Serena Williams on financial abuse: ‘When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern’

And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e


And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. The warning signs of financial abuse”What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that e
Serena Williams on financial abuse: ‘When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, pattern, financial, recognize, serena, violence, victim, signs, partner, williams, francis, victims, power, abuse, change


Serena Williams on financial abuse: 'When you recognize the signs, you can change the pattern'

In the United States, more than 10 million victims experience domestic violence annually from their intimate partner, which is an average of 20 people every minute, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. And up to 99% percent of survivors have also experienced financial abuse. In honor of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October, the Allstate Foundation partnered with tennis star Serena Williams to raise awareness of financial abuse. “Not being able to use your credit cards, having to show receipts for every little dime that you spend, having freedom of choice taken away from you. Those are all signs,” Williams told Woman’s Day. “It’s important to use my voice to shine a spotlight on the barriers women can face when they’re trying to leave.” Abusers may try to control how the victim can access or use cash, bank accounts, or credit cards. They can also limit the victim’s earning potential by preventing them from going to work or applying for a job. “Financial abuse occurs in a relationship where your partner is withholding information about the finances to essentially keep the victim in the dark,” says certified financial planner Stacy Francis, the president and chief executive of Francis Financial in New York.

The warning signs of financial abuse

“What’s difficult is that financial abuse can take on many forms,” says Francis. “Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse.” Controlling behavior can start with one partner cutting the other off from financial matters and decisions and giving them less and less money to spend on themselves and the children. “For example,” Francis says, “a food allowance or clothing allowance that is just not doable. Then the victim has to come back to their partner and say, ‘I don’t have enough money for the kids’ shoes for school, or for groceries for the week.’ And it creates a power dynamic where the partner has the power. And they have the power because they control all the money.”

Serena Williams and daughter Alexis Olympia during the S by Serena Williams Runway Show on September 10, 2019, in New York City. Thomas Concordia | Getty Images

That dynamic also exists when the victim is belittled, manipulated, and made to feel less capable when it comes to money. While cases of financial abuse frequently affect women, the elderly are also susceptible. The National Council on Aging reports that elder financial abuse and fraud costs its victims about $36.5 billion per year. If you or a loved one are experiencing financial abuse, here are some tips to help you protect yourself:

Review a copy of your credit report

“Many times, individuals will find out later on that credit cards, other types of debts, and home equity lines of credit, have been taken out in their name by their abuser,” Francis says. Under federal law, you can obtain a free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each of the three bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Make sure you recognize all the debts listed. If you don’t, dig further to find out how they got onto your card.

Many people who actually are victims are unaware that this is a form of abuse. Stacy Francis President and CEO of Francis Financial

Save and use cash

“Using a debit or credit card is going to allow your abuser to track you,” says Francis. Going mostly or entirely cash-only allows you to operate in the world without leaving a trail.

Educate yourself about your income


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: mariam abdallah, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here’s how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi


Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. Give them the opportunity to make choi
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You can start teaching even little kids about money, experts say — here's how

Most parents wait until their kids are teenagers before discussing money with them, according to T. Rowe Price’s 10th Annual Parents, Kids & Money Survey. That’s a mistake, says Nikhol Bentley, a math teacher at Gilbert Stuart Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island. “People tend to sell kids short,” says Bentley. “They are extremely smart, and letting them be part of the financial conversations at home is a good way to make sure that they’re able to make smarter financial choices when they’re older.” Teaching your child concepts like spending, saving, and earning can help them establish good financial habits that can last them the rest of their lives. And there are age-appropriate ways to get started early on. The National Education Association (NEA) provides lesson plans for teaching financial literacy to children as young as 4, and there are ways to lay the groundwork with even younger kids.

Counting

Around age 2, your child may be able to sound out different numbers, recognize numerals, or count out a sequence of numbers that they’ve heard over and over again. By age 4, most children are counting up to 10 or even beyond, according to LeapFrog, which helps parents use technology as a learning tool. Counting is the first step in building and strengthening math skills in the classroom. It’s basic but absolutely necessary. Parents can help reinforce this skill by encouraging their child count everyday items like crayons or the number of apples or bananas you pick up at the grocery store.

Spending and earning

Children can loosely understand the concept of income early on, says Bentley: As soon as they start school, or even before, they can grasp how currency works. Though they’re not actually exchanging goods for money, they can show they understand value by trading Pokemon cards with each other, for example. “They learn to share, trade cards or toys for things that they want, or some teachers will have some sort of ticket system that reinforces this concept of saving up your tickets for rewards or what it means to not have enough,” says Bentley. By age 6, kids generally understand that some bills or coins are smaller than others, and more money is needed to afford something more valuable. “Any type of reward system helps emphasize this idea of currency, and kids will pick up on the fact that there are certain things they need to do or behaviors they need to manage in order to earn that extra ‘income,'” explains Bentley. The goal isn’t to teach them not to spend but to show them how to spend wisely so they end up feeling satisfied. “Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money,” suggests Marguerita Cheng, chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth. “Maybe it’s letting them pick out a reasonably priced souvenir on a family vacation. They are capable of understanding and retaining these things.”

Saving

Two in three parents give their child an allowance, shelling out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save what they get. Encouragement from parents, though, can make a difference.

Give them the opportunity to make choices about how to best spend their money. Marguerita Cheng chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth

Bentley suggests one helpful exercise to help even younger children get used to saving: Let your child pick out a toy at the store. Explain how much it costs, and emphasize that they’ll need to save up their own money if they want to take it home. However old your child is when you start offering an allowance, make sure to give them a consistent amount on a consistent basis, “because it’s like getting a paycheck,” Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education told Grow earlier this year.

Avoiding conversations about money can cost you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: ivana pino, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
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In a falling rate environment, a different kind of CD can protect your savings

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. In fact, traders are betting with


The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. In fact, traders are betting with
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: bob sullivan, alizah salario, sam becker, lisa ferber
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In a falling rate environment, a different kind of CD can protect your savings

The Federal Reserve is expected to cut interest rates again later this month. As rates fall, securing a steady return through a low-commitment certification of deposit (CD) is becoming a more appealing option for savers. With a traditional CD, you can’t withdraw money for a predetermined length of time – like six months, 12 months, or even five years – without paying for the privilege. But some banks are offering no-penalty CDs that do away with that caveat. Savers benefit from a fixed interest rate for a set period, and you can withdraw without penalty. “In a falling rate environment, it’s a good option,” Ken Tumin, founder of DepositAccounts.com, told Grow earlier this year.

Falling interest rates can affect your savings

Savings accounts don’t usually provide much interest. The average traditional savings account pays roughly 0.09% annually, according to the FDIC. That’s 9 cents for every $100 after one year. High-yield savings accounts, which are generally offered by internet-only banks or subsidiaries, make you more money. Right now, rates hover around 2% at Ally bank, Barclay’s, and Discover, so savers earn about $2 for every $100 annually. If your emergency fund holds $10,000, you’ll earn about $200 each year in a high-yield account.

The Fed has cut rates twice this year, in July and September, however. Savings account yields have been decreasing as a result, although as an October MagnifyMoney.com report points out, online savings accounts “haven’t yet fallen as far.” This summer, Goldman Sachs’ Marcus and Ally cut their savings rates for the first time, each by 0.1%. After further cuts, as of early October, both offer 1.9% yields. Market observers expect more rate cuts in the next few months. In fact, traders are betting with about 83% probability that central bankers will cut interest rates when they meet later this month. That means, even with a high-yield account, you could earn less interest on your savings. That can make CDs a more attractive option.

CDs help you lock in a rate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: bob sullivan, alizah salario, sam becker, lisa ferber
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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th


If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster MoneyHere are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make th
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3 ways to help your kids make the most of their allowance

If you want your kids to save part or all of their allowance, make it easy for them. Consider getting them a savings jar or even opening them a bank account. Two in three parents give their child an allowance. They dole out an average of $30 per week, according to a recent survey of 1,002 adults conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and in many cases the money is linked to the completion of household chores. But only 3% of parents report that their kids primarily save their allowance, a figure that the AICPA finds “concerning.” Nearly all, or 92%, of parents say it’s important for their child to learn how to manage money, and helping your kids become savers early on is a great way to make that happen. By saving a third of a $30 weekly allowance, your child would be able to sock away over $500 every year. “It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money,” says Paul Golden, managing director at the National Endowment for Financial Education. “It’s still parents who have the most influence [on kids’ money habits]. They’re the front line of defense.”

Graphic preview What kids earn The top-paying chores for kids in the U.S. kiersten schmidt/grow Rooster Money

Here are three ways you can use an allowance to teach your kids about money management and help them to make the most of it over time.

1. Set kids up to be savers

Encouraging your kid to save even part of their allowance can help them establish healthy financial habits. Start by conditioning your kids to automatically save a certain amount each month because “then they don’t miss it,” says Golden. With younger children, Golden suggests using a savings jar so they can see the money building up. Then, once your child starts asking about how banks work, consider opening a savings account. Pay attention to their cues and take advantage of their interest, he says. “Once you’ve started with the habit of saving when you’re young, you start seeing what saving [money] actually does for you,” Clark D. Randall, a certified financial planner and the founder of Financial Enlightenment in Dallas, Texas, told Grow earlier this year. Parents are usually the No. 1 money influence on their kids. In a recent survey of “supersavers,” or people who put an impressive share of their income away for retirement, 80% gave credit to their parents for positively influencing their savings habits.

It’s a missed opportunity, generally, if you’re not taking to your kids about money. Paul Golden Managing director, National Endowment for Financial Education

2. Teach them to budget

Instead of saving, kids, like many adults, put money toward the things they want in the moment. In the AICPA’s survey, parents reported that kids spend most of their allowance money on outings with friends (47%) followed by digital devices and downloads (37%) and toys (33%). Learning to budget, though, will allow your child to think about all what they want to prioritize in the coming week, month, or year. If there’s something expensive your child really wants, you can drive home the connection between spending and earning by explaining how budgeting can help them meet their goals. Let’s say they want a $200 tablet but they end up blowing their allowance each week going out with friends. By setting aside, say, $20 of their $30 allowance, they can count on getting what they want in only 10 weeks. If they want it sooner, they can sock away the full $30 each week. And if they continue to splurge instead of save, don’t get mad. “It’s OK to make mistakes,” says Golden. “That starts to condition us as adults. There’s not some fairy that will come down and get you through till the next paycheck” when you’re an adult, either. So the best time for kids to trip up is when parents are there to guide and counsel them, and help them figure out what to do better going forward.

3. Help them differentiate between wants and needs

By helping them learn to budget for short- and long-term goals at a young age, you’re setting your kids up to tell the difference between wants and needs, explains Golden. Older kids may have to cover bills for the first time. “Once you have teens, they have to start prioritizing things they’ve never done [before], like putting gas in the car or paying for auto insurance,” he says. Condition kids to put money aside by encouraging them to save and budget starting at a young age, and they’ll be prepared to put their needs first. That, in turn, can help them avoid certain pitfalls of overspending, like winding up without money for gas.

Bonus advice: How much to give and how to set an example


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: alizah salario, ivana pino, sam becker, lisa ferber
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4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save


“Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. How to save money on housingHere are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. You can use your negotiation skills to save
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4 ways to save money on housing, even as costs keep going up

Housing can be the single biggest monthly expense in your budget. Your rent or mortgage payment can eat up a significant portion of your income, and it can be particularly difficult to figure out how to spend less on where you live. In some places, especially cities with high rents and astronomical home prices, keeping housing costs manageable is incredibly difficult. Ideally, experts say you should be spending only around a quarter of your income on housing-related costs. “Total housing costs shouldn’t exceed 28%,” says Heather Winston, a certified financial planner at retirement plan provider Principal, referring to the “28/36 rule” used by some advisors to help determine home affordability. “That’s superhard, especially for young people in an expensive real estate market,” Winston says.

How to save money on housing

Here are some ways you may be able to save some money whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. 1. Consider refinancing The current economic environment is friendly to homeowners looking to refinance, so it may be a good idea to consider your options. Mortgage rates are falling, which opens up an opportunity for homeowners to refinance and potentially lower your payments. Rates are 1.25 percentage points lower than they were in October 2018, which could save those with a $300,000 mortgage as much as $2,700 per year.

2. Invest in upgrades Making some small changes around the house may help you save money on your utility bills. Salvador Nobre Veiga, a 32-year-old living in Pennsylvania, told Grow earlier this year that he was able to reduce his annual utility costs by 66% by making upgrades to his house. For Nobre Veiga, investing in additional insulation, energy-efficient light bulbs, and a smart thermostat saved him hundreds of dollars per year. These are upgrades you can consider, too, whether you’re a homeowner or a renter. Utility bills cost the average household in the U.S. around $2,000 per year, so a few small upgrades can potentially save you hundreds of dollars annually. 3. Negotiate You can negotiate the price of almost anything. The trouble is, many people find it uncomfortable, so they just accept the terms they’re offered. But you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a better deal. You can use your negotiation skills to save money in other areas, too. Homeowners can negotiate with their insurance companies or contractors to save money on certain bills. Renters may be able to negotiate reductions in rent in exchange for making upgrades or repairs to properties, or in exchange for signing longer leases. It never hurts to ask — just remember to be nice.

4. Consider moving If you run out of options and can’t find a way for your current living situation to make financial sense, it may be in your best interest to move. For renters, this will be easier — though you still may have to pay a fee if you break your lease. But even that might save you money if you can find a significantly less expensive place to rent or share. Selling a house is a much bigger project, and it can take both an emotional and a financial toll. You can always look at other options, such as selling equity in your home to help you get by, before deciding to put your home on the market. Even if you’re open to moving, make sure you shift to a place you can better afford so you won’t end up finding yourself in a worse, or equally difficult, situation. And you probably shouldn’t hold out hope that your rent or home prices will decrease in the near future.

Housing costs keep going up


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Grocery chain CEO who ate expired food for a year says ignoring some sell-by dates can save you ‘a ton of money’

Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Raw


Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Raw
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Grocery chain CEO who ate expired food for a year says ignoring some sell-by dates can save you 'a ton of money'

Three years ago, Scott Nash, the founder and CEO of Mom’s Organic Market, a grocery store chain, found a six-month-old yogurt in his fridge. He peeled off the lid, and to his surprise found that the yogurt smelled fine and it wasn’t moldy. He ate it and waited. He felt fine. From there, he undertook an experiment. Nash, who calls himself a “staunch environmentalist,” spent the next year eating past-date food and blogging about it. He has made it his mission to show that expiration dates often don’t actually indicate that food has spoiled. By making consumers think otherwise, he argues, those dates contribute to America’s food waste problem. Americans throw away a staggering $218 billion worth of food a year, which averages out to a cost of $1,800 for a family of four. “As someone who has spent 30-plus years in the grocery business, I believe the main culprit, and the easiest way to make the most progress [in reducing food waste], is to overhaul our food product dating system and guidelines,” Nash wrote on his blog.

Mom’s Organic Market CEO and founder Scott Nash speaks at national “Keep Hives Alive Tour” on June 22, 2016. Courtesy Scott Nash

There is no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging, except for infant formula. Manufacturers mostly use their discretion to pick the “best by,” “sell by,” and “use by” dates printed on their products, so the chosen date can be a reflection of when the food company recommends using the product for peak quality rather than an indication of how safe it is to eat the labeled food. Nash shares with Grow the tricks he learned during his experiment that, he says, can help you avoid “throwing money in the garbage.” The CEO also shares a quiche recipe that he says serves as “a great vehicle for getting rid of stuff.”

Use your senses to determine if food has gone bad

Certain foods can last years beyond their expiration dates, primarily items like grains and dried foods. “Canned goods and jarred goods last for decades. They’re airtight and preserved,” says Nash. If a can appears warped or bloated, though, toss it. Grains like crackers or cereal might be edible past the expiration date, but they do eventually become rancid. “You’ll smell it if grains go bad … but you can also touch them to see if they’re stale,” Nash says. The point is that you can usually use your senses to determine if something’s no longer fit to eat. “If it smells bad, throw it away. If it looks moldy, throw it away,” says Nash. “It’s that simple.”

If it smells bad, throw it away. If it looks moldy, throw it away. … It’s that simple. Scott Nash CEO of Mom’s Organic Grocery

Meat, dairy, and eggs have a shorter shelf life. If you’re in doubt about these, he says, there are a few techniques you can use to test for freshness. “You can pour half-and-half into hot water and see if it curdles” before pouring it into your coffee and ruining your whole cup, he says. If an egg floats in a bowl of water, it’s gone bad.

When you can safely cut off mold

Mold can make certain foods dangerous to consumers. Other foods are fine, though, after mold is removed. Hard cheese with mold, for example, can still be edible if you remove the mold because it doesn’t penetrate the whole product. To use the cheese, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cutting off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot. Firm fruits and vegetables like cabbage, bell peppers, and carrots are also safe to use after getting rid of the moldy spot with the same technique. If you want to play it even safer, Nash says, cook the product after removing the mold: “Make a grilled cheese. Cook with that cheese instead of eating it with crackers.” And the same goes for butter, he says: “If it’s expired, cook with it to kill the bacteria.”

As someone who has spent 30-plus years in the grocery business, I believe the main culprit (and the easiest way to make the most progress) is to overhaul our food product dating system and guidelines. Scott Nash Mom’s Organic Market founder & CEO

The dish on beef

Uncooked beef with a foul odor, slimy texture, or sticky or tacky feel, is best thrown out, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But if refrigerated meat looks and smells slightly funky, it’s not necessarily unsafe. If you have ground beef that you want to salvage, try cooking it and adding tomato sauce: “The acid in the tomatoes helps preserve the meat for an extra two weeks in the refrigerator,” says Nash. Nash suggests freezing meat that’s past the expiration date. Keep in mind that the government has stricter guidelines, though. Here’s how the Food and Drug Administration recommends you freeze foods and how long they can last.

The HTML5 Herald How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. kiersten schmidt | grow Source: fda How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. kiersten schmidt | grow Source: fda How long to store food in the freezer If freezing meat or poultry in its original package longer than two months, cover it with airtight heavy-duty foil, freezer paper, or plastic wrap; or place inside a plastic bag. Raw eggs Ground meats* Hot dogs Lunch meats Fresh steaks* Fresh chops* Fresh roasts* Whole chicken Lean fish Fatty fish 0 months 3 6 9 12 *Includes beef, turkey, veal, pork, and lamb. Note: Because freezing at the recommended 0 F (-18 C) keeps food safe indefinitely, the storage times are for quality only. Graphic: kiersten schmidt | grow Source: FDA

Food for thought

Though these and other techniques worked for Nash, who didn’t suffer ill effects from his experiment, make sure to do your own research to determine what you’re comfortable with, and to always use your own good judgment. If you’re wavering about whether to keep certain foods around, remember that you can make most foods last by freezing them while fresh. Frozen foods generally won’t go bad because bacteria and other pathogens can’t grow at those temperatures. Nash also points out that while he took his food waste reduction strategy to extreme, “the other extreme is constantly throwing away perfectly fine stuff because of that arbitrary, stupid date.” And food waste is taking a toll on the planet: It’s an often overlooked driver of climate change. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 30% of food is wasted globally, contributing 8% of total global greenhouse gas emissions. If food waste were a country, it would come in third after the United States and China in terms of the impact on global warming. In other words, your choice is not all or nothing, says Nash: “If you at least stop throwing away canned or jarred goods, that would go a long way.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-05  Authors: sofia pitt, scott nash, anna-louise jackson, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grocery, fresh, ignoring, plastic, ton, expired, sellby, freezing, foods, away, meat, meats, months, dates, money, save, nash, food, chain


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Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, ‘What do I want my money to do for me?’

Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestsell


Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestsell
Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, ‘What do I want my money to do for me?’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, ask, setting, winging, dont, goals, retirement, financial, chatzky, step, money, jean, start


Jean Chatzky: When setting goals, ask, 'What do I want my money to do for me?'

Most people don’t set out on a road trip without settling on the route they’ll take — but chances are they haven’t done the same with their financial goals. A variety of surveys, including recent ones from Fidelity and Charles Schwab, show that at least 75% of Americans don’t have a financial plan. “People don’t lay out paths that get themselves to retirement, to having money put away for college tuition, even to having a basic emergency fund,” says Jean Chatzky, CEO of HerMoney.com and bestselling author of books including “Women with Money.” Without a plan for their financial future, many people end up winging it, and that can make them ill-prepared for retirement or any emergencies that might pop up. Don’t feel discouraged if you find the process of trying to create a plan overwhelming, either, says Chatzky: “It’s a challenge for most human beings.” Here are two of her tips for making the process simpler.

1. Figure out the right goals for you

If you’re among those who have been winging it, the first step to take is to figure out what your goals are, Chatzky recommends. Your goals may well be personal, like buying a home, planning for a family, or saving for retirement. “Take a step back and say, ‘What do I want my money to do for me this year?'” she says. “‘What do I want it to do for me in a couple of years? What do I want it to do for me five or 10 years down the road?'”

With those aims in mind, you’ll need to divvy up your money each month so that you can start saving up, and investing, for short-, medium, and long-term goals. If you’ve never created a personal budget, many experts recommend the 50/30/20 rule. It suggests you allocate 50% of your take-home pay to basic living expenses, 30% to discretionary spending, and the remaining 20% to savings and investments.

2. ‘Be really structured’

The earlier you can start planning your future, the better, as the money moves you make in your 20s and 30s will shape the rest of your life. Still, many small steps — such as the ones we outlined in Grow’s 30-day easy money makeover — can help you save or earn more at any time in life. And while you may have ideas for your goals, it’s important to really think through what you want. “Give yourself a little bit of time and a little bit of space, either with yourself or with a partner if you have one, to just focus,” Chatzky says. And then ask yourself: “‘What do I want and how can I use my limited resources in order to accomplish those things?'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: anna-louise jackson, myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, ask, setting, winging, dont, goals, retirement, financial, chatzky, step, money, jean, start


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How quickly you’ll save money by using eco-friendly gear instead of disposable items

But environmentally friendly products like water bottles and lunch containers ultimately save you money, says consumer expert Trae Bodge. Invest in a reusable water bottle”So many plastic water bottles are discarded anywhere and never are recycled,” says Victoria Fillet, a certified financial planner at Roosevelt Wealth Management in New York City. You can help cut down on plastic filling landfills by investing in a reusable water bottle. Bodge suggests a BPA-free plastic water bottle with a rep


But environmentally friendly products like water bottles and lunch containers ultimately save you money, says consumer expert Trae Bodge. Invest in a reusable water bottle”So many plastic water bottles are discarded anywhere and never are recycled,” says Victoria Fillet, a certified financial planner at Roosevelt Wealth Management in New York City. You can help cut down on plastic filling landfills by investing in a reusable water bottle. Bodge suggests a BPA-free plastic water bottle with a rep
How quickly you’ll save money by using eco-friendly gear instead of disposable items Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, water, items, ecofriendly, disposable, bottle, save, quickly, plastic, money, silicone, cost, using, gear, youll, bottles, coffee, reusable, instead


How quickly you'll save money by using eco-friendly gear instead of disposable items

Making the switch from single-use items to reusable products comes with an up-front investment. But environmentally friendly products like water bottles and lunch containers ultimately save you money, says consumer expert Trae Bodge. “Look for ways to reuse items, instead of throwing them away,” she says. Here are four eco-friendly products that can keep more trash out of landfills — and more money in your pocket.

1. Invest in a reusable water bottle

“So many plastic water bottles are discarded anywhere and never are recycled,” says Victoria Fillet, a certified financial planner at Roosevelt Wealth Management in New York City. You can help cut down on plastic filling landfills by investing in a reusable water bottle. Bodge suggests a BPA-free plastic water bottle with a replaceable carbon filter so you can fill your bottle at any tap without worrying about drinking water that has a strange taste or order. You can pick up a reusable bottle for less than $10. A 24-pack of 16.9-ounce Poland Spring water bottles costs $4.39 at Target, or $0.18 per bottle. Meanwhile, an 18.5-ounce Bobble bottle costs $8.99, and uses a filter that lasts long enough to fill up 300 16.9-ounce bottles. It’ll pay for itself after roughly 50 bottles’ worth of use.

2. Bring coffee to work with an insulated mug

A single coffee run likely isn’t breaking your budget, but over time, that daily caffeine fix can add up. “Getting coffee is a huge money waster because it’s very easy to make at home,” says Bodge. She recommends taking your coffee on-the-go with a reusable mug, which can cost anywhere from $25 to $37. On average, Americans pay $2.99 for a basic takeout cup of coffee. Making your own coffee at home would cost you about $1.28 per cup, saving you $1.71 a day, according to a coffee calculator from certified financial planner Doug Boneparth. So if you bought a $27 Zojirushi mug, it would pay for itself after roughly 16 cups of homemade coffee. Even if you’d rather buy your coffee instead of making it, there’s still a benefit to swapping in a reusable mug: You can often get discounts for doing so at popular chains such as Dunkin’ or Starbucks, and local coffee shops.

3. Meal prep with collapsible silicone containers

Not only can you save money by bringing your lunch to the office, you can also save by packing it in a reusable container instead of plastic baggies or takeout containers. Bodge recommends looking for BPA-free, freezer and microwave-safe collapsible silicone food containers, which can cost roughly $20 for a pack of four. Silicone lasts longer than plastic and has a lower chance of releasing chemicals into stored food, according to Recyclebank.com. “Your reusable packaging will cut down on the amount of recycled items that end up in the landfill, and of course it will save you lots of money,” says Fillet. A 145-count of Ziploc plastic sandwich baggies cost $7.42 on Amazon, or $0.05 per bag. Meanwhile, a 3-pack of washable and reusable silicone food storage bags cost $6.99 on Amazon. If you use one bag daily for a sandwich in your packed lunch, swapping in reusable silicone bags will pay off after 140 uses.

4. Replace your sponge with a dish cloth


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: myelle lansat, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, water, items, ecofriendly, disposable, bottle, save, quickly, plastic, money, silicone, cost, using, gear, youll, bottles, coffee, reusable, instead


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How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer

But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can. Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural


But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can. Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural
How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: aditi shrikant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, sell, food, product, groceries, longer, throwing, sale, expiration, dates, long, date, decode


How to decode expiration dates — and make your groceries last longer

Americans toss out almost a pound of food per day, according to a 2018 study. But you can curb how much you discard — and in turn, how much you spend on groceries. The trick is to understand expiration dates, so you know when it’s actually necessary to fling that milk into the trash can.

Food date labels became the norm in the 1970s, but there’s no federal regulation that says manufacturers have to include expiration dates on the packaging. (The lone exception: infant formula.) The language was never streamlined, which is why you see a mix of “best by,” “sell by,” and “use by” while you’re shopping.

Shoppers’ lack of education about expiration dates can cause problems, says Elizabeth Balkan, the food waste director of the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Those who have no intention of being wasteful in their consumption habits end up throwing things away because there is massive confusion,” she says.

The USDA defines these three kinds of expiration dates:

Use by: This is the “last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality.”

This is the “last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality.” Sell by: This is “how long to display the product for sale for inventory management.”

This is “how long to display the product for sale for inventory management.” Best by: This is when a product will be of “best flavor or quality.”

None of these dates indicate how safe it is to eat the labeled food. So instead of throwing out your purchases on what is essentially an arbitrary date, try these expert-approved tips for making your food last as long as possible so you can save money in the long run.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: aditi shrikant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, sell, food, product, groceries, longer, throwing, sale, expiration, dates, long, date, decode


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Filing this key form in October can double the amount of money you get for college

Starting October 1, families can file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (aka, FAFSA) for the 2020-2021 academic year. And if you want to get more money for college, it helps to get the form in early. The FAFSA matters so much because colleges and federal and state governments review it to figure out how much financial aid you can get. You’ll also need to fill it out to apply for federal student loans. Don’t make the mistake of waiting too long: It’s important to get the form in as soo


Starting October 1, families can file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (aka, FAFSA) for the 2020-2021 academic year. And if you want to get more money for college, it helps to get the form in early. The FAFSA matters so much because colleges and federal and state governments review it to figure out how much financial aid you can get. You’ll also need to fill it out to apply for federal student loans. Don’t make the mistake of waiting too long: It’s important to get the form in as soo
Filing this key form in October can double the amount of money you get for college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kelli grant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filing, double, college, financial, key, federal, colleges, aid, form, reich, file, money, fafsa, student


Filing this key form in October can double the amount of money you get for college

Starting October 1, families can file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (aka, FAFSA) for the 2020-2021 academic year. Yes, for next fall. And if you want to get more money for college, it helps to get the form in early.

The FAFSA matters so much because colleges and federal and state governments review it to figure out how much financial aid you can get. It informs their decisions about need-based grants and, often, merit scholarships. You’ll also need to fill it out to apply for federal student loans.

Don’t make the mistake of waiting too long: It’s important to get the form in as soon as you can.

“We’ve always said that, the sooner you can file, the better,” says T. Eric Reich, a certified financial planner and president of Reich Asset Management in Marmora, New Jersey. “That’s when the school has the most money — at the beginning.”

States and colleges set their own aid deadlines, often within months of when the FAFSA form becomes available — and it’s not unusual to see them dole out aid on a first-come, first-served basis.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kelli grant, sofia pitt, sam becker, lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filing, double, college, financial, key, federal, colleges, aid, form, reich, file, money, fafsa, student


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