Five US Marines missing after aircraft crash into sea off Japan

Five U.S. Marines were missing after two Marine Corps aircraft collided in mid-air and crashed into the sea off the coast of Japan on Thursday, in what U.S. officials said may have been a refueling exercise gone wrong. A series of emergency landings and parts falling from U.S. military aircraft have highlighted safety concerns. The Marine Corps said in a statement the incident occurred around 2 a.m. local time in Japan (1700 GMT Wednesday) about 200 miles off the Japanese coast. The two aircraft


Five U.S. Marines were missing after two Marine Corps aircraft collided in mid-air and crashed into the sea off the coast of Japan on Thursday, in what U.S. officials said may have been a refueling exercise gone wrong. A series of emergency landings and parts falling from U.S. military aircraft have highlighted safety concerns. The Marine Corps said in a statement the incident occurred around 2 a.m. local time in Japan (1700 GMT Wednesday) about 200 miles off the Japanese coast. The two aircraft
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: chung sung-jun, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marine, condition, incident, crash, marines, sea, military, japan, aircraft, ministry, corps, japanese, missing, occurred


Five US Marines missing after aircraft crash into sea off Japan

Five U.S. Marines were missing after two Marine Corps aircraft collided in mid-air and crashed into the sea off the coast of Japan on Thursday, in what U.S. officials said may have been a refueling exercise gone wrong.

Japan’s defense ministry said its maritime forces had so far found two of the seven Marines who were aboard the aircraft — an F/A-18 Hornet fighter jet and KC-130 Hercules — at the time of the incident.

One was in a stable condition at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, while the second had been found about 10 hours after the collision and brought aboard a Japanese military vessel, the ministry said. No other details about the second Marine were known, a ministry spokesman said.

Search and rescue efforts for the remaining five continued.

The incident adds to a growing list of U.S. military aviation accidents around the world in recent years, prompting hearings in Congress to address the rise.

The Military Times reported earlier this year that aviation accidents jumped nearly 40 percent from fiscal years 2013 to 2017. At least 133 service members were killed in those incidents, it said.

U.S. military accidents are a sensitive topic in Japan, particularly for residents of the southern prefecture of Okinawa, which is home to the bulk of the U.S. presence in the country. A series of emergency landings and parts falling from U.S. military aircraft have highlighted safety concerns.

“The incident is regrettable, but our focus at the moment is on search and rescue,” Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya told a news conference. “Japan will respond appropriately once the details of the incident are uncovered.”

The Marine Corps said in a statement the incident occurred around 2 a.m. local time in Japan (1700 GMT Wednesday) about 200 miles off the Japanese coast.

The two aircraft had launched from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni and were conducting regular training when there was a “mishap,” the Marine Corps said.

The Marine Corps did not elaborate on the nature of the incident. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said it occurred during a refueling exercise.

Officials who spoke to Reuters on condition of anonymity were unsure precisely how the mishap occurred but none suspected foul play. An investigation has begun.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-06  Authors: chung sung-jun, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marine, condition, incident, crash, marines, sea, military, japan, aircraft, ministry, corps, japanese, missing, occurred


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This basic rule from the Marines is the secret to leading a successful business

The U.S. Marines have a rule: “Officers eat last.” It’s a fundamental philosophy of Marine Corps leadership that officers wait to eat until all Marines beneath them in rank have gotten their food. The rule creates a sense of unity and instills loyalty, and it’s an attitude that business leaders should use too, says war reporter and author Sebastian Junger. Junger is an award-winning journalist, author and documentary filmmaker known for works such as the novels “The Perfect Storm” and “Tribe,” a


The U.S. Marines have a rule: “Officers eat last.” It’s a fundamental philosophy of Marine Corps leadership that officers wait to eat until all Marines beneath them in rank have gotten their food. The rule creates a sense of unity and instills loyalty, and it’s an attitude that business leaders should use too, says war reporter and author Sebastian Junger. Junger is an award-winning journalist, author and documentary filmmaker known for works such as the novels “The Perfect Storm” and “Tribe,” a
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-28  Authors: mary stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, secret, leading, marines, basic, war, officers, rule, eat, author, unity, successful, works, documentary, wait


This basic rule from the Marines is the secret to leading a successful business

The U.S. Marines have a rule: “Officers eat last.” It’s a fundamental philosophy of Marine Corps leadership that officers wait to eat until all Marines beneath them in rank have gotten their food. The rule creates a sense of unity and instills loyalty, and it’s an attitude that business leaders should use too, says war reporter and author Sebastian Junger.

Junger is an award-winning journalist, author and documentary filmmaker known for works such as the novels “The Perfect Storm” and “Tribe,” and the feature-length documentary “Restrepo.” He is a contributor to a PBS film premiering Memorial Day called “Going to War,” which is about the human experience of preparing for war, fighting and coming home.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-28  Authors: mary stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, secret, leading, marines, basic, war, officers, rule, eat, author, unity, successful, works, documentary, wait


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Japan activates first marines since WW2 to bolster defenses against China

Japan on Saturday activated its first marine unit since World War Two trained to counter invaders occupying Japanese islands along the edge of the East China Sea that Tokyo fears are vulnerable to attack by China. “Given the increasingly difficult defense and security situation surrounding Japan, defense of our islands has become a critical mandate,” Tomohiro Yamamoto, vice defense minister, said in a speech. China, which dominates the South China Sea, is outpacing Japan in defense spending. “If


Japan on Saturday activated its first marine unit since World War Two trained to counter invaders occupying Japanese islands along the edge of the East China Sea that Tokyo fears are vulnerable to attack by China. “Given the increasingly difficult defense and security situation surrounding Japan, defense of our islands has become a critical mandate,” Tomohiro Yamamoto, vice defense minister, said in a speech. China, which dominates the South China Sea, is outpacing Japan in defense spending. “If
Japan activates first marines since WW2 to bolster defenses against China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-07  Authors: richard atrero de guzman, nurphoto via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, japan, defenses, bolster, activates, sea, marines, troops, force, ships, china, amphibious, marine, islands, ww2


Japan activates first marines since WW2 to bolster defenses against China

Japan on Saturday activated its first marine unit since World War Two trained to counter invaders occupying Japanese islands along the edge of the East China Sea that Tokyo fears are vulnerable to attack by China.

In a ceremony held at a military base near Sasebo on the southwest island of Kyushu, about 1,500 members of the Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade (ARDB) wearing camouflage lined up outside amid cold, windy weather.

“Given the increasingly difficult defense and security situation surrounding Japan, defense of our islands has become a critical mandate,” Tomohiro Yamamoto, vice defense minister, said in a speech.

The troops conducted a 20-minute mock public exercise recapturing a remote island from invaders.

The formation of the Japanese marine brigade is controversial because amphibious units can project military force and could, critics warn, be used to threaten Japan’s neighbors. In its post World War Two constitution Japan renounced the right to wage war.

The brigade is the latest component of a growing marine force that includes helicopter carriers, amphibious ships, Osprey tilt-rotor troop carriers and amphibious assault vehicles, meant to deter China as it pushes for easier access to the Western Pacific.

China, which dominates the South China Sea, is outpacing Japan in defense spending. In 2018, Beijing which claims a group of uninhabited islets in the East China Sea controlled by Tokyo, will spend 1.11 trillion yuan ($176.56 billion) on its armed forces, more than three times as much as Japan.

The activation of the 2,100 strong ARDB takes Japan a step closer to creating a force similar to a U.S. Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) able to plan and execute operations at sea far from its home base.

“They’ve already demonstrated the ability to put together an ad hoc MEU. But to have a solid, standing MEU capability requires concerted effort,” Grant Newsham, a research fellow at the Japan Forum for Strategic Studies.

“If Japan put its mind to it, within a year or year and a half it could have a reasonable capability.”

Newsham, who helped train Japan’s first amphibious troops as a U.S. Marine Corps colonel liaison officer assigned to the Ground Self Defense Force (GSDF), said Japan still needs a joint navy-army amphibious headquarters to coordinate operations as well as more amphibious ships to carry troops and equipment.

Japanese military planners are already mulling some of those additions. Its Air Self Defense Force (ASDF) wants to acquire F-35Bs to operate from its Izumo and Ise helicopter carriers, or from islands along the East China Sea, sources have told Reuters.

The United States last month deployed its F-35Bs for their first at-sea operations aboard the USS Wasp amphibious assault ship, which is based in Sasebo. The Kyushu port is also home to Japan’s Ise and close to the ARDB’s base.

Separately the GSDF may acquire small amphibious ships up to a 100 meters (328.08 ft) long to transport troops and equipment between islands and from ship to shore, two sources familiar with the discussion said. Japanese ground forces have not operated their own ships since World War Two.

“The idea is to bring forces and gear on large ships to the main Okinawa island and then disperse them to other islands on smaller vessels,” said one of the sources, who asked not to be identified because they are not authorized to talk to the media.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-07  Authors: richard atrero de guzman, nurphoto via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, japan, defenses, bolster, activates, sea, marines, troops, force, ships, china, amphibious, marine, islands, ww2


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Record number of US Marines to train in Australia in symbolic challenge to China

The United States will deploy a record number of Marines to train in Australia, the Australian defence minister said on Friday, as Washington seeks to counter what it describes as Chinese aggression in the region. China claims most of the South China Sea, an important trade route that is also believed to contain large quantities of oil and natural gas, and has been building artificial islands on reefs, some with ports and air strips. In a move likely to irk Beijing, the U.S. Marines will train w


The United States will deploy a record number of Marines to train in Australia, the Australian defence minister said on Friday, as Washington seeks to counter what it describes as Chinese aggression in the region. China claims most of the South China Sea, an important trade route that is also believed to contain large quantities of oil and natural gas, and has been building artificial islands on reefs, some with ports and air strips. In a move likely to irk Beijing, the U.S. Marines will train w
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-22  Authors: cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, record, train, challenge, symbolic, australia, australian, counter, south, marines, minister, claims, united, number, china, security


Record number of US Marines to train in Australia in symbolic challenge to China

The United States will deploy a record number of Marines to train in Australia, the Australian defence minister said on Friday, as Washington seeks to counter what it describes as Chinese aggression in the region.

Payne said 1,587 U.S. Marines will spend six months training in Australia’s remote north, an increase of nearly 27 percent on its 2017 rotation for the program known as the Force Posture Initiatives.

“The U.S. military plays a vital role in underwriting security and stability across the Indo-Pacific, and the Force Posture Initiatives will be an essential component in preserving stability and security over the coming decades,” Defence Minister Marise Payne said in a statement.

The deployment, first introduced in 2011 as part of a U.S. “pivot” to Asia, has emerged as a key indicator of Washington’s commitment to the region under U.S. President Donald Trump and his willingness to counter Chinese influence in a region where tensions have spiked amid disputes over the South China Sea.

China claims most of the South China Sea, an important trade route that is also believed to contain large quantities of oil and natural gas, and has been building artificial islands on reefs, some with ports and air strips.

In a move likely to irk Beijing, the U.S. Marines will train with personnel from Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, several nations that also have claims in the South China Sea.

“China will monitor whatever the U.S. does and it would prefer that the United States not work with the Asian countries included in these exercises,” said Euan Graham, director of the international security program at Australian think tank the Lowy Institute.

“Beijing would like to deal one-on-one with Southeast Asia nations that have counter claims,” he said.

The military deployment also threatens to further weaken Australia-Chinese relations. Australia, a staunch U.S. ally with no claim to the South China Sea, has long maintained its neutrality in the dispute to protect its economic relationship with China.

But bilateral relations have soured in recent months after Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said China was improperly interfering in Canberra’s affairs, an accusation that triggered a rare protest from Beijing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-22  Authors: cheriss may, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, record, train, challenge, symbolic, australia, australian, counter, south, marines, minister, claims, united, number, china, security


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BMW opens job training school for US Marines at Camp Pendleton

BMW is opening a job training institute in California for U.S. Marines transitioning into civilian life. The automaker is partnering with for-profit vocational school Universal Technical Institute to open a training workshop at Camp Pendleton, a Marine Corps base near San Diego. Marines will bring “invaluable” skills to BMW, as many of them already have some kind of technical training or expertise, said BMW North America CEO Bernard Kuhnt in a statement. Once they graduate, BMW will help them fi


BMW is opening a job training institute in California for U.S. Marines transitioning into civilian life. The automaker is partnering with for-profit vocational school Universal Technical Institute to open a training workshop at Camp Pendleton, a Marine Corps base near San Diego. Marines will bring “invaluable” skills to BMW, as many of them already have some kind of technical training or expertise, said BMW North America CEO Bernard Kuhnt in a statement. Once they graduate, BMW will help them fi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-02-16  Authors: robert ferris, source
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BMW opens job training school for US Marines at Camp Pendleton

BMW is opening a job training institute in California for U.S. Marines transitioning into civilian life.

The automaker is partnering with for-profit vocational school Universal Technical Institute to open a training workshop at Camp Pendleton, a Marine Corps base near San Diego. It is the first time a premium automotive brand has opened an institute like this on a military base in the U.S., BMW said Friday.

Marines will bring “invaluable” skills to BMW, as many of them already have some kind of technical training or expertise, said BMW North America CEO Bernard Kuhnt in a statement.

A pilot group of nine students will start a 16-week training program on Feb. 26. Once they graduate, BMW will help them find jobs at American BMW dealerships. The company already employs more than 14,000 BMW technicians in the U.S., but more are needed, especially those who BMW trains.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-02-16  Authors: robert ferris, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technical, pendleton, opens, job, training, camp, bmw, base, marines, institute, trains, universal, vocational, transitioning, school, workshop


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Pentagon chief Jim Mattis reveals himself in storytelling moments with the troops

On a summer morning in a desolate corner of Iraq’s western desert, Jim Mattis learned he’d narrowly evaded an assassination attempt. “General,” the man asked Mattis, “if I am a model prisoner do you think someday I could emigrate to America?” Mattis, now the Pentagon boss and perhaps the most admired member of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, is a storyteller. Mattis used stories to emphasize that today’s uncertain world means every military member needs to be ready to fight at a moment’s notic


On a summer morning in a desolate corner of Iraq’s western desert, Jim Mattis learned he’d narrowly evaded an assassination attempt. “General,” the man asked Mattis, “if I am a model prisoner do you think someday I could emigrate to America?” Mattis, now the Pentagon boss and perhaps the most admired member of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, is a storyteller. Mattis used stories to emphasize that today’s uncertain world means every military member needs to be ready to fight at a moment’s notic
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-09  Authors: thomas watkins, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, moments, political, work, week, recalled, mattis, marines, reveals, military, needs, man, storytelling, chief, pentagon, jim, troops


Pentagon chief Jim Mattis reveals himself in storytelling moments with the troops

On a summer morning in a desolate corner of Iraq’s western desert, Jim Mattis learned he’d narrowly evaded an assassination attempt.

A Sunni Arab man had been caught planting a bomb on a road shortly before Mattis and his small team of Marines passed by. Told the captured insurgent spoke English, Mattis decided to talk to him.

After Mattis offered a cigarette and coffee, the man said he tried to kill the general and his fellow Marines because he resented the foreigner soldiers in his land. Mattis said he understood the sentiment but assured the insurgent he was headed for Abu Ghraib, the infamous U.S.-run prison. What happened next explains the point of the story.

“General,” the man asked Mattis, “if I am a model prisoner do you think someday I could emigrate to America?”

In Mattis’ telling, this insurgent’s question showed he felt “the power of America’s inspiration.” It was a reminder of the value of national unity.

Mattis, now the Pentagon boss and perhaps the most admired member of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, is a storyteller. And at no time do the tales flow more easily than when he’s among the breed he identifies with most closely — the men and women of the military.

The anecdote about the Iraqi insurgent, and other stories he recounted during a series of troop visits shortly before Christmas, are told with purpose.

“I bring this up to you, my fine young sailors, because I want you to remember that on our worst day we’re still the best going, and we’re counting on you to take us to the next level,” he said. “We’ve never been satisfied with where America’s at. We’re always prone to looking at the bad things, the things that aren’t working right. That’s good. It’s healthy, so long as we then roll up our sleeves and work together, together, together, to make it better.”

The stories tend to be snippets of Mattis’ personal history, including moments he believes illustrate the deeper meaning of military service.

On a trip last month to the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and three domestic military installations, Mattis revealed himself in ways rarely seen in Washington, where he has studiously maintained a low public profile. With no news media in attendance except one Associated Press reporter, Mattis made clear during his troop visits that he had not come to lecture or to trade on his status as a retired four-star general.

“Let’s just shoot the breeze for a few minutes,” he said at one point.

Another time he opened with: “My name is Mattis, and I work at the Department of Defense.”

Mattis used stories to emphasize that today’s uncertain world means every military member needs to be ready to fight at a moment’s notice.

He recalled the words of a Marine sergeant major when Mattis was just two years into his career:

“Every week in the fleet Marine force is your last week of peace,” the sergeant major said. “If you don’t go into every week thinking like this, you’re going to have a sick feeling in the bottom of your stomach when your NCOs (non-commissioned officers) knock on your door and say, ‘Get up. Get your gear on. We’re leaving.'”

By leaving, Mattis meant departing for war.

A recurring Mattis theme is that the military operates in a fundamentally unpredictable world. He recalled how he was hiking with his Marines in the Sierra Nevadas in August 1990 when he got word to report with his men to the nearest civilian airport. Iraq’s Saddam Hussein had just invaded Kuwait, and the Marines were needed to hold the line in Saudi Arabia.

In an exchange with Marines at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Mattis recalled sitting in the back of a room at the Pentagon in June 2001 while senior political appointees of the new George W. Bush administration fired questions at a military briefer about where they should expect to see the most worrisome security threats. At one point, Mattis said, the briefer said confidently that amid all the uncertainty, the one place the U.S. definitely would not be fighting was Afghanistan.

“Five and a half months later, I was shivering in Afghanistan,” Mattis said, referring to his role as commander of Task Force 58, a special group that landed in southern Afghanistan aboard helicopters flown from Navy ships in the Arabian Sea to attack the Taliban in and around Kandahar.

Regardless how much they resonate with his young audience, Mattis’ stories illustrate how he sees his military experience as a way to connect with troops who often feel distant from their political leaders. They also are a reminder Mattis’ boss is one of the most politically divisive figures in recent history.

Speaking to troops and family members at an outdoor movie theater at Guantanamo, Mattis pointed directly to the political battles.

“I’m so happy to be in Guantanamo that I could cry right now, to be out of Washington,” he said, adding jokingly that he wouldn’t mind spending the rest of his tenure away from the capital. He said as soon as he gets back in the company of uniformed troops, he is reminded of why the military can set a standard for civility.

“Our country needs you,” he said, and not just because of the military’s firepower. “It’s also the example you set for the country at a time it needs good role models; it needs to look at an organization that doesn’t care what gender you are, it doesn’t care what religion you are, it doesn’t care what ethnic group you are. It’s an organization that can work together.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-01-09  Authors: thomas watkins, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, moments, political, work, week, recalled, mattis, marines, reveals, military, needs, man, storytelling, chief, pentagon, jim, troops


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U.S. Marines conducting search and rescue operation after aviation ‘mishap’ off Australia

The U.S. Marine Corps said on Saturday an active search and rescue operation was underway for servicemembers involved in an aviation “mishap” off the east coast of Australia. The incident involved an MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, the III Marine Expeditionary Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said on its Twitter account. “Ship’s small boats and aircraft from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group are conducting the search and rescue operations,” the tw


The U.S. Marine Corps said on Saturday an active search and rescue operation was underway for servicemembers involved in an aviation “mishap” off the east coast of Australia. The incident involved an MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, the III Marine Expeditionary Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said on its Twitter account. “Ship’s small boats and aircraft from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group are conducting the search and rescue operations,” the tw
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-05  Authors: getty images
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U.S. Marines conducting search and rescue operation after aviation 'mishap' off Australia

The U.S. Marine Corps said on Saturday an active search and rescue operation was underway for servicemembers involved in an aviation “mishap” off the east coast of Australia.

The incident involved an MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, the III Marine Expeditionary Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said on its Twitter account.

“Ship’s small boats and aircraft from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group are conducting the search and rescue operations,” the tweet said. “We will provide more details as they become available.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-05  Authors: getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, mishap, aviation, unit, operation, underway, conducting, expeditionary, australia, marines, aircraft, twitter, search, involved, tiltrotor, marine, rescue


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