Options are few for storm-ravaged homes with insufficient insurance

With the Atlantic hurricane season underway, homeowners should be aware that inadequate insurance coverage can make recovering from a bad situation even worse. Whether damage from a storm comes from wind or water, homeowners whose coverage is insufficient have discovered the hard way that it makes recovery difficult and that their options for help are limited. While most homeowners carry standard homeowners insurance, those policies typically have a hurricane deductible, and don’t cover damage f


With the Atlantic hurricane season underway, homeowners should be aware that inadequate insurance coverage can make recovering from a bad situation even worse. Whether damage from a storm comes from wind or water, homeowners whose coverage is insufficient have discovered the hard way that it makes recovery difficult and that their options for help are limited. While most homeowners carry standard homeowners insurance, those policies typically have a hurricane deductible, and don’t cover damage f
Options are few for storm-ravaged homes with insufficient insurance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormravaged, youre, insurance, typically, billion, damage, insufficient, flood, homes, fema, sba, options, long, homeowners


Options are few for storm-ravaged homes with insufficient insurance

With the Atlantic hurricane season underway, homeowners should be aware that inadequate insurance coverage can make recovering from a bad situation even worse. Whether damage from a storm comes from wind or water, homeowners whose coverage is insufficient have discovered the hard way that it makes recovery difficult and that their options for help are limited. “Some people believe they don’t need [coverage], and then they experience an event and realize they can’t afford the cost of repairs or rebuilding,” said Brock Long, former administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and now executive chairman at Hagerty Consulting, an emergency management consulting firm based in Evanston, Illinois.

A woman crosses a flooded street. Jim Watson | AFP | Getty Images

As temperatures rise and more moisture is held in the air, massive storms — some of which stall and dump torrential rainfall — have become more frequent in recent years. This has caused flooding in places that previously were unaccustomed to it. While most homeowners carry standard homeowners insurance, those policies typically have a hurricane deductible, and don’t cover damage from flooding — which often causes the most damage. Separate flood insurance is available through the National Flood Insurance Program or a private carrier. Yet unless you’re in a special designated flood zone, your lender likely doesn’t require it. When a homeowner faces storm-related damage — regardless of the weather event — that is uncovered, there might be government programs that can provide financial assistance: FEMA grants and Small Business Administration loans. However, that help is not guaranteed, and it likely wouldn’t get you quickly back on your feet.

For instance, after 2017’s Hurricane Harvey, which dumped as much as 60 inches of rain in some spots in Texas, the average FEMA grant for individuals was $7,000, while the average claim through the National Flood Insurance Program was more than $100,000. “FEMA can kickstart recovery, but it wasn’t designed to make you whole,” Long said. And, FEMA only gets involved when the weather event is declared a disaster area by the president. SBA loans also are only available in those situations. You can apply for up to $200,000 toward the cost of repairing or replacing your primary residence — vacation homes generally don’t count.

Five costliest U.S. hurricanes on record Name Year Cost Katrina 2005 $161 billion Harvey 2017 $125 billion Maria 2017 $90 billion Sandy 2012 $71 billion Irma 2017 $50 billion

Remember, too, that you’re expected to continue your mortgage payments after a disaster. That means an SBA loan would be an additional monthly obligation. “In that situation, you’re essentially paying two mortgages for your home,” Long said. The SBA sometimes will refinance part or all of an existing home loan, although that decision is made on a case-by-case basis. And, of course, a bank might be willing to lend you money to rebuild, in the form of a home-equity or construction loan. Nonprofit organizations also typically are on hand after disasters to provide assistance, ranging from the basics such as food and shelter to longer-term aid that can include housing — although a new home through a nonprofit is typically available only to very low-income residents.

If you go through a disaster and have a lot of uninsured losses, and you weren’t financially stable to begin with, your ability to overcome that is very difficult. Brock Long Executive chairman at Hagerty Consulting and former FEMA administrator


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stormravaged, youre, insurance, typically, billion, damage, insufficient, flood, homes, fema, sba, options, long, homeowners


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New York, London and Paris remain the world’s most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult


New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities. That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees. For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and cult
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


New York, London and Paris remain the world's most competitive cities — but perhaps not for long

New York, London and Paris continue to dominate as the world’s top three most competitive cities.

But their prime positions could be up for contention as progress across Europe, Asia and the Middle East shows signs of disrupting the status quo.

That’s the conclusion of the 2019 Global Cities Report from management consulting company A.T. Kearney, which ranks the world’s major cities on their attractiveness for businesses and employees.

For the tenth year in a row, New York (1st), London (2nd) and Paris (3rd) retained their titles as the world’s three most competitive cities based on a variety of factors including business activity and culture, human capital, political engagement and information exchange.

New York ranked especially highly for business activity and human capital, while Paris performed well for information exchange and London for culture.

The leading trio were joined in the top 10 of the “Global Cities Index” by Tokyo (4th), Hong Kong (5th), Singapore (6th), Los Angeles (7th), Chicago (8th), Beijing (9th) and Washington D.C. (10th).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cities, york, competitive, human, long, capital, london, worlds, information, paris, global, remain


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Fitch’s top analyst warns he’s ‘fearful’ of a long trade war

The global head of sovereign ratings at Fitch has said he is “fearful” that the trade standoff between China and the United States will not be resolved soon. “I am fearful that we are in for a long standoff between China and the United States,” said McCormack. Fitch’s top analyst on country risk added that the United States had gone a long way from simple concerns about trade imbalance figures which bothered few in Congress or the business community. White House trade adviser Peter Navarro has c


The global head of sovereign ratings at Fitch has said he is “fearful” that the trade standoff between China and the United States will not be resolved soon. “I am fearful that we are in for a long standoff between China and the United States,” said McCormack. Fitch’s top analyst on country risk added that the United States had gone a long way from simple concerns about trade imbalance figures which bothered few in Congress or the business community. White House trade adviser Peter Navarro has c
Fitch’s top analyst warns he’s ‘fearful’ of a long trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, warns, war, white, fearful, house, fitchs, hes, analyst, chinese, china, economic, risk, states, yergin, long, united


Fitch's top analyst warns he's 'fearful' of a long trade war

Chinese President Xi Jinping chats with President Donald Trump during a welcome ceremony in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017.

The global head of sovereign ratings at Fitch has said he is “fearful” that the trade standoff between China and the United States will not be resolved soon.

Speaking on a panel at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) in Russia on Thursday, James McCormack told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore that the trade debate has morphed into a situation that may harden positions.

“I am fearful that we are in for a long standoff between China and the United States,” said McCormack.

“There is a risk that we end up with the two biggest economies operating in parallel tracks in many regards and not in a cooperative way and the world economy will suffer from that.”

Fitch’s top analyst on country risk added that the United States had gone a long way from simple concerns about trade imbalance figures which bothered few in Congress or the business community.

McCormack said White House officials who wanted to take China on, finally felt momentum when the U.S. corporate sector started to complain about losses of intellectual property via forced tech transfers.

Forced technology transfer (FTT) means that when a foreign company wants to enter the Chinese market, it has to surrender its technology to Chinese companies through joint ventures.

Speaking on the same panel was the Vice Chairman of IHS Markit, Dan Yergin, who agreed that the increasing concern from the business community had put energy into White House efforts to widen their attack on Chinese practices.

Yergin said previously it was U.S. Democrats who were “kind of protectionist” while the Republicans were more amenable to free global trade. He said the switch by Republicans has allowed a coalescence of political support for Trump.

The economic historian said there was a risk that the trade spat could ultimately develop beyond rhetoric and tariffs to a “new clash of systems” between China and the United States.

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro has claimed that Trump’s isolationist tactics have been successful in bringing production back onshore to the U.S.

Addressing this claim, Yergin said he was skeptical that firms would make major investment decisions “based upon a few months of political wrangling.”

Also contributing to the discussion was the Deputy Minister of Economic Development for Russia, Timur Maksimov. He said the discussions between the U.S. and China were about trade “in form but were economic in substance.”

Maksimov added that trade deficit was not previously an issue for the Trump administration and that Washington was not particularly upset until China started to manufacture its own product rather than just assemble western goods.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-06  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, warns, war, white, fearful, house, fitchs, hes, analyst, chinese, china, economic, risk, states, yergin, long, united


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Goldman Sachs HR exec: Showing ‘authentic’ emotion in your interview can help you land the job

But Goldman Sachs wants candidates who are in touch with the emotions. Head of Human Capital Management Dane Holmes says that showing genuine emotion and honesty in your interview with the bank can actually improve your chances of being hired. “Failure is a big part of getting to understand how someone operates and what motivates them,” Holmes says. Goldman Sachs’ hiring process is a rigorous and extensive evaluation of a candidate’s entire resume, not just their grades or work experience. Holme


But Goldman Sachs wants candidates who are in touch with the emotions. Head of Human Capital Management Dane Holmes says that showing genuine emotion and honesty in your interview with the bank can actually improve your chances of being hired. “Failure is a big part of getting to understand how someone operates and what motivates them,” Holmes says. Goldman Sachs’ hiring process is a rigorous and extensive evaluation of a candidate’s entire resume, not just their grades or work experience. Holme
Goldman Sachs HR exec: Showing ‘authentic’ emotion in your interview can help you land the job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holmes, land, help, goldman, work, job, process, motivates, person, candidates, showing, sachs, exec, hr, emotion, interview, long, interviewer, understand


Goldman Sachs HR exec: Showing 'authentic' emotion in your interview can help you land the job

Financial services companies have a reputation for being competitive, often challenging work environments. But Goldman Sachs wants candidates who are in touch with the emotions.

Head of Human Capital Management Dane Holmes says that showing genuine emotion and honesty in your interview with the bank can actually improve your chances of being hired. “When we are going to put you in a demanding, high-expectation job, it’s better the more that we understand you, what motivates you, what drives you,” Holmes tells CNBC Make It.

He says candidates have even cried when they were talking about struggles they overcame and experiences that touched them personally. Rather than discounting them for being emotional, he says he and other Goldman recruiters developed a deeper respect for those willing to discuss deeply personal experiences.

Holmes says being upfront about your shortcomings as well as your successes gives your interviewer a wider sense of who you are. Admitting how you bounced back from failure shows your grit and ability to learn from your mistakes.

“Failure is a big part of getting to understand how someone operates and what motivates them,” Holmes says. “Everybody fails. Everybody has their setback — acknowledge it.”

Goldman Sachs’ hiring process is a rigorous and extensive evaluation of a candidate’s entire resume, not just their grades or work experience. The interview process examines a candidate’s behavioral skills, judgment and character in addition to their professional qualifications.

“The whole real point is, ‘Can you be an honest person? Can you be a transparent, authentic person?'” Holmes says.

Holmes says demonstrating your passion and work ethic to your interviewer will also go a long way to winning the job.

“As long as emotion is authentic and direct, and it’s not messing with your perspective or your decision-making, it’s generally a good thing,” says Holmes.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jordan mcdonald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, holmes, land, help, goldman, work, job, process, motivates, person, candidates, showing, sachs, exec, hr, emotion, interview, long, interviewer, understand


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‘The algorithm is our boss’: Uber drivers face long hours, no benefits and sometimes danger

I’m working 70 hours a week, year in and year out, and I have to face the fact that I can’t take a vacation for one week. Rick Mendell Uber driverIn a typical week, he drives people around for 30 hours and said he makes $500. (Indeed, more than half of Uber’s drivers work less than 10 hours a week, according to the company.) Sonam Lama Uber driverLAMA’S LIFE CHANGED for the worse after Uber changed its pay structure in 2016. Of late, he said he works 40 hours a week and makes around $800.


I’m working 70 hours a week, year in and year out, and I have to face the fact that I can’t take a vacation for one week. Rick Mendell Uber driverIn a typical week, he drives people around for 30 hours and said he makes $500. (Indeed, more than half of Uber’s drivers work less than 10 hours a week, according to the company.) Sonam Lama Uber driverLAMA’S LIFE CHANGED for the worse after Uber changed its pay structure in 2016. Of late, he said he works 40 hours a week and makes around $800.
‘The algorithm is our boss’: Uber drivers face long hours, no benefits and sometimes danger Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, face, boss, work, company, algorithm, mendell, benefits, york, danger, long, drivers, lama, car, uber, hours, week


'The algorithm is our boss': Uber drivers face long hours, no benefits and sometimes danger

Uber driver Sonam Lama. Annie Nova | CNBC

AT 3 A.M., SONAM LAMA’S ALARM goes off. In his house in Queens, New York, while his wife and baby son sleep, he pulls on his clothes and makes coffee. Then he turns on his Uber app and waits. On this morning, a warm but windy Tuesday in May, an hour passes without a passenger request. “You’re just thinking, ‘When is the ride going to come? When is the ride going to come?'” the 35-year-old Lama said. A little after 5 a.m., one does. In a collared, white button-down shirt and khakis, he’s dressed more formally than usual. Later in the day, he’s taking a test for a job with the New York Police Department. He doesn’t want to drive for Uber anymore. “I’m not making a living,” Lama said. “Almost all drivers are looking for work elsewhere.”

REDONDO BEACH, CA – MARCH 25: Driver and strike organizer Nicole Moore speaks during a one-day strike against Uber and Lyft on Monday, Mar 25, 2019. MediaNews Group/Torrance Daily Breeze via Getty Images | MediaNews Group | Getty Images

UBER SAYS ITS MISSION IS “to ignite opportunity by setting the world in motion.” Yet as the company’s initial public offering unfolded in May, drivers across the country went on strike to denounce its low wages and lack of benefits. The ride-hailing company went public at $45 a share and has since dropped to around $40. On Thursday, in its first earnings report since the IPO, Uber showed revenue of $3.1 billion and a loss of $1.01 billion. The company labels its 3.9 million drivers as independent contractors instead of employees, a distinction that means it isn’t required to provide a minimum wage or paid time off, compensation for overtime or health insurance. And drivers are almost entirely on their own when it comes to the constant expenses of their cars, including insurance, repairs and gas. Uber says it offers people a way to work on their own schedule. And while it insists its drivers are not employees, it says it’s committed to proving a support system to them. The company points out that it recently introduced a rewards program, which gets drivers cash back on gas and discounts on car maintenance. Drivers can also sign up for an injury protection plan, in which they’d receive a monthly check should they become injured while working. Perks include tuition assistance at Arizona State University. CNBC spoke with the company’s drivers about how their financial lives are faring.

Protestors display a banner outside the New York Stock Exchange as Uber Technologies holds it’s IPO in New York, May 10, 2019. Andrew Kelly | Reuters

FOR FIVE YEARS NOW, Ismail has worked for Uber in Minnesota. He likes the flexibility and has always enjoyed being on the road. He has a full-time job — as a claim support specialist at CVS — but he makes only $40,000 a year at the pharmacy. (He asked to use his first name only since he was speaking about his employer.) “The income isn’t enough,” said Ismail, who is 38, married and has three young children.

I’m working 70 hours a week, year in and year out, and I have to face the fact that I can’t take a vacation for one week. Rick Mendell Uber driver

In a typical week, he drives people around for 30 hours and said he makes $500. Many people drive for companies such as Uber and Lyft because “they don’t get enough from their full-time job,” said Lawrence Mishel, an economist for the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute. (Indeed, more than half of Uber’s drivers work less than 10 hours a week, according to the company.) Ismail’s only day off is Sunday. “You basically don’t have any life,” he said. Recently, Ismail was driving a passenger to the airport when one of his tires ruptured. He lost control of the car, and it smashed into a highway wall. He and the passenger were uninjured, but the damage to his car was significant. It will cost him more than $3,000 to fix; however, he has no savings to draw from. In the meantime, he uses his wife’s car when it’s available.

RICK MENDELL’S ONLY JOB is driving for Uber. He’s 65 and works around 70 hours a week for the company, earning around $1,200. “That’s what it takes to pay the bills,” Mendell said. He didn’t expect to be doing this kind of work in his 60s. He was general manager of a towing and auto-body company for two decades, and then owned a wine bar in Corte Madera, California, which he eventually had to sell when the financial crisis hit. “When people are unemployed, they don’t go out buying $400 bottles of wine,” Mendell said. He depleted his savings trying to save the business. In 2016, he and his wife moved to a rental house in Nevada, where the cost of living is lower.

Uber Driver Rick Mendell Source: Rick Mendell

At first, he interviewed for a position as a wine and spirits specialist at the Safeway supermarket chain, but the job paid just $9 an hour. He attended career fairs but said he felt discriminated against because of his age. That’s when he turned to the Uber app. A recent analysis by the Retirement Equity Lab at the New School for Social Research found that workers over age 55 are three times more likely than those under 35 to work in the gig economy.

Mendell said he loves driving for Uber. The company recently notified him that he’s given rides to passengers from 71 different countries. “I have met some amazing people,” he said. One time, hip-hop star Nicki Minaj got into his car. And Mendell said he likes taking care of his passengers; he stocks his backseat area with tissues, cold water bottles and “seven phone chargers.” Yet he can’t keep up with the costs of his car. After a part on his 2015 Chrysler recently became unusable, he had to trade the vehicle in for another, racking up more auto debt in the process. “Three weeks ago, I replaced the rear brakes for $300,” he said. “You have to do the preventive maintenance, no matter how painful it is.” All told, his car typically costs him around $1,500 a month. He feels trapped without any paid time off. “I’m working 70 hours a week, year in and year out,” he said, “and I have to face the fact that I can’t take a vacation for one week.” With little retirement savings, he tries not to think about what would happen if he couldn’t drive for Uber anymore.

The algorithm is our boss. Sonam Lama Uber driver

LAMA’S LIFE CHANGED for the worse after Uber changed its pay structure in 2016. Of late, he said he works 40 hours a week and makes around $800. At one point, he earned over $2,000 a week, though he was putting in more hours then. “It’s stressful,” Lama said. “You have to make adjustments.” It was important to his wife to feed their child, named after his father, Sonam, organic food but she’s had to turn to cheaper items. The three of them used to escape the city on weekends, often to upstate New York, but they do so less these days.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, face, boss, work, company, algorithm, mendell, benefits, york, danger, long, drivers, lama, car, uber, hours, week


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Beijing experts’ latest message as trade talks stall: The US needs China

Now, there have been no announcements about the next round of talks, and markets await some signal about the future of the trade war that’s roiled stocks over the last year. This big economic system will give America more material benefits, including employment, including products, including product exports, including revenues,” Wei said, according to Mandarin-language remarks translated by CNBC. “Originally, we believed that in the U.S.-China economic trade relationship … we could mutually co


Now, there have been no announcements about the next round of talks, and markets await some signal about the future of the trade war that’s roiled stocks over the last year. This big economic system will give America more material benefits, including employment, including products, including product exports, including revenues,” Wei said, according to Mandarin-language remarks translated by CNBC. “Originally, we believed that in the U.S.-China economic trade relationship … we could mutually co
Beijing experts’ latest message as trade talks stall: The US needs China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economic, war, experts, including, long, needs, trade, talks, latest, message, china, products, wei, beijing, chinese, stall


Beijing experts' latest message as trade talks stall: The US needs China

A Chinese flag is seen in front of containers at the Yangshan Deep-Water Port, an automated cargo wharf, in Shanghai on April 9, 2018. Johannes Eisele | AFP | Getty Images

China’s domestic media is rallying the country’s population with messages of standing firm against American “bullying,” while Chinese government-aligned experts are stressing to an overseas audience that the U.S. will need to negotiate. The world’s two largest economies have been locked in a trade fight for more than a year. Both sides appeared to be making progress until early this month, when President Donald Trump accused China of reneging on a deal and raised tariffs on an additional $200 billion in Chinese products to 25%. Beijing retaliated with raising levies on $60 billion worth of U.S. products. Now, there have been no announcements about the next round of talks, and markets await some signal about the future of the trade war that’s roiled stocks over the last year. Throughout this current lull, China’s state-run newspapers and television channels have taken an increasingly anti-American tone. Still, the country’s expert class is emphasizing what the U.S. has to gain from cooperating with Beijing. “In the next 20 to 30 years, the U.S. shouldn’t miss out on this opportunity and lose the China market,” Wei Jianguo, a former vice minister at China’s Ministry of Commerce, told CNBC in an interview Wednesday. He is now vice chairman and deputy executive officer at Beijing-based think tank China Center for International Economic Exchanges.

Personally, I think, as long as there is negotiation, then there will be results. Wei Jianguo a former vice minister at China’s Ministry of Commerce

“I believe Americans should grasp this opportunity. This big economic system will give America more material benefits, including employment, including products, including product exports, including revenues,” Wei said, according to Mandarin-language remarks translated by CNBC. “Personally, I think, as long as there is negotiation, then there will be results,” he said. On the same day, two speakers addressing foreign reporters at a small press event organized by the government’s main information office echoed some of Wei’s sentiments. “My personal view is that, from the perspective of U.S. businesses, if the trade war continues, it will … have a negative impact on what was a good relationship between U.S. and Chinese businesses,” said Li Yong, deputy director of the expert committee at the China Association of International Trade, which falls under the Commerce Ministry’s direct leadership. “At the end of the day, the image and influence U.S. businesses have developed over the long term will (be affected). It’s a pity.” The other speaker, Zhang Yansheng, head researcher at the China Center for International Economic Exchanges, also emphasized that Beijing would like to keep negotiating with the U.S. It could even be a years-long process that cycles through negotiation and fights, he said. The tone stands in contrast to state-run media, whose Chinese-language reports in the last two weeks have promoted the country’s ability to defy pressure from the U.S. For the last several days, the national broadcaster CCTV has also been airing anti-U.S. movies set during the Korean War. On Wednesday, the prime-time evening report featured Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit earlier in the week to the province of Jiangxi. The Chinese leader’s remarks during the visit about rare earth elements as an “important strategic resource” and a “new Long March ” signaled to many that Beijing is resolved not to bend to American demands.

Who needs a deal?

At Wednesday’s news conference, Li said China is in a position where it can’t appease American demands. “Originally, we believed that in the U.S.-China economic trade relationship … we could mutually cooperate and rely on each other,” he said in Mandarin. “But now we need to revisit this.” Analysts generally agree that, right now, Beijing still depends heavily on the U.S. as an export market. Last year, China was the largest supplier of goods to the U.S. at $539.5 billion, according to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. China is trying to transform its economy into one driven by consumption rather than manufacturing. The country hosted its first import expo last fall in an effort to bill itself and its hundreds of millions of consumers as a buyer of the world’s products. “China needs the U.S. more than the U.S. needs China,” said Jacob Shapiro, director of analysis at online publication Geopolitical Futures.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economic, war, experts, including, long, needs, trade, talks, latest, message, china, products, wei, beijing, chinese, stall


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Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market

Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market2:12 PM ET Wed, 22 May 2019Tim Draper, long time venture capitalist, joins CNBC’s Dierdre Bosa to discuss the IPO rush, bitcoin volatility and regulating Facebook.


Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market2:12 PM ET Wed, 22 May 2019Tim Draper, long time venture capitalist, joins CNBC’s Dierdre Bosa to discuss the IPO rush, bitcoin volatility and regulating Facebook.
Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bitcoin, market, rush, draper, regulating, capitalist, tim, ipo, venture, long, volatility


Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market

Long time venture capitalist Tim Draper on bitcoin and volatility in the IPO market

2:12 PM ET Wed, 22 May 2019

Tim Draper, long time venture capitalist, joins CNBC’s Dierdre Bosa to discuss the IPO rush, bitcoin volatility and regulating Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bitcoin, market, rush, draper, regulating, capitalist, tim, ipo, venture, long, volatility


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Xi Jinping says China is embarking on a ‘new Long March,’ signaling no end to trade war soon

Chinese President Xi Jinping ramped up his rhetoric yet again on the trade war. “We are here at the starting point of the Long March to remember the time when the Red Army began its journey,” Xi said at a rally in Jiangxi province during a domestic tour. “We are now embarking on a new Long March, and we must start all over again!” according to a report from the South China Morning Post.


Chinese President Xi Jinping ramped up his rhetoric yet again on the trade war. “We are here at the starting point of the Long March to remember the time when the Red Army began its journey,” Xi said at a rally in Jiangxi province during a domestic tour. “We are now embarking on a new Long March, and we must start all over again!” according to a report from the South China Morning Post.
Xi Jinping says China is embarking on a ‘new Long March,’ signaling no end to trade war soon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, soon, end, china, xi, jinping, south, report, long, tour, trade, embarking, war, rhetoric, warwe, starting, signaling


Xi Jinping says China is embarking on a 'new Long March,' signaling no end to trade war soon

Chinese President Xi Jinping ramped up his rhetoric yet again on the trade war.

“We are here at the starting point of the Long March to remember the time when the Red Army began its journey,” Xi said at a rally in Jiangxi province during a domestic tour. “We are now embarking on a new Long March, and we must start all over again!” according to a report from the South China Morning Post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, soon, end, china, xi, jinping, south, report, long, tour, trade, embarking, war, rhetoric, warwe, starting, signaling


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Pinterest CEO: We’re in growth phase of our business

Pinterest CEO: We’re in growth phase of our business47 Mins Ago”We’re trying to be transparent and … we want to focus on the long term,” CEO Ben Silbermann says.


Pinterest CEO: We’re in growth phase of our business47 Mins Ago”We’re trying to be transparent and … we want to focus on the long term,” CEO Ben Silbermann says.
Pinterest CEO: We’re in growth phase of our business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparent, phase, pinterest, trying, mins, growth, long, business, ceo, silbermann, term


Pinterest CEO: We're in growth phase of our business

Pinterest CEO: We’re in growth phase of our business

47 Mins Ago

“We’re trying to be transparent and … we want to focus on the long term,” CEO Ben Silbermann says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparent, phase, pinterest, trying, mins, growth, long, business, ceo, silbermann, term


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Nike’s ‘inclusive’ image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say

Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. Taking a standThe controversy also raises


Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. Taking a standThe controversy also raises
Nike’s ‘inclusive’ image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, issues, women, risk, company, social, york, fails, nike, say, athletes, long, nikes, inclusive, brand, image, experts, maternity


Nike's 'inclusive' image at risk if it fails women athletes, brand experts say

When Olympic athlete Alysia Montano took part in a race only one month away from having a baby, she became known as “the pregnant runner.” It was 2014 and she went on to win a national championship when her daughter was six months old, and another when she was 10 months old. But in an opinion piece and video published by the New York Times on Sunday, Montano said when she told one of her former sponsors, Nike, that she wanted to have a baby during her career, the sports giant told her it would pause her contract and stop paying her. This, she said, is at odds with commercials such as “Dream Crazier,” released by Nike in February, where Nike-sponsored tennis player Serena Williams is praised for “having a baby and then coming back for more,” and in which viewers are told: “Show them what crazy can do.”

Pregnant athlete Alysia Montano at the USA Field and Track Championship on June 26, 2014 in Sacramento, California Ezra Shaw | Getty Images

Nike has admitted that “a few” female athletes did previously have “performance-based reductions” in their fees, but last year it standardized its approach across all sports “so that no female athlete is penalized financially for pregnancy,” according to a statement emailed to CNBC. It said it is common industry practice for agreements to include performance-based payment reductions, but did not confirm to the Times if its change in approach is a contractual guarantee. Montano’s article has prompted much debate. Women’s rights campaigning organization Time’s Up tweeted that Nike “should be supporting safe and healthy pregnancies — not pushing people out or slashing benefits.” Running coach Mario Fraioli called the lack of maternity benefits for women athletes “one of athletics’ dirtiest secrets,” in a tweet. Meanwhile, Kelly Williams, managing director of consultancy Sports Revolution, believes that because most athletes are self-employed, paid maternity leave is not warranted. “I think there is more of a debate about keeping a ranking than getting paid. I think the movement in women’s sport and focus on equality is absolutely great. But would we give a male athlete maternity leave? … (Women) don’t want to be different, just treated the same (and) we should not notice the difference between athletes,” she said in an email to CNBC. “I own my own business and if I don’t work, I don’t get paid. I have to budget for babies and I have had three,” she added.

Taking a stand

The controversy also raises the question of whether brands should take a stand on social issues, as Nike has done in its advertising, or have their executives publicize opinions. “Consumers increasingly expect brands to have a voice in political and social conversations, and gender equality is among the top issues Americans want to see companies support,” according to Jeremy Robinson-Leon, president of New York based PR firm Group Gordon, in an email to CNBC. “However, the public won’t stand for lip service. When a company’s words and actions don’t add up, its reputation will inevitably take a hit.”

A Nike Ad featuring American football quarterback Colin Kaepernick is on diplay September 8, 2018 in New York City. Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images

Nike is not afraid of controversy: Shares in the company fell in September 2018 after it released an ad starring activist Colin Kaepernick. For Simeon Siegel, an analyst at Nomura Instinet, its willingness to make a stand has not dented long-term sales. “Nike has a long history of … controversy for good and bad … and that long history sits side by side with a long history of becoming the largest … apparel (and) footwear brand in the history of time,” he told CNBC by phone.

Ads vs reality

For Robinson-Leon, any company that pushes gender equality in its advertising but behaves differently in private risks its reputation. “Clearly, a brand like Nike that bills itself as a leader on social issues hurts its credibility by saying one thing publicly and doing another backstage. It’s illogical for the business and a disservice to the intended social impact. And, more broadly, it gives rise to an understandable cynicism on the part of the public that undermines the positive efforts of other responsible businesses,” Robinson-Leon said in an email to CNBC. Other companies have been tripped up by how their public behavior contrasts with their advertising — United Airlines’ “Fly the friendly skies” was mocked on social media after a man was forcibly removed from a flight in 2017. But almost a year later, parent company United Continental Holdings posted its fifth consecutive year of profits.

Nike and women

“Dream Crazier,” from February, and “Dream with Us,” released on Mother’s Day to promote Nike’s sponsorship of teams playing in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup, are part of the company’s strategy to grow its U.S. business by focusing on women. The debate over maternity pay is not likely to dent sales to women, according to Siegel. “The reality is Nike(‘s)… marketing and their messaging is also inclusive … I believe that as long as they are not putting their head in the sand we are unlikely to see a sales miss,” he told CNBC by phone.

Nike President and CEO Mark Parker speaks during the 2016 Nike New Innovations Debut at Skylight at Moynihan Station on March 16, 2016 in New York City. Mike Pont | WireImage | Getty Images

Siegel added that Nike has been fast to deal with problems as it became aware of them. A year ago, the company saw an exodus of executives amid accusations of harassment and discrimination, and an apology from CEO Mark Parker who said the company would change its culture. “Nike, generally speaking, over the past year has actually sought to get ahead of issues presumably as they became aware of them,” Siegel said. “Rather than being called into question and then fixing the business, Nike during the worst of it aired their own dirty laundry. It’s always fair to challenge why there was dirty laundry in the first place, but on a relative scale the fact that the company has moved fast to at least try to make change and correct is worthy of note,” he told CNBC by phone. “From an investing perspective right now, the company continues to grow healthfully which means from a consumer perspective people are still buying their products en masse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, issues, women, risk, company, social, york, fails, nike, say, athletes, long, nikes, inclusive, brand, image, experts, maternity


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