‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p


Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both p
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: The best piece of investing advice I ever got

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell It Like Serhant,” knows a thing or two about money — he spends his time selling high-end real estate to some of the richest people in the world, after all. But when it comes to his own money, he’s fairly conservative. He saves a lot, and he knows the value of a dollar. When it comes to investing, he sticks to a pretty simple strategy: Invest in what you know. Serhant recently sat down with the Grow team to discuss the most valuable investing advice he’s received, how he learned about money at a young age, and more. Here is his story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

Serhant’s investing advice: ‘Invest in things you know’

The best piece of investment advice I was ever given was to invest in things you know. Things you use. Things you could see yourself using; things you actually like. Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. So, I invest in things or products that I enjoy, use, or think are really interesting. And that includes investing in technology, investing in people who are inventors and creating things — both physical products as well as software — [and] investing in real estate.

When it comes to real estate, I used to really think that to be a wise investor, you have to invest what you actually have to spend, so don’t spend more than you can afford. But I’ve found that to be incorrect. The best investments I’ve made are the ones that actually push me outside of my comfort level. Because you need to work more. You need to do more to actually get a return on this investment. And that’s worked really, really well for me.

‘The best investment I ever made’

The best investment I ever made: I invest in my business all the time. I invested in our YouTube vlog, and I think it’s funny because before I started the vlog on YouTube, everyone thought it was stupid and crazy. Including me. Actually, mostly me. I thought it was dumb. Just another form of social media. I was just sick and tired of it and I had no idea what it was going to do to our business. But it is a massive way of driving business and driving brand awareness. So, by investing the money that I did into the vlog, more people buy my book, more people buy the course, more people reach out to me to buy and sell homes.

Don’t invest in stuff that doesn’t interest you, because then you’re not going to follow up on it. You’re not going to be as active an investor. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

How being ‘broke’ led to his real estate career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, star, investing, advice, listing, serhant, piece, dollar, invest, youre, million, best, real, things, ryan, really, estate, actually, going


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‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money

Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City. Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. If we wanted money, we had to work for i


Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City. Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. If we wanted money, we had to work for i
‘Million Dollar Listing’ star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learned, serhant, dollar, million, star, wanted, thats, work, really, ryan, york, listing, money, sell, estate


'Million Dollar Listing' star Ryan Serhant: How I learned about money

Ryan Serhant visits Build Brunch to discuss “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT: How to Sell More, Earn more, and Become the Ultimate Sales Machine” at Build Studio on September 20, 2018, in New York City.

Real estate broker Ryan Serhant, star of the Bravo series “Million Dollar Listing” and “Sell it Like Serhant,” sat down with Grow for the first installment of our new series in which we ask authors, TV personalities, CEOs, and more how they first learned about money. Here is Serhant’s story, as told to senior reporter Sam Becker.

My work ethic: ‘If you work harder, you get more money’

My parents were smart with us. They taught us the value of the dollar and the value of hard work. I think that was the most important thing that they wanted us to understand. We never got money for free. It always had to come with some type of work. And it wasn’t just chores: It was manual labor, outside. It was shoveling for neighbors when it would snow, for example. If we wanted money, we had to work for it. That was instilled into my brain for as long as I can remember. My brothers and sisters all say the same thing. Our parents really, really, really pushed on us that if you want money you have to work for it, and if you work harder, you get more money. That’s it. It’s not that hard. That’s how you make it happen. Then with that money you can go and buy things that you want, or you can invest it or you can save it. You can do whatever you want.

If we wanted money, we had to work for it. That was instilled into my brain for as long as I can remember. Ryan Serhant Real estate broker, author, and TV star

My earning strategy: ‘Be yourself, know your stuff’

I distinctly remember what it was like to be in New York City in the summer of 2008 with no money. I had no idea how I was going to pay my rent come September 1. I had no idea how I was going to buy groceries. I had no idea what I was going to do. And that is a terrifying, sickening, awful feeling. If you’ve ever been that broke — anywhere, but especially in New York City where everything is really expensive — I feel for you. You know what I’m talking about. That is really what pushed me to get into real estate. I had a friend who said, “Listen, it doesn’t cost anything, just get your real estate license, go out there, and start advising people and showing people rental apartments. You don’t have to buy anything. You don’t have to do anything. All you have to do is be yourself, know your stuff, and people will pay you a fee for showing them apartments.” And that’s what I did. And it worked. I got my first rental commission and it was like $500. I was like, “Yes, 500 bucks! Awesome!” And my next one was $700 and then $1,000, and it grew slowly from there.

My savings secret: ‘I always have a massive, massive rainy day fund’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: sam becker, ivana pino, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learned, serhant, dollar, million, star, wanted, thats, work, really, ryan, york, listing, money, sell, estate


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‘The IPO process has devolved,’ tech investor Bill Gurley says as he leads a direct listing movement

The IPO process has “devolved” and it’s time for a new approach, venture capitalist Bill Gurley said in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Alley,” Wednesday. Executives from Slack and Spotify, which both completed direct listings, were among the attendees. Gurley told CNBC that direct listings provide more open and equal access to shares and ensures market-based pricing. While an IPO may be appealing for a company that wants to raise capital, Gurley said the group discussed late stage capital fundra


The IPO process has “devolved” and it’s time for a new approach, venture capitalist Bill Gurley said in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Alley,” Wednesday. Executives from Slack and Spotify, which both completed direct listings, were among the attendees. Gurley told CNBC that direct listings provide more open and equal access to shares and ensures market-based pricing. While an IPO may be appealing for a company that wants to raise capital, Gurley said the group discussed late stage capital fundra
‘The IPO process has devolved,’ tech investor Bill Gurley says as he leads a direct listing movement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, capital, meeting, listings, investor, leads, shares, movement, listing, gurley, devolved, direct, ipo, companies, process, tech


'The IPO process has devolved,' tech investor Bill Gurley says as he leads a direct listing movement

The IPO process has “devolved” and it’s time for a new approach, venture capitalist Bill Gurley said in an interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Alley,” Wednesday.

Gurley, a general partner at Benchmark Capital, hosted a meeting with about 100 private companies and VC firms in San Francisco Tuesday to discuss the benefits of direct listing rather than the traditional initial public offering process. Executives from Slack and Spotify, which both completed direct listings, were among the attendees.

Gurley told CNBC that direct listings provide more open and equal access to shares and ensures market-based pricing. While an IPO may be appealing for a company that wants to raise capital, Gurley said the group discussed late stage capital fundraising options at Tuesday’s meeting. Airbnb is expected to be one of the next major tech companies to consider a direct listing, according to Bloomberg.

“The data of how Silicon Valley companies have been taken advantage of by this broken process, it goes back … 30 or 40 years,” Gurley said. “In the past three years it’s gotten worse and I think that’s because the IPO process has devolved … it used to be that the IPO process was about disseminating and marketing and selling far and wide and it’s become a game of just hand-allocating shares to the same 10 or 15 firms.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, capital, meeting, listings, investor, leads, shares, movement, listing, gurley, devolved, direct, ipo, companies, process, tech


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Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs

One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop. Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg. From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the ev


One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop. Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg. From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the ev
Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy scott wapner, ari levy, scott wapner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, talk, companies, ways, nearly, venture, valley, listings, slack, lewis, event, according, michael, ipo, listing, public, silicon, direct, buy


Slack, Spotify and Michael Lewis will join nearly every big investor in Silicon Valley to talk about direct listings vs IPOs

Bill Gurley, the venture capitalist from Benchmark and former Uber board member, is leading a meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday to explore alternatives to the traditional IPO process, which the investor said recently has put Silicon Valley “on the bad end of a bad joke for about four decades now.”

The invitation-only event — Direct Listings: A Simpler and Superior Alternative to the IPO — is being held at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco and will include presentations from public CEOs and CFOs who have gone through IPOs in recent years, as well top executives from Slack and Spotify, which bypassed underwriters in favor of the direct listing path, according to the agenda obtained by CNBC.

The direct listing approach will be a primary topic of discussion, as companies look for ways to allow employees and early investors to sell shares without waiting for the six-month lock-up period to expire and to avoid paying such hefty fees to underwriters. One of the main ways bankers currently make money is through the so-called greenshoe, which allows them to buy shares at the IPO price after the initial pop.

Sequoia Capital’s Mike Moritz is participating in a session with Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy. Sequoia is a large investor in Airbnb, one of the largest remaining tech companies that has not gone public. It’s expected to pursue a direct listing next year, according to Bloomberg.

CEOs speaking include Zillow’s Rich Barton, who co-founded the real estate site in 2004 and just took the helm this year, Stitch Fix’s Katrina Lake and MuleSoft’s Greg Schott, whose company was bought by Salesforce last year.

From the buy side — the investors who buy public stocks — the event will feature a discussion between money managers at Wellington, Holocene and Altimeter.

About 100 private companies are expected to attend, along with partners from venture firms Andreessen Horowitz, Menlo Ventures, Bessemer Venture Partners, GGV and others, according to people familiar with the event who asked not to be named because the guest list is private. Stacey Cunningham, president of NYSE Euronext will be interviewed on stage, and Jay Ritter, an IPO expert and business professor at the University of Florida, will present four decades worth of data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy scott wapner, ari levy, scott wapner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spotify, talk, companies, ways, nearly, venture, valley, listings, slack, lewis, event, according, michael, ipo, listing, public, silicon, direct, buy


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You don’t have to be a big brand name to do a direct listing, investors try to convince start-ups

For a company to go public through a direct listing successfully, conventional wisdom says it needs to have a big brand that consumers recognize and every investor knows. Tuesday’s event, Direct Listings: A Simpler and Superior Alternative to the IPO, was by invitation only and closed to the press. Barry McCarthy, Spotify’s CFO and the architect of the music company’s direct listing last year, spoke first about how his company handled the direct listing. “Direct listings I always thought of as t


For a company to go public through a direct listing successfully, conventional wisdom says it needs to have a big brand that consumers recognize and every investor knows. Tuesday’s event, Direct Listings: A Simpler and Superior Alternative to the IPO, was by invitation only and closed to the press. Barry McCarthy, Spotify’s CFO and the architect of the music company’s direct listing last year, spoke first about how his company handled the direct listing. “Direct listings I always thought of as t
You don’t have to be a big brand name to do a direct listing, investors try to convince start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direct, big, brand, companies, try, outreach, investors, convince, company, ipo, listings, event, medina, money, startups, dont, listing, traditional


You don't have to be a big brand name to do a direct listing, investors try to convince start-ups

For a company to go public through a direct listing successfully, conventional wisdom says it needs to have a big brand that consumers recognize and every investor knows. Spotify and Slack could go that route because they didn’t need bankers to explain their stories to money managers.

But some big-name venture capitalists are trying to get other types of companies to consider the possibility of bypassing the traditional IPO and selling their existing shares to investors directly.

At an event on Tuesday in San Francisco for about 100 CEOs of late-stage start-ups and another 200 people in the tech investing universe, Benchmark’s Bill Gurley said many more companies should start considering direct listings, rather than going the traditional IPO route.

Gurley, a former board member of Uber, has criticized IPO bankers for pricing offerings too low, leading to a first-day “pop” that makes money for early buyers at the expense of the companies selling the shares. Tuesday’s event, Direct Listings: A Simpler and Superior Alternative to the IPO, was by invitation only and closed to the press.

One audience member who got the message loud and clear was Manny Medina, the CEO of Outreach, a Seattle-based company whose software is designed to help salespeople track and stay in touch with customers. Outreach is far from a household name, but Medina said it’s a high-growth company with the public market in its sights.

“I don’t need introductions to funds,” said Medina, noting that big investment firm Lone Pine Capital is already a backer, and firms like Wellington, T. Rowe Price and Fidelity have talked to the company at some point during its private fundraising efforts. “And we sell to enterprise customers, so the discovery process is a lot less obscure than it used to be.”

Barry McCarthy, Spotify’s CFO and the architect of the music company’s direct listing last year, spoke first about how his company handled the direct listing.

Medina is well aware that Outreach has nowhere near that kind of brand recognition, but the event convinced him it might not matter.

“Direct listings I always thought of as this mythical animal,” said Medina, who came in from Seattle just for the one-day event. “The point is that the bar is not that high anymore.”

It’s still very early and the market has hardly been tested. Spotify and Slack are both trading well below their debut prices, so even though the companies avoided leaving money on the table, they haven’t generated the kind of continued excitement of a Zoom or CrowdStrike, which have surged since their IPOs.

Tech giant Airbnb is leaning towards a direct listing, but other investors who spoke to CNBC at Tuesday’s event said almost all of the late-stage companies in their portfolios are still planning for a traditional IPO.

Correction: An earlier version of this story included the incorrect name of an Outreach investor. It’s Lone Pine Capital.

WATCH: Direct listings the way to go as companies become more profitable


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: ari levy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direct, big, brand, companies, try, outreach, investors, convince, company, ipo, listings, event, medina, money, startups, dont, listing, traditional


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Tech investor Bill Gurley says IPOs have put Silicon Valley on ‘bad end of a bad joke for about four decades’

Bill Gurley of venture capital firm Benchmark says that when it comes to IPOs, investment banks have been getting the better of tech companies and start-up investors for a long time. In a discussion on CNBC’s “Halftime Report” on Tuesday, Gurley, whose firm is a big investor in Uber and WeWork, said the direct listing approach taken by Spotify and Slack is a model that more companies should consider. In a direct listing, companies don’t use banks to distribute and price new shares, but rather op


Bill Gurley of venture capital firm Benchmark says that when it comes to IPOs, investment banks have been getting the better of tech companies and start-up investors for a long time. In a discussion on CNBC’s “Halftime Report” on Tuesday, Gurley, whose firm is a big investor in Uber and WeWork, said the direct listing approach taken by Spotify and Slack is a model that more companies should consider. In a direct listing, companies don’t use banks to distribute and price new shares, but rather op
Tech investor Bill Gurley says IPOs have put Silicon Valley on ‘bad end of a bad joke for about four decades’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, investors, silicon, investor, end, ipos, bad, banks, listing, direct, tech, valley, decades, gurley, ipo, joke


Tech investor Bill Gurley says IPOs have put Silicon Valley on 'bad end of a bad joke for about four decades'

Bill Gurley of venture capital firm Benchmark says that when it comes to IPOs, investment banks have been getting the better of tech companies and start-up investors for a long time.

In a discussion on CNBC’s “Halftime Report” on Tuesday, Gurley, whose firm is a big investor in Uber and WeWork, said the direct listing approach taken by Spotify and Slack is a model that more companies should consider. In a direct listing, companies don’t use banks to distribute and price new shares, but rather open up the public market to stock owned by existing stakeholders.

“I think Silicon Valley has been on the bad end of a bad joke for about four decades now, in terms of the way the traditional IPO process works,” Gurley said. “The more I study and contrast it with direct listings, the more I realize that.”

Gurley pointed to research from Jay Ritter, an IPO expert and business professor at the University of Florida, which shows that top investment banks like Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Jefferies continue to underprice IPOs, meaning companies are giving away upside to new investors. Based on Ritter’s data, he estimates that Silicon Valley companies have handed over more than $170 billion as a result of underpricing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-12  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, investors, silicon, investor, end, ipos, bad, banks, listing, direct, tech, valley, decades, gurley, ipo, joke


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Saudi Aramco CEO confirms IPO will list locally ‘very soon’

ABU DHABI — Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil company, is prepared for a listing on the Riyadh stock exchange and it will take place “very soon,” its CEO said Tuesday. “What we have always said is that Aramco is ready for listing whenever the shareholders make a decision to list,” Aramco President and CEO Amin Nasser told reporters at the World Energy Conference in Abu Dhabi. Nasser also confirmed the state oil giant’s aims to list internationally in addition to Saudi Arabia, though did not


ABU DHABI — Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil company, is prepared for a listing on the Riyadh stock exchange and it will take place “very soon,” its CEO said Tuesday. “What we have always said is that Aramco is ready for listing whenever the shareholders make a decision to list,” Aramco President and CEO Amin Nasser told reporters at the World Energy Conference in Abu Dhabi. Nasser also confirmed the state oil giant’s aims to list internationally in addition to Saudi Arabia, though did not
Saudi Aramco CEO confirms IPO will list locally ‘very soon’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: natasha turak sam meredith, natasha turak, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listing, soon, saudi, stock, public, list, oil, locally, ceo, shareholders, ready, aramco, confirms, ipo


Saudi Aramco CEO confirms IPO will list locally 'very soon'

ABU DHABI — Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil company, is prepared for a listing on the Riyadh stock exchange and it will take place “very soon,” its CEO said Tuesday.

“What we have always said is that Aramco is ready for listing whenever the shareholders make a decision to list,” Aramco President and CEO Amin Nasser told reporters at the World Energy Conference in Abu Dhabi.

“And as you heard from His Royal Highness Prince Abdulaziz yesterday, it is going to be very soon. So, we are ready — that is the bottom line.”

Nasser also confirmed the state oil giant’s aims to list internationally in addition to Saudi Arabia, though did not specify which other locations are under consideration.

“The primary listing is to list locally but we are ready also for listing outside in other districts,” Nasser said.

When asked whether he would prefer to see Aramco list in Tokyo, Japan, he replied: “We are ready to list wherever shareholders decide.”

Reuters reported on Monday that the kingdom plans to list 1% of Aramco on its local stock exchange before the end of this year and another 1% in 2020, citing sources, as first steps ahead of a public sale of roughly 5% of the company.

The oil giant has delayed its IPO, originally scheduled for 2018, reportedly over Saudi concerns about public scrutiny over its finances and because of the complexity of its corporate structure. The listing would be the largest public offering in history.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: natasha turak sam meredith, natasha turak, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, listing, soon, saudi, stock, public, list, oil, locally, ceo, shareholders, ready, aramco, confirms, ipo


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Jeff Bezos’ job listing for Amazon’s first hire: You have to exceed what ‘most competent people think possible’

Jeff Bezos published a job listing for Amazon’s first hire in August 1994, and it’s completely in line with the way Bezos runs his tech empire today. Thursday, Bezos posted a screenshot of the job listing on Instagram. “Feels like yesterday,” Bezos wrote, ending with the hashtag “#gratitude.” Bezos’ listing said he was seeking “extremely talented” developers “to help pioneer commerce on the Internet.” And with the same high standards Bezos requires today, he wrote that candidates should be able


Jeff Bezos published a job listing for Amazon’s first hire in August 1994, and it’s completely in line with the way Bezos runs his tech empire today. Thursday, Bezos posted a screenshot of the job listing on Instagram. “Feels like yesterday,” Bezos wrote, ending with the hashtag “#gratitude.” Bezos’ listing said he was seeking “extremely talented” developers “to help pioneer commerce on the Internet.” And with the same high standards Bezos requires today, he wrote that candidates should be able
Jeff Bezos’ job listing for Amazon’s first hire: You have to exceed what ‘most competent people think possible’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, possible, think, jeff, job, bezos, today, way, version, cadabra, competent, listing, amazons, yesterday, posted, exceed, wrote, hire


Jeff Bezos' job listing for Amazon's first hire: You have to exceed what 'most competent people think possible'

Jeff Bezos published a job listing for Amazon’s first hire in August 1994, and it’s completely in line with the way Bezos runs his tech empire today.

Thursday, Bezos posted a screenshot of the job listing on Instagram.

“I posted our first job opening 25 years ago today, when I hadn’t even settled on the name Amazon yet,” he wrote. (The name at the time was Cadabra, a shortened version of the magician’s expression, “abracadabra.” After Bezos’ lawyer said “Cadabra” sounded like “cadaver” over the phone, Bezos changed it.)

“Feels like yesterday,” Bezos wrote, ending with the hashtag “#gratitude.”

Bezos’ listing said he was seeking “extremely talented” developers “to help pioneer commerce on the Internet.” And with the same high standards Bezos requires today, he wrote that candidates should be able to build large, complex systems “in about one-third the time that most competent people think possible.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, possible, think, jeff, job, bezos, today, way, version, cadabra, competent, listing, amazons, yesterday, posted, exceed, wrote, hire


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Goodbye IPO, hello direct listing?

Google had its IPO 15 years ago, and it was a big deal for a couple of reasons. First of all, Google’s IPO was a glimmer of hope after the dotcom bust. And Google was trying to reinvent the IPO by making it more transparent, using a process called a Dutch Auction. Today, the IPO hasn’t changed for the most part, but maybe it’s about to. Jon Fortt breaks down the IPO market with Mr. IPO Jay Ritter, Quartz’s Kevin Delaney and TechCrunch’s Connie Loizos.


Google had its IPO 15 years ago, and it was a big deal for a couple of reasons. First of all, Google’s IPO was a glimmer of hope after the dotcom bust. And Google was trying to reinvent the IPO by making it more transparent, using a process called a Dutch Auction. Today, the IPO hasn’t changed for the most part, but maybe it’s about to. Jon Fortt breaks down the IPO market with Mr. IPO Jay Ritter, Quartz’s Kevin Delaney and TechCrunch’s Connie Loizos.
Goodbye IPO, hello direct listing? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jonathan kim jon fortt, jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direct, google, wrote, wont, process, hello, mean, ipo, fortt, wall, way, listing, weekly, goodbye


Goodbye IPO, hello direct listing?

Google had its IPO 15 years ago, and it was a big deal for a couple of reasons. First of all, Google’s IPO was a glimmer of hope after the dotcom bust. And Google was trying to reinvent the IPO by making it more transparent, using a process called a Dutch Auction.

Today, the IPO hasn’t changed for the most part, but maybe it’s about to.

Prominent venture capitalist Michael Mortiz of Sequoia Capital wrote an op-ed arguing that Slack and Spotify are leading the way to a better day where Wall Street won’t control and mystify the process of going public. Instead, companies will directly list their shares when they go public.

But what would that mean for mom-and-pop investors? What would it mean for startup employees looking to make good?

Jon Fortt breaks down the IPO market with Mr. IPO Jay Ritter, Quartz’s Kevin Delaney and TechCrunch’s Connie Loizos.

Fortt Knox is a weekly podcast from CNBC anchor Jon Fortt. Previous episodes of the program can be found here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-22  Authors: jonathan kim jon fortt, jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direct, google, wrote, wont, process, hello, mean, ipo, fortt, wall, way, listing, weekly, goodbye


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Tesla has started a new anti-fraud department, according to a recent job listing

For instance, in June 2018, Musk sent a pair of e-mails around to all Tesla employees urging them to find and stop turncoats. In one e-mail, Musk asserted:”A Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations.” In that same e-mail, Musk told Tesla employees that they are in a battle that could be characterized as Tesla versus the world. In November 2018, according to a Department of Justice statement, a former Tesla employee named Salil Parulekar was indicte


For instance, in June 2018, Musk sent a pair of e-mails around to all Tesla employees urging them to find and stop turncoats. In one e-mail, Musk asserted:”A Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations.” In that same e-mail, Musk told Tesla employees that they are in a battle that could be characterized as Tesla versus the world. In November 2018, according to a Department of Justice statement, a former Tesla employee named Salil Parulekar was indicte
Tesla has started a new anti-fraud department, according to a recent job listing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicle, started, listing, waste, musk, antifraud, teslas, fraud, employees, recent, department, tesla, told, employee, according, job


Tesla has started a new anti-fraud department, according to a recent job listing

Tesla is stepping up its efforts to detect and prevent fraud and waste within its ranks, according to a job listing posted to its own careers page on July 19th, and syndicated to LinkedIn about a week ago.

According to the recruiting ad, Tesla seeks a “Manager, Financial (Anti-Fraud) Analytics & Investigation,” to helm a new group. Here’s an excerpt:

“Global Fraud Management is a new team established to promote and foster a culture of ethical behavior and to mitigate fraud, waste, and abuse through prevention, investigation, and remediation. In this role, the ideal candidate would work with key stakeholders to build the global fraud strategy for Tesla and develop a world-class fraud prevention, detection, and response team.'”

The listing doesn’t say what prompted the creation of this team.

However, Tesla’s factories have been plagued by waste and disorganization in the past. For example, employees previously told CNBC that they had trouble tracking their project budgets and specific purchase orders within Tesla’s disparate systems. Others told CNBC they engaged in quick fixes during Model 3 vehicle assembly which Tesla said were not in line with company’s official procedures and policies.

CEO Elon Musk has also espoused the notion that Tesla is besieged by haters, some out to damage the electric vehicle and renewable energy company from within.

For instance, in June 2018, Musk sent a pair of e-mails around to all Tesla employees urging them to find and stop turncoats. In one e-mail, Musk asserted:

“A Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations.”

It turned out Musk was referencing Martin Tripp, a former Gigafactory employee who claimed Tesla was using flawed battery manufacturing practices, and hiding relevant info from shareholders. Tripp is still embroiled in a legal battle with Tesla after taking his claims to press.

In that same e-mail, Musk told Tesla employees that they are in a battle that could be characterized as Tesla versus the world. He wrote:

“As you know, there are a long list of organizations that want Tesla to die. These include Wall Street short sellers, who have already lost billions of dollars and stand to lose a lot more. Then there are the oil and gas companies, the wealthiest industry in the world—they don’t love the idea of Tesla advancing the progress of solar power and electric cars.”

In another e-mail that week, speaking of one of several paint shop fires that occurred at Tesla’s Fremont, California factory throughout 2018, Musk said: “Could just be a random event, but as Andy Grove said, ‘Only the paranoid survive.’ Please be on the alert for anything that’s not in the best interests of our company.”

In November 2018, according to a Department of Justice statement, a former Tesla employee named Salil Parulekar was indicted for allegedly embezzling $9.3 million from Tesla by diverting payments from one supplier to another.

And in the first quarter of 2019, Tesla filed a pair of lawsuits against former employees at self-driving tech venture Zoox, and Chinese electric vehicle makers, Xiaopeng, alleging theft of trade secrets.

CNBC has reached out to Tesla for comment about the job listing and will update this post if the company responds.

WATCH: Inside Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-05  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vehicle, started, listing, waste, musk, antifraud, teslas, fraud, employees, recent, department, tesla, told, employee, according, job


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