What it’s like trying to live on minimum wage—it’s a ‘constant struggle’

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?


Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?
What it’s like trying to live on minimum wage—it’s a ‘constant struggle’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, struggle, work, support, minimum, trying, job, davis, wageits, 15, workers, nicholson, constant, raise, live


What it's like trying to live on minimum wage—it's a 'constant struggle'

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail.

Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. One of her sons has asthma, and she estimates she’s been to the emergency room for her kids six or seven times so far this year. But her cashier job at Church’s Chicken doesn’t come with paid time off and every shift is essential. “It’s stressful because I basically have to pick and choose what’s more important,” Nicholson tells CNBC Make It. “Of course my child is more important, but at the same time, I have to work and make money to be able to support and take care of them.” While Nicholson, 28, makes $8.60 an hour, $1.35 more than the federal minimum wage, thanks to a recent state increase, she says it’s still not enough money to get by, especially since her hours (and paycheck) can vary significantly week to week. “The hours are constantly shifting. I don’t have a set schedule,” Nicholson says, adding she’s notified about her start time the night before via text message. Sometimes that doesn’t come until 1 a.m. “By that time, me and my children are in bed.” Church’s did not immediately respond to a request for comment. To support herself and her kids, Nicholson is forced to rely on assistance from both her family and the government. “I’m currently homeless, so I stay with my mother,” she says, adding that she helps with rent when she can. She also relies on food stamps to buy groceries for her family. Yet even with that support, there are weeks where she doesn’t have the $15 needed to take the bus to and from work. Instead, she walks, rain, snow or sun. “You can be doing everything right and it’s still not enough,” she says. “It’s a constant struggle every day.”

A steady push toward a mandatory $15 minimum wage

What happens next

Democratic lawmakers have tried to increase the minimum wage for years, but the most recent bill, the Raise the Wage Act, introduced by Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January has gotten the furthest. The bill, which now has 203 cosponsors, is set for a House floor vote on Thursday morning. But the legislation, even if it passes the House, is far from a sure thing. Predictive intelligence firm Skopos Labs estimates the Raise the Wage Act has a 24% chance of being enacted. Many opponents of the bill say they’re concerned raising the minimum wage to $15 may cause significant job loss. A report from the Congressional Budget Office released last week found that a mandatory $15 minimum wage may eliminate as many as 3.7 million jobs across the U.S. because companies will look to cut costs. Additionally, the report projected that real income — the compensation and purchasing power you have after taking into account inflation — would fall by about $16 billion for families above the poverty line, which would reduce their total income by about 0.1% due, in part, to consumers potentially paying higher prices. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a conservative business lobby group, sent a letter to House members saying the organization had “serious concerns” about the Raise the Wage Act. It added that while it’s “willing to work with members of Congress to develop a legislative package that includes an increase guided by economic conditions, $15 per hour is not that number, and the Raise the Wage Act is not that legislation.” That same CBO report also noted, however, that a $15 federal minimum is estimated to increase wages for as many as 27 million Americans and potentially lift as many as 1.3 million families out of poverty. “The CBO’s report comes to a clear conclusion: The benefits of gradually raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour over five years far outweighs any potential costs to American workers,” Scott said during a call with reporters last week. The EPI estimates that the benefit could be even wider, calculating that 33.5 million workers would see increased wages. Of those workers, the National Women’s Law Center estimates that one in three working women would directly receive a raise. And 43% of single mothers in the U.S. would see an increased income for their families, the EPI calculates.

Moving beyond the minimum is worth fighting for

Jessica Davis, 27, who worked for years at minimum wage or near-minimum wage jobs, says she’s had to work hard for every penny she’s earned at these types of jobs. “They will make you bend over backwards and it’s crazy how much work they give you when you’re making that much money,” Davis tells CNBC Make It. Davis, who completed some college and has $14,000 in student loan debt, says the last minimum wage job she held was working at Dollar General outside Nashville, Tennessee. She worked at the store for about nine months in 2016, and spent her entire 8-to-10-hour shifts on her feet. The store was routinely understaffed, Davis says, which meant she was trying to juggle checking out customers, managing the inventory and keeping the store clean. “It’s physical,” she says, adding each shift was a workout. “They wanted me to run over to this area, open up boxes and put out stock, and then run to register every time there was a customer. And they had a customer every five to 10 minutes,” she says. “My job now is hard, but it’s nothing like the [minimum wage] jobs I used to work.” A spokeswoman for Dollar General tells CNBC Make It that the company prioritizes investing in its employees and regularly promotes from within, as well as provides opportunities to help workers realize their career aspirations. “We believe career opportunities, our competitive wages and benefits and the engaging environment we offer that is rooted in our mission of ‘serving others’ allows us to remain an employer of choice,” the company said in a statement.

There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job Jessica Davis

While working at Dollar General, Davis brought home about $1,000 a month. At the time, she split rent and utilities with her boyfriend, but housing costs still ate up about $580 a month — more than 50% of her income. There was little left for extras, let alone big life events such as getting married and starting a family. “We would be married, but that costs too,” Davis says, adding that she’d like to have a small wedding at some point. But juggling the costs and planning associated with a wedding just wasn’t feasible. “Things like that get put on the back burner.” Davis managed to find a better paying opportunity when a regular customer at Dollar General befriended her and recommended her for a tech support role. She applied and got the job, which came with a significant raise: She now earns $17.95 an hour. The higher salary allowed her to focus on herself and even dream a little — she is planning on going back to college in January. At the end of the day, having a support system is critical if you’re going to make ends meet on $7.25 an hour. Both Davis and Nicholson credit their friends and family, rather than employers, for helping them survive on minimum wage. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, struggle, work, support, minimum, trying, job, davis, wageits, 15, workers, nicholson, constant, raise, live


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Jeff Bezos: I spend my billions on space because we’re destroying Earth

Amazon boss Jeff Bezos is the richest person in the world with a current net worth of $125 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaire Index. “We humans have to go to space if we are going to continue to have a thriving civilization,” Bezos says. People will be able to live in space (in self-sufficient space structures) if they so choose, Bezos says. “People are going to want to live on Earth, and they are going to want to live off Earth. See also:3 of billionaire Jeff Bezos’ secrets to succ


Amazon boss Jeff Bezos is the richest person in the world with a current net worth of $125 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaire Index. “We humans have to go to space if we are going to continue to have a thriving civilization,” Bezos says. People will be able to live in space (in self-sufficient space structures) if they so choose, Bezos says. “People are going to want to live on Earth, and they are going to want to live off Earth. See also:3 of billionaire Jeff Bezos’ secrets to succ
Jeff Bezos: I spend my billions on space because we’re destroying Earth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, space, planet, jeff, think, things, letter, bezos, live, spend, destroying, earth, going


Jeff Bezos: I spend my billions on space because we're destroying Earth

Amazon boss Jeff Bezos is the richest person in the world with a current net worth of $125 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaire Index. And he’s investing much of his Amazon fortune in the development of space technologies through his aerospace company Blue Origin.

Why? “Because I think it’s important,” Bezos tells Norah O’Donnell of “CBS Evening News” in an interview which aired Tuesday. “I think it is important for this planet. I think it’s important for the dynamism of future generations. It is something I care deeply about. And it is something I have been thinking about all my life.”

Bezos — who says “you don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you” — became fascinated with space when he was a child watching astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong land on the moon, he tells O’Donnell.

Further, developing space technologies is critical for human beings to have a long future, Bezos says.

“We humans have to go to space if we are going to continue to have a thriving civilization,” Bezos says. “We have become big as a population, as a species, and this planet is relatively small. We see it in things like climate change and pollution and heavy industry. We are in the process of destroying this planet. And we have sent robotic probes to every planet in the solar system — this is the good one. So, we have to preserve this planet.”

To do that will require being able to live and work in space, says Bezos.

“We send things up into space, but they are all made on Earth. Eventually it will be much cheaper and simpler to make really complicated things, like microprocessors and everything, in space and then send those highly complex manufactured objects back down to earth, so that we don’t have the big factories and pollution generating industries that make those things now on Earth,” Bezos says. “And Earth can be zoned residential.”

It will be “multiple generations” and “hundreds of years” before this is a reality, Bezos said on CBS, but with Blue Origin he is working to develop the technology that will make it possible.

People will be able to live in space (in self-sufficient space structures) if they so choose, Bezos says.

“People are going to want to live on Earth, and they are going to want to live off Earth. There are going to be very nice places to live off earth as well. People will make that choice,” Bezos says.

Astronaut John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, wrote Bezos a letter in 2016 saying the work Bezos was doing would eventually make space travel as common as air travel.

“He wrote me the most beautiful letter just a few days before he passed away and I have it framed in my office and it is very meaningful to me,” Bezos says. Glenn said in that letter he saw a future when we will board spacecraft like jetliners, and “when that happens, it will largely be because of your epic achievements.”

“I think that is entirely believable,” Bezos says. “If you went back in time a hundred years and told people today that you would be able to buy a ticket and fly across the world on a jetliner, they would have thought you were crazy. But that’s the kind of change that can happen in just 100 years or less.”

The first step in that journey is space tourism, Bezos says. Blue Origin is already testing its vehicle, the New Shepherd, for taking humans into space for short tourism trips.

“Everybody who goes to space says they come back a little changed and they realize how beautiful this planet is and how small and fragile it is,” Bezos says. “Something that we can’t see when we are down here, but from up there it becomes obvious.”

See also:

3 of billionaire Jeff Bezos’ secrets to success

The Seattle suburb where Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates both live is running out of money

Jeff Bezos’ single teen mom brought him to night school with her when he was a baby


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, space, planet, jeff, think, things, letter, bezos, live, spend, destroying, earth, going


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Emmys 2019: The complete list of nominees for the 71st annual TV awards show

Did your favorite TV show nab an Emmy nomination? The Academy of Television Arts & Science’s 71st annual Emmy Awards will be presented Sept. 22 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, but who will be in the running? The Primetime Emmy Awards will feature 26 different categories ranging from acting and writing awards to awards for different types of programs — comedies, dramas and talk shows, among others. The Creative Arts Emmys, which take place a week before the live broadcast Emmys ceremony,


Did your favorite TV show nab an Emmy nomination? The Academy of Television Arts & Science’s 71st annual Emmy Awards will be presented Sept. 22 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, but who will be in the running? The Primetime Emmy Awards will feature 26 different categories ranging from acting and writing awards to awards for different types of programs — comedies, dramas and talk shows, among others. The Creative Arts Emmys, which take place a week before the live broadcast Emmys ceremony,
Emmys 2019: The complete list of nominees for the 71st annual TV awards show Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, live, maisel, 2019, list, thrones, comedy, emmys, drama, nominees, marvelous, complete, barry, night, tv, annual, 71st, awards, mrs


Emmys 2019: The complete list of nominees for the 71st annual TV awards show

Did your favorite TV show nab an Emmy nomination? It’s time to find out.

The Academy of Television Arts & Science’s 71st annual Emmy Awards will be presented Sept. 22 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, but who will be in the running?

On Tuesday, Ken Jeong ( “Community”) and D’Arcy Carden (“The Good Place”) unveiled the nominees — both in front of and behind the camera — that could take home the coveted prizes in two months’ time.

The Primetime Emmy Awards will feature 26 different categories ranging from acting and writing awards to awards for different types of programs — comedies, dramas and talk shows, among others.

The Creative Arts Emmys, which take place a week before the live broadcast Emmys ceremony, recognize technical achievements and are not included in the program. These awards go to cinematographers, casting directors and sound editors, among others.

Here is the full list of nominees:

Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie:

Mahershala Ali — “True Detective” (HBO)

Benicio Del Toro — “Escape at Dannemora” (Showtime)

Hugh Grant — “A Very English Scandal” (BBC)

Jared Harris — “Chernobyl” (HBO)

Jharrel Jerome — “When They See Us” (Netflix)

Sam Rockwell — “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)

Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie:

Amy Adams — “Sharp Objects” (HBO)

Patricia Arquette — “Escape at Dannemora” (Showtime)

Aunjanue Ellis — “When They See Us” (Netflix)

Joey King — “The Act” (Hulu)

Niecy Nash — “When They See Us” (Netflix)

Michelle Williams — “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)

Lead Actor in a Comedy Series:

Anthony Anderson — “Black-ish” (ABC)

Don Cheadle — “Black Monday” (Showtime)

Ted Danson — “The Good Place” (NBC)

Michael Douglas — “The Kominsky Method” (Netflix)

Bill Hader — “Barry” (HBO)

Eugene Levy — “Schitt’s Creek” (CBC Television)

Lead Actress in a Comedy Series:

Christina Applegate — “Dead to Me” (Netflix)

Rachel Brosnahan — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Julia Louis-Dreyfus — “Veep” (HBO)

Natasha Lyonne — “Russian Doll” (Netflix)

Catherine O’Hara — “Schitt’s Creek” (CBC Television)

Phoebe Waller-Bridge — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Lead Actor in a Drama Series:

Jason Bateman — “Ozark” (Netflix)

Sterling K. Brown — “This is Us” (NBC)

Kit Harington — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Bob Odenkirk — “Better Call Saul” (Netflix/AMC)

Billy Porter — “Pose” (FX)

Milo Ventimiglia — “This is Us” (NBC)

Lead Actress in a Drama Series:

Emilia Clarke — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Jodie Comer — “Killing Eve” (BBC/AMC)

Viola Davis — “How to Get Away with Murder” (ABC)

Laura Linney — “Ozark” (Netflix)

Mandy Moore — “This is Us” (NBC)

Sandra Oh — “Killing Eve” (BBC/AMC)

Robin Wright — “House of Cards” (Netflix)

Outstanding Competition Program:

“The Amazing Race” (CBS)

“American Ninja Warrior” (NBC)

“Nailed It” (Netflix)

“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)

“Top Chef” (Bravo)

“The Voice” (NBC)

Outstanding Variety Talk Series:

“The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” (Comedy Central)

“Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” (TBS)

“Jimmy Kimmel Live” (ABC)

“Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” (HBO)

“The Late Late Show with James Cordon” (CBS)

“The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” (CBS)

Outstanding Television Movie:

“Bandersnatch: Black Mirror” (Netflix)

“Brexit” (Amazon)

“Deadwood: The Movie” (HBO)

“King Lear” (BBC)

“My Dinner with Herve” (HBO)

Outstanding Limited Series:

“Chernobyl” (HBO)

“Escape at Dannemora” (Showtime)

“Fosse/Verdon” (FX)

“Sharp Objects” (HBO)

“When They See Us” (Netflix)

Outstanding Comedy Series:

“Barry” (HBO)

“Fleabag” (Amazon)

“The Good Place” (NBC)

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

“Russian Doll” (Netflix)

“Schitt’s Creek” (CBC Television)

“Veep” (HBO)

Outstanding Drama Series:

“Better Call Saul” (Netflix/AMC)

“Bodyguard” (Netflix)

“Game of Thrones” (HBO)

“Killing Eve” (BBC/AMC)

“Ozark” (Netflix)

“Pose” (FX)

“Succession” (HBO)

“This is Us” (NBC)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series:

Alan Arkin — “The Kominsky Method” (Netflix)

Anthony Carrigan — “Barry” (HBO)

Henry Winkler — “Barry” (HBO)

Stephen Root — “Barry” (HBO)

Tony Hale — “Veep” (HBO)

Tony Shalhoub — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series:

Alex Borstein — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Anna Chlumsky — “Veep” (HBO)

Betty Gilpin — “GLOW” (Netflix)

Kate McKinnon — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Marin Hinkle— “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Olivia Coleman — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Sarah Goldberg — “Barry” (HBO)

Sian Clifford — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series:

Adam Sandler — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

John Mulaney — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Luke Kirby — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Matt Damon — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Peter MacNicol — “Veep” (HBO)

Robert De Niro — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Rufus Sewell — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series:

Emma Thompson — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Fiona Shaw — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Jane Lynch — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Kristin Scott Thomas — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Maya Rudolph — “The Good Place” (NBC)

Sandra Oh — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series:

Alec Berg — “Barry” (HBO)

Amy Sherman-Palladino — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Bill Hader — “Barry” (HBO)

Daniel Palladino — “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Harry Bradbeer — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Mark Cendrowski — “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series:

Alec Berg and Bill Hader — “Barry” (HBO)

Phoebe Waller-Bridge — “Fleabag” (Amazon)

Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle — “PEN15” (Hulu)

Leslye Headland, Natasha Lyonne and Amy Poehler — “Russian Doll” (Netflix)

Allison Silverman — “Russian Doll” (Netflix)

Josh Siegal and Dylan Morgan — “The Good Place” (NBC)

David Mandel — “Veep” (HBO)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series:

Alfie Allen — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Chris Sullivan — “This is Us” (NBC)

Giancarlo Esposito — “Better Call Saul” (Netflix/AMC)

Jonathan Banks — “Better Call Saul” (Netflix/AMC)

Michael Kelly — “House of Cards” (Netflix)

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Peter Dinklage — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series:

Fiona Shaw — “Killing Eve” (BBC)

Gwendoline Christie — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Julia Garner — “Ozark” (Netflix)

Lena Headey — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Maisie Williams — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Sophie Turner — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series:

Bradley Whitford — “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Glynn Turman — “How to Get Away with Murder” (ABC)

Kumail Nanjiani — “The Twilight Zone” (CBS)

Michael Angarano — “This is Us” (NBC)

Michael McKean — “Better Call Saul” (Netflix/AMC)

Ron Cephas Jones — “This is Us” (NBC)

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series:

Carice van Houten — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Cherry Jones — “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Cicely Tyson — “How to Get Away with Murder” (ABC)

Jessica Lange — “American Horror Story: Apocalypse” (FX)

Laverne Cox — “Orange is the New Black” (Netflix)

Phylicia Rashad — “This is Us” (NBC)

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series:

David Benioff and D.B. Weiss — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

David Nutter — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Miguel Sapochnik — “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Lisa Bruhlmann — “Killing Eve” (BBC)

Jason Bateman — “Ozark” (Netflix)

Adam McKay — “Succession” (HBO)

Daina Reid — “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Choreography for Variety or Reality Programming:

Travis Wall — “So You Think You Can Dance” (Fox)

Luther Brown — “So You Think You Can Dance” (Fox)

Suresh Mukund — “World of Dance” (NBC)

Karen Forcano and Ricardo Vega — “World of Dance” (NBC)

Tessandra Chavez — “World of Dance” (NBC)

Melvin “Timtim” Rogador — “World of Dance” (NBC)

Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special:

Stephen Frears — “A Very English Scandal” (BBC)

Johan Renck — “Chernobyl” (HBO)

Ben Stiller — “Escape at Dannemora” (Showtime)

Thomas Kail — “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)

Jessica Yu — “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)

Ava DuVernay — “When They See Us” (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing for a Reality Program:

Patrick McManus — “American Ninja Warrior” (NBC)

Hisham Abed — “Queer Eye” (Netflix)

Nick Murray — “RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)

Ken Fuchs — “Shark Tank” (ABC)

Bertram van Munster — “The Amazing Race” (CBS)

Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series:

Alex Buono and Rhys Thomas — “Documentary Now!” (IFC)

Derek Waters — “Drunk History” (Comedy Central)

Paul Pennolino — “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” (HBO)

Don Roy King — “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)

Jim Hoskinson — “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” (CBS)

Sacha Baron Cohen, Nathan Fielder, Daniel Gray Longino and Dan Mazer — “Who Is America?” (Showtime)

Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special:

Ben Winston — “Carpool Karaoke: When Corden Met McCartney Live From Liverpool” (CBS)

Beyonce Knowles-Carter and Ed Burke— “Homecoming: A Film By Beyonce” (Netflix)

James Burrows and Andy Fisher— “Live In Front Of A Studio Audience: Norman Lear’s ‘All In The Family’ And ‘The Jeffersons'”

Thom Zimny — “Springsteen On Broadway” (Netflix)

Glenn Weiss — “The Oscars” (ABC)

Outstanding Directing for a Documentary / Nonfiction Program:

Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin — “Free Solo” (National Geographic)

Chris Smith — “FYRE: The Greatest Party That Never Happened” (Netflix)

Dan Reed — “Leaving Neverland” (HBO)

Julie Cohen and Betsy West — RBG (CNN)

Time Wardle — “Three Identical Strangers” (CNN)

This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, live, maisel, 2019, list, thrones, comedy, emmys, drama, nominees, marvelous, complete, barry, night, tv, annual, 71st, awards, mrs


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These are the best places to live in America in 2019

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being


Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being
These are the best places to live in America in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, best, states, crime, state, score, live, air, getty, places, america, life, 2019, points


These are the best places to live in America in 2019

Getty Images

If you could live anywhere in America, where would that be? By the numbers, these are the states that offer the best quality of life. That’s because they offer everything people yearn for: job opportunities, affordable housing, great schools, a low cost of living, affordable health care and a clean environment. Good quality of life is also good business. What better selling point could there be for a company looking to attract the best talent than to offer a great location for employees to settle down and raise a family. In this tight labor market, companies are increasingly realizing how important this is for their strategic growth plans. It is why Quality of Life is one of the key categories worth 300 out of 2,500 points in CNBC’s annual America’s Top States for Business 2019 rankings. We use hard data to evaluate all 50 states as places to live — factors including crime rates, local attractions, environmental quality and inclusiveness as measured by legal protections written into state laws.

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year.

10. Massachusetts

People running near Boston Harbor and Financial District at sunrise in Boston, Massachusetts. Prasit photo | Moment | Getty Images

Fewer than 3% of residents in the Bay State are without health insurance. That is the lowest uninsured rate in the nation, and it helps explain why this is one of America’s healthiest states. But that is not the only reason Massachusetts is a great place to live. Local attractions abound, from historic Boston and scenic Cape Cod in the east, to the beautiful Berkshires in the west. Boston prides itself as the Cradle of Liberty, and strong legal protections help ensure that freedom in Massachusetts applies to all. But Boston is also the cradle of some polluted air, hurting the state’s environmental quality. 2019 Quality of Life score: 217 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, attractions, inclusiveness

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 10

9. Utah

Hiker in Arches Park Moab, Utah. Sportstock | E+ | Getty Images

The Beehive State gets its nickname from the industriousness of its citizens. Utahans not only work hard, they apparently love their work. According to Gallup’s 2018 Wellbeing Index, nowhere in the continental United States do people feel better about their careers. As busy as people are in Utah, they still find time to take care of themselves. They exercise frequently, and obesity rates are low. But air quality leaves a bit to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, well-being

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 12

7. (tie) Montana

Trail running in Big Sky. Jordan Siemens | Taxi | Getty Images

They call Montana Big Sky Country because all those unobstructed views really do make the sky seem bigger. And it turns out that big sky — and everything beneath it — contains the cleanest air in the nation according to the American Lung Association. Montana is a healthy, inclusive state, and crime is low. The state is lacking somewhat in attractions, at least in terms of places frequented by tourists. But if you are looking for breathtaking views, majestic mountains and crystal-clear waters — oh, and that big sky — this may be the place for you. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Air quality, health

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 7

7. (tie) Colorado

Skiing the Rockies in Colorado Getty Images

The Centennial State is home to rich natural beauty, vibrant cities, and robust inclusiveness provisions firmly enshrined in state law. Coloradans are healthy. Only 22.6% of the population is obese, the lowest rate in the nation. Air quality could be better, and the crime rate is slightly worse than the national average. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 9

5. (tie) Washington

A couple enjoy an extended hike in the Pacific Northwest RyanJLane | E+ | Getty Images

The Evergreen State is among America’s healthiest states, and its people are the most physically active. Who would not want to get out and enjoy a state with such natural beauty and so much to do. Washington prides itself on inclusiveness, with strong protections built into state law. Crime is low, but air quality may leave something to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Health, inclusiveness, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

5. (tie) New Hampshire

White Mountains, New Hampshire Greg Dale | National Geographic Image Collection | Getty Images

With its famous motto, “Live Free or Die,” it stands to reason that the Granite State is among America’s most inclusive. Freedom also includes security. New Hampshire enjoys the third lowest violent crime rate in the nation. The state also boasts the nation’s lowest child poverty rate. On the other hand, air quality can suffer, partly due to the state’s proximity to Boston. And the quiet life here means New Hampshire can sometimes lack things to do. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, crime rate

Weaknesses: Air quality, attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

4. North Dakota

The International Peace Garden along the US-Canada border in North Dakota. The central division divides Canada (right) from the USA (left). Photo: Dig Deeper | Wikipedia

The Peace Garden State derives its nickname from the International Peace Garden straddling the U.S.-Canadian border, a project that has its roots at the International Gardeners Association convention exactly 90 years ago. But the term “peace garden” could also refer to the idyllic lifestyle in this state. The crime rate is low, the population is healthy and happy, and anti-discrimination laws are stronger than most. But other than the aforementioned International Peace Garden, attractions can be sparse. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)

Strengths: Well-being, air quality, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 4

3. Minnesota

Couple cross country skiing on a north woods trail. JMichl | iStock | Getty Images

One of the many features of the North Star state is what the locals call “Minnesota Nice,” which is exactly what it sounds like. Minnesotans are welcoming and inclusive, as evidenced by thorough legal protections against discrimination. Crime rates are low, the population is healthy, and the air is clean. We don’t factor weather into our rankings because it is too subjective. But it is worth pointing out that while winters can be brutal here, Minnesotans not only adapt to the frigid weather; they flourish in it. 2019 Quality of Life score: 259 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, air quality, crime rate

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 3

2. Vermont

Man hiking in Vermont during Autumn Getty Images

The Green Mountain State has the nation’s second-lowest crime rate, inclusive state laws, and a healthy population. Vermont rode those attributes to a first-place finish in Quality of Life in 2018. The state still offers an enviable quality of life, but it slipped just enough in terms of air quality and its citizens’ perceived well-being in 2019 to drop out of the top spot. Vermont’s one discernible weakness is the fact that it offers few popular tourist attractions, but many people here would consider that a positive. 2019 Quality of Life score: 262 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Crime rate, health, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 1

1. Hawaii

Woman Kayaking, Oahu, Hawaii darekm101 | RooM | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, best, states, crime, state, score, live, air, getty, places, america, life, 2019, points


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This small European country has been ranked the world’s best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded


Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded
This small European country has been ranked the world’s best place to live and work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


This small European country has been ranked the world's best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. But at a time of growing global uncertainty, Switzerland’s famed political and economic stability helped it climb the ranks of HSBC Expat’s annual survey to score the top spot for the first time. Switzerland jumped up the rankings from 8th place last year after the vast majority of people who had relocated there from overseas said they were happy with its economic (80%) and political (86%) climate. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country.

Mist above Lucerne City, Switzerland in October 2017. shan.shihan | Moment | Getty Images

Seven in 10 (71%) of those who have moved to Switzerland now enjoy higher levels of disposable income with their average salary being $111,587 — well above the global mean of $75,966. Meanwhile, 70% said their surroundings were cleaner and 42% felt physically healthier. This year’s report, which is based on responses from more than 18,000 expats across 163 markets, marks the first time in five years that Singapore was not ranked in first place. The Southeast Asian city-state shifted down one position to take second place. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded out in order by Canada, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, Turkey, Germany, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.

Singapore

Best for families

Mother and child walk close to Singapore business district. Leren Lu | Photographer’s Choice | Getty Images

Though Singapore failed to make it to the top of HSBC’s ranking for the sixth consecutive year, it remained a strong performer, especially for those moving abroad with children. Some 62% of respondents said the schooling system in Singapore is better than in their home country, while 69% rated the opportunity it afforded their kids to learn new languages.

Canada

Welcoming to foreigners

Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

A consistently high performer, Canada’s reputation for welcoming foreign visitors saw it take third place this year. The vast majority (80%) of respondents also said they enjoyed a better quality of life in their new home, compared to the global average of 65%.

Spain

High quality of living

View of The Alhambra in Granada City, Spain Gonzalo Azumendi | The Image Bank | Getty Images

While few respondents said they relocated to Spain for their careers, more than two-thirds (67%) said they’d seen an improvement in their work-life balance as a result of the move. That, coupled with the country’s top ranking for mental well-being, saw Spain jump up 10 spots this year.

New Zealand

A long-term destination

View of Queenstown, New Zealand just after sunset. Ramiro Torrents | Moment | Getty Images

Renowned for its stunning scenery and laid back way of life, more than half (57%) of people who moved to New Zealand said they did so to improve their quality of life. And it appears to pay off: 60% of those who moved stayed longer than expected. In fact, those who move to New Zealand are the most likely to stay in their new country for over 20 years. Don’t miss: Working abroad could boost your salary by more than a third Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


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What do 90-somethings regret most? Here’s what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life

What 90-somethings regret the mostI began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. How to live a happy and regret-free lifeThe lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you s


What 90-somethings regret the mostI began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. How to live a happy and regret-free lifeThe lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you s
What do 90-somethings regret most? Here’s what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: lydia sohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regret, heres, regrets, wish, live, love, 90somethings, regretfree, happy, regretted, man, children, crazy, life, work, learned


What do 90-somethings regret most? Here's what I learned about how to live a happy, regret-free life

My preconceptions about the elderly went out the window four years ago, when a woman in her early-80s came to me seeking pastoral care. She had been widowed for several years, but her distress didn’t come from the loss of her husband. Instead, it was because she had fallen in love with a married man who couldn’t return her affections. As she shared her story with me over some tea and a box of Kleenex, I was bewildered by the realization that people who are far past their 80s still experience the “butterflies-in-the-stomach” kind of love.

An age-old assumption

One of the wonderful and strange features of my job as a minister is that I get to be a confidant and advisor to people from all stages of life, though I primarily interact with those who are double — even triple — my age. I became a minister in 2015 thinking that I, a Korean-American woman in her mid-30s, wouldn’t be able to connect with a congregation of people from a completely different generation and across a variety of ethnic backgrounds. But my interactions with the widow and several others clued me in on how very wrong I was. Until recently, I generally associated deep yearnings and high ambitions with the energy and idealism of youth. I assumed that as we get older, we become more stoic and sage-like — or maybe even the exact opposite: Disillusioned by life and lacking vitality. My kernel of new insight launched me into a rapt curiosity about the internal lives of elderly people. I needed to know: What is life like for 90-year-olds? Do they still have vocational ambitions? Do they still crave love, sex and intimacy? What are their greatest fears, hopes and thoughts on aging? What do they regret most in life? I should note that I’m not a researcher, sociologist or psychologist, but I was determined to find answers. With a pen and paper in hand, I met with and interviewed the oldest people I know, including several congregants and their friends — all between the ages of 90 and 99.

What 90-somethings regret the most

I began each conversation by asking if they had any regrets. Their responses abounded with self-blame and deep sorrow. They all expressed similar sentiments: “If only I had done this differently.” “If I could have seen this coming, maybe I would have done something differently to prevent this.” I was intrigued to learn that their biggest regrets had little to do with their careers, missed opportunities or things they didn’t achieve. Rather, their pain came from failures in their relationships. They regretted not cultivating closer relationships with their children. They regretted not putting their children on the right path in life. They regretted not taking risks to be more loving, such as being more open about their feelings for new people or more affectionate with those already in their lives. They regretted not being better listeners; they wish they had been more empathetic and considerate. They regretted not spending enough time with the people they loved.

The happiest moments of their lives

I then switched up the mood by asking them about their most joyful memories. Each and every person I spoke to cited a time when their spouses were still alive or their children were younger and living at home. I found this surprising, as their answers seemed to contradict the “U-bend of life” theory, which suggests that our happiness generally dips in our 30s and reaches a bottom in our mid-40s. Then, at 50, it rebounds and continues to increase years after. But the people I interviewed said they were the happiest from their late-20s to mid-40s, when they were raising kids and trying to figure out who they were — the exact phase of my life right now.

When I asked one man if he wishes he had accomplished more, he responded, ‘No, I wish I had loved more.’

As a young working mother, I frequently fantasize about the pleasures of retirement. But the conversations I had made me consider the possibility that I might one day look back at this hectic period of juggling potty-training, full-time work and little scraps of self-care as the most fulfilling time of my life.

How to live a happy and regret-free life

The lesson, it appears, is that now is the time to be crazy, overextended, in love, curious and explorative. That might sound unrealistic at first; parenting is hard, marriage can be emotionally taxing, work is crazy and “leisure time” is so limited. But if we take these fleeting moments for granted, we’ll regret it later on. According to my 90-something interviewees, the secret to happy and regret-free life is to savor every second you spend with the people you love. Put another way, when I asked one man if he wishes he had accomplished more, he responded, “No, I wish I had loved more.”

Despite their deepest regrets, the elders I met still laugh like crazy, fall madly in love and fiercely pursue happiness.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: lydia sohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regret, heres, regrets, wish, live, love, 90somethings, regretfree, happy, regretted, man, children, crazy, life, work, learned


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Researchers say they’re closer to finding cure for HIV after using CRISPR technology to eliminate disease in live mice for the first time

Researchers say they’re one step closer to finding a potential cure for HIV after successfully eliminating the virus in living mice for the first time. About 1.1 million people in the U.S. live with HIV, a virus that attacks the body’s immune system and makes a person more susceptible to falling ill. If HIV is not treated, it can turn into AIDS, a disease in which the virus badly damages the immune system. But now researchers say they’re able to destroy the virus in “humanized” mice, which were


Researchers say they’re one step closer to finding a potential cure for HIV after successfully eliminating the virus in living mice for the first time. About 1.1 million people in the U.S. live with HIV, a virus that attacks the body’s immune system and makes a person more susceptible to falling ill. If HIV is not treated, it can turn into AIDS, a disease in which the virus badly damages the immune system. But now researchers say they’re able to destroy the virus in “humanized” mice, which were
Researchers say they’re closer to finding cure for HIV after using CRISPR technology to eliminate disease in live mice for the first time Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mice, theyre, live, hiv, finding, gendelman, study, researchers, work, say, art, virus, aids, center, technology, eliminate, using


Researchers say they're closer to finding cure for HIV after using CRISPR technology to eliminate disease in live mice for the first time

“We think this study is a major breakthrough because it for the first time demonstrates after 40 years of the AIDS epidemic that the HIV disease is a curable disease,” said study co-author Dr. Kamel Khalili, chair of the department of neuroscience and director of the Center for Neurovirology and the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple University.

Using a combination of CRISPR gene-editing technology and a therapeutic treatment called LASER ART, scientists at Temple University and the University of Nebraska Medical Center said they erased HIV DNA from the genomes of animals in what they call an unprecedented study that was published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications .

Researchers say they’re one step closer to finding a potential cure for HIV after successfully eliminating the virus in living mice for the first time.

About 1.1 million people in the U.S. live with HIV, a virus that attacks the body’s immune system and makes a person more susceptible to falling ill. If HIV is not treated, it can turn into AIDS, a disease in which the virus badly damages the immune system. People with AIDS on average live about three years after their diagnosis, according to HIV.gov.

The virus is currently treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), which suppresses it from replicating and prevents many patients in the U.S. from developing AIDS. ART does not rid the body of HIV, though, and if a patient stops treatment the virus will continue to replicate.

But now researchers say they’re able to destroy the virus in “humanized” mice, which were injected with human bone marrow to imitate the human immune system.

The study authors used two different tools to combat the virus: CRISPR technology and LASER ART.

CRISPR-Cas9 is a gene editing tool that’s been boasted as breakthrough technology that can help researchers treat or potentially cure genetic diseases. It gives scientists the ability to change an organism’s DNA, so they can add, remove or change certain genetic material.

LASER ART is a “super” form of ART that keeps replication of the virus at low levels for longer time periods, according to co-author Dr. Howard Gendelman, chair of UNMC’s pharmacology and experimental neuroscience department and director of the the Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. The antiretroviral drug is then stored in nanocrystals, which slowly release the drug where the virus is located.

“We’re going at the root cause,” Gendelman said. “We’re going after the virus that’s already integrated in the genome of the host cell.”

The researchers said they used the two treatments concurrently. First, they administered the LASER ART to reduce HIV growth, then they used the CRISPR treatment as “chemical scissors” to “eliminate the residual integrated HIV DNA still present,” Gendelman said.

The virus did not return in nine of the 21 mice in which the method was tested, according to Khalili.

The study authors say the findings are promising and they are now testing the CRISPR-LASER ART combination on primates. However, there is still much work that needs to be done before the method can be tested on humans.

“Things that work in mice, may not work in men,” Gendelman said. “The limitations of any mouse work have to do with the species, how the drug is administered, the distribution, which is a lot easier than a man or a woman.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mice, theyre, live, hiv, finding, gendelman, study, researchers, work, say, art, virus, aids, center, technology, eliminate, using


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Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says

Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:1. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on


Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:1. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on
Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: kabir sehgal, contributor deepak chopra, deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, science, young, wellbeing, live, unemployed, little, study, exercise, spend, life, free, longer, weekends, doing, happier, work, mental, things


Doing these 3 little things on weekends can help you live a happier and longer life, science says

Living in the moment, being spontaneous, taking a mental break from work — these are the things that make free time so special. What you do choose to do with your free time is important; once you spend it, you can’t get it back. Frittering it away by binge-watching Netflix or scrolling through Instagram won’t bring you long-lasting happiness. Instead, it will likely leave you feeling languished or mired in mediocrity. The happiest and most successful people make the most out of their free time — on weekends, especially — by incorporating healthy habits that have been scientifically proven to improve our physical and mental well-being. To live a happier and longer life, try doing these 3 simple things on weekends:

1. Spend time with friends and family

Weekends are the best days of the week — not just for the employed, but also for the unemployed, according to a 2014 study from Stanford University. Researchers found that emotional well-being increases by about 15% on weekends — and that number rises the more we spend time with family and friends. “People who spend weekends alone get very little of the boost in emotional well-being,” said Cristobal Young, an assistant professor and co-author of the study. Social time is especially important for those who are unemployed, the researchers also noted. People out of work spend most of their extra free time alone. Often, their time might be spent doing household chores or watching daytime TV. “Weekends are a break from unemployment,” Young added, “because on Saturday and Sunday, other people are available to spend time with.”

2. Exercise

The world’s most successful business leaders, like Oprah Winfrey, Sheryl Sandberg and Bill Gates all make exercise a priority. Not only can a healthy cardiovascular system improve your memory and learning ability, it can also release endorphins that elicit a “feel-good” effect. A 2018 study, published in The Lancet, found that people who are physically active have a greater sense of well-being than those who are inactive. “Individuals who exercised had 43% fewer days of poor mental health in the past month than individuals who did not exercise,” according to the study. Social exercises (i.e., team sports and running with a friend) had higher positive effects, although cycling also ranked highly. This all leads to one simple reminder: Find out what form of physical activity motivates you most and make time for it. As the study’s authors wrote, “All exercise types were associated with a lower mental health burden.”

3. Meditate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: kabir sehgal, contributor deepak chopra, deepak chopra
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, science, young, wellbeing, live, unemployed, little, study, exercise, spend, life, free, longer, weekends, doing, happier, work, mental, things


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The Seattle suburb where Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates both live is running out of money

Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates are the richest people in the world, worth $119 billion and $107 billion respectively, according to Bloomberg. While property values continue to rise, the City’s tax revenues don’t rise in tandem,” reads a June 2019 Medina city newsletter. For Medina, the property tax rate is $7.92925 per $1000 of assessed value. The proposed increase of property taxes in Medina would increase the property tax by 20 cents per $1000 of assessed value, Ketter says. In 2001, a rule limitin


Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates are the richest people in the world, worth $119 billion and $107 billion respectively, according to Bloomberg. While property values continue to rise, the City’s tax revenues don’t rise in tandem,” reads a June 2019 Medina city newsletter. For Medina, the property tax rate is $7.92925 per $1000 of assessed value. The proposed increase of property taxes in Medina would increase the property tax by 20 cents per $1000 of assessed value, Ketter says. In 2001, a rule limitin
The Seattle suburb where Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates both live is running out of money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, seattle, bill, jeff, increase, property, goes, million, bezos, city, ketter, tax, running, suburb, gates, live, town, money, medina


The Seattle suburb where Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates both live is running out of money

Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates are the richest people in the world, worth $119 billion and $107 billion respectively, according to Bloomberg.

Amazon is headquartered in Seattle and Microsoft is just outside the city, and both billionaires have have homes in the nearby small town of Medina, Washington.

With a population of just over 3,000, Medina is the seventh richest zip code in the country with a median home value of $2.77 million, and the town has a median household income of $186,464 in 2017, the most recent data available. (By comparison, the 2017 median household income in the United States was $60,336.)

Yet Medina is running out of money — and the irony is lost on no one.

So how is the home of the richest people on the planet coming up short?

The problem is, even though Medina home values are increasing, the city’s income is not rising at the same speed, the city says.

“You may find it hard to imagine that the City doesn’t have enough income to sustain current service levels, particularly in this economy. While property values continue to rise, the City’s tax revenues don’t rise in tandem,” reads a June 2019 Medina city newsletter.

That’s because by law, the local government can not increase the amount of tax revenue it collects by more than 1% each year without the residents voting to approve a larger amount.

The property tax rate in Washington state is set as a rate, not a percentage, Medina’s director of finance Julie Ketter tells CNBC Make It. For Medina, the property tax rate is $7.92925 per $1000 of assessed value.

Of that, only $0.63486 goes to the city of Medina, Ketter says. (Another $2.42782 goes to local schools, $0.12266 goes to the port, $1.21906 goes to the county, $0.37441 goes to the library, $0.21762 goes to emergency medical services, $0.09660 goes to a flood fund, $0.20700 goes to regional transit and $2.62992 goes to the state school fund.)

The most expensive home in Medina is assessed by the King County Assessors office as being worth $131,239,000, Ketter tells CNBC Make It. This home — presumably Gates “Xanadu 2.0,” which has 24 bathrooms and a trampoline room — has a $1,040,627 total property tax in 2019 and of that, $83,318 will go to the City of Medina.

But the majority of the homes in Medina are not that expensive: the median value of a home in Medina is just over $2 million, Ketter says.

Therefore, in 2019, Medina will bring in only $2.8 million in property taxes the City says. A 1% increase of that is an additional $28,000, which is not enough to cover rising expenses. “Fire services alone increased by nearly double that amount in 2019,” the newsletter reads.

To fix the budget shortfall in Medina, the town will vote in November 2019 to lift the cap on property taxes enough to “provide funds to continue current service levels without significant cuts,” the newsletter reads.

The proposed increase of property taxes in Medina would increase the property tax by 20 cents per $1000 of assessed value, Ketter says. For a $2 million home, that would be $400 per year in 2020 and an increase of $589 per year in 2025, Medina says.

The city, if it continues to operate without raising property taxes, will have a deficit of $500,000 by 2020 and a deficit of $3.3 million by 2025, the City says.

“We’re on an unsustainable path,” the newsletter says.

The fiscal problem in Medina is illustrative of a larger taxation issue in the state of Washington, which doesn’t have a personal or corporate income tax. In 2001, a rule limiting the increase in revenue brought in from property taxes to 1% per year was voted in. The state’s supreme court overturned the law and then it was brought back again in 2007.

The cap is so restrictive that it can cripple local budgets.

“Need more proof that Washington’s tax system is as messed up as it gets? Even the richest town in the state can’t make it work,” Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat wrote of Medina on Friday. “The town of 3,200 is discovering what King County, Seattle and countless other municipalities around here have been screaming for nearly two decades: the math doesn’t work anymore.”

Westneat continued: “I hear some really important people live in Medina. Maybe now that it’s their town that’s said to be in ‘dire straits,’ these questions will finally get some traction.”

Representatives for Bezos and Gates did not immediately respond to CNBC Make It’s request for a comment.

Correction: This story has been updated and corrected to reflect that Microsoft headquarters is outside of Seattle.

See also:

Bill Gates: This is a ‘great’ way to use your tech skills

Jeff Bezos’ single teen mom brought him to night school with her when he was a baby

Jeff Bezos says dad emigrated from Cuba alone at 16: ‘His grit, determination, optimism are inspiring’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taxes, seattle, bill, jeff, increase, property, goes, million, bezos, city, ketter, tax, running, suburb, gates, live, town, money, medina


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Watch Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s news conference live after central bank leaves rates unchanged

Powell on Trump: ‘The law is clear that I have a four-year term’The Fed chief said that despite reports that Trump was looking to demote or fire him, he doesn’t plan on leaving anytime soon. The Fedread more


Powell on Trump: ‘The law is clear that I have a four-year term’The Fed chief said that despite reports that Trump was looking to demote or fire him, he doesn’t plan on leaving anytime soon. The Fedread more
Watch Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s news conference live after central bank leaves rates unchanged Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, termthe, fouryear, leaving, rates, jerome, plan, watch, live, conference, looking, powells, trump, powell, soonthe, law, fed, chair, leaves, unchanged, reports


Watch Fed Chair Jerome Powell's news conference live after central bank leaves rates unchanged

Powell on Trump: ‘The law is clear that I have a four-year term’

The Fed chief said that despite reports that Trump was looking to demote or fire him, he doesn’t plan on leaving anytime soon.

The Fed

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: jeff cox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, termthe, fouryear, leaving, rates, jerome, plan, watch, live, conference, looking, powells, trump, powell, soonthe, law, fed, chair, leaves, unchanged, reports


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