As Democrats look to 2020, here’s how the party is trying to repair the damage of 2016

The Democratic National Committee sent a clear message when it announced its 2020 convention would be held in Milwaukee: We don’t want a repeat of 2016. Clinton also lost the Wisconsin primary to Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont democratic socialist who led a surprisingly strong challenge to the Democrats’ presumed front-runner. Critics often blame Clinton’s failure to campaign in the state for her loss to Trump in the general election. As the party seeks a strong challenger to Trump, it faces a d


The Democratic National Committee sent a clear message when it announced its 2020 convention would be held in Milwaukee: We don’t want a repeat of 2016. Clinton also lost the Wisconsin primary to Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont democratic socialist who led a surprisingly strong challenge to the Democrats’ presumed front-runner. Critics often blame Clinton’s failure to campaign in the state for her loss to Trump in the general election. As the party seeks a strong challenger to Trump, it faces a d
As Democrats look to 2020, here’s how the party is trying to repair the damage of 2016 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: valerie block, noah berger, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democratic, heres, trump, lost, 2020, number, 2016, repair, primary, democrats, damage, strong, look, state, clinton, trying, campaign, party


As Democrats look to 2020, here's how the party is trying to repair the damage of 2016

The Democratic National Committee sent a clear message when it announced its 2020 convention would be held in Milwaukee: We don’t want a repeat of 2016.

That year, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton lost Wisconsin’s 10 electoral votes to Republican Donald Trump – marking the first time since 1984 that a GOP presidential candidate had won the state. Clinton also lost the Wisconsin primary to Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont democratic socialist who led a surprisingly strong challenge to the Democrats’ presumed front-runner.

Critics often blame Clinton’s failure to campaign in the state for her loss to Trump in the general election.

Now, as the 2020 race heats up, the Democratic Party has a made a number of changes to its strategy, rules and bylaws as it struggles to manage a primary process with an unwieldy number of candidates, including Sanders.

As the party seeks a strong challenger to Trump, it faces a delicate balancing act: please its establishment wing, satisfy its expanding base and maintain impartiality.

“They need to be as transparent as possible,” said Doug Sosnik, a former senior advisor to President Bill Clinton, to prove “that they’re being an honest broker and not leaning toward one candidate.”

DNC Chairman Tom Perez, who stepped in after the 2016 election, told CNBC the organization is aware of its past errors and has “passed the most wide-ranging reforms in decades.”

Here are the key steps the DNC is taking to repair its damage from the 2016 campaign, from blowback over so-called superdelegates to the Russian email hack.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: valerie block, noah berger, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democratic, heres, trump, lost, 2020, number, 2016, repair, primary, democrats, damage, strong, look, state, clinton, trying, campaign, party


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Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A


Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A
Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday's 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia.

Boeing’s shares slid 11 percent from $422.54 Friday to $375.41 at Tuesday’s close before turning positive Wednesday morning. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico.

Its shares were up by less than 1 percent Wednesday.

Edward Jones downgraded Boeing’s stock to hold from buy, noting a possible “delay in orders.”

Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 crashed in Indonesia, killing all 189 people aboard. The cause of the Ethiopian Airlines plane is under investigation.

The U.S. is increasingly alone in defending the American-made jets since the Federal Aviation Administration deemed the 737 Max to be “airworthy” earlier this week. The aircraft hasn’t been grounded in the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


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Silicon Valley just lost a friend with the exit of Gottlieb from the FDA

The departure of Scott Gottlieb from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday is a potential blow to Silicon Valley. In his two years as commissioner of the FDA, Gottlieb, a doctor and former venture capitalist, gained a reputation as a proponent of health-care innovation, including pharmaceutical companies bringing new drugs to market. He helped to establish a digital health software program called Pre-Cert to provide a way for tech companies like Apple and Samsung to get quicker approv


The departure of Scott Gottlieb from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday is a potential blow to Silicon Valley. In his two years as commissioner of the FDA, Gottlieb, a doctor and former venture capitalist, gained a reputation as a proponent of health-care innovation, including pharmaceutical companies bringing new drugs to market. He helped to establish a digital health software program called Pre-Cert to provide a way for tech companies like Apple and Samsung to get quicker approv
Silicon Valley just lost a friend with the exit of Gottlieb from the FDA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: christina farr, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, innovation, kocher, companies, gottlieb, silicon, exit, lost, health, valley, tech, fda, apple, friend, care


Silicon Valley just lost a friend with the exit of Gottlieb from the FDA

The departure of Scott Gottlieb from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday is a potential blow to Silicon Valley.

In his two years as commissioner of the FDA, Gottlieb, a doctor and former venture capitalist, gained a reputation as a proponent of health-care innovation, including pharmaceutical companies bringing new drugs to market.

He helped to establish a digital health software program called Pre-Cert to provide a way for tech companies like Apple and Samsung to get quicker approval for low-risk health products. Last September, Apple received clearance to market an electrocardiogram app and sensor on its Apple Watch, the company’s biggest move into the health-care market.

Gottlieb issued a statement at the time to encourage Apple and other tech companies to push into health care, especially if they could help consumers engage more proactively with their health.

“Scott did a lot culturally to make the agency easier to work with,” said Bob Kocher, a partner at venture capital firm Venrock, investing in health-technology. “I think he’ll be missed by many in the tech industry, including the start-ups.”

Silicon Valley has long feared too much regulation, particularly in the health sector. Gottlieb said in last year’s statement, which he penned with FDA’s Jeffrey Shuren, that health care has been historically slow to adopt new technologies, and that regulators would do their part to help.

“The FDA is working to modernize our regulatory approach to better enable and more efficiently spur innovation in this novel area to improve the health and quality of life of consumers and patients,” he wrote.

Robin Goldstein, who worked on Apple’s health team before stepping down in late 2017, said Gottlieb’s efforts were applauded in the tech sector.

“He struck me as both smart and thoughtful,” Goldstein said. He was “deeply aware of the risks inherent in trying to bring change to the FDA, where lives are at stake, and yet willing to explore innovation originating from Silicon Valley in an effort to begin to reimagine the future of health care and medicine,” she said.

In his resignation letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Gottlieb didn’t say why he was leaving. President Trump sent two tweets announcing Azar’s departure, but didn’t say what spurred the change.

With Gottlieb departing, Kocher and others at the intersection of health and technology will have to wait and see if the Trump administration changes course.

“This administration has been generally pretty friendly to the private sector in encouraging competition,” Kocher said. “So I would assume that there will be others in the agency who will remain highly engaged with Silicon Valley.”

WATCH: FDA’s Scott Gottlieb is resigning


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: christina farr, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, innovation, kocher, companies, gottlieb, silicon, exit, lost, health, valley, tech, fda, apple, friend, care


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How health-care costs us $89 billion a year in lost time

The travel and wait times remained consistently high over the last decade, despite the expansion of new alternatives like urgent care clinics and access to physician visits via telemedicine for nonemergencies. By comparison, combined travel and wait times for government services like getting a driver’s license averaged about 30 minutes over the same period, and about 15 minutes for banking services. Altarum estimates that the economic impact of all that time spent on travel and waiting for healt


The travel and wait times remained consistently high over the last decade, despite the expansion of new alternatives like urgent care clinics and access to physician visits via telemedicine for nonemergencies. By comparison, combined travel and wait times for government services like getting a driver’s license averaged about 30 minutes over the same period, and about 15 minutes for banking services. Altarum estimates that the economic impact of all that time spent on travel and waiting for healt
How health-care costs us $89 billion a year in lost time Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: bertha coombs, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, spent, waiting, decade, travel, care, costs, 89, times, minutes, billion, average, wait, healthcare, lost


How health-care costs us $89 billion a year in lost time

Americans spend more time traveling and waiting for health appointments than for any other service, including getting a driver’s license at motor vehicle agencies, according to a new study by health research firm Altarum.

On average, Americans spent 34 minutes to traveling to doctor appointments and the 11 minutes waiting to be seen once they got there, according to Altarum’s analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ American Time Use Survey from 2006 through 2017.

The travel and wait times remained consistently high over the last decade, despite the expansion of new alternatives like urgent care clinics and access to physician visits via telemedicine for nonemergencies.

By comparison, combined travel and wait times for government services like getting a driver’s license averaged about 30 minutes over the same period, and about 15 minutes for banking services.

Altarum estimates that the economic impact of all that time spent on travel and waiting for health care was nearly $1 trillion over the last decade, or an average of $89 billion a year, when quantified in average hourly wages.

“When you’re talking about total time spent on health-care activities, but then more specifically travel and wait times, … there’s virtually no change” over the last decade, said Corey Rhyan, a senior analyst at Altarum’s center for value in health care.

But for some, the loss may be even bigger than time and money.

“You have to have patients who actually don’t seek out care because … they’re an employee that doesn’t have the luxury to take time off to get care, so they forgo care,” Rhyan said.

Altarum researchers say one thing that could help reduce wait times is if doctor’s offices adopted the practice of alerting patients when appointments are running late so they can better plan their visits.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: bertha coombs, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, spent, waiting, decade, travel, care, costs, 89, times, minutes, billion, average, wait, healthcare, lost


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Kraft Heinz has lost the one thing that distinguished it from General Mills and Mondelez

The one thing Kraft Heinz had going for it was its profit margins. Shares of Kraft Heinz tumbled about 28 percent, at one point hitting a 52-week low of $34.51 in trading Friday. If this trend continues, big packaged food companies like Kraft, General Mills and Mondelez are at risk of seeing sales continue to plummet. One thing Kraft had going for it was the cost-cutting that came after the 2015 merger between Kraft and Heinz, facilitated by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway and Brazilian priv


The one thing Kraft Heinz had going for it was its profit margins. Shares of Kraft Heinz tumbled about 28 percent, at one point hitting a 52-week low of $34.51 in trading Friday. If this trend continues, big packaged food companies like Kraft, General Mills and Mondelez are at risk of seeing sales continue to plummet. One thing Kraft had going for it was the cost-cutting that came after the 2015 merger between Kraft and Heinz, facilitated by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway and Brazilian priv
Kraft Heinz has lost the one thing that distinguished it from General Mills and Mondelez Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: sarah whitten, christina cheddar berk, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profit, mills, thing, lost, margins, billion, quarter, company, heinz, big, distinguished, kraft, general, sales, food, mondelez


Kraft Heinz has lost the one thing that distinguished it from General Mills and Mondelez

The one thing Kraft Heinz had going for it was its profit margins. Now, it doesn’t even have that.

The food giant, known for its boxed macaroni and cheese and its ketchup, saw its stock tumble Friday after it released a batch of bad news late Thursday, including that it would swing to a net loss of $12.61 billion in the fourth quarter from a profit of $8 billion a year ago. That loss included a $15 billion write down on the value of two of its best-known brands.

Shares of Kraft Heinz tumbled about 28 percent, at one point hitting a 52-week low of $34.51 in trading Friday. The sell-off slashed its market value by $16 billion to $42.1 billion.

From the third quarter of 2015 through today, Kraft’s overall sales have been stagnant — and it’s not the only consumer packaged food company to feel this pinch. Like others, Kraft blamed changes in consumer eating habits, a desire for organic foods over processed ones, for the poor performance. The company has tried to spruce up its brands, offering organic Capri Sun drinks and all-natural Oscar Mayer hot dogs, but consumers aren’t biting.

Packaged food is out of favor. Consumers are looking to eat fresh foods, and when they don’t they are often turning to niche, upstart brands with a healthier image or private-label products that don’t carry a big price tag. If this trend continues, big packaged food companies like Kraft, General Mills and Mondelez are at risk of seeing sales continue to plummet.

Mondelez, the maker of Oreo, Ritz and Chips Ahoy, has also struggled with sales over the last five years. Since it hauled in net revenue of $8.83 billion in the fourth quarter of 2014, sales at the company have continued to slip.

General Mills, too, has seen its sales shrink. In the last four years, sales have stumbled and, while they have started to rise again, have not reached the same level as before.

One thing Kraft had going for it was the cost-cutting that came after the 2015 merger between Kraft and Heinz, facilitated by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway and Brazilian private investment group 3G Capital. Those cuts helped boost profit margins, but that lever is tapped out now.

As Kraft Heinz’s profit margins have fallen — and its competitors have caught up with them — it’s become simply one of the many Big Food companies struggling with slowing sales and rising costs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: sarah whitten, christina cheddar berk, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profit, mills, thing, lost, margins, billion, quarter, company, heinz, big, distinguished, kraft, general, sales, food, mondelez


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Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says

The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to. “This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.” Read the WSJ story here.


The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to. “This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.” Read the WSJ story here.
Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: hugh son, luke macgregor, toni l sandys, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standards, bank, unit, wrongway, unwound, tothis, wsj, transaction, told, buffett, warren, trade, single, billion, deutsche, ultimately, involving, lost


Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says

The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to.

“This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.”

Read the WSJ story here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: hugh son, luke macgregor, toni l sandys, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standards, bank, unit, wrongway, unwound, tothis, wsj, transaction, told, buffett, warren, trade, single, billion, deutsche, ultimately, involving, lost


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Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says

The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to. “This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.” Read the WSJ story here.


The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to. “This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.” Read the WSJ story here.
Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: hugh son, luke macgregor, toni l sandys, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standards, bank, unit, wrongway, unwound, tothis, wsj, transaction, told, buffett, warren, trade, single, billion, deutsche, ultimately, involving, lost


Deutsche Bank lost $1.6 billion on a single trade involving Warren Buffett, WSJ says

The bank’s executives debated up until last year whether it should have restated previous earnings based on the wrong-way trade, ultimately deciding not to.

“This transaction was unwound in 2016 as part of the closure of our Non-Core Operations” unit, a bank spokesman told the Journal. “External lawyers and auditors reviewed the transaction and confirmed it was in line with accounting standards and practices.”

Read the WSJ story here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: hugh son, luke macgregor, toni l sandys, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standards, bank, unit, wrongway, unwound, tothis, wsj, transaction, told, buffett, warren, trade, single, billion, deutsche, ultimately, involving, lost


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Tesla has lost more than 40 execs since 2016 — here’s an updated list

Oct. 17: Gilbert Passin, vice president of manufacturing, has left, according to a Business Insider report. Sept. 7: Gabrielle Toledano, chief people officer at Tesla, leaves the company. July: Ganesh Srivats, vice president at Tesla leaves company to become chief executive officer at Moda Operandi. May: Matthew Schwall, director of field performance engineering, exits to join Alphabet’s self-driving unit, Waymo. January: Jason Mendez, director of manufacturing engineering, leaves after more tha


Oct. 17: Gilbert Passin, vice president of manufacturing, has left, according to a Business Insider report. Sept. 7: Gabrielle Toledano, chief people officer at Tesla, leaves the company. July: Ganesh Srivats, vice president at Tesla leaves company to become chief executive officer at Moda Operandi. May: Matthew Schwall, director of field performance engineering, exits to join Alphabet’s self-driving unit, Waymo. January: Jason Mendez, director of manufacturing engineering, leaves after more tha
Tesla has lost more than 40 execs since 2016 — here’s an updated list Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: benjamin wachenje
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, engineering, exits, chief, list, tesla, 2016, president, execs, 40, leaves, officer, heres, global, updated, company, vice, lost


Tesla has lost more than 40 execs since 2016 — here's an updated list

Nov. 27: Jeff Jones, head of global security, is no longer working with Tesla after just 11 months on the job, CNBC reported, citing one current and one former employee.

Oct. 17: Gilbert Passin, vice president of manufacturing, has left, according to a Business Insider report.

Sept. 20: Liam O’Connor, vice president of global supply management resigned from the company, Bloomberg reported, citing sources familiar with the matter.

Sept. 12: Justin McAnear, vice president of worldwide finance and operation, said he would be leaving Tesla to take a CFO role at another company.

Sept. 7: Gabrielle Toledano, chief people officer at Tesla, leaves the company.

Sept. 4: Dave Morton, chief accounting officer at Tesla, resigns just a month after starting work.

July: Ganesh Srivats, vice president at Tesla leaves company to become chief executive officer at Moda Operandi.

July: Doug Field, senior vice president of engineering, steps down after five years with the electric carmaker.

June: Karim Bousta, vice-president of worldwide service and customer experience, left the company, automotive news website Electrek reported.

May: Cal Lankton stepped down as senior vice president of energy operations and will be replaced by Sanjay Shah from Amazon, according to a Bloomberg report.

May: Matthew Schwall, director of field performance engineering, exits to join Alphabet’s self-driving unit, Waymo.

April: Georg Ell, director of Tesla’s Western Europe operations, leaves to head UK-based Smoothwall.

March: Chief Accounting Officer Eric Branderiz exits after joining in October 2016.

March: Susan Repo, corporate treasurer and vice president of finance, exits to become chief financial officer at another company.

February: Jon McNeill, president of global sales and services, leaves to join ride-hailing company Lyft as chief operating officer.

January: Jason Mendez, director of manufacturing engineering, leaves after more than 12 years.

January: Will McColl, manager of equipment engineering, leaves after seven years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: benjamin wachenje
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, engineering, exits, chief, list, tesla, 2016, president, execs, 40, leaves, officer, heres, global, updated, company, vice, lost


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Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf


Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf
Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lvmh, legendary, designer, 85, release, talent, age, dies, lagerfeld, creative, karl, fashion, chanel, lost, fendi


Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85.

He passed away after a short illness, a statement given to Reuters said.

Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Regarding Gabrielle Chanel, he said, ‘My job is not to do what she did, but what she would have done. The good thing about Chanel is it is an idea you can adapt to many things,'” the release added.

Alain Wertheimer, Chanel’s chief executive, said in the release: “Today, not only have I lost a friend, but we have all lost an extraordinary creative mind to whom I gave carte blanche in the early 1980s to reinvent the brand.”

Tributes poured in from the world of haute couture.

Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerfeld a “creative genius.” Lagerfeld led Chanel’s design and had been the creative head at Fendi since 1965.

“With the passing of Karl Lagerfeld we have lost a creative genius who helped to make Paris the fashion capital of the world and Fendi one of the most innovative Italian houses. We owe him a great deal: his taste and talent were the most exceptional I have ever known. Artistic director of Jean Patou in 1959, creator of Fendi since 1965, member of the LVMH Prize jury since its creation in 2013, he honored the LVMH group with an extraordinarily stimulating creative and entrepreneurial friendship,” Arnault said.

New York Times fashion critic Vanessa Friedman tweeted: “In honor of Karl Lagerfeld, who died today, some of his indelible quotes and quips: ‘Sweatpants are a sign of defeat;’ ‘I’m very much down to earth. Just not this earth;'”

Italian designer Donatella Versace also praised Lagerfeld’s talent, writing on Instagram: “Karl your genius touched the lives of so many, especially Gianni and I. We will never forget your incredible talent and endless inspiration. We were always learning from you.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lvmh, legendary, designer, 85, release, talent, age, dies, lagerfeld, creative, karl, fashion, chanel, lost, fendi


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Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf


Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85. Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerf
Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fendi, fashion, legendary, creative, dies, 85, lost, talent, age, chanel, lagerfeld, lvmh, karl, release, designer


Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld dies at age 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the iconic Chanel fashion designer, has died at age 85.

He passed away after a short illness, a statement given to Reuters said.

Chanel called Lagerfeld “an extraordinary creative individual” in a release emailed to CNBC. “Karl Lagerfeld reinvented the brand’s codes created by (founder) Gabrielle Chanel: the Chanel jacket and suit, the little black dress, the precious tweeds, the two-tone shoes, the quilted handbags, the pearls and costume jewelry. Regarding Gabrielle Chanel, he said, ‘My job is not to do what she did, but what she would have done. The good thing about Chanel is it is an idea you can adapt to many things,'” the release added.

Alain Wertheimer, Chanel’s chief executive, said in the release: “Today, not only have I lost a friend, but we have all lost an extraordinary creative mind to whom I gave carte blanche in the early 1980s to reinvent the brand.”

Tributes poured in from the world of haute couture.

Bernard Arnault, chairman and CEO of LVMH, the conglomerate that runs fashion house Fendi, called Lagerfeld a “creative genius.” Lagerfeld led Chanel’s design and had been the creative head at Fendi since 1965.

“With the passing of Karl Lagerfeld we have lost a creative genius who helped to make Paris the fashion capital of the world and Fendi one of the most innovative Italian houses. We owe him a great deal: his taste and talent were the most exceptional I have ever known. Artistic director of Jean Patou in 1959, creator of Fendi since 1965, member of the LVMH Prize jury since its creation in 2013, he honored the LVMH group with an extraordinarily stimulating creative and entrepreneurial friendship,” Arnault said.

New York Times fashion critic Vanessa Friedman tweeted: “In honor of Karl Lagerfeld, who died today, some of his indelible quotes and quips: ‘Sweatpants are a sign of defeat;’ ‘I’m very much down to earth. Just not this earth;'”

Italian designer Donatella Versace also praised Lagerfeld’s talent, writing on Instagram: “Karl your genius touched the lives of so many, especially Gianni and I. We will never forget your incredible talent and endless inspiration. We were always learning from you.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: lucy handley, stephane cardinale – corbis, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fendi, fashion, legendary, creative, dies, 85, lost, talent, age, chanel, lagerfeld, lvmh, karl, release, designer


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