Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions

“And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.” Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting. But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior. So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt. With some conditions: You want


“And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.”
Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting.
But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior.
So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt.
With some conditions: You want
Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, navigate, etiquette, questions, love, truly, youre, manners, providing, tricky, know, receipts, receipt, sure, giver, gift, holiday, regifting, mister, think


Mister Manners: How to navigate gift receipts, regifting, and more tricky holiday etiquette questions

Thomas Farley, aka Mister Manners, knows that holiday giving can be fraught: You could accidentally spend too much, or too little, or regift something to the person who originally bought it for you. No need to panic, says the etiquette expert, whose clients range from JPMorgan Chase to the United States Army. One of Farley’s top tips: You can make almost any gift feel special by presenting it with a heartfelt note or in-person explanation of why you thought they would enjoy that particular item. “People love gifts that have a backstory,” he explains. “And to be able to have a backstory to your gift, that’s a real winner gift, providing that it’s something that you know they would truly love and enjoy.”

Video by Courtney Stith Here are Farley’s answers to some of the season’s most common etiquette questions around gifting.

What do you do if someone buys you a more expensive gift than you got them?

That’s terrific, up to a point. If someone gives you something excessively priced, there needs to be a conversation where you say, “This is lovely, I so appreciate your gesture, [but] I simply can’t accept something so extravagant.” If they’ve outspent you by 20 or 30 or 40 dollars because they can, I would be profusely thankful. I would make sure to send them a thank you note. But I would not feel in any way that the gift I was giving, providing it was thoughtful, was inferior.

What’s a tactful way to ask for a receipt to return a gift?

I think that the gift giver, providing that you know they really love the gift, wants to make sure that it fits you: your body, your decor, or that you don’t have something identical already. So if any of those are the case, I think it’s completely fine to ask for a gift receipt. And then offering them a follow-up explanation: “I love it, but I have that color already. I’d love to get that same identical shirt in a different color.” As the giver, I think it’s a thoughtful gesture to make sure you provide a receipt so that that awkward exchange doesn’t need to happen.

Regifting can get tricky. Are there best practices I can follow?

I’m actually a big advocate for regifting, I think, both for the environment and in terms of reducing the amount of clutter that we all have in our lives. With some conditions: You want to make sure it is in fresh, clean, original packaging, that you’ve removed the gift tags, and that this is something your gift recipient will truly love. Make sure that the two individuals do not know one another. You don’t want the original giver to see it in the home of the person you’ve just given it to. “You can say, John, I got this coffee table book, which I do like quite a lot, but knowing that you’re a huge fan of Palm Springs, I think this might be something that you’d truly enjoy, and I’d like to give it to you if you’d like to have it.” So you’re not trying to make up a story or make up a ruse about where you got the book, but rather you’re owning up to the fact that this is a regift.

What should you bring if you’re staying with someone during the holidays?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: lisa ferber
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, navigate, etiquette, questions, love, truly, youre, manners, providing, tricky, know, receipts, receipt, sure, giver, gift, holiday, regifting, mister, think


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‘Shark Tank’ star Daymond John says his secret to work-life balance isn’t warm and fuzzy, but it works

The trip was all in the name of work-life balance, John wrote. “I got a quick couple of hours to sneak in some striped bass fishing,” John said in an Instagram post on Nov. 4, which was accompanied by a photo of him holding up a huge fish. Daymond John, an investor on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” recently shared photos of a fishing trip he took at 5:30 a.m. on a Monday morning with his friends. You’ll never get to that if you don’t do it,” John told Lewis Howes’ on the “School of Greatness” podcast in 20


The trip was all in the name of work-life balance, John wrote.
“I got a quick couple of hours to sneak in some striped bass fishing,” John said in an Instagram post on Nov. 4, which was accompanied by a photo of him holding up a huge fish.
Daymond John, an investor on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” recently shared photos of a fishing trip he took at 5:30 a.m. on a Monday morning with his friends.
You’ll never get to that if you don’t do it,” John told Lewis Howes’ on the “School of Greatness” podcast in 20
‘Shark Tank’ star Daymond John says his secret to work-life balance isn’t warm and fuzzy, but it works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daughter, isnt, worklife, works, warm, tank, told, fishing, love, john, secret, know, daughters, shark, fuzzy, star, going


'Shark Tank' star Daymond John says his secret to work-life balance isn't warm and fuzzy, but it works

“If you want #worklifebalance , you need to make it a priority to steal away time for yourself no matter how small it is. It will add up over time and you won’t regret it,” he said.

The trip was all in the name of work-life balance, John wrote.

“I got a quick couple of hours to sneak in some striped bass fishing,” John said in an Instagram post on Nov. 4, which was accompanied by a photo of him holding up a huge fish.

Daymond John, an investor on ABC’s “Shark Tank,” recently shared photos of a fishing trip he took at 5:30 a.m. on a Monday morning with his friends.

John also schedules time in order to ensure work-life balance.

“Most people will say, ‘It’s so cold, I’m not going to schedule [when] I’m going to call my mother and tell her I love her or take my daughter out on a little daddy and daughter day,'” he said. “But you know what? You’ll never get to that if you don’t do it,” John told Lewis Howes’ on the “School of Greatness” podcast in 2018.

John learned how to balance his personal life and his business the hard way. When he founded clothing company FUBU in 1992, he wasn’t sure it would be successful, so he worked long hours. “I was like, this is my shot at the big time I’m not going to let anybody stop me,” he said.

And that meant sacrificing time with his daughters with his first wife, Yasmeen and Destiny (who are now adults). “I was so concentrated on work. Many of us who live with our families don’t see our families,” John said in 2016.

“I didn’t have a life at that point,” John told Howes. “I really kind of mentally said to myself, I’ll get to know my daughters when they’re 10 or 15 years old, because there is no time now.”

John tells a story about how one of his daughters fell off her bike and needed stitches: “She never got back on a bike again,” John said in 2016. “Because her father consoled her over the phone.”

After John’s first wife told him he needed to change or lose his family, he did learn from his mistakes.

Now, “obviously, I am in a better place, you know, and I have the opportunity to be able to give as much love as I can,” he told Howes.

These days, “I want to get home to my lady,” John says, referring to Heather Taras — the couple married in 2018 and have a 2-year-old daughter, Minka.

“I want to do the things I love to do,” like fishing, archery and snowboarding, John added.

To that end, in the Instagram caption with John holding the bass, he confessed: “I was not the one that actually caught this fish. But I will damn sure be telling everybody I meet that I did!”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, daughter, isnt, worklife, works, warm, tank, told, fishing, love, john, secret, know, daughters, shark, fuzzy, star, going


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How one man transformed South Korea’s sordid ‘love hotels’ into a billion-dollar business

Love hotels are a type of short-term, pay-per-hour accommodation famed across the global for their exotic — and indeed erotic — stylings. For Lee, however, love hotels had always been a source of sanctuary. Su Jin Lee, founder of South Korean accommodation platform Yanolja. He also rolled out Yanolja renovation services to help love hotels clean up their image and target new customers. A South Korean ‘unicorn’


Love hotels are a type of short-term, pay-per-hour accommodation famed across the global for their exotic — and indeed erotic — stylings.
For Lee, however, love hotels had always been a source of sanctuary.
Su Jin Lee, founder of South Korean accommodation platform Yanolja.
He also rolled out Yanolja renovation services to help love hotels clean up their image and target new customers.
A South Korean ‘unicorn’
How one man transformed South Korea’s sordid ‘love hotels’ into a billion-dollar business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, koreas, south, industry, young, hotels, transformed, accommodation, business, man, billiondollar, love, started, lee, yanolja, korean, sordid


How one man transformed South Korea's sordid 'love hotels' into a billion-dollar business

To be a successful entrepreneur, they say you’ve got to have passion. That’s something Su Jin Lee had in spades when he started his business. After all, he was going after an industry built on the stuff. Lee is the founder of Yanolja, an online accommodation bookings platform that has reinvigorated South Korea’s once dying love hotel industry and given birth to the country’s latest billion-dollar start-up. Love hotels are a type of short-term, pay-per-hour accommodation famed across the global for their exotic — and indeed erotic — stylings. In the Korean language, Yanolja means “Hey, let’s play.” The Korean entrepreneur started the company in Seoul in 2007 in a bid to modernize what he saw as a misrepresented market. It has since grown it into a multifaceted hospitality business with 32 million downloads and a major millennial following.

Reinvigorating the love hotel

Originating in Japan, the amorous accommodations rose to prominence in South Korea in the late 1980s during an era of growing sexual liberalization. But in the decades since, they have marred the conservative country’s hotel industry, due to their seedy associations as breeding grounds for illicit activities and extramarital affairs. For Lee, however, love hotels had always been a source of sanctuary. Orphaned at a young age, he gained work as a janitor at a love hotel when he was 23, thankful for a place to stay and a steady wage. “I think such kind of experience is very, very, very helpful to understand the nature of the industry,” Yanolja’s CEO Jong Yoon Kim told CNBC Make It in Seoul. So, when an anti-prostitution law passed in 2004 threatened to kill the industry, he saw it as an opportunity.

Su Jin Lee, founder of South Korean accommodation platform Yanolja. Yanolja

Lee started by creating an online advertising platform so hotel-owners could attract new guests, before he launched Yanolja as a full-fledged bookings site in 2007. He also rolled out Yanolja renovation services to help love hotels clean up their image and target new customers. Chief among those were two major segments: Young couples and budget travelers seeking short-term accommodation. In South Korea, it’s typical for young people to live at home until marriage, making love hotels an appealing escape from the prying eyes of parents. Meanwhile, a booming travel industry had made the country one of Asia’s largest tourism markets. “(Lee) was thinking what are the pain points nobody understands or nobody finds out,” Kim continued.

A South Korean ‘unicorn’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, koreas, south, industry, young, hotels, transformed, accommodation, business, man, billiondollar, love, started, lee, yanolja, korean, sordid


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The rise of the love hotel — Korea’s latest $1 billion business

The rise of the love hotel — Korea’s latest $1 billion businessLove hotel bookings app Yanolja has just become South Korea’s latest $1 billion start-up. But what has everyone so hot for love hotels? CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist heads to Seoul to find out.


The rise of the love hotel — Korea’s latest $1 billion businessLove hotel bookings app Yanolja has just become South Korea’s latest $1 billion start-up.
But what has everyone so hot for love hotels?
CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist heads to Seoul to find out.
The rise of the love hotel — Korea’s latest $1 billion business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, yanolja, billion, latest, business, hotel, seoul, south, koreas, rise, love


The rise of the love hotel — Korea's latest $1 billion business

The rise of the love hotel — Korea’s latest $1 billion business

Love hotel bookings app Yanolja has just become South Korea’s latest $1 billion start-up. But what has everyone so hot for love hotels? CNBC Make It’s Karen Gilchrist heads to Seoul to find out.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-04
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, startup, yanolja, billion, latest, business, hotel, seoul, south, koreas, rise, love


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Delta says will restore same-sex love scenes in ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Rocketman’ after criticism

Delta Air Lines is restoring same-sex love scenes in two films after outrage on social media, including from Olivia Wilde, the director of the 2019 comedy ‘Booksmart’, one of the movies. Delta and other airlines source films from third-party companies that edit and distribute various versions of films for in-flight viewing. The Atlanta-based airline said studios provide the theatrical version and an edited version of many films and that it selected edited versions of both “Booksmart” and Elton J


Delta Air Lines is restoring same-sex love scenes in two films after outrage on social media, including from Olivia Wilde, the director of the 2019 comedy ‘Booksmart’, one of the movies.
Delta and other airlines source films from third-party companies that edit and distribute various versions of films for in-flight viewing.
The Atlanta-based airline said studios provide the theatrical version and an edited version of many films and that it selected edited versions of both “Booksmart” and Elton J
Delta says will restore same-sex love scenes in ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Rocketman’ after criticism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: leslie josephs ryan ruggiero, leslie josephs, ryan ruggiero, in ryanruggiero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, restore, edited, airlines, versions, delta, booksmart, love, rocketman, films, version, screens, criticism, airline, scenes, samesex


Delta says will restore same-sex love scenes in 'Booksmart' and 'Rocketman' after criticism

Delta Air Lines is restoring same-sex love scenes in two films after outrage on social media, including from Olivia Wilde, the director of the 2019 comedy ‘Booksmart’, one of the movies.

Delta and other airlines source films from third-party companies that edit and distribute various versions of films for in-flight viewing. The Atlanta-based airline said studios provide the theatrical version and an edited version of many films and that it selected edited versions of both “Booksmart” and Elton John biopic “Rocketman.”

“We are immediately putting a new process in place for managing content available through Delta’s in-flight entertainment,” the airline said in statement. “We selected the edited version and now realize content well within our guidelines was unnecessarily excluded from both films. We are working to make sure this doesn’t happen again.”

Delta touts its seat-back screens as a selling point for travelers. The airline continues to use these screens while some competitors like American and United have opted to eschew seat-back screens on narrow-body planes and offer films and television shows available for viewing on passengers’ personal devices through the carriers’ apps.

Airlines receive films from their third-party content providers that work with studios on various versions. Spafax, a unit of British advertising giant WPP, works with Delta. Industry sources have said airlines’ film guidelines vary greatly, with airlines such as state-owned Saudia Airlines among the strictest.

Delta said it plans to receive new edits of the films “that retains the LGBTQ+ love scenes in both Booksmart and Rocketman that will be on our flights as soon as possible.”

It is not the first time Delta has been under fire for edits to same-sex love scenes in its on-board movies. In 2016, customers criticized the airline for showing an edited version of the 2016 movie “Carol.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-02  Authors: leslie josephs ryan ruggiero, leslie josephs, ryan ruggiero, in ryanruggiero
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, restore, edited, airlines, versions, delta, booksmart, love, rocketman, films, version, screens, criticism, airline, scenes, samesex


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3 diamond alternatives that look real and can save you thousands of dollars on an engagement ring

If your holiday shopping list includes an engagement ring, you may want to consider a diamond alternative instead of a natural diamond to make the most of your budget. Lab grown diamondsComposite image comparing a natural diamond (left) to a laboratory grown diamond (right). “With a lab-grown diamond, like every other industrial product, it becomes better, faster, and cheaper in manufacturing,” he says. You can assess the value of a lab-grown diamond using the same standards as you would a natur


If your holiday shopping list includes an engagement ring, you may want to consider a diamond alternative instead of a natural diamond to make the most of your budget.
Lab grown diamondsComposite image comparing a natural diamond (left) to a laboratory grown diamond (right).
“With a lab-grown diamond, like every other industrial product, it becomes better, faster, and cheaper in manufacturing,” he says.
You can assess the value of a lab-grown diamond using the same standards as you would a natur
3 diamond alternatives that look real and can save you thousands of dollars on an engagement ring Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, real, natural, diamond, stone, look, labgrown, dollars, engagement, thousands, save, right, promise, love, diamonds, ring, moissanite, alternatives


3 diamond alternatives that look real and can save you thousands of dollars on an engagement ring

About 40% of engagements happen between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day, according to WeddingWire.com. If your holiday shopping list includes an engagement ring, you may want to consider a diamond alternative instead of a natural diamond to make the most of your budget. Depending on the stone you pick, you could save 90%. That’s not small change. Couples spent an average of $7,829 on engagement rings in 2018, according to the 2018 Brides American Wedding Study. That’s up significantly from 2017’s average of $5,023. Here are three diamond alternatives that can save you thousands on an engagement ring.

1. Lab grown diamonds

Composite image comparing a natural diamond (left) to a laboratory grown diamond (right). Photo by Kevin Schumacher © GIA. Courtesy the Gemological Institute of America

Lab-grown diamonds have the same chemical makeup as natural diamonds. That means they’re just as shiny and durable as diamonds but significantly less expensive, says Russell Shor, senior industry analyst for Gemological Institute of America (GIA). A nonprofit gemology institute, GIA issues grading reports to help shoppers understand gemstone quality. “With a lab-grown diamond, like every other industrial product, it becomes better, faster, and cheaper in manufacturing,” he says. You can assess the value of a lab-grown diamond using the same standards as you would a natural diamond, namely, the four C’s: color, clarity, cut, and carat. The big difference: price. A lab-grown, 1.5-carat round colorless diamond with VVS1 clarity can run you between $4,500 to $6,800, says Shirley Kam, the owner of Love & Promise Jewelers in Chicago, which specializes in diamond alternatives. A natural diamond with the same details can range from $10,000 to $12,000, according to Rare Carat, a diamond price-comparison site.

2. Moissanite

Natural sapphire (on left) and a lab grown moissanite (on right). Courtesy Love & Promise Jewelers

Moissanite is a naturally occurring crystal that forms after a meteor hits Earth, although it’s common to find lab-grown versions of the stones, too. “When you look into a moissanite stone, the light will come out of more facets than a diamond, making it more sparkly,” says Shor. Moissanite grading and pricing is different than that for diamonds. It’s based on a stone’s measurements, or calibrated size, rather than its weight. Clarity is graded by a color spectrum. A 7.55 mm moissanite stone is approximately 1.5 carats in size. A round 7.55 mm near-colorless, high-clarity moissanite is about $700, says Kam. You should expect to spend about $1,050 for a colorless moissanite, which means you could spend about 90% less than you would on a natural diamond with similar details.

3. White sapphires

Natural sapphire (on left) and lab grown moissanite (on right). Courtesy Love & Promise Jewelers


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, real, natural, diamond, stone, look, labgrown, dollars, engagement, thousands, save, right, promise, love, diamonds, ring, moissanite, alternatives


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Trump and Democratic rivals love to rip Big Tech companies – but their campaigns still pay them millions

She has also called for the breakup of Big Tech companies, arguing that the largest firms in the sector have too much power and harm competition. Warren’s campaign paid at least $2.9 million to Big Tech companies in the third quarter, according to data from the Federal Election Commission. CNBC’s analysis did reveal spend from Sanders with Amazon, Google and Apple, though all of Sanders’ listed Google spend is for “software.” Buttigieg said in April that he’d encourage the FTC to investigate Big


She has also called for the breakup of Big Tech companies, arguing that the largest firms in the sector have too much power and harm competition.
Warren’s campaign paid at least $2.9 million to Big Tech companies in the third quarter, according to data from the Federal Election Commission.
CNBC’s analysis did reveal spend from Sanders with Amazon, Google and Apple, though all of Sanders’ listed Google spend is for “software.”
Buttigieg said in April that he’d encourage the FTC to investigate Big
Trump and Democratic rivals love to rip Big Tech companies – but their campaigns still pay them millions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yelena dzhanova nate rattner, yelena dzhanova, nate rattner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, campaigns, trump, candidates, pay, companies, tech, democratic, spend, rivals, amazon, facebook, rip, love, campaign, millions, big, google


Trump and Democratic rivals love to rip Big Tech companies – but their campaigns still pay them millions

2020 presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, from left, former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, and Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, arrive on stage for the Democratic presidential candidate debate in Westerville, Ohio, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. The candidates meet for the fourth debate after an extraordinary series of events that has dramatically altered the race since the last forum in September. Photographer: Allison Farrand/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Donald Trump and some candidates for the Democratic nomination have slammed Big Tech companies this year, but campaign filings reveal those same critics are funneling millions of dollars into Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Alphabet’s Google.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., has been the most vocal, openly and repeatedly criticizing Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg over the company’s handling of misinformation and its contribution to the 2016 election interference. She has also called for the breakup of Big Tech companies, arguing that the largest firms in the sector have too much power and harm competition.

Warren’s campaign paid at least $2.9 million to Big Tech companies in the third quarter, according to data from the Federal Election Commission. Generally, candidates purchase ads from Facebook and Google, computers from Apple, and office supplies from Amazon, among other things. The payments suggest that it’s difficult for candidates to distance themselves from Big Tech since the companies are so large and their products and services are pervasive.

A significant chunk of Warren’s spend on Big Tech — a contribution accounting for at least $1.67 million — went to Facebook, mostly on ad spending. Her campaign paid Google at least $1.2 million, also mostly comprising ad spending.

These figures may not account for all spend on a particular vendor due to the nature of how candidates report their expenses in FEC filings. Money paid to Big Tech firms could also be made through third-party agencies or other organizations, which would obscure the final destination of funds.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, an independent who is running as a Democrat, spent at least $114,000 on Big Tech companies in the third quarter, according to FEC filings. Throughout his campaign and in the most recent Democratic debate, he argued for the breakup of Big Tech along with large finance and media companies.

Notably, the Sanders campaign’s FEC filings detail more than $3 million in spend to a firm called Aisle 518 Strategies for “Fundraising/Digital Advertising.” That sum may include a portion of spend on Facebook and Google, though the specific details are not available. CNBC’s analysis did reveal spend from Sanders with Amazon, Google and Apple, though all of Sanders’ listed Google spend is for “software.”

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, a Democrat, spent at least $4.3 million on Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon in the same time period. Buttigieg said in April that he’d encourage the FTC to investigate Big Tech companies for antitrust violations if he were president. Campaign spokesperson Chris Meagher said Oct. 21 that Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, have privately made hiring recommendations to Buttigieg, revealing the tech giant’s involvement in the presidential election.

Meagher said in a statement to CNBC that the campaign’s spending on Facebook and Google is “mostly for advertising” and that the campaign purchased “office supplies and some photography equipment” from Amazon.

Trump has lashed out at Big Tech, accusing the companies of working against him and his administration. But Facebook ad library analytics show that Trump’s campaign spent $4.77 million on ads in the third quarter of this year. Google’s political ads report shows that the Trump Make America Great Again Committee is the top buyer in ads, having spent more than $7.9 million. Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. cracked the top 10 on that same list with $3.5 million. These advertisers are affiliated with Trump’s 2020 campaign.

The first Democratic presidential candidate who cracked the top 10 on the Google ads report, with $2.7 million in spending, is billionaire Tom Steyer. Warren closely follows at No. 11, having spent $2.5 million on Google ads.

But not all of these tech purchases were for ads. It’s also common for candidates to make large purchases from Amazon and Apple for office supplies and computers. An overwhelming number of Amazon purchases — 92.6% — among the five candidates went toward office supplies and equipment, according to the individual FEC filings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: yelena dzhanova nate rattner, yelena dzhanova, nate rattner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, campaigns, trump, candidates, pay, companies, tech, democratic, spend, rivals, amazon, facebook, rip, love, campaign, millions, big, google


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Hedge fund titan Paul Tudor Jones is apparently a fan of presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg

Presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg has seen a marked uptick in support following his standout performance earlier this month at the Democratic debate in Ohio. And that includes billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones. “I love Pete, I love Mayor Pete, because I think he would be the best administrator to run this country, and he’s got a compassionate heart,” the billionaire investor said at a recent gala, according to a Bloomberg News report. The hedge fund manager has given to both Republicans an


Presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg has seen a marked uptick in support following his standout performance earlier this month at the Democratic debate in Ohio.
And that includes billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones.
“I love Pete, I love Mayor Pete, because I think he would be the best administrator to run this country, and he’s got a compassionate heart,” the billionaire investor said at a recent gala, according to a Bloomberg News report.
The hedge fund manager has given to both Republicans an
Hedge fund titan Paul Tudor Jones is apparently a fan of presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, titan, investor, pete, mayor, love, tudor, fan, recent, hes, presidential, paul, jones, buttigieg, hopeful, months, past, hedge


Hedge fund titan Paul Tudor Jones is apparently a fan of presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg

Presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg has seen a marked uptick in support following his standout performance earlier this month at the Democratic debate in Ohio.

And that includes billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones.

“I love Pete, I love Mayor Pete, because I think he would be the best administrator to run this country, and he’s got a compassionate heart,” the billionaire investor said at a recent gala, according to a Bloomberg News report. “He’s my man.”

Jones added that he’s not politically active at this time. The hedge fund manager has given to both Republicans and Democrats in the past, including in the last 12 months. Tudor Jones declined to comment on the Bloomberg report.

He has within the past year donated to groups supportive of Ohio Representative Tim Ryan, Virginia Senator Mark Warner and former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper, according to public filings at the Federal Election Commission.

As for Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has in recent months distinguished himself from the party’s more extremely progressive wing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, titan, investor, pete, mayor, love, tudor, fan, recent, hes, presidential, paul, jones, buttigieg, hopeful, months, past, hedge


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Jars by Dani CEO: Make a $5 gift in 10 minutes to show your love this holiday season

But a little creativity can help cut holiday costs, says Dani Beckerman, the CEO and founder of dessert company Jars by Dani, who turned her handmade desserts into a profitable business. “Making a gift actually saves you time and money, and it’s just as — if not more — thoughtful,” she says. Dani Beckerman with Jars by Dani cake jars. Add a note to whatever you bake to make your DIY gift stand out. Dani Beckerman hand-delivering Jars by Dani in 2013.


But a little creativity can help cut holiday costs, says Dani Beckerman, the CEO and founder of dessert company Jars by Dani, who turned her handmade desserts into a profitable business.
“Making a gift actually saves you time and money, and it’s just as — if not more — thoughtful,” she says.
Dani Beckerman with Jars by Dani cake jars.
Add a note to whatever you bake to make your DIY gift stand out.
Dani Beckerman hand-delivering Jars by Dani in 2013.
Jars by Dani CEO: Make a $5 gift in 10 minutes to show your love this holiday season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: sofia pitt, dani beckerman, aditi shrikant, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jars, dani, love, making, save, season, diy, beckerman, gift, baking, minutes, business, ceo, holiday


Jars by Dani CEO: Make a $5 gift in 10 minutes to show your love this holiday season

Holiday spending can easily get out of hand. Americans racked up more than $1,000 in holiday debt each, on average, at the end of 2018, according to MagnifyMoney’s annual postholiday debt survey. But a little creativity can help cut holiday costs, says Dani Beckerman, the CEO and founder of dessert company Jars by Dani, who turned her handmade desserts into a profitable business. “Making a gift actually saves you time and money, and it’s just as — if not more — thoughtful,” she says. For Beckerman, a little creativity went a long way. After the dessert company CEO graduated pre-med from the University of Maryland in 2012, she switched gears to pursue her passion for baking and attend the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. In 2013, when she got the idea to layer cakes in Mason jars, she pivoted again, leaving culinary school to focus full time on her business. It took off as she began posting her creations to Instagram. Her winding path taught her that playing by the rules doesn’t always serve you and in fact can cost you, she says. In the spirit of the holidays, Beckerman offers a recipe for a personalized $5 “cookies in a jar” gift that’s inspired by her signature cake jars and takes less than 10 minutes to make. She also shares tips to keep from overspending on gifts in general.

Dani Beckerman with Jars by Dani cake jars. Courtesy Dani Beckerman

Spending less doesn’t mean you care less

“Personalization can trump how expensive a gift is,” says Beckerman. “Anyone can go out and buy a nice scarf, but making something homemade will not only set you apart, it shows you care.” If you’re going to a holiday gathering, instead of spending $12 on a bottle of wine or picking up a store-made pie, bake something, Beckerman suggests: “It can cost less than $5 … and it shows you put thought into it.” Add a note to whatever you bake to make your DIY gift stand out. And think about who you’re baking for, she says. What makes the person unique? How can you show your gift was made with them in mind? It can be as simple as making the dessert their favorite color, she says.

Dani Beckerman hand-delivering Jars by Dani in 2013. Courtesy Dani Beckerman

Beckerman credits her personal touch for the success of her business. When Jars by Dani was just starting out, she hand-delivered each personalized cake jar to her customers in their New York City apartments. Her effort helped her earn loyal fans: “Those people that I delivered to by hand at the very beginning … they still root for me the hardest,” she says. Now that Jars by Dani has grown into a 16-person business that sells desserts nationwide, hand delivery is no longer an option. Regardless, she says, “I still try to make the experience personal. Customers can upload a photo to create their own label and add their own meaningful message.”

Going DIY can save time and money

While buying boxed baking mix might seem like a time saver, “it will actually end up costing you more than buying the dry ingredients,” says Beckerman. “And in the time it took you to go to the store to buy that box, you could’ve been creating something unique and thoughtful from scratch.” While the initial investment in baking basics like flour, vanilla, sugar, baking soda, and baking powder might be seem to make baking from scratch more expensive, those ingredients have a long shelf life and can be used over and over again to save you money. Take flour, for example. Buying in bulk can save you as much as $10, Beckerman says. And if you’re worried that your flour will spoil, you can extend its shelf life by storing it in a airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer. To keep bugs away, add a few bay leaves, since those can act as a natural insect repellent. In addition to saving money, you’ll save time when you DIY. If you multiply Beckerman’s “cookies in a jar” recipe by 10, you can cross that many people off of your gift list pretty quickly. “It takes a lot longer than an hour to buy something for 10 people on your holiday list,” she says. In general, DIY doesn’t have to be daunting, say Beckerman. Try it for just one party and see how many Brownie points you earn for your effort: “It really goes a long way, both in business and in life,” she says. “Making something homemade will not only set you apart, it shows you care.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: sofia pitt, dani beckerman, aditi shrikant, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jars, dani, love, making, save, season, diy, beckerman, gift, baking, minutes, business, ceo, holiday


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The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon

If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card. CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers. 1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card. Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement. Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.


If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card.
CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers.
1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card.
Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement.
Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.
The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offers, rewards, card, select, credit, best, online, love, prime, month, shopping, amazon


The best credit card for people who love shopping on Amazon

More than 40% of online shoppers buy from Amazon at least once a month, according to a recent poll from NPR.

If you’re one of them, you might have seen promotions for an Amazon credit card. The mega online retailer offers four types of credit cards. CNBC Select crunched the numbers to determine which of these options provides the biggest benefit to frequent shoppers.

Our No. 1 pick is the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Card. Although this card requires users to have an eligible Amazon Prime membership ($119 annually, or $12.99 a month), the company’s branded credit card offers the highest rewards return: 5% cash back at Amazon.com and Whole Foods Market. Since Amazon Prime has 100 million subscribers and is growing, many people already meet this requirement.

Below, CNBC Select breaks down Amazon’s four credit cards to help you choose the best card for your needs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, offers, rewards, card, select, credit, best, online, love, prime, month, shopping, amazon


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