The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


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NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp


The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp
NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


NBC's 2020 streaming service won't be very compelling for cord cutters — and that's by design

The streaming wars — the race to launch subscription video products — has been driven by an underlying concept: The traditional pay-TV bundle is dying as millions of U.S. households cut the cord each year and shift their video consumption to services like Netflix.

This has been a hard pill to swallow for legacy media companies, which derive billions of dollars from traditional pay TV. Yet, many of those media companies are coming to grips with reality and beginning to disrupt their own business models, headlined by Disney’s $6.99 Disney+ offering for this year.

That’s not the case for Comcast’s NBCUniversal (the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com).

NBC doesn’t want you to cut the cord. Maybe this isn’t too surprising since its owner is the largest U.S. cable company. But it’s unusual because it directly contradicts the disruption narrative. Instead of submissively accepting that the pay-TV world is ending, NBC is taking a stand and fighting back.

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring.

NBC’s ad-supported streaming service will be free to all customers who pay for traditional live television — whether through Comcast or any other provider, including virtual pay-TV bundles like Google’s YouTube TV or AT&T’s DirecTV Now, assuming partnership deals are struck, according to people familiar with the matter.

For those who have cut the cord, it will probably be about $10, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions on price are still ongoing.

CNBC has also learned that the free version of service for pay-TV subscribers will include live linear channels, same-season episodes and past-season episodes. Customers will be able to watch NBC programming anywhere, on any device, independent of their cable provider’s footprint. NBC will have nonexclusive access to all of the programming it sells to Hulu for the streaming service, as part of the deal with Disney the two companies announced on Tuesday.

But the $10 version for cord cutters won’t include live linear channels and won’t include same-season shows. You’ll get a bunch of reruns, most of which will also be available on Hulu if you already subscribe to that service. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined.

So what are you getting for your $10 a month? Not much at first. And that’s the point.

NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. The company is actively trying to make its cord-cutting streaming service inferior to its pay-TV version. The service is primarily meant as a nice additional benefit for customers who already pay for cable or satellite TV.

NBC’s decision isn’t totally motivated by supporting Comcast’s cable TV business. Now that Disney has full operational control of Hulu, Disney can bundle Hulu (or Hulu with Live TV) with Disney+ to make a compelling streaming offering that should further accelerate cord cutting. NBC is OK with this. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free.

NBC will certainly monitor the take rate of its streaming service among non pay-TV subscribers if cord cutting dramatically accelerates. If necessary, it can move content on and off its service thanks to Tuesday’s deal with Hulu, as well as the impending expiration of streaming-rights deals for popular shows it owns, such as “The Office.” And three years from now, when its content deal with Hulu ends, there’s an easy path for NBC to make its streaming service more compelling by making all its content exclusive to it.

But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a compelling addition for cord cutters. And that’s the point.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

WATCH: Comcast will sell its Hulu stake to Disney, giving Disney full control


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


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Uber, volatility and trillion-dollar companies: The Reformed Broker Live on Twitter at 11amET

Today’s market conversation is going to be dominated by two things: The recent spate of volatility and the imminent public offering of Uber. Uber’s great challenge is to convince investors that ongoing losses are optimal for the company’s pursuit of dominant market share. It must also convince Wall Street that it is more than just a networked taxi and limousine service — and so you can expect to hear a lot about Uber Eats as well as experiments in freight and trucking. Investors want to know if


Today’s market conversation is going to be dominated by two things: The recent spate of volatility and the imminent public offering of Uber. Uber’s great challenge is to convince investors that ongoing losses are optimal for the company’s pursuit of dominant market share. It must also convince Wall Street that it is more than just a networked taxi and limousine service — and so you can expect to hear a lot about Uber Eats as well as experiments in freight and trucking. Investors want to know if
Uber, volatility and trillion-dollar companies: The Reformed Broker Live on Twitter at 11amET Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: josh brown
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reformed, wall, twitter, going, live, companies, uber, market, 11amet, convince, investors, recent, lyft, ongoing, volatility, trilliondollar, broker, theres


Uber, volatility and trillion-dollar companies: The Reformed Broker Live on Twitter at 11amET

Today’s market conversation is going to be dominated by two things: The recent spate of volatility and the imminent public offering of Uber.

And there’s some crossover between the topics.

Uber’s IPO may be raising less money than had originally been expected due to a cooling off of investor enthusiasm for stocks in general and for ride-hailing services in particular.

With Lyft currently selling for 27% less than it’s opening tick, there’s a bit of second-guessing going on among investors about whether or not these companies can continue to scale unprofitably.

Uber’s great challenge is to convince investors that ongoing losses are optimal for the company’s pursuit of dominant market share.

It must also convince Wall Street that it is more than just a networked taxi and limousine service — and so you can expect to hear a lot about Uber Eats as well as experiments in freight and trucking.

Lastly, the recent strikes by Lyft and Uber drivers may have cast a pall over the category in the media, but we’ll see if investors are concerned at all about this ongoing issue.

Investors want to know if Uber will turn into the next trillion-dollar company — a milestone Microsoft hit (albeit briefly) since our last show. We’ll be talking about that, too.

Dominic Chu and I want your questions on these topics. We’ll be answering your queries live on Twitter at 11 a.m. ET. Check it out here:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-10  Authors: josh brown
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reformed, wall, twitter, going, live, companies, uber, market, 11amet, convince, investors, recent, lyft, ongoing, volatility, trilliondollar, broker, theres


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‘American Ninja Warrior’ host Akbar Gbajabiamila’s simple money secret: Live within your means

Before Akbar Gbajabiamila became a pro football player and co-host of NBC’s “American Ninja Warrior,” he was a kid growing up in South Central Los Angeles with six siblings and immigrant parents. During that time, he formed ideas about money that he still carries with him today. “I had a counselor once tell me that I had a poor mentality. Gbajabiamila’s parents, who emigrated from Nigeria in 1974, were both business owners. “I can hear them in their Nigerian accent: ‘You better save for a rainy


Before Akbar Gbajabiamila became a pro football player and co-host of NBC’s “American Ninja Warrior,” he was a kid growing up in South Central Los Angeles with six siblings and immigrant parents. During that time, he formed ideas about money that he still carries with him today. “I had a counselor once tell me that I had a poor mentality. Gbajabiamila’s parents, who emigrated from Nigeria in 1974, were both business owners. “I can hear them in their Nigerian accent: ‘You better save for a rainy
‘American Ninja Warrior’ host Akbar Gbajabiamila’s simple money secret: Live within your means Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: michelle fox, stan litow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, todayi, means, keeps, warrior, ninja, live, gbajabiamilas, day, think, american, simple, rainy, save, gbajabiamila, business, poor, host, secret, money


'American Ninja Warrior' host Akbar Gbajabiamila's simple money secret: Live within your means

Before Akbar Gbajabiamila became a pro football player and co-host of NBC’s “American Ninja Warrior,” he was a kid growing up in South Central Los Angeles with six siblings and immigrant parents.

During that time, he formed ideas about money that he still carries with him today.

“I had a counselor once tell me that I had a poor mentality. I think like a poor man,” he said.

“I’m OK with that,” Gbajabiamila added. “Because it keeps me humble.

“It keeps me staying within a framework that allows me to invest in my future.”

Gbajabiamila’s parents, who emigrated from Nigeria in 1974, were both business owners. His father owned a plumbing business and his mother had her own hair salon. They instilled in him the importance of saving money.

“I can hear them in their Nigerian accent: ‘You better save for a rainy day, save for a rainy day,'” he said. “And to me that was the foundation of my financial literacy.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: michelle fox, stan litow
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, todayi, means, keeps, warrior, ninja, live, gbajabiamilas, day, think, american, simple, rainy, save, gbajabiamila, business, poor, host, secret, money


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Melinda Gates: Capitalism needs work, but it beats socialism and the US is ‘lucky’ to have it

Capitalism vs. socialism? “What I know to be true is I would far rather live in a capitalistic society than a socialist society,” Gates said in an interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick that aired on “Squawk Box” on Wednesday. “I think when we stop and think of what we have from a capitalistic society, we have to remember what we actually have.” Gates’ comments come as the American political system is embroiled in a debate about socialism and capitalism. Without mentioning the political debate, Gates


Capitalism vs. socialism? “What I know to be true is I would far rather live in a capitalistic society than a socialist society,” Gates said in an interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick that aired on “Squawk Box” on Wednesday. “I think when we stop and think of what we have from a capitalistic society, we have to remember what we actually have.” Gates’ comments come as the American political system is embroiled in a debate about socialism and capitalism. Without mentioning the political debate, Gates
Melinda Gates: Capitalism needs work, but it beats socialism and the US is ‘lucky’ to have it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, melinda, say, society, socialism, capitalism, beats, capitalistic, gates, work, lucky, system, need, think, live


Melinda Gates: Capitalism needs work, but it beats socialism and the US is 'lucky' to have it

Capitalism vs. socialism? For Melinda Gates, the choice is simple.

“What I know to be true is I would far rather live in a capitalistic society than a socialist society,” Gates said in an interview with CNBC’s Becky Quick that aired on “Squawk Box” on Wednesday. “I think when we stop and think of what we have from a capitalistic society, we have to remember what we actually have.”

Gates’ comments come as the American political system is embroiled in a debate about socialism and capitalism. Several Democratic lawmakers and presidential candidates have called for sweeping changes to a system they say is responsible for growing inequality and division within the country. President Donald Trump has accused them of embracing socialism, which he says would lead to economic ruin in the U.S.

Without mentioning the political debate, Gates, who co-chairs the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation along with her husband, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, defended the U.S. system. Yet she also acknowledged the need to address the gaps between the rich and the poor.

Gates also said U.S. residents are “lucky,” and that people living in developing countries “want to live in these types of capitalistic societies.”

Several American billionaires have argued that the modern version of capitalism isn’t working. Wealthy business leaders such as Warren Buffett, Jamie Dimon, Ray Dalio and Bill Gates have called for fixes to widening economic inequality and the lack of public education funding. Some are advocating for public-private partnerships and higher taxes on the wealthy to address widespread income inequality.

These business leaders have also condemned arguments for socialism. Dimon, CEO of J.P. Morgan, told shareholders this month that socialism “inevitably produces stagnation, corruption and often worse,” but acknowledged there are flaws with capitalism and that it should be combined with a strong social safety net.

In her CNBC interview, Gates called for proper government regulation and a solid tax system to address capitalism’s gaps.

“I think we all do better as a globe when countries can grow from low, to middle income, to high income,” she said. “And so I think we need to look at our system and say, ‘OK, what are the great things about it? And what are the things that, at this point in time, we need to adjust and change?'”

Despite these issues, she said, American capitalism is the envy of much of the world.

“When I go to places like Malawi or Tanzania or Senegal, they say they all want to live in America,” Gates said. “We are lucky to live here. They want to live in these types of capitalistic societies. And we just need to tune it and get it right.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needs, melinda, say, society, socialism, capitalism, beats, capitalistic, gates, work, lucky, system, need, think, live


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Trump’s Fed pick Moore in trouble again, once called Cincinnati and Cleveland ‘armpits of America’

President Donald Trump’s pick to a fill a vacancy at the Federal Reserve has run into more trouble thanks to new revelations about his past remarks. Video has surfaced of Stephen Moore making disparaging remarks about Cleveland and Cincinnati. “If you live in the Midwest, where else do you want to live besides Chicago, right?” “You don’t want to live in Cincinnati or Cleveland, these, you know, armpits of America. Neither Cain nor Moore have been officially nominated for Fed positions.


President Donald Trump’s pick to a fill a vacancy at the Federal Reserve has run into more trouble thanks to new revelations about his past remarks. Video has surfaced of Stephen Moore making disparaging remarks about Cleveland and Cincinnati. “If you live in the Midwest, where else do you want to live besides Chicago, right?” “You don’t want to live in Cincinnati or Cleveland, these, you know, armpits of America. Neither Cain nor Moore have been officially nominated for Fed positions.
Trump’s Fed pick Moore in trouble again, once called Cincinnati and Cleveland ‘armpits of America’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff cox, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, heartland, called, armpits, pick, moore, america, cincinnati, midwest, revelations, chicago, fed, cleveland, trouble, remarks, live


Trump's Fed pick Moore in trouble again, once called Cincinnati and Cleveland 'armpits of America'

President Donald Trump’s pick to a fill a vacancy at the Federal Reserve has run into more trouble thanks to new revelations about his past remarks.

Video has surfaced of Stephen Moore making disparaging remarks about Cleveland and Cincinnati. The statements were made during a forum at the Heartland Institute in August 2014.

During a talk that spanned a number of economic topics, the subject shifted to the Midwest and the various fiscal challenges the area faces.

“Let’s start with Chicago. I mean, I’m biased, but Chicago is a world class city, right? There is no reason Chicago is not the Hong Kong of the Midwest United States,” said Moore, who at the time was chief economist at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank where he continues to serve as a distinguished fellow.

So far so good, but the remarks then turned to a put-down of other big cities in the region.

“If you live in the Midwest, where else do you want to live besides Chicago, right?” he continued. “You don’t want to live in Cincinnati or Cleveland, these, you know, armpits of America. You all want to live in Chicago.”

While the remarks sparked laughter from the audience, the disparagement prompted a swift rebuke this week from Sen. Sherrod Brown, an Ohio Democrat who said they were enough to eliminate Moore from consideration for Fed seat.

“That view should be disqualifying for the critical role of Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. You didn’t just insult Cleveland and Cincinnati – you dismissed millions of Americans who work and live in small towns and cities across the industrial heartland, and who have been looked down on and left behind by Washington and Wall Street for decades,” Brown said in a letter he sent to Moore.

“As a public servant, your job would be to fight for these Americans — something you cannot do when you don’t know the first thing about the places where they live,” he added.

CNBC has reached out to Moore for comment.

The remarks are another potentially embarrassing obstacle for Moore, whose prospective Fed candidacy has led to revelations about past problems with spousal support, taxes and, most recently, sexist remarks he made about women in sports for columns he wrote for the National Review.

The revelations come just two days after another potential Trump Fed pick, Herman Cain, withdrew his name from consideration amid reports that he did not have enough Republican support in the Senate. Cain was dogged with allegations of abusive behavior toward women during his 2012 presidential run.

Neither Cain nor Moore have been officially nominated for Fed positions.

In his letter, Brown, who lives in Cleveland, said Moore’s statements show he doesn’t understand the challenges faced by those whose interests he would represent on the Fed.

“Based on your bias against communities across the heartland of our country, it’s clear that you lack the judgment to make important decisions in their best interest,” the senator wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: jeff cox, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, heartland, called, armpits, pick, moore, america, cincinnati, midwest, revelations, chicago, fed, cleveland, trouble, remarks, live


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Embattled Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore complains: ‘They’re pulling a Kavanaugh against me’

Stephen Moore isn’t the right pick for Fed board, says AEI’s Pethokoukis 4:56 PM ET Wed, 27 March 2019 | 03:10″They’re trying to derail this nomination.” When the radio interviewer said, “It’s all National Enquirer stuff,” Moore eagerly replied, “It really is!” Moore was picked by Trump in late March for one of two open seats on the central bank’s governing board. A number of economists have criticized the appointment, saying Moore has a track record of being wrong about economic issues. Moore o


Stephen Moore isn’t the right pick for Fed board, says AEI’s Pethokoukis 4:56 PM ET Wed, 27 March 2019 | 03:10″They’re trying to derail this nomination.” When the radio interviewer said, “It’s all National Enquirer stuff,” Moore eagerly replied, “It really is!” Moore was picked by Trump in late March for one of two open seats on the central bank’s governing board. A number of economists have criticized the appointment, saying Moore has a track record of being wrong about economic issues. Moore o
Embattled Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore complains: ‘They’re pulling a Kavanaugh against me’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, women, pulling, kavanaugh, work, fed, moore, wrote, live, paid, pick, stephen, nomination, trump, embattled, complains, theyre


Embattled Trump Fed pick Stephen Moore complains: 'They're pulling a Kavanaugh against me'

Stephen Moore isn’t the right pick for Fed board, says AEI’s Pethokoukis 4:56 PM ET Wed, 27 March 2019 | 03:10

“They’re trying to derail this nomination.”

But the conservative economics pundit vowed: “We’re going to get through this.”

Kavanaugh himself got through his own nomination last year by angrily denying claims he had drunkenly sexually assaulted a 15-year-old girl when they were both in high school in the early 1980s, as well as other allegations of sexual misconduct by other women from the same era.

Moore said that “I kind of wear it as a badge of honor” that purported opponents of his nomination in the media are bringing up “my divorce 10 years ago, or something I wrote 25 years ago.”

When the radio interviewer said, “It’s all National Enquirer stuff,” Moore eagerly replied, “It really is!”

Read more: Mitt Romney poses a major headache for Trump on Fed appointments

The National Enquirer’s publishers paid off a woman, Playboy model Karen McDougal, in 2016 to keep her quiet about her claims that she had an affair with then-presidential candidate Trump a decade earlier.

Moore, a distinguished visiting fellow at conservative think tank Heritage Foundation, spoke days after businessman and 2012 presidential contender Herman Cain removed himself from consideration for another Fed board seat. Cain bowed out of contention after a backlash to his own nomination over past allegations of sexual harassment and after it became clear he did not have the support of enough Republican senators to win Senate approval.

Cain has denied the harassment claims and said he was dropping out because joining the Fed would require him to take a deep pay cut.

Moore echoed Cain’s concerns about pay, saying during his interview that “probably the easiest thing to do would be to throw in the towel,” and noting that “I’m taking a 60 percent cut” in pay if approved for the Fed.

Yet he said he would continue to seek the Fed seat and he is in the midst of a vetting process that will include financial disclosures and an FBI background investigation.

Later Wednesday, Trump’s top economic advisor Larry Kudlow, in an interview on Fox Business, said “Steve Moore’s in, he continues to have the backing of the president and myself.”

“We stand completely behind him,” Kudlow said.

Moore was picked by Trump in late March for one of two open seats on the central bank’s governing board. Moore has supported Trump’s criticisms of the Fed for raising interest rates last year, a move that the president says has kept the U.S. economy from reaching its full capacity.

A number of economists have criticized the appointment, saying Moore has a track record of being wrong about economic issues.

Since Moore’s nomination, there has been a steady drip of revelations about his past, which are detailed in court records and Internet news archives.

Moore’s ex-wife Allison sued him for divorce in 2010, accusing him of being a brazen adulterer who subjected her to “emotional and psychological abuse … throughout their marriage.”

In March 2013, a judge found Moore in contempt of court for having failed to pay Allison more than $330,000 he had agreed to fork over in a divorce settlement, alimony and child support. The contempt action against him was lifted after he paid Allison about two-thirds of what he owed her and resumed paying alimony and child support.

Moore has a $75,000 federal tax lien lodged against him for underpayment of income taxes in 2014. Moore is contesting the amount of the tax lien, which his current wife says stems from a disallowance of his deducting alimony he paid Allison.

In online columns for the National Review in the early 2000s, Moore dismissed arguments by female athletes that they should be paid as much as male counterparts, and complained about the “outrageous” practice of having a woman referee an NCAA basketball tournament game.

Moore once wrote, “The women tennis pros don’t really want equal pay for equal work. They want equal pay for inferior work,” and suggested that “if there’s an injustice in tennis, it’s that women like Martina Hingis and Monica Seles make millions of dollars a year” even though hundreds of male college players “could beat them handily.”

Moore told CNN, which first wrote about those columns, “This was a spoof. I have a sense of humor.”

On Wednesday, CNBC noted that video has surfaced showing Moore making disparaging remarks about Cleveland and Cincinnati in a 2014 speech.

“If you live in the Midwest, where else do you want to live besides Chicago, right?” he continued. “You don’t want to live in Cincinnati or Cleveland, these, you know, armpits of America. You all want to live in Chicago.”

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said Moore’s comments “should be disqualifying for the critical role of Governor of the Federal Reserve Board.”

“You didn’t just insult Cleveland and Cincinnati — you dismissed millions of Americans who work and live in small towns and cities across the industrial heartland, and who have been looked down on and left behind by Washington and Wall Street for decades,” Brown said in a letter he sent to Moore. “As a public servant, your job would be to fight for these Americans — something you cannot do when you don’t know the first thing about the places where they live.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pay, women, pulling, kavanaugh, work, fed, moore, wrote, live, paid, pick, stephen, nomination, trump, embattled, complains, theyre


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How much money you need to live in the most expensive zip code in every state

While Florida is home to the richest zip code in America, and New York City and San Francisco are notoriously expensive, every state has its own wealthy enclaves. The two most expensive areas are Sagaponack, New York, where you’d need income of $853,738 a year, and Beverly Hills, California, where you’d need $692,388 a year. In all but 10 states you’d need to make six figures to live comfortably in the most expensive zip code. The most affordable zip code on the list is Brookhaven, West Virginia


While Florida is home to the richest zip code in America, and New York City and San Francisco are notoriously expensive, every state has its own wealthy enclaves. The two most expensive areas are Sagaponack, New York, where you’d need income of $853,738 a year, and Beverly Hills, California, where you’d need $692,388 a year. In all but 10 states you’d need to make six figures to live comfortably in the most expensive zip code. The most affordable zip code on the list is Brookhaven, West Virginia
How much money you need to live in the most expensive zip code in every state Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, comfortably, live, need, income, gobankingrates, youd, code, zip, money, state, expensive


How much money you need to live in the most expensive zip code in every state

While Florida is home to the richest zip code in America, and New York City and San Francisco are notoriously expensive, every state has its own wealthy enclaves.

Personal finance site GoBankingRates crunched the numbers to determine the most expensive zip codes in every state as well as Washington, D.C, looking at median home values for April 2018 on Zillow. It also determined cost-of-living comparisons (for a single person) based on a number of factors, including cost of housing, groceries, utilities, transportation and healthcare expenditures.

By calculating the annual cost of necessities and the annual income needed to live comfortably in that location using the popular 50-30-20 budgeting method, GoBankingRates determined how much you would need to earn to live comfortably in the most expensive zip codes in every state.

The two most expensive areas are Sagaponack, New York, where you’d need income of $853,738 a year, and Beverly Hills, California, where you’d need $692,388 a year. In all but 10 states you’d need to make six figures to live comfortably in the most expensive zip code.

The most affordable zip code on the list is Brookhaven, West Virginia, which would require a yearly income of $79,786.

Here’s how much you would need to make to live comfortably in the most expensive zip code in every state (in alphabetical order), according to GoBankingRates:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, comfortably, live, need, income, gobankingrates, youd, code, zip, money, state, expensive


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These 15 new books will help you live a happier, wealthier and more successful life

It’s never too late to start developing a new (and improved) perspective on life — and what better way to accomplish that than by reading books? Below are 15 highly-praised books that have the ability to change the way we view our lives and the world we live in. “Team Human”By Douglas Rushkoff”Team Human” gives plenty of insight into why being “fully human” is a team sport, rather than an individual one. With no plans to expand the business beyond himself, Jarvis explains how leaving a high-pres


It’s never too late to start developing a new (and improved) perspective on life — and what better way to accomplish that than by reading books? Below are 15 highly-praised books that have the ability to change the way we view our lives and the world we live in. “Team Human”By Douglas Rushkoff”Team Human” gives plenty of insight into why being “fully human” is a team sport, rather than an individual one. With no plans to expand the business beyond himself, Jarvis explains how leaving a high-pres
These 15 new books will help you live a happier, wealthier and more successful life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: dave schools, kawamura
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealthier, company, life, work, today, passion, successful, live, books, happier, 15, help, capitalist, world, digital, team, steve


These 15 new books will help you live a happier, wealthier and more successful life

It’s never too late to start developing a new (and improved) perspective on life — and what better way to accomplish that than by reading books?

Luckily, 2019 has already brought in a handful of new titles that you probably haven’t heard of. Below are 15 highly-praised books that have the ability to change the way we view our lives and the world we live in.

1. “Team Human”

By Douglas Rushkoff

“Team Human” gives plenty of insight into why being “fully human” is a team sport, rather than an individual one. In what the Washington Post calls “a manifesto for connecting personally in a tech-dominated world,” media theorist Douglas Rushkoff takes a look at how technology trends today have flipped society on its back — and why it’s time to rally together and reforge social bonds with positivity.

2. “Company of One: Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for Business”

By Paul Jarvis

Freelance designer Paul Jarvis is best known for his creative work with big companies like Yahoo, Microsoft and Mercedes-Benz. In “Company of One,” he gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at how he makes a six-figure income working for himself out of his small home on an island off of Vancouver. With no plans to expand the business beyond himself, Jarvis explains how leaving a high-pressure corporate world led him to a happier, more successful and productive life.

3. “The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty”

By Clayton M. Christensen, Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon

It’s time to get serious about making the world a better place for future generations. More than 20 nations have received billions of dollars in support and yet are poorer today. Clayton M. Christensen, the best-selling author of classics like “How to Measure Your Life” and “The Innovator’s Dilemma,” along with co-authors Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon deliver a groundbreaking strategy on how to end the cycle of global poverty for good.

4. “Zucked”

By Roger McNamee

Roger McNamee, a venture capitalist and former mentor to Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, recounts and reflects on the conversations, events and realizations that led up to the catastrophic failure of the world’s largest social network. “Zucked” is a compelling exploration of how moments of political culture and crisis can affect a business.

5. “Digital Minimalism”

By Cal Newport

There’s nothing cooler than a digital minimalist — they’re happier, healthier, less distracted and a lot nicer to be around (nobody likes talking to a person who checks their phone every five minutes). Already a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly and USA Today best-seller, “Digital Minimalism” offers insight into how to achieve focus in a world that’s overwhelmed with digital clamor.

6. “Wise Guy: Lessons From a Life”

By Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki, a Silicon Valley icon, serial author and chief evangelist of Canva, was part of the original Macintosh team back in the early 1980s. His latest work is a memoir-esque collection of stories from his life journey. Get smarter and gain wisdom about everything from parenting to work to moral values. You’ll also find a handful of interesting vignettes about Kawasaki’s experience working at Apple under Steve Jobs. “In many ways, I am who I am and where I am because of Steve Jobs and Apple,” he says.

7. “How to Be a Capitalist Without Any Capital”

By Nathan Latka

The host of the Top Entrepreneurs podcast started a software company at age 19 — with just $119 in his bank account. Five years later, it got a valuation of $10.5 million. In “How to Be a Capitalist Without Any Capital,” Nathan Latka, now 29, offers advice on how to retire at 29 by doing just four things:

Focusing on one skill Focusing on one goal Being unique Appealing to the masses

8. “The Passion Paradox: A Guide to Going All In, Finding Success, and Discovering the Benefits of an Unbalanced Life”

By Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness

“Follow your passion” is the advice we hear all the time. But is it really ever that simple? Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness, co-authors of the best-selling book “Peak Performance,” dig into scientific case studies to examine the “passion vs. balance” debate. You’ll learn how to cultivate and sustain your passion while avoiding common pitfalls like endless seeking, suffering and burnout.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: dave schools, kawamura
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealthier, company, life, work, today, passion, successful, live, books, happier, 15, help, capitalist, world, digital, team, steve


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Ukraine presidential favorite Zelensky skips live TV debate – but it doesn’t matter, experts say

The favorite to win Ukraine’s presidential election this weekend caused a stir on Sunday by skipping a live televised debate with incumbent Petro Poroshenko – but even that isn’t expect to damage his chances of winning the upcoming final round of voting. Zelensky had not said that he was going to attend the debate, instead agreeing to attend a televised debate on Friday, April 21. Experts say Zelenksy’s “no-show” has not affected the likelihood that he will become president at a final run-off vo


The favorite to win Ukraine’s presidential election this weekend caused a stir on Sunday by skipping a live televised debate with incumbent Petro Poroshenko – but even that isn’t expect to damage his chances of winning the upcoming final round of voting. Zelensky had not said that he was going to attend the debate, instead agreeing to attend a televised debate on Friday, April 21. Experts say Zelenksy’s “no-show” has not affected the likelihood that he will become president at a final run-off vo
Ukraine presidential favorite Zelensky skips live TV debate – but it doesn’t matter, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: holly ellyatt, brendan hoffman, getty images news, getty images, sopa images, lightrocket
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, runoff, zelensky, tv, matter, live, presidential, favorite, televised, told, say, ukraine, debate, skips, experts, winning, election, win, poroshenko


Ukraine presidential favorite Zelensky skips live TV debate – but it doesn't matter, experts say

The favorite to win Ukraine’s presidential election this weekend caused a stir on Sunday by skipping a live televised debate with incumbent Petro Poroshenko – but even that isn’t expect to damage his chances of winning the upcoming final round of voting.

Volodymyr Zelensky, a comedian and actor and the favorite to win a run-off round in the election this coming Sunday, had agreed to face the more seasoned politician and incumbent President Petro Poroshenko in a televised debate from Kiev’s Olympic Stadium but the pair had disagreed on a date.

That left Poroshenko to speak on his own for 45 minutes while standing next to an empty lectern for his political opponent. Zelensky had not said that he was going to attend the debate, instead agreeing to attend a televised debate on Friday, April 21.

It’s not the first bizarre episode in an election race that has enlivened Ukrainians who appear to have tired of the country’s old political guard.

Zelensky accepted Poroshenko’s invitation to hold debates with three conditions, one of them being that both candidates take live drug and alcohol tests to, as Zelenksy put it, “show the Ukrainian people that neither is an alcoholic or drug addict.”

Experts say Zelenksy’s “no-show” has not affected the likelihood that he will become president at a final run-off vote next on April 21.

“I still cannot see Poroshenko winning – he (Zelensky) is just too far ahead,” Timothy Ash, senior emerging markets strategist at Bluebay Asset Management, told CNBC on Monday. “Poroshenko’s negative ratings are just too high. He lost this election months ago,” Ash added.

Unsurprisingly, Poroshenko used his uninterrupted platform on Sunday to criticize an absent Zelensky and his apparent lack of concrete manifesto.

“If he hides from people again, if he is afraid, we will invite him again. We will invite him every day to every live show for the whole country to see who it is going to elect for the next five years,” Poroshenko told the audience Sunday, according to news reports.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: holly ellyatt, brendan hoffman, getty images news, getty images, sopa images, lightrocket
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, runoff, zelensky, tv, matter, live, presidential, favorite, televised, told, say, ukraine, debate, skips, experts, winning, election, win, poroshenko


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