San Francisco’s Clever Girls Facebook group is a place for people who love live music — and raptor memes

“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows. Approximately 50 people showed up for the scavenger hunt, putting in place the foundation for Clever Girls, a music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was previously known as Concert Raptors. A few months later, he officially started the Facebook group. After the group started, the scavenger hunts gr


“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows.
Approximately 50 people showed up for the scavenger hunt, putting in place the foundation for Clever Girls, a music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was previously known as Concert Raptors.
A few months later, he officially started the Facebook group.
After the group started, the scavenger hunts gr
San Francisco’s Clever Girls Facebook group is a place for people who love live music — and raptor memes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, love, group, started, girls, hunt, tickets, raptor, memes, ari, live, san, concert, scavenger, place, music, franciscos, facebook


San Francisco's Clever Girls Facebook group is a place for people who love live music — and raptor memes

“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows. Courtesy of Ari the Raptor

Just before the 2015 edition of San Francisco’s Outside Lands music festival, a mysterious Facebook user who went by the name of “Concert Raptor” devised a 20-clue scavenger hunt across the city for any music fans skillful enough to get through it. The top prize was a free three-day pass. Approximately 50 people showed up for the scavenger hunt, putting in place the foundation for Clever Girls, a music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was previously known as Concert Raptors. “That hunt was definitely a turning point for me, the energy within it and just the amount of interest that there was,” the original Concert Raptor told CNBC. He now goes by “Ari teh Raptor,” an alias he said he uses to keep the focus on the community rather than himself. The group has since grown to more than 11,600 users and is now used by music lovers around the Bay Area to share news and early bird ticket codes, and to buy, sell or give away concert tickets. Occasionally, members will also use the group to share any quality raptor memes that they come across. It’s just one example of the changing relationship between Facebook users and the social network, which boasts more than 2.5 billion visitors per month. Until recently, users were focused on the site’s News Feed, which contained updates from friends. But as that main billboard got clogged with random news stories and political screeds, Facebook has begun to nudge people more toward participating in groups with others who share their interests.

Make music free again

The project began in 2014 when Ari was living in San Francisco, working as a data scientist by day and hitting up concerts at night. He noticed that people were often stuck outside concert venues, unable to get in. This made him realize that money was a huge blocker for true fans, so he decided to use some of his extra cash to give tickets away in unique ways. At first, he would post on concert event pages, telling people to find him at a bar to receive a free ticket. “I had always wanted to do a scavenger hunt from the get-go, but there was a lot of trust I had to garner because I just looked like a scam, I was just this dinosaur saying ‘I got free tickets,'” said Ari with a laugh. As music fans grew to trust him, Ari began to ramp up the challenges. After the 2015 Outside Lands scavenger hunt, a group of the people who had participated in a number of his ticket give-aways encouraged him to create a community. A few months later, he officially started the Facebook group. After the group started, the scavenger hunts grew. In many cases, people had to search for hidden stickers with raptor emblems on them.

“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows. Courtesy of Ari the Raptor


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, love, group, started, girls, hunt, tickets, raptor, memes, ari, live, san, concert, scavenger, place, music, franciscos, facebook


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Power Rankings: love ’em or dump ’em, meme machine & bitcoin boom — top moments from the week of Feb. 10

Whether you’re married, cuffed, or single and ready to mingle we wanted to make sure you felt the love today. Then the Love Doctor told you whether to “love” them (buy) or “dump” them (sell). Fundstrat Co-founder and bitcoin bull Tom Lee told us that bitcoin will beat the Dow Jones to 40,000. Said posts are satirical and goofy, with Bloomberg asking influencers to create a meme that will make him look cool. NY Times Reporter and Meme Master Taylor Lorenz gave us the rundown on whether this strat


Whether you’re married, cuffed, or single and ready to mingle we wanted to make sure you felt the love today.
Then the Love Doctor told you whether to “love” them (buy) or “dump” them (sell).
Fundstrat Co-founder and bitcoin bull Tom Lee told us that bitcoin will beat the Dow Jones to 40,000.
Said posts are satirical and goofy, with Bloomberg asking influencers to create a meme that will make him look cool.
NY Times Reporter and Meme Master Taylor Lorenz gave us the rundown on whether this strat
Power Rankings: love ’em or dump ’em, meme machine & bitcoin boom — top moments from the week of Feb. 10 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: gino siniscalchi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, love, bitcoin, told, feb, dump, paying, week, meme, rankings, influencers, bloomberg, youre, machine, week1, moments, power


Power Rankings: love 'em or dump 'em, meme machine & bitcoin boom -- top moments from the week of Feb. 10

Here are the top 5 moments from Power Lunch this week:

1. Luv ‘Em or Dump ‘Em?

It’s Valentine’s Day. Whether you’re married, cuffed, or single and ready to mingle we wanted to make sure you felt the love today. We brought in Tim Seymour to run through 4 stocks: Tesla (TSLA), Apple (AAPL), Beyond Meat (BYND), Canopy Growth (CGC), and Expedia (EXPE). Then the Love Doctor told you whether to “love” them (buy) or “dump” them (sell).

2. Bitcoin Boom

The price of bitcoin topped $10,000 for the first time since September of last year. But given crypto’s tendency toward volatility, many are unsure if this rally is here to stay. The bulls argued that uncertainty around the globe surrounding the Coronavirus actually makes bitcoin even more appealing. Fundstrat Co-founder and bitcoin bull Tom Lee told us that bitcoin will beat the Dow Jones to 40,000.

3. Meme Machine

Former Mayor Mike Bloomberg is banking big on memes. The presidential hopeful is paying viral instagram influencers hundreds of thousands to promote his campaign. Said posts are satirical and goofy, with Bloomberg asking influencers to create a meme that will make him look cool. NY Times Reporter and Meme Master Taylor Lorenz gave us the rundown on whether this strategy is paying off.

**BONUS**


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: gino siniscalchi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, love, bitcoin, told, feb, dump, paying, week, meme, rankings, influencers, bloomberg, youre, machine, week1, moments, power


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From $300 T-shirts to retail arbitrage, online entrepreneurs can make serious bank doing what they love

lechatnoir | Getty ImagesTaking clothing you don’t wear anymore to a thrift shop? Three big platforms that help you do this are eBay, Amazon and Poshmark, and each has its star users. In college, he’d return from a thrift shop run with five or six items of clothing. Instead, “they shop online.” “We’re at least selling unique items,” Escobedo said.


lechatnoir | Getty ImagesTaking clothing you don’t wear anymore to a thrift shop?
Three big platforms that help you do this are eBay, Amazon and Poshmark, and each has its star users.
In college, he’d return from a thrift shop run with five or six items of clothing.
Instead, “they shop online.”
“We’re at least selling unique items,” Escobedo said.
From $300 T-shirts to retail arbitrage, online entrepreneurs can make serious bank doing what they love Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thrift, retail, items, bank, ebay, escobedo, serious, koehler, amazon, clothing, mcauliffe, online, love, 300, shop, tshirts, arbitrage, entrepreneurs, doing


From $300 T-shirts to retail arbitrage, online entrepreneurs can make serious bank doing what they love

lechatnoir | Getty Images

Taking clothing you don’t wear anymore to a thrift shop? That’s so last millennium. Reselling online touches several current trends. You don’t add to the landfill. You streamline your possessions and satisfy your inner Marie Kondo. And you side hustle, because who can’t use a few extra bucks? Aside from clothes, people are shedding or reselling other household items, including books, furniture, kitchenware. Three big platforms that help you do this are eBay, Amazon and Poshmark, and each has its star users. While eBay is the granddaddy of online selling, it has plenty of competition. It’s possible to make bank on Amazon and Poshmark, depending on what you sell. Do the math on pricing and the margin you need to achieve to stay in business. Surprisingly few people run the numbers. Experienced resellers always stress the importance of research. “My advice to anyone who thinks they want to be an online seller is to stay away from YouTubers who make it look like a get-rich-quick scheme,” said Kelly McAuliffe, 41, who lives in Sebring, Florida.

Flipping clothes

Bryan Koehler, 25, turned a lifelong love of thrift-shopping into a solid income stream. Source: Bryan Koehler

Bryan Koehler, 25, is a lifelong thrift shopper. His family went thrift shopping frequently when he was younger, and it became a hobby. In college, he’d return from a thrift shop run with five or six items of clothing. His friends would ask, “How do you have the money for this?” When he found he had accumulated too much, he turned to Poshmark to unload some pieces.

On the site, he bought a pair of Toms shoes for $2 and sold them for $13. It was a lightbulb moment. He realized he could flip purchases. He started with men’s clothing but soon realized there wasn’t quite enough traffic. So he began picking up women’s clothing and accessories. “You can do it full-time or part-time,” he said. Koehler does it for extra income — to date, more than $55,000, he said. Koehler’s top tip for selling is quality pictures. Give as many details as possible in your listing, such as brand and model name, if possible. Note any damage. Keep in mind the site’s sellers are also buyers. Share items from your closet frequently, Koehler says, at least once a day. “Go to your closet and click on [the bag icon], then share to your followers,” he said. Koehler recommends accumulating as many followers as you can. Follow back, and list constantly. You want to get the late-night shoppers, he says.

Never give up

For Kelly McAuliffe, 41, persistence paid off to the tune of nearly $1 million in sales. Source: Kelly McAuliffe

Kelly McAuliffe and her husband started small. Twenty years ago, the couple used to hit garage sales and resell items on eBay. In the early years, they pulled in about $30,000 a year. With two full-time jobs, they thought of eBay as a side job for extra cash. To make it worth their time, they tried to sell items that would bring in at least $50. “I was happy with 10 sales a week,” McAuliffe said. Last year, McAuliffe’s one-time side gig became a business. She’s sold cooking ingredients on Amazon, grossing $775,000 — about 35,000 sales, she said. She and her husband have ditched their former full-time jobs. More from Invest in You:

3 questions to ask before launching a new business

How to teach your kid to think like an entrepreneur

Dream of being your own boss? Take this quiz “I have encountered just about every customer service issue you can imagine and just keep plugging along,” said McAuliffe. “If you fail and go broke, it does not matter. “I have failed over and over again to get to the point I am at now.” Recently, McAuliffe was in Home Depot and took a quick look at face masks because of the coronavirus news. She bought the last six boxes and sold them all within 10 minutes.

The $300 T-shirt

Patricia Escobedo, 44, sells unique, vintage items and doesn’t worry about online competition. Courtesy: Patricia Escobedo

Patricia Escobedo, 44, found herself sidelined by a serious health issue. She had been a user on eBay since 2008, but now needed a source of income. “Reselling is a life saver,” said Escobedo, who lives in Pahrump, Nevada, and has been unable to work outside the home since having open heart surgery last June. “EBay keeps me afloat.” She likes vintage clothing and specializes in T-shirts, which she says can be resold quickly and sometimes bring in more money than women’s clothes. Escobedo can do most of her eBay work from home. She uses her living room to set up and photograph items. Her house has a storage room for mailing and packing supplies. The rise of online shopping has made her business possible. “A lot of people don’t like to shop [in stores],” Escobedo said. Instead, “they shop online.” The thrill of the hunt is part of the fun, Escobedo says. “How often can you find a $300 T-shirt that was $3?” Though she normally avoids the women’s section in the thrift shops she does visit, that’s where she found a vintage Dr. Who T-shirt. Within eight hours of listing it for $500 as a buy-it-now item on eBay, she accepted an offer of $300.

Two keys are research and patience. Make sure to compare prices before you buy, Escobedo says. “Unless it’s really a great price and you can’t lose money on it,” she said. “Limit to yourself to what you can afford to wait on. “Because your money will be tied up in your merchandise, and sometimes it’s not a quick eight-hour flip.” Escobedo doesn’t worry about competition. “There are billions of people out there trying to buy on eBay,” she said. If Walmart, Target and Kmart can successfully coexist in the same neighborhood, so can multiple eBay and Amazon sellers. “We’re at least selling unique items,” Escobedo said.

On the books

John Muscarello, 33, started his Amazon book business as a side hustle. Courtesy: John Muscarello


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thrift, retail, items, bank, ebay, escobedo, serious, koehler, amazon, clothing, mcauliffe, online, love, 300, shop, tshirts, arbitrage, entrepreneurs, doing


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Cramer says it’s ‘stupid and dumb as wood’ to think Apple and CEO Tim Cook aren’t innovating

CNBC’s Jim Cramer praised Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday, criticizing the notion that the tech giant’s “best times are behind them.” On “Squawk on the Street,” he said the success of the iPhone 11, a major factor in Apple’s strong earnings report, was proof that Cook and Apple are still making desirable products. “The idea that the company’s best times are behind them is stupid and dumb as wood.” After-the-bell on Tuesday, Apple reported fiscal first quarter earnings that beat Wall Street expec


CNBC’s Jim Cramer praised Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday, criticizing the notion that the tech giant’s “best times are behind them.”
On “Squawk on the Street,” he said the success of the iPhone 11, a major factor in Apple’s strong earnings report, was proof that Cook and Apple are still making desirable products.
“The idea that the company’s best times are behind them is stupid and dumb as wood.”
After-the-bell on Tuesday, Apple reported fiscal first quarter earnings that beat Wall Street expec
Cramer says it’s ‘stupid and dumb as wood’ to think Apple and CEO Tim Cook aren’t innovating Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-29  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stupid, tim, tech, dumb, arent, thought, street, wood, innovating, iphone, apple, love, cook, ceo, times, think, cramer


Cramer says it's 'stupid and dumb as wood' to think Apple and CEO Tim Cook aren't innovating

CNBC’s Jim Cramer praised Apple CEO Tim Cook on Wednesday, criticizing the notion that the tech giant’s “best times are behind them.”

On “Squawk on the Street,” he said the success of the iPhone 11, a major factor in Apple’s strong earnings report, was proof that Cook and Apple are still making desirable products.

“No one thought the phone was going to be the driver, because no one thought there was anything new about the 11; because everyone thinks that Tim Cook has never come up with anything that is really special,” Cramer said. “The idea that the company’s best times are behind them is stupid and dumb as wood.”

After-the-bell on Tuesday, Apple reported fiscal first quarter earnings that beat Wall Street expectations on the top and bottom lines. The company’s shares were up more than 2% in early trading.

Strong iPhone sales were a big reason for that beat. The company reported iPhone revenue of $55.96 billion, topping an estimate of $51.62 billion, according to Refinitiv.

Cook told Cramer and CNBC tech reporter Josh Lipton on Tuesday that the iPhone 11’s popularity was due to several features that appealed to consumers.

“People love the battery life. They love the camera. They love the industrial design. The battery lasts all day,” Cook said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-29  Authors: jesse pound
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stupid, tim, tech, dumb, arent, thought, street, wood, innovating, iphone, apple, love, cook, ceo, times, think, cramer


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Apple generated $56 billion in iPhone revenue last quarter on strong iPhone 11 sales

Apple reported iPhone revenue of $56 billion for its fiscal first quarter on Tuesday, blowing past analysts’ estimates, proving that the new iPhone 11 is off to a strong start. IPhone revenue for the quarter rose 8% from a year earlier and climbed from the fourth quarter when Apple generated $33.36 billion in iPhone sales. The big bump was partly because this was the first full period to factor in sales of the iPhone 11, which launched last year. CEO Tim Cook said in Tuesday’s earnings release t


Apple reported iPhone revenue of $56 billion for its fiscal first quarter on Tuesday, blowing past analysts’ estimates, proving that the new iPhone 11 is off to a strong start.
IPhone revenue for the quarter rose 8% from a year earlier and climbed from the fourth quarter when Apple generated $33.36 billion in iPhone sales.
The big bump was partly because this was the first full period to factor in sales of the iPhone 11, which launched last year.
CEO Tim Cook said in Tuesday’s earnings release t
Apple generated $56 billion in iPhone revenue last quarter on strong iPhone 11 sales Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-28  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphone, billion, apple, generated, sales, love, analysts, revenue, quarter, strong


Apple generated $56 billion in iPhone revenue last quarter on strong iPhone 11 sales

Apple reported iPhone revenue of $56 billion for its fiscal first quarter on Tuesday, blowing past analysts’ estimates, proving that the new iPhone 11 is off to a strong start.

IPhone revenue for the quarter rose 8% from a year earlier and climbed from the fourth quarter when Apple generated $33.36 billion in iPhone sales. Analysts were expecting revenue for the devices to come in at $51.62 billion in the first quarter.

The big bump was partly because this was the first full period to factor in sales of the iPhone 11, which launched last year. CEO Tim Cook said in Tuesday’s earnings release that the company saw “strong demand for our iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro models.”

“People love the battery life. They love the camera. They love the industrial design. The battery lasts all day,” Cook told CNBC’s Josh Lipton Tuesday, referring to the iPhone 11. “We also hit the right price with it.”

The fiscal first quarter also covers the important holiday season, which leads to a bigger revenue lift compared to other parts of the year.

Apple has gradually turned its focus toward other areas of its business like wearables and services, amid broader stagnation in the smartphone market. The company hinted at the move when it stopped breaking out iPhone unit sales last year.

The iPhone is still Apple’s most important product, claiming a significant share of its overall revenue. There’s growing speculation that Apple could launch its first 5G phone in September, which could reignite slumping iPhone sales and drive a renewed “supercycle” for its stock. However, analysts say Apple may not be in a rush to release a 5G phone, since the fastest 5G networks aren’t widely available yet.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-28  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iphone, billion, apple, generated, sales, love, analysts, revenue, quarter, strong


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Marianne Williamson sells $149 tickets for ‘love and power’ seminar to pay off presidential campaign debt

The author and spiritual leader has been soliciting donations to pay off her campaign debt since dropping out of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary earlier this month. Supporters received an email from Williamson on Jan. 27 inviting them to participate in a “love and power” seminar to raise money for campaign debt relief. Williamson did not reply to a request for comment from CNBC on the size of her campaign debt. The Federal Election Commission specifies that a candidate may continue to c


The author and spiritual leader has been soliciting donations to pay off her campaign debt since dropping out of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary earlier this month.
Supporters received an email from Williamson on Jan. 27 inviting them to participate in a “love and power” seminar to raise money for campaign debt relief.
Williamson did not reply to a request for comment from CNBC on the size of her campaign debt.
The Federal Election Commission specifies that a candidate may continue to c
Marianne Williamson sells $149 tickets for ‘love and power’ seminar to pay off presidential campaign debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, marianne, campaign, committee, williamson, love, web, seminar, funds, saying, debt, jan, pay, power, tickets, presidential, sells


Marianne Williamson sells $149 tickets for 'love and power' seminar to pay off presidential campaign debt

Marianne Williamson talks a lot about love, but right now, she’s all about the money.

The author and spiritual leader has been soliciting donations to pay off her campaign debt since dropping out of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary earlier this month.

Supporters received an email from Williamson on Jan. 27 inviting them to participate in a “love and power” seminar to raise money for campaign debt relief.

Tickets are going for $149, and livestream access is $79.

The web page calls the event “An All Day Seminar on Transforming the World from the Inside Out.” Williamson will host the live event in Pasadena, California, on Saturday, Feb. 15.

Williamson dropped out of the presidential primary race on Jan. 10, just days after she fired her entire campaign staff due to insufficient funds. She vowed to stay in the race at the time, saying, “A campaign not having a huge war chest should not be what determines its fate.”

Williamson did not reply to a request for comment from CNBC on the size of her campaign debt.

In a separate email to supporters on Jan. 14, Williamson included a note at the bottom saying that all funds collected on her website would go toward the Committee for Campaign Debt Retirement. The note, when clicked, leads to a web page for donors.

“I very much appreciate your generosity, both in supporting the campaign and in helping me to retire the debt that is left,” Williamson wrote on the page.

Williamson formed an exploratory committee in late 2018 and officially announced a bid for president in January 2019. Between November 2018 and Sept. 30 of last year, the last day of the third quarter, her campaign reported $6.1 million, a sum that pales compared with what some Democratic contenders have raised in a single quarter.

The Federal Election Commission specifies that a candidate may continue to collect funds after suspending their campaign to repay debt.

Candidates who suspend their campaigns are no longer in the running for a seat, but a campaign is officially over only when its committee pays off its debt, former FEC head of enforcement Kenneth Gross told The Wall Street Journal.

There’s no difference between a campaign saying a candidate is “quitting” and “suspending” their campaign, but candidates may use the latter to continue inviting potential donors who can help repay debt, Gross said.

“It is harder to raise money when you’re out rather than thinking about getting out,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, marianne, campaign, committee, williamson, love, web, seminar, funds, saying, debt, jan, pay, power, tickets, presidential, sells


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Trump says he ‘could get used to’ negative interest rates as he knocks the Fed: ‘Love that’

President Donald Trump on Tuesday spoke glowingly of negative interest rates and took another shot at the Federal Reserve to a global audience. … We’re forced to compete with nations that are getting negative rates, something very new,” Trump said in his address at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Economists are divided over the stimulative effects of negative interest rates. Some fear negative rates can keep an economy in a subdued state, rather than boost it from lackluster grow


President Donald Trump on Tuesday spoke glowingly of negative interest rates and took another shot at the Federal Reserve to a global audience.
… We’re forced to compete with nations that are getting negative rates, something very new,” Trump said in his address at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
Economists are divided over the stimulative effects of negative interest rates.
Some fear negative rates can keep an economy in a subdued state, rather than boost it from lackluster grow
Trump says he ‘could get used to’ negative interest rates as he knocks the Fed: ‘Love that’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, used, fed, knocks, interest, negative, world, central, bank, yields, love, economic, rates


Trump says he 'could get used to' negative interest rates as he knocks the Fed: 'Love that'

Donald Trump delivers a speech at the Congres center during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, on January 21, 2020.

President Donald Trump on Tuesday spoke glowingly of negative interest rates and took another shot at the Federal Reserve to a global audience.

“Even now as the United States is by far the strongest economic power in the world, it’s not even close. … We’re forced to compete with nations that are getting negative rates, something very new,” Trump said in his address at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “Meaning, they get paid to borrow money, something I could get used to very quickly. Love that.”

Several central banks have adopted negative interest-rate policies over the past year in hopes of jolting their economies. Most notably, the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan implemented this policy amid stubbornly low inflation.

This has led to sovereign yields in Japan and Germany to trade below zero. By comparison, U.S. Treasury yields and the Federal Reserve’s overnight rate are high, which Trump contends puts the U.S. at a disadvantage relative to the rest of the world. The 10-year Treasury yield hovered above 1.8% on Tuesday.

“Nevertheless, we still have the best numbers that we’ve had in so many different areas. It’s a conservative approach and we have this tremendous upside potential,” he said, touting possible bilateral trade deals and deregulation measures.

Economists are divided over the stimulative effects of negative interest rates. Some fear negative rates can keep an economy in a subdued state, rather than boost it from lackluster growth.

This is not the first time Trump has praised the use of negative interest rates. He said last week the concept was “incredible.”

Trump also took another shot at the Fed, saying the recent U.S. economic run-up comes “despite the fact that the Fed has raised rates too fast and lowered them too slowly.”

The U.S. central bank hiked rates four times in 2018, igniting criticism from Trump. The last one contributed to a massive sell-off in December 2018. In 2019, however, the Fed cut rates three times and set a high bar for further cuts or even starting off another hiking cycle.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, used, fed, knocks, interest, negative, world, central, bank, yields, love, economic, rates


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David Tepper says he’s still betting on this bull market: ‘I love riding a horse that’s running’

David Tepper, billionaire founder of Appaloosa Management, said Friday he still likes this bull market, which is the longest on record. “I love riding a horse that’s running,” Tepper told CNBC’s Joe Kernen in an exclusive email. The current bull market started in March 2009. However, there are signs the bull market may be a bit long in the tooth. Tepper told Kernen that “at some point, the market will get to a level that I will slow down that horse and eventually get off.”


David Tepper, billionaire founder of Appaloosa Management, said Friday he still likes this bull market, which is the longest on record.
“I love riding a horse that’s running,” Tepper told CNBC’s Joe Kernen in an exclusive email.
The current bull market started in March 2009.
However, there are signs the bull market may be a bit long in the tooth.
Tepper told Kernen that “at some point, the market will get to a level that I will slow down that horse and eventually get off.”
David Tepper says he’s still betting on this bull market: ‘I love riding a horse that’s running’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ratio, kernen, long, horse, bull, tepper, riding, david, high, running, market, thats, hes, told, love


David Tepper says he's still betting on this bull market: 'I love riding a horse that's running'

David Tepper, billionaire founder of Appaloosa Management, said Friday he still likes this bull market, which is the longest on record.

“I love riding a horse that’s running,” Tepper told CNBC’s Joe Kernen in an exclusive email. “We have been long and continue that way.”

The current bull market started in March 2009. Since then, the S&P 500 has skyrocketed more than 380%. On Thursday, the S&P 500 reached an all-time high and broke above 3,300 for the first time.

The hedge fund billionaire made a bold call on CNBC back in 2010, betting on the power of the Federal Reserve’s easing program. Tepper predicted then that super-low interest rates and the central bank’s massive bond buying would make most investment choices go up. His market advice turned out to be spot-on for the whole decade.

However, there are signs the bull market may be a bit long in the tooth. The U.S. equity market cap-to-GDP ratio — a measure of how big the stock market is relative to the broader economy — recently hit an all-time high. The cyclically adjusted price-to-earnings (CAPE) ratio — which was created by Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller — currently sits near its dot-com bubble high.

Tepper told Kernen that “at some point, the market will get to a level that I will slow down that horse and eventually get off.” He did not, however, specify when that would be.

—CNBC’s Yun Li contributed to this report.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ratio, kernen, long, horse, bull, tepper, riding, david, high, running, market, thats, hes, told, love


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NFL owners don’t like Carolina Panthers’ $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it

Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement. “It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview. In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released. Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field


Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement.
“It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview.
In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released.
Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field
NFL owners don’t like Carolina Panthers’ $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owners, dont, matt, nfl, rhule, love, million, deal, coach, pay, coaching, panthers, university, head, coaches


NFL owners don't like Carolina Panthers' $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it

Carolina Panthers head coach Matt Rhule, second from left, laughs as he stands with team owner David Tepper, left, Tom Glick, President of Business Operations, and General Manager Marty Hurney during an introductory news conference at Atrium Health Dome in Charlotte, N.C., on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020. David T. Foster | Charlotte Observer | Getty Images

Whether he knows it or not, Matt Rhule has cemented his place in the National Football League’s coaching history books — before he’s coached a single professional football game. Rhule, who signed a seven-year deal worth $60 million to become head coach of the Carolina Panthers, sent shock waves through the NFL when the news leaked last week. His deal is also being celebrated throughout coaching circles as other coaches hope it will push their salaries higher as well, according to interviews with sports agents and league officials, many of whom didn’t want to be identified because contract terms are confidential. While Panthers owner David Tepper will be paying Rhule roughly $8 million to $10 million per season, which is a lot in the league, that’s not a record amount for an NFL coach. New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick is currently the highest paid coach at $12 million per season, with Seattle’s Pete Carroll next at $11 million, according to Forbes. New Orleans coach Sean Payton and Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin are also earning at least $10 million a year, according to two people with knowledge of the contracts. Rhule’s deal attracted a lot of attention because, unlike other highly paid NFL coaches, the former head football coach at Baylor University has never coached an NFL team in his career, let alone win a Super Bowl like Belichick, Carroll, Payton and Tomlin.

Setting the bar

Top NFL coaches didn’t start regularly making multiple millions until the late 1990s when former Green Bay Packers coach Mike Holmgren set the bar for lucrative coaching contracts. He left his $2 million coaching gig in Wisconsin in 1998 to sign an eight-year deal with the Seahawks valued at roughly $4 million a season. The deal made Holmgren the highest-paid coach in the NFL in 1999 and set in motion a new pay scale for top head coaches. Jon Gruden’s $100 million deal signed with the Oakland Raiders in 2018 is interesting, not only for the amount, but the fact that it’s for 10 years, which was viewed in coaching circles as another shift. Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement. It’s estimated the average NFL head coaching salary is roughly $6 million to $7 million, but it could climb to as high as $10 million with Rhule’s deal, according to one sports agent.

Upset owners

‘Raised the bar’

The thinking in some NFL coaching circles is Rhule’s deal, which was longer than most thanks to Gruden’s precedent-setting 10-year deal, will help more top NFL coaches garner even more than Rhule’s $60 million contract. “It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview. “It’s like that player — as soon as one player makes that — then everybody else in the office the next time around, ‘Hey, so and so is worth this. I must be worth this.'” “There is no going back now,” Dungy added. “I think you’re going to see this increase because it’s telling the other coaches that money is out there. Carolina is not the only team that can afford to pay that.” In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released. Sports agents generally obey a code of silence when asked about coach pay. Teams report coach contract terms to the NFL for commissioner Roger Goodell to review, and numbers are documented in case there’s a dispute.

Value of a coach

Bob LaMonte, the agent who became one of the most powerful coaching agents in the NFL, said owners are increasingly seeing the value in a great coach and some, like Tepper, aren’t afraid to spend a lot of money to get one.

Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field on January 12, 2020 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Dylan Buell | Getty Images

“Owners have the money to spend,” LaMonte said. “The coach, without him, it doesn’t matter going down the line with the players you have because he’s not going to be able to get you to the promised land if he’s not a great coach.” LaMonte is president of Public Sports Representation, an agency that represent coaches and NFL general managers, including Holmgren and Gruden. When he first founded the agency in 1979, his challenge was getting owners to understand “money-value wise what a coach was worth because coaches never had agents. Coaches didn’t make any money.”

Changing the pay scales

LaMonte helped change the pay scales when he negotiated the deals for Holmgren and Gruden, giving coaches more leverage. LaMonte “knew what other guys were making,” Dungy said. “So, you want my client; I know what [a team] is prepared to pay. We didn’t know that as coaches. We didn’t know what other guys were making, what could be done, so you were at the mercy of the owners. Bob just said, ‘Hey, I’ve got six or seven guys. I know what they’re making. If you want one of my other guys, you’ve got to step to the table with this,’ and it helped everybody out.” One reason why some owners were upset with Tepper is because they are worried it will drive up prices for talented college coaches like University of Alabama’s Nick Saban, who returned to college coaching after leading the Miami Dolphins.

College to NFL

When Saban first came to the NFL from Louisiana State University, his five-year head coaching contract in Miami was reportedly valued at roughly $5 million per season. In 2019, Saban made approximately $8.8 million at Alabama, which ranks second behind Clemson University’s Dabo Swinney at $9.3 million, according to Sporting News. University of Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh’s win record would suggest even higher pay if he ever decides to return to the NFL. As a college coach, Rhule has only been to four bowl games with a combined record of 47-43 after stints at Temple University and Baylor University. Harbaugh’s college record is 76-39, including seven bowl appearances, and he led the San Francisco 49ers to Super Bowl XLVII in 2013. Tepper also signed Rhule for seven years when owners typically don’t commit to first-year head NFL coaches for more than four years. “But now they’re not going to be able to get them for anything less than five,” said the NFL agent who asked not to be identified. “I think the new standard has been set.”

The hard part


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owners, dont, matt, nfl, rhule, love, million, deal, coach, pay, coaching, panthers, university, head, coaches


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Whitney Houston, Notorious B.I.G. and Nine Inch Nails will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

will lead a new class into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, joined by Depeche Mode, the Doobie Brothers, Nine Inch Nails, and T-Rex. 1 singles: “Saving All My Love for You,” “How Will I Know” and “The Greatest Love of All.” Leader Trent Reznor has become a go-to soundtrack producer in addition to his continued work with Nine Inch Nails. The Doobie Brothers weren’t critical favourites, but they had some indelible rock hits in the 1970s, including “Listen to the Music,” “Black Water” and “China Gro


will lead a new class into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, joined by Depeche Mode, the Doobie Brothers, Nine Inch Nails, and T-Rex.
1 singles: “Saving All My Love for You,” “How Will I Know” and “The Greatest Love of All.”
Leader Trent Reznor has become a go-to soundtrack producer in addition to his continued work with Nine Inch Nails.
The Doobie Brothers weren’t critical favourites, but they had some indelible rock hits in the 1970s, including “Listen to the Music,” “Black Water” and “China Gro
Whitney Houston, Notorious B.I.G. and Nine Inch Nails will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singles, induction, rap, inducted, whitney, fame, nails, manager, rock, roll, houston, leader, hits, mode, love, music, inch, notorious, hall


Whitney Houston, Notorious B.I.G. and Nine Inch Nails will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

The annual induction ceremony will take place May 2 at the Public Auditorium in Cleveland, the city where the rock museum is located. The Saturday night show will be on HBO, televised live for the first time.

The gospel-trained Houston, whose soaring voice transformed the Dolly Parton cover “I Will Always Love You” into a gigantic hit, was one of four artists elected after being on the ballot for the first time. The Doobie Brothers, Biggie and T-Rex were the others.

Posthumous inductees Whitney Houston and The Notorious B.I.G. will lead a new class into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, joined by Depeche Mode, the Doobie Brothers, Nine Inch Nails, and T-Rex.

Houston, who succumbed to years of drug abuse in 2012, was an instant success after being signed to a record contract at age 19. Her 1985 debut had three No. 1 singles: “Saving All My Love for You,” “How Will I Know” and “The Greatest Love of All.” She had seven consecutive singles top the charts, a first for any artist.

The daughter of gospel singer Cissy Houston and cousin of Dionne Warwick, she grew up in the business.

The imposing, Brooklyn-born rap artist Christopher Wallace took on the identities of The Notorious B.I.G. and Biggie Smalls and was massively influential as rap became music’s dominant style in the 1990s. With hits like “Juicy” and “Big Poppa,” he was the leader of an East Coast school of rap that found itself in a bitter rivalry with artists from the West Coast.

He was killed in a still-unsolved drive-by shooting in Los Angeles at age 24 in 1997. On the album, “Life After Death,” with hits like “Mo Money Mo Problems” and “Hypnotize,” he became the first artist to earn multiple No. 1 singles after his death.

Depeche Mode remains active, but its biggest influence came in the 1980s, when its post-punk, synthesizer-dominated music made the Brits a favourite of the goth subculture. Hits included “Personal Jesus,” “Just Can’t Get Enough” and “Enjoy the Silence.”

Depeche Mode shares with fellow inductees Nine Inch Nails the honour of having one of their signature songs covered by country legend Johnny Cash, who recorded “Personal Jesus” and NIN’s “Hurt” during his late-career resurgence.

With songs like “Closer,” NIN was a leader of the industrial rock movement in the 1990s. Like Green Day, a memorable performance in the mud at Woodstock ’94 brought them a wider audience. Leader Trent Reznor has become a go-to soundtrack producer in addition to his continued work with Nine Inch Nails.

The Doobie Brothers weren’t critical favourites, but they had some indelible rock hits in the 1970s, including “Listen to the Music,” “Black Water” and “China Grove.” They’re embarking on a 50th anniversary tour this summer, bringing members Michael McDonald, Pat Simmons, Tom Johnston and John McFee together for the first time in 25 years, and a rock hall induction makes for perfect publicity.

The British band T-Rex was know primarily for its 1970s hit “Bang a Gong (Get it On)” and, to a lesser extent, “Jeepster.” The death of leader Marc Bolan in 1977 ended the band.

The two non-performing inductees may be able to bring some star power with them. Music manager Irving Azoff has watched the finances for several bands, but is best-known as the manager of the Eagles since 1974. Jon Landau is a former music journalist, known for an indelible line when he saw a concert by a little-known artist in 1974: “I saw rock ‘n’ roll’s future and its name is Bruce Springsteen.” Shortly thereafter, he became Springsteen’s manager, a job he still holds today.

Tickets for the induction ceremony go on sale Feb. 27. Performers will be announced at a later date.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singles, induction, rap, inducted, whitney, fame, nails, manager, rock, roll, houston, leader, hits, mode, love, music, inch, notorious, hall


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