Luxury brands must now show they are ‘good Chinese citizens’ after T-shirt territory anger, expert says

Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region. The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing. Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. Jackson Yee, a si


Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region. The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing. Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. Jackson Yee, a si
Luxury brands must now show they are ‘good Chinese citizens’ after T-shirt territory anger, expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, kong, territorial, chinese, citizens, anger, hong, brands, luxury, world, expert, brand, tshirt, good, wolf, china


Luxury brands must now show they are 'good Chinese citizens' after T-shirt territory anger, expert says

Western luxury labels will need to demonstrate that they are good Chinese citizens in the face of territorial sensitivities, according to an expert on branding in the region.

Fashion brands including Givenchy, Coach and Versace apologized last week when some Chinese social media stars canceled their endorsement deals after text on some of their T-shirts suggested that places such as Hong Kong are separate countries from mainland China.

The apologies came as protests in Hong Kong snowballed into a broader pro-democracy movement, with some activists even demanding full autonomy from Beijing.

But David Wolf, a partner at Allison + Partners who helps multinational companies expand into China, warned that apologies from the luxury brands may not be enough for Chinese people who have “deep patriotic pride.”

“The more sensitive this whole territorial issue becomes, the more challenging the trade issues become between China and the rest of the world, the more that these brands are going to have to kowtow, if you will, and so they should be thinking very creatively about what they can do to demonstrate that they’re good, if you will, Chinese citizens, without at the same time alienating some of their other audiences in territories elsewhere in the world,” he told CNBC by phone.

Wolf added that luxury brands have a difficult balance to make in appealing to consumers, regardless of where they live or their cultural preferences. “It is extraordinarily difficult for these brands to do two things at once, which is first to understand what those sensitivities are, cultural and political around the world, to tiptoe around all those, and at the same time maintain the edginess that’s required of a fashion brand. That’s a very hard road to walk.”

Along with apologizing, Wolf said the fashion labels should “do something to visibly make amends” in the coming fashion season.

Chinese supermodel Liu Wen, a brand ambassador for Coach, owned by Tapestry, said on Weibo she had severed her endorsement deal with the American brand over a T-shirt, which listed Taiwan as a country. Jackson Yee, a singer with Chinese boy band TFBoys, said he was no longer working with Givenchy, the LVMH-owned brand, after one of the band’s world tour T-shirts referred to “Hong Kong, Hong Kong,” and “Macau, Macau.”

Wolf suggested that the Chinese brand ambassadors were also protecting themselves.

“These spokespeople, if they want to continue operating in China, they want to maintain themselves in the good graces of the Chinese government … so they have to make sure that they’re not associated with brands that take lightly issues that China takes seriously, like territorial integrity,” Wolf said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, territory, kong, territorial, chinese, citizens, anger, hong, brands, luxury, world, expert, brand, tshirt, good, wolf, china


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Japanese chef Nobu originally refused Robert De Niro’s New York restaurant offer

“He said ‘Nobu, I’d like to open a restaurant in New York together with you’ and he invited me to New York, and I stayed four days,” Matsuhisa said. ‘Nobu, maybe time to come again to New York?’ I so much appreciated (it) and he trusts me, he was a big support to me, he wants to open a restaurant in New York, and with me, we did it.” Nobu had been nervous about partnerships after disagreements with a business partner in Peru, but his first venture with De Niro in New York opened in Tribeca in 19


“He said ‘Nobu, I’d like to open a restaurant in New York together with you’ and he invited me to New York, and I stayed four days,” Matsuhisa said. ‘Nobu, maybe time to come again to New York?’ I so much appreciated (it) and he trusts me, he was a big support to me, he wants to open a restaurant in New York, and with me, we did it.” Nobu had been nervous about partnerships after disagreements with a business partner in Peru, but his first venture with De Niro in New York opened in Tribeca in 19
Japanese chef Nobu originally refused Robert De Niro’s New York restaurant offer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, appreciated, matsuhisa, niros, robert, japanese, invited, offer, refused, nobu, niro, bob, open, originally, restaurant, chef, opened


Japanese chef Nobu originally refused Robert De Niro's New York restaurant offer

Speaking to CNBC’s Tania Bryer for an episode of “Trailblazers,” Matsuhisa said he was flattered by De Niro’s approach, after the star dined in his eponymous Los Angeles restaurant that opened in 1987.

“He said ‘Nobu, I’d like to open a restaurant in New York together with you’ and he invited me to New York, and I stayed four days,” Matsuhisa said. “Also, Bob didn’t explain too much. So, you know he invited me to open a restaurant, (and) I so appreciated that he likes my food (and I said): ‘Bob, thank you so much but it’s still too early to open it because my first restaurant was not organized yet.’ So, he said ‘OK’.”

But De Niro was patient.

“After, like, four years, he called me. ‘Nobu, maybe time to come again to New York?’ I was so surprised but now I can trust him because he was waiting for me for four years. I so much appreciated (it) and he trusts me, he was a big support to me, he wants to open a restaurant in New York, and with me, we did it.”

Nobu had been nervous about partnerships after disagreements with a business partner in Peru, but his first venture with De Niro in New York opened in Tribeca in 1994 and had much success. The pair founded Nobu Hospitality together and opened their first hotel in Las Vegas in 2013. The group now operates several hotels on five continents.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, appreciated, matsuhisa, niros, robert, japanese, invited, offer, refused, nobu, niro, bob, open, originally, restaurant, chef, opened


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger

American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China. The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract


American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China. The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract
Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anger, givenchy, macau, fashion, brand, chinese, luxury, sorry, hong, versace, tshirt, coach, chinas, kong, say


Versace, Givenchy and Coach say sorry over Chinese T-shirt anger

American fashion brand Coach, French label Givenchy and Italian luxury brand Versace have been boycotted by some Chinese social media stars for suggesting that places like Hong Kong and Macau are separate from China.

The Versace label and its artistic director Donatella Versace apologized on Sunday after images of a T-shirt pairing cities with their countries stated “Macau, Macau” and “Hong Kong, Hong Kong” were criticized on social media. Yang Mi, a popular actress in China, ended her contract with Versace, owned by Capri Holdings, over the issue.

“Versace reiterates that we love China deeply, and resolutely respect China’s territory and national sovereignty,” the company said in a statement.

Donatella Versace also stated on her Instagram account: “Never have I wanted to disrespect China’s National Sovereignty and this is why I wanted to personally apologize for such inaccuracy and for any distress that it might have caused.”

Chinese supermodel Liu Wen, a brand ambassador for Coach, said on Weibo she had severed her endorsement deal with the American brand over a similar T-shirt, which listed Taiwan as a country.

“I apologise to everyone for the damage that I have caused as a result of my less-careful choice of brand!” she said in a post that was ‘liked’ hundreds of thousands of times.”

“I love my motherland, and I steadfastly safeguard China’s sovereignty.”

Coach, owned by Tapestry, posted an apology on its Twitter account on Monday, saying it removed the T-shirts from sale after it found a “serious inaccuracy” in May 2018.

In 2018, China appeared to increase its policing of how overseas companies refer to territories such as Hong Kong and Macau, both of which are Chinese territories but run with a high degree of autonomy.

Jackson Yee, a singer with Chinese boy band TFBoys, said he was no longer working with Givenchy, the LVMH-owned brand, after one of the band’s world tour T-shirts also referred to Hong Kong, Hong Kong, and Macau, Macau. Givenchy posted an apology in its Weibo account on Monday.

China is a key market for luxury goods makers, with Chinese people accounting for a third of all global spending, although a weaker yuan will make imported goods more expensive.

This isn’t the first time luxury brands have been criticized by Chinese consumers. Italian fashion house Dolce and Gabbana canceled a fashion show in Shanghai in 2018 after posting a series of videos on Instagram showing a Chinese woman how to use chopsticks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-12  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, anger, givenchy, macau, fashion, brand, chinese, luxury, sorry, hong, versace, tshirt, coach, chinas, kong, say


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Digital ‘clothes’ could be the next big Instagram hit

Virtual “clothes,” pieces that were available only as digital items, turned out to be the answer. Carlings’ digital clothes start at 10 euros ($9.06) for a headband and go up to 30 euros for a long oversized shiny nylon puffer jacket printed with computer code lettering. For marketers, digital clothes and goods may be an efficient way to create posts. It might be a while until digital items take off on social media, but they are making headlines. But, if you’re looking for a coveted Carlings dig


Virtual “clothes,” pieces that were available only as digital items, turned out to be the answer. Carlings’ digital clothes start at 10 euros ($9.06) for a headband and go up to 30 euros for a long oversized shiny nylon puffer jacket printed with computer code lettering. For marketers, digital clothes and goods may be an efficient way to create posts. It might be a while until digital items take off on social media, but they are making headlines. But, if you’re looking for a coveted Carlings dig
Digital ‘clothes’ could be the next big Instagram hit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: lucy handley james wright, lucy handley, james wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothes, games, social, items, virtual, told, hit, carlings, digital, instagram, media, big


Digital 'clothes' could be the next big Instagram hit

Hip Scandinavian fashion retailer Carlings knew it had to make a big impression when it launched its first online store in 2018 — years after most other apparel brands. Carlings has more than 200 physical stores in Norway, Finland and Sweden and is known for its wide range of jeans and casual clothes. When it finally started selling online last year, it wanted to do something that would draw people to its website and make it stand out. Virtual “clothes,” pieces that were available only as digital items, turned out to be the answer. It turned to Virtue, the creative agency owned by Vice, for a big idea. “We started thinking about what would a web shop look like 10 years ahead,” Morten Grubak, executive creative director of Virtue Nordic, told CNBC’s James Wright.

“Of course (we were) inspired by the gaming industry, games like ‘Fortnite’ and the whole virtual ‘skinning’ of your avatar. And that’s what you’ll also have on web shops 10 years ahead, digital clothing, that’s what we pitched to them basically.” The response? “It’s too risky,” Grubak explained. When the agency pitched the idea, it didn’t go well. Carlings CEO Ronny Mikalsen called it “the strangest meeting of my life.” “I didn’t understand what they were talking about, making a digital collection … I was like, this can’t be serious, this is nothing that the consumers would be interested in,” he told CNBC. But after Virtue held a second meeting with Carlings, something hit a nerve. “I spoke to my daughter, she’s 12 years-old and I told her about this, and she made me realize that it’s not that strange actually, it’s not that far fetched or science fiction. People are buying skins, people are using filters on social media and so on,” Mikalsen said. Carlings’ digital clothes start at 10 euros ($9.06) for a headband and go up to 30 euros for a long oversized shiny nylon puffer jacket printed with computer code lettering. Customers upload a photo and a designer will “dress” them virtually. Once they get their outfit, they can “brag to your friends,” on social media, per Carlings suggestion. The clothes are never made in the real world and have been produced purely for the digital realm.

These virtual outfits look certain to up wearers’ credibility on Instagram, Mikalsen added. “We created a new way of thinking for the fashion industry, for the consumers, we know we have a lot of influencers out there creating this fake reality that is not available for the everyday boy or girl,” he said. The Carlings collection is genderless and available in any size, and also taps into the trend for reducing environmental impact.

Marketing solution

Yuval Ben-Itzhak, CEO of social media analytics consultancy Socialbakers, told CNBC that digital clothing is in its infancy for creators on the likes of Instagram and Snapchat. For marketers, digital clothes and goods may be an efficient way to create posts. “In marketing, one of the biggest and most complicated issues is how can I create content at scale. How can I keep innovating and how can I keep the digital dialogue with my audience and know my audience,” he told CNBC by phone. Digital apparel is no emperor’s new clothes fad — in the gaming industry, “skins” and “cosmetics” are a staple item and it is estimated that in-game transactions, including buying clothes, are estimated to have made “Fortnite” parent company Epic Games $1 billion, according to figures from Nielsen company SuperData. For Ben-Itzhak, virtual apparel will need to find a real purpose within social media to be successful. “It will require some gamification … you are seeing many games selling those virtual items and it’s a huge business … Think about dolls or think about cars and all those collections, probably when we were kids, we were collecting, we can collect that as digital items, it doesn’t need to be a physical item,” he said. Some companies are pushing beyond virtual clothing and are creating digital characters sporting fashionable brands. On Tuesday, hip toy brand Superplastic launched Instagram pages for its two “synthetic celebrities,” animated characters Janky and Guggimon, who are set to earn money like real-life influencers, Superplastic claimed.

Worlds collide

Janky, a fashion fan, was soon posting about Guggimon’s sneakers, threatening to “burn his @balenciaga kicks” if Guggimon didn’t get out of his way, while Guggimon was pictured sitting on a “Louis Vuitton” case. “Living for this custom @lousivuitton titane trunk,” he posted. While Superplastic is not in discussions with either label about a collaboration, founder Paul Budnitz told CNBC that sponsorships are part of its business plan. Ben-Itzhak told CNBC CGI characters and animation is an important step in social media content. “It all started with simple text. It’s moved to static images then to videos. Now, we’re looking at short videos like (Instagram) Stories and (now) these characters … On social media, innovation is at its highest velocity if you compare it to (innovation by) traditional publishers,” he said.

Having boasting rights seems to be the main motivation behind buying virtual goods. Seventy-nine percent of paying gamers in the U.S. spent money on in-game items in 2018, according to Newzoo. These include virtual clothes, where within games such as “Fortnite,” certain outfits are seen as status symbols. Kids even use the term “default” as a real-life putdown, referring to the generic clothes the video game assigns characters. Epic Games, maker of “Fortnite,” makes money by offering “skins” to players, with a “Top Gun” skin costing $5, for example. But buying these items doesn’t get people to a new level or give them more lives in the game; gamers are looking for attention and ways to bond with friends also competing. The real and virtual worlds are benefiting each other: Mobile game “The Sims” partnered with fashion retailer Asos last year to run a virtual fashion show within the game itself, and people could then buy real versions of the clothes on Asos. It might be a while until digital items take off on social media, but they are making headlines. A digital dress was sold for $9,500 at a blockchain event called the Ethereal Summit in New York in May. Named “iridescence,” it was created by digital agency The Fabricant, designer Johanna Jaskowska and blockchain company Dapper Labs, and Jaskowska was seen “modelling” the item on Instagram before it was sold. But, if you’re looking for a coveted Carlings digital puffa jacket or oversized silver metallic track pants, you’re out of luck. The collection has “sold out,” although a second drop is coming soon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: lucy handley james wright, lucy handley, james wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, clothes, games, social, items, virtual, told, hit, carlings, digital, instagram, media, big


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tsunami warning for parts of Indonesia’s Sumatra, Java after strong quake

People stand outside a shopping mall following an earthquake in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. The geophysics agency said there was a risk of a tsunami of in southern parts of Pandeglang and Panaitan island in Banten province, and Lampung in Sumatra. The quake could also be felt in other cities such as Yogyakarta on Java island. “It was so scary,” said Gustiani Pratiwi, who was carrying two children near an apartment block in Jakarta when she felt the quake strongly. At Carita beach i


People stand outside a shopping mall following an earthquake in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. The geophysics agency said there was a risk of a tsunami of in southern parts of Pandeglang and Panaitan island in Banten province, and Lampung in Sumatra. The quake could also be felt in other cities such as Yogyakarta on Java island. “It was so scary,” said Gustiani Pratiwi, who was carrying two children near an apartment block in Jakarta when she felt the quake strongly. At Carita beach i
Tsunami warning for parts of Indonesia’s Sumatra, Java after strong quake Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: lucy handley, james wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, island, hit, strong, parts, magnitude, felt, earthquake, sumatra, near, jakarta, tsunami, quake, java, warning, higher, indonesias


Tsunami warning for parts of Indonesia's Sumatra, Java after strong quake

People stand outside a shopping mall following an earthquake in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. A strong earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia’s Java island on Friday, swaying buildings as far away as the capital and prompting national authorities to urge those in coastal areas to head to higher ground in case of a tsunami.

Indonesian authorities urged coastal-dwellers to head for higher ground on Friday after a tsunami warning with potential for waves up to three metres (10 feet) following a powerful earthquake off the islands of Sumatra and Java.

The Indonesian geophysics agency issued the warning after the quake, which the U.S. Geological Survey initially said had a magnitude of 7 and hit at a depth of 59 km (37 miles), about 227 km (141 miles) from the city of Teluk Betung.

The magnitude was later lowered to 6.8.

The geophysics agency said there was a risk of a tsunami of in southern parts of Pandeglang and Panaitan island in Banten province, and Lampung in Sumatra.

Indonesia’s disaster mitigation agency said on Twitter that residents near coastlines at risk should “immediately evacuate to higher ground”.

There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties, but strong tremors were felt in Jakarta, the capital, prompting people to run out of office buildings.

The quake could also be felt in other cities such as Yogyakarta on Java island.

“It was so scary,” said Gustiani Pratiwi, who was carrying two children near an apartment block in Jakarta when she felt the quake strongly.

Indonesia is situated on the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, which is frequently hit by earthquakes and sometimes accompanying tsunamis.

The most devastating in recent Indonesian history was on Dec. 26 in 2004, when a magnitude 9.5 quake triggered a massive tsunami that killed around 226,000 people along the shorelines of the Indian Ocean, including more than 126,000 in Indonesia.

Last year, a tsunami hit the city of Palu in Sulawesi island, killing thousands, while a crater collapse at the Anak Krakatau volcano triggered a tsunami that killed at least 430 people in an area near the latest quake.

At Carita beach in Banten, which was affected by the Anak Krakatau quake, a resident described the alarm in the area.

“We are panicking a lot,” Sandi, a resident of Carita beach, told Metro TV by telephone.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: lucy handley, james wright
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, island, hit, strong, parts, magnitude, felt, earthquake, sumatra, near, jakarta, tsunami, quake, java, warning, higher, indonesias


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Facebook is at the point of no return’: These 17-year-olds are very clear about what they love and hate about social media

So, I’m quite conscious of people watching what I post,” she told CNBC. “When I first got social media, my parents made sure I did that and now, it’s just grown on me,” he told CNBC. Two teams were tasked with creating an ad campaign to warn younger teens of the dangers of social media, before presenting them to a judging panel. But at the moment he’s unlikely to use social media to promote his acting, he said. Advertising is an accepted part of social media, but it wasn’t always obvious to the


So, I’m quite conscious of people watching what I post,” she told CNBC. “When I first got social media, my parents made sure I did that and now, it’s just grown on me,” he told CNBC. Two teams were tasked with creating an ad campaign to warn younger teens of the dangers of social media, before presenting them to a judging panel. But at the moment he’s unlikely to use social media to promote his acting, he said. Advertising is an accepted part of social media, but it wasn’t always obvious to the
‘Facebook is at the point of no return’: These 17-year-olds are very clear about what they love and hate about social media Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, dont, instagram, media, point, social, love, hate, told, clear, snapchat, group, tanjia, 17yearolds, return


'Facebook is at the point of no return': These 17-year-olds are very clear about what they love and hate about social media

Generation Z has never known a world without the internet, smartphones and social media and their behavior is a constant source of fascination for companies who want to understand how to reach them with the next big thing. The group — often described as being aged between around 8 and 22 years-old — rarely watch TV, use WhatsApp for communicating with their parents, sometimes “ghost” job offers, and are courted by the likes of Snapchat, Instagram and YouTube for their attention. Some are really not fans of Facebook despite the firm’s attempts to win teens back to the platform. According to a group of 17-year-olds CNBC spoke to, Gen Z can be pretty private on social media but aren’t always sure when they’re shown ads on apps. Tanjia is studying math, economics and history at high school and mainly uses Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter, keeps her location private and only accepts people she knows as friends or followers. “If I take a photo near home, I don’t tag it (in) those areas and stuff like that. So, I’m quite conscious of people watching what I post,” she told CNBC. Emil, studying math, French and politics, also keeps his Instagram private, although he rarely posts. “When I first got social media, my parents made sure I did that and now, it’s just grown on me,” he told CNBC. “I don’t want to say I grew out of it but that’s sort of what it felt like happened. I stopped caring, basically, about likes,” he added.

Students took part in a week’s work experience at London advertising agency Isobel, in July 2019

The teenagers spoke to CNBC after a week at London ad agency Isobel, which runs a summer school program for students. Two teams were tasked with creating an ad campaign to warn younger teens of the dangers of social media, before presenting them to a judging panel. Tanjia’s team cautioned children not to share their location on social media with the tagline “Your World is Theirs,” while the second group encouraged youngsters to “Pull the Plug on Online Hate.” While none of the students wanted to speak publicly about cyber-bulling, they were very aware of it, according to Isobel Managing Partner Jamie Williams. “They knew all about it, whether that’s happened to them or their friends … there were themes that were very relevant,” he told CNBC by phone. As 17-year-olds, the risks appear to be more about blowing a job prospect than staying safe. “What you post can affect how you work when you’re older … But when you’re younger, it’s more about being careful for yourself,” Tanjia said.

Likes concern

There was a concern about validation too. “I wouldn’t want to want to post a picture and people’s reactions to be (negative), even if they’re not responding or anything, I don’t want the idea that these people were thinking ‘Oh, God, what did he just post?’ or anything like that,” Emil said. This is a key topic for Instagram, which announced this month that it is expanding its trial to hide like counts and video views in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Japan and New Zealand. Head of Instagram Adam Mosseri said hiding like counts is one way to make the social network “a less pressurized environment.” Deniss, who wants to be an actor, told CNBC he “doesn’t care” who follows him on Instagram, and mainly uses Snapchat to communicate, although won’t accept contact requests from people he doesn’t know. But at the moment he’s unlikely to use social media to promote his acting, he said. “I don’t want to use social media to provoke popularity. So if I become popular, people may choose to follow me,” he added.

Deniss prefers to use Russian social network VKontakte (or VK, similar to Facebook) to chat with friends in Latvia and Russia as well as to listen to music. Advertising is an accepted part of social media, but it wasn’t always obvious to the group when they were seeing ads. Instagram Stories for example, features “native” ads that look like posts from accounts people follow, which can be confusing, Tanjia said. “Sometimes they show ads in between. The same one as how you’d watch a normal story. Sometimes I don’t realize that’s not a person’s account … it’s like subconsciously (an ad).” All three use Snapchat to chat with friends regularly, while WhatsApp is for group conversations or messages from parents, “as they don’t have anything else.” As for Facebook? “Most of us have it, we just never use it,” Tanjia said. “It’s not our thing.” They are aware that Facebook owns Instagram and WhatsApp. “I think it’s kind of sad when they do more things like … Facebook Stories is the same as Instagram Stories and Snapchat Stories … (Facebook is) just trying to copy everything that they already own,” Tanjia added. Facebook is just not cool, Emil stated. “Our generation is quite ‘brand-y.’ We are obsessed (with brands) and we’re like sheep, we just flock to whatever seems the coolest. And Facebook is at the point of no return.” Williams agreed. “When I ask if they’re on Facebook, they would look at me as if they had barely ever heard of it,” he said. As well as gaining insights into how Generation Z uses social media, the program at Isobel is an opportunity for the ad industry to reach a more diverse group of people as the students were from a variety of backgrounds, Williams added. “Ultimately, we’re trying to engage consumers right across the U.K. with the brands that we work with, and representing society within our agency, within our industry, is important.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, dont, instagram, media, point, social, love, hate, told, clear, snapchat, group, tanjia, 17yearolds, return


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU

The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU. “We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised


The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU. “We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised
UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nodeal, telegraph, huge, set, brexit, join, launch, public, country, uk, javid, deal, campaign, information, leave, party, eu, ready


UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU

The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not.

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU.

“We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised to leave on October 31. More details will be announced soon, but I can say that this looks set to be one of the government’s biggest ever public information campaigns,” Javid wrote on Sunday.

Up to £100 million ($123.4 million) is thought to have been allocated to the ad campaign, according to a Telegraph source, and it is likely to use large-scale media such as billboards and TV, together with leaflets and online advertising.

It could also include a no-deal preparation leaflet delivered to every home in the U.K.

“Making sure Britain is prepared for no deal is the best way to get a great new deal,” Javid wrote. “That is why this government is turbocharging preparations to leave with no deal.” Javid is set to reveal plans to spend £1 billion on preparations for a no-deal Brexit, the Telegraph report suggested.

Boris Johnson, Britain’s new prime minister, has already said that the country must leave the EU by the October 31 deadline “do or die, come what may,” and on Monday the government stepped up its planning for a no-deal scenario.

Johnson and his Conservative Party have already been advertising on Facebook. One ad, which started running on the social network on Sunday, appealed to people to join the party. “No ifs, no buts. We’ll leave on 31st October — and whatever happens EU citizens here can be certain of their rights to stay. Agree? Join Boris’s team, ” it stated, with a link to join the Conservatives. The party spent £13,487 on Facebook ads for the seven days starting July 21, three days before Johnson took office as prime minister.

Previous large publicly-funded information campaigns include the launch of Britain’s National Health Service in 1948 and a “Don’t die of ignorance,” ad campaign about AIDS prevention in 1986, then the government’s largest ever public health campaign.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nodeal, telegraph, huge, set, brexit, join, launch, public, country, uk, javid, deal, campaign, information, leave, party, eu, ready


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Shares of ad giant Publicis plunge after cut to revenue guidance

Shares in French advertising conglomerate Publicis slumped after the group cut its 2019 revenue growth guidance. Late Thursday, the company reported lower-than-expected revenue for the second-quarter of 2019. Shares of Publicis plunged 8.5% to their lowest level since December 2012 in early trading on Friday. The company posted organic growth of 0.1% against analyst expectations of 0.7% for the quarter and put its 2020 targets under review. Brokerage Liberum downgraded Publicis to “hold” from “b


Shares in French advertising conglomerate Publicis slumped after the group cut its 2019 revenue growth guidance. Late Thursday, the company reported lower-than-expected revenue for the second-quarter of 2019. Shares of Publicis plunged 8.5% to their lowest level since December 2012 in early trading on Friday. The company posted organic growth of 0.1% against analyst expectations of 0.7% for the quarter and put its 2020 targets under review. Brokerage Liberum downgraded Publicis to “hold” from “b
Shares of ad giant Publicis plunge after cut to revenue guidance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plunge, liberum, giant, north, america, guidance, main, company, shares, publicis, weakness, ad, growth, cut, revenue


Shares of ad giant Publicis plunge after cut to revenue guidance

Shares in French advertising conglomerate Publicis slumped after the group cut its 2019 revenue growth guidance.

Late Thursday, the company reported lower-than-expected revenue for the second-quarter of 2019. Shares of Publicis plunged 8.5% to their lowest level since December 2012 in early trading on Friday.

The company posted organic growth of 0.1% against analyst expectations of 0.7% for the quarter and put its 2020 targets under review.

Arthur Sadoun, the company’s chair and chief executive, said the company’s $4.4 billion acquisition of data marketing business Epsilon was the main reason for the review.

North America, one of its main markets, was down 1.7%, due to some of its consumer-packaged goods (CPG) clients spending less on traditional advertising, the company said in a statement. CPG makes up around 25% of its clients overall.

Brokerage Liberum downgraded Publicis to “hold” from “buy,” according to Reuters. “Operationally, the weakness in North America is the biggest concern given Publicis is the strongest player in North American media buying, which should be the highest margin part of the business and we now have two major agencies (WPP and Publicis) both having weakness in North America, which raises questions as to what is happening in this particular market,” Liberum wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plunge, liberum, giant, north, america, guidance, main, company, shares, publicis, weakness, ad, growth, cut, revenue


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100%

Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more hea


Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more hea
Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100% Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, 100, ads, increase, spend, advertisers, day, sales, asked, told, prime, products, advertising


Amazon asked some advertisers to increase spend on Prime Day by at least 100%

Amazon doesn’t just make money from product sales on Prime Day: advertising will earn it a ton of cash too. Last year, Amazon Prime Day broke records for the e-commerce giant, with people buying more than 100 million products during the 36-hour sale starting July 16. In 2019, the shopping event on July 15 and 16 will add Prime subscribers and is an opportunity for Amazon to push companies to spend more on advertising, some experts told CNBC. Amazon made $2.72 billion in its “other” segment in the first-quarter of the year, consisting primarily of advertising sales, though the growth rate in revenue slowed compared to the same period last year. Debbie Ellison, the chief digital officer at marketing agency Geometry U.K., said that one of its clients was asked to at least double its ad spend for Prime Day. “One of our CPG (consumer packaged goods) clients was asked recently by Amazon to increase its budget by a minimum of 100% to ensure that it did not lose market share during this key sales period. In the case of this client, its products are not natural deals for Prime Day so taking part would only reduce their overall margin,” she told CNBC by email. Geometry advised the client not to increase its ad spend for the shopping event.

“Brands which over-invest in ad spend during Prime Day tend to sit in the electronic & computing and beauty & personal care categories, where they typically achieve between a 50% and 60% sales uplift during this time,” Ellison added. Companies can advertise on Amazon in a few ways, including sponsored listings in search results (like Google’s paid-for search results, labeled ‘Ad’) or with display ads or videos that run the full width of the site. Amazon also has a “demand-side platform,” (DSP) software that automatically chooses the most relevant ads to show shoppers, as well as where they are placed. Brands using the DSP can have ads appear on other sites owned by Amazon, such as movie database IMDb. Jim Cridlin, global head of innovation at media agency Mindshare, noted that Amazon will boost the visibility of advertisers who spend more on the platform — and those who push people to its deals on Amazon via advertising elsewhere. But while Amazon’s pitch to advertisers has got “more sophisticated,” Mindshare has not yet seen the level of “additional support” advertisers provide Alibaba around Singles’ Day, he told CNBC by email. “We are starting to see advertisers (to whom Amazon is a critical partner) doing more on their owned and social channels to support the sales event,” he added.

Advertising is becoming “a far more crucial” part of a company’s overall sales performance on Amazon, according to Malcolm Pinkerton, vice-president of ecommerce and digital insights at Kantar. While Prime Day is an opportunity for Amazon to encourage more ad spending, businesses are using it strategically, by promoting exclusive offers or launch products, he told CNBC by phone. “But what they are seeing is that if they do start to invest more heavily through Amazon advertising, there’s a noticeable halo effect after Prime Day,” he added. Sellers are likely to increase budgets for sponsored listings, according to Jake Schwarzbaum, co-founder of Velocity Sellers, a company that helps businesses sell on Amazon. He also expects companies that have invested in Amazon Storefronts, a new part of the site that highlights small businesses, and those with extra product information — known as A+ Content — to do well this year. “Prime Day is not about profit for Amazon sellers. It is primarily an opportunity for new product introductions, expanding online market share, as well as helping sellers find new customers to increase brand loyalty,” he told CNBC by email.

Toys, beauty, computing, apparel and kitchen goods were the most-shopped on Amazon during Prime Day in 2018 and some of them are also products that Amazon sells under its private label brands. People can buy AmazonBasics USB cables and water filter cartridges or fashion under its Find by Amazon label, for example, although in April it scaled down promotions of private-label brands following regulatory scrutiny and calls of unfair advantage. “Brands should focus on pushing products that do not directly compete with Amazon’s or promote those products on other platforms,” said Inbal Lavi, chief executive of marketing company Webpals Group, in an email to CNBC. She advocated using Amazon’s lighting deals and coupons features to encourage people to shop. As well as heavily promoting Prime Day on its website, Amazon is also investing in ads of its own — some of which will appear on Google Shopping, Google’s retail search function. While this means Amazon is paying to advertise with Google, the online traffic that goes back to Amazon means it is likely to benefit because people will click on ads on its website. Amazon had not responded to CNBC’s request for comment at the time of publication.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, 100, ads, increase, spend, advertisers, day, sales, asked, told, prime, products, advertising


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho


The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho
McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


McDonald's and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids' meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire.

McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly.

McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases.

“We like to go to eat at Burger King and McDonald’s, but children only play with the plastic toys they give us for a few minutes before they get thrown away and harm animals and pollute the sea,” wrote Ella and Caitlin Wood on a Change.org petition page, which has more than 335,000 signatures.

The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at school and recycle at home. “But we want to do more, which is why we started this petition. It’s not enough to make recyclable plastic toys — big, rich companies shouldn’t be making toys out of plastic at all,” they wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post