex, and there is invariably somebody that you’re going to leave out, and it can get very expensive.” Likewise, he says, don’t worry about giving your boss something. Workplace gift exchanges like Secret Santas, though, are a different story. Here are Farley’s top tips for navigating office gifting.

Video by Courtney Stith

Should you give presents to everyone you work with?

I so respect the instinct, and the generosity of someone who feels that they are in a workplace that they love and they simply want to give presents to everyone. And even if you are financially able to do so, my concern is you are opening up a Pandora’s box and making many of the people you’re giving gifts to feel guilty because they don’t have presents to give you back. There is no expectation as a colleague that you are giving to every single member of your team. That responsibility really is on the boss. Don’t feel that you need to be giving a present to the boss. Because frankly, if you give a gift to the boss, especially if it’s a pricier one, then the boss is thinking, ‘Wow, maybe this person doesn’t need such a raise.’ It can also can appear to your colleagues like you’re trying to curry favor with the boss and maybe make them look bad because they didn’t get a present for the boss.

What kinds of workplace gifts might be inappropriate?

You don’t want to give anything too personal. So clothing, for example, could be considered very personal, especially where there’s a man and a woman giving a gift to one another. You would not, for example give a tight sweater. I would stick with something that shows a personal touch without being overly intimate or overly personal. I would also think long and hard about do you give any kind of alcohol, particularly if this person may have had an issue with alcohol in the past.

My concern is you are opening up a Pandora’s box and making many of the people you’re giving gifts to feel guilty. Thomas Farley Mister Manners

So although your motivations may be pure and thoughtful, you may unwittingly be giving a gift that is problematic. One of my favorite gifts to suggest in a workplace situation is either a beautiful coffee table book on a subject that you know the individual absolutely loves, or if you give a gift card to their favorite store or favorite restaurant for them to then go and enjoy with the people in their lives.

Do you have to participate in Secret Santas or gift exchanges?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, gifts, presents, youre, santa, present, gift, boss, workplace, face, giving, manners, personal, secret, dont, mister


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Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions

“And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.” Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting. But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior. So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt. With some conditions: You want


“And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.”
Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting.
But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior.
So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt.
With some conditions: You want
Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, navigate, etiquette, questions, love, truly, youre, manners, providing, tricky, know, receipts, receipt, sure, giver, gift, holiday, regifting, mister, think


Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions

Thomas Farley, aka Mister Manners, knows that holiday giving can be fraught: You could accidentally spend too much, or too little, or regift something to the person who originally bought it for you. No need to panic, says the etiquette expert, whose clients range from JPMorgan Chase to the United States Army. One of Farley’s top tips: You can make almost any gift feel special by presenting it with a heartfelt note or in-person explanation of why you thought they would enjoy that particular item. “People love gifts that have a backstory,” he explains. “And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.”

Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting.

What do you do if someone buys you a more expensive gift than you got them?

That’s terrific, up to a point. If someone gives you something excessively priced, there needs to be a conversation where you say, “This is lovely, I so appreciate your gesture, [but] I simply can’t accept something so extravagant.” If they’ve outspent you by 20 or 30 or 40 dollars because they can, I would be profusely thankful. I would make sure to send them a thank you note. But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior.

What’s a tactful way to ask for a receipt to return a gift?

I think that the gift giver, providing that you know they really love the gift, wants to make sure that it fits you: your body, your decor, or that you don’t have something identical already. So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt. And then offering them a follow-up explanation: “I love it, but I have that color already. I’d love to get that same identical shirt in a different color.” As the giver, I think it’s a thoughtful gesture to make sure you provide a receipt so that that awkward exchange doesn’t need to happen.

Regifting can get tricky. Are there best practices I can follow?

I’m actually a big advocate for regifting, I think, both for the environment and in terms of reducing the amount of clutter that we all have in our lives. With some conditions: You want to make sure it is in fresh, clean, original packaging, that you’ve removed the gift tags, and that this is something your gift recipient will truly love. Make sure that the two individuals do not know one another. You don’t want the original giver to see it in the home of the person you’ve just given it to. “You can say, John, I got this coffee table book, which I do like quite a lot, but knowing that you’re a huge fan of Palm Springs, I think this might be something that you’d truly enjoy, and I’d like to give it to you if you’d like to have it.” So you’re not trying to make up a story or make up a ruse about where you got the book, but rather you’re owning up to the fact that this is a regift.

What should you bring if you’re staying with someone during the holidays?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, navigate, etiquette, questions, love, truly, youre, manners, providing, tricky, know, receipts, receipt, sure, giver, gift, holiday, regifting, mister, think


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3 benefits your company may offer to help you cope with anxiety, depression, and stress

And as companies are starting to recognize the role they play in their employees’ mental health, they are adding programs to help workers deal with that stress. “[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she told Grow recently. But some mental health resources are actually helpful and often go unused. To contact your workplace EAP, call the toll-free number provided by your employer. Darcy Gruttadaro Directo


And as companies are starting to recognize the role they play in their employees’ mental health, they are adding programs to help workers deal with that stress.
“[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she told Grow recently.
But some mental health resources are actually helpful and often go unused.
To contact your workplace EAP, call the toll-free number provided by your employer.
Darcy Gruttadaro Directo
3 benefits your company may offer to help you cope with anxiety, depression, and stress Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: aditi shrikant, lisa ferber, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eap, companies, workplace, benefits, gruttadaro, mental, wellness, work, stress, health, offer, employees, help, company, cope, depression, anxiety, things


3 benefits your company may offer to help you cope with anxiety, depression, and stress

When it comes to things that stress people out, work and money are tied right at the top of the list, according to a 2018 report by the American Psychological Association. And as companies are starting to recognize the role they play in their employees’ mental health, they are adding programs to help workers deal with that stress. So much so that Alison Green of Ask a Manager tells Grow that in the last two years, she’s received lots of questions about mental health exercises — some of them a bit uncomfortable. “[Companies] have taken the message that increased openness about mental health is a good thing — but their execution is terrible,” she told Grow recently. But some mental health resources are actually helpful and often go unused. Here are three actions you can take if you’re looking for support.

Look into your company’s employment assistance program

An employment assistance program, or EAP, is a confidential service that provides employees with resources to help them address various problems in their work or personal lives. In the U.S., 77% of companies with more than 50 employees provide EAPs, according to a 2014 report by the Families and Work Institute. “People can call the EAP line if they’re struggling with finances, domestic issues, mental health — there’s a whole range of things they can call EAP for,” says Darcy Gruttadaro, director of the Center for Workplace Mental Health at the American Psychiatric Association Foundation. To contact your workplace EAP, call the toll-free number provided by your employer. If you don’t know it, ask your HR representative. You’ll have to give them your name, address, and the name of your workplace. They will then offer counseling, direct you to a specialist, help you find online materials, or refer you to a support group. “The EAP is a good referral source for many,” Gruttadaro says.

See what wellness measures your company subsidizes

Some companies offer to pay for wellness or mindfulness apps as a way to reduce or avoid stress. These may include online cognitive therapy or meditation and sleep apps. CVS pays for its employees to use the sleep app Sleepio, for example, and General Electric subsidizes memberships for Headspace. “It’s a little more on the prevention and mental wellness side,” Gruttadaro says.

People can call the EAP line if they’re struggling with finances, domestic issues, mental health — there’s a whole range of things they can call EAP for. Darcy Gruttadaro Director of the Center for Workplace Mental Health

Ask if your on-site clinic offers mental health services


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: aditi shrikant, lisa ferber, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eap, companies, workplace, benefits, gruttadaro, mental, wellness, work, stress, health, offer, employees, help, company, cope, depression, anxiety, things


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How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages

About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020. Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt. “Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate. Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your financesAny unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonu


About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020.
Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt.
“Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate.
Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your financesAny unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonu
How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alizah salario, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, money, life, stages, recession, mcbride, financial, recessionproof, ways, credit, unemployment, savings, control


How to recession-proof your life in 3 stages

About a quarter of economists predict the U.S. economy will be in a recession by the end of 2020. But 40% of Americans aren’t financially ready for a downturn if one were to occur in the next six to 12 months, according to a new Bankrate survey of 2,605 adults. Three in 10 respondents (31%) said they have done nothing to prepare for a recession. Among respondents who are taking steps, 44% are actively spending less money, 33% are saving more for emergencies, and 31% are paying down credit card debt. “Putting your head in the sand is not going to make the problem go away,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate. “We can’t control the economic environment, but we can take control of our finances.” Here’s how.

1. Add to your savings

Getting your finances recession-ready is an exercise in “getting back to the basics,” certified financial planner Shannah Compton Game, host of the Millennial Money podcast, told Grow earlier this year. Some of the key steps include building your cash reserves, getting your spending under control, and reviewing your investments. If your budget is really tight, you can still find creative ways to boost your savings, says McBride: “Any unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonus check, or something small, like a rebate, is money you can put into savings.” Read more: 4 ways to recession-proof your finances

Any unanticipated income, whether it’s something big, like a bonus check, or something small, like a rebate, is money you can put into savings. Greg McBride Chief financial analyst, Bankrate.com

2. Manage your debt

Navigating a recession is tougher if you have debt payments to keep up with, like student loans, a mortgage, or credit card balances. Ahead of a downturn, it can help to focus on paying off high-interest debts and look into refinancing. You may also want to meet with a debt counselor if you’re struggling to come up with a repayment plan. Accelerating debt payments while the economy is still strong can also free up your borrowing capacity in case you’re really in a pinch if times get tough, says McBride. “If the savings are running low, and you still need money to get groceries or put gas in the car to go to a job interview, you’ll have the capacity [to use credit] for something that’s truly necessary.” Read more: 3 ways to manage your debt ahead of a possible recession

Comparing past recessions While the most recent recession was the longest since the Great Depression, a shorter one in the early ’80s saw higher unemployment rates. Recession length and peak unemployment rate since 1948 Social chart title Note: In some cases, the unemployment rate climbed higher after the recession officially ended. kiersten schmidt/grow National Bureau of Economic Research (recession duration); FactSet (unemployment rate)

3. Invest in your career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alizah salario, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debt, money, life, stages, recession, mcbride, financial, recessionproof, ways, credit, unemployment, savings, control


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Serena Williams on financial abuse: ‘When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern’

And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e


And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e
Serena Williams on financial abuse: ‘When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, pattern, financial, recognize, serena, violence, victim, signs, partner, williams, francis, victims, power, abuse, change


Serena Williams on financial abuse: 'When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern'

In the United States, more than 10 million victims experience domestic violence annually from their intimate partner, which is an average of 20 people every minute, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. “Not being able to use your credit cards, having to show receipts for every little dime that you spend, having freedom of choice taken away from you. Those are all signs,” Williams told Woman’s Day. “It’s important to use my voice to shine a spotlight on the barriers women can face when they’re trying to leave.” Abusers may try to control how the victim can access or use cash, bank accounts, or credit cards. They can also limit the victim’s earning potential by preventing them from going to work or applying for a job. “Financial abuse occurs in a relationship where your partner is withholding information about the finances to essentially keep the victim in the dark,” says certified financial planner Stacy Francis, the president and chief executive of Francis Financial in New York.

The warning signs of financial abuse

“What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. “Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse.” Controlling behavior can start with one partner cutting the other off from financial matters and decisions and giving them less and less money to spend on themselves and the children. “For example,” Francis says, “a food allowance or clothing allowance that is just not doable. Then the victim has to come back to their partner and say, ‘I don’t have enough money for the kids’ shoes for school, or for groceries for the week.’ And it creates a power dynamic where the partner has the power. And they have the power because they control all the money.”

Serena Williams and daughter Alexis Olympia during the S by Serena Williams Runway Show on September 10, 2019, in New York City. Thomas Concordia | Getty Images

That dynamic also exists when the victim is belittled, manipulated, and made to feel less capable when it comes to money. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that elder financial abuse and fraud costs its victims about $36.5 billion per year. If you or a loved one are experiencing financial abuse, here are some tips to help you protect yourself:

Review a copy of your credit report

“Many times, individuals will find out later on that credit cards, other types of debts, and home equity lines of credit, have been taken out in their name by their abuser,” Francis says. Under federal law, you can obtain a free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each of the three bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Make sure you recognize all the debts listed. If you don’t, dig further to find out how they got onto your card.

Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse. Stacy Francis President and CEO of Francis Financial

Save and use cash

“Using a debit or credit card is going to allow your abuser to track you,” says Francis. Going mostly or entirely cash-only allows you to operate in the world without leaving a trail.

Educate yourself about your income


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, pattern, financial, recognize, serena, violence, victim, signs, partner, williams, francis, victims, power, abuse, change


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