Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook’s focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it’s changed how people use the site

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California. Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own. Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker. Photo courtesy of Dino SkrijeljBrands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans. Members of the Facebook grou


Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California.
Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own.
Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker.
Photo courtesy of Dino SkrijeljBrands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans.
Members of the Facebook grou
Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook’s focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it’s changed how people use the site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, group, company, social, changed, site, soundboks, tickets, zuckerberg, facebooks, 2016, groups, mark, election, users, shifted, focus, meaningful, facebook


Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook's focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it's changed how people use the site

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California. Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Dennis Neymit, a 25-year-old San Francisco chemical engineer, had been trying to sell his tickets to an electro pop concert for a few days with no luck, so finally he decided to give them away. “Giving away my 2 tix to TENDER at GAMH tonight!” Neymit posted in a private Facebook group called Clever Girls, where more than 11,600 Bay Area music fans share songs, news, raptor memes and concert tickets with each other. “I can’t make it anymore but hope two of y’all can enjoy their beatz and emotionz,” Neymit posted, along with screenshots of his tickets and their QR codes. The tickets were soon claimed. “It made me feel better just knowing that someone else had a good time,” Neymit said Neymit’s use of Facebook reflects a shift in how many people are now experiencing the social network. Whereas years ago people’s News Feeds were littered with auto-playing videos, news articles both real and fake, and nonsensical gibberish from their racist uncles or high school acquaintances, Facebook is now placing more emphasis on content from groups that users join.

“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows. Courtesy of Ari the Raptor

Since 2017, Facebook has dealt with the fallout from Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the Cambridge Analytica scandal in 2018 and the launch of four separate antitrust-focused investigations into the company in 2019. Yet despite those obstacles and significant negative press coverage, Facebook usage has continued to grow, climbing from 1.86 billion monthly users in February 2017 to 2.5 billion monthly users in December. Although Facebook does not share detailed statistics about how users are spending time on the site, groups give people a new reason to check the site regularly. In April 2019, Facebook said that there were more than 400 million people in groups that they find meaningful. (The company determines “meaningful” through surveys and by seeing how they engage in those groups, such as whether they have friends there and how much they interact with people in them.) “The growth in focus on groups is strategic and well designed,” said Daniel Newman, principal analyst at Futurum Research, which focuses on digital technology. “It’s keeping users on the site longer and providing rich, harvestable data for Facebook and its advertisers.” Users seem to love it as well. “Facebook groups are a great way for people to customize their social media experience by connecting with other people with similar interests and needs,” said Hugo Cesar, who is an admin of “Bay Area Conscious Community Housing Board” a group that is used by more than 71,600 users to find housing in the San Francisco Bay Area.

‘Meaningful communities’

Facebook began shift its emphasis away from the News Feed and toward groups following the 2016 U.S. presidential election. At the time, the company was under fire for not doing more to prevent the spread of fake news and misinformation. As part of its response, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg published a 6,000-word note in February 2017 outlining how the social network would improve by focusing on supporting and creating safe communities. Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own. “There is a real opportunity to connect more of us with groups that will be meaningful social infrastructure in our lives,” Zuckerberg wrote at the time. “If we can improve our suggestions and help connect one billion people with meaningful communities, that can strengthen our social fabric.” Since then, Facebook has made strides to emphasize groups, showing content from them more often in users’ timelines and using marketing to promote groups, including paying an estimated $10 million to run a 60-second commercial during Super Bowl LIV. “Whatever you rock, there’s a Facebook Group for you,” the company said in the ad, which showcased numerous groups, including a rock climbing group and another focused on rock collecting. There’s no limit to the focus of these groups. There are groups dedicated to helping people find housing, others focused on niche interests like craft beer, groups that serve specific communities like army veterans, and groups focused on women in the trucking industry. “It is the new, modern-day AOL Chatroom organized by topics and interests,” said Crystal Aminzadeh, an admin of the group “Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley & Tanya Rad” which is for fans of the podcast of the same name. The group counts more than 27,000 members. “It brings together people from all walks of life who may have just that one interest in common. In this case they share a common love for this podcast,” Aminzadeh said.

Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker. Photo courtesy of Dino Skrijelj

Brands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans. For example, Soundboks is a Danish company that makes a popular Bluetooth speaker. The company uses multiple Facebook groups to post announcements while fans use it to discuss different ways to accessorize the speakers, post videos of their Soundboks in action or compare the Soundboks to other speakers. Since Soundboks is still a young company, it also relies on people in its groups to showcase the company’s speakers to potential customers. “It really drives a lot people to purchase when they see this active community,” said Collin Burdette, Soundboks direct community support coordinator. “Seeing negative things, seeing positive things — we’re not trying to censor that.”

So much depends on admins

Running these groups is no easy task. Group admins and moderators who spoke with CNBC said their efforts can easily take up 8 hours or more of their week. These users pore through red notifications on their Facebook tabs from users who have requested approval to join the groups or reports from group members who have flagged content as spam, harassment or simply off topic and breaking group rules, among other things. Facebook has given these users more tools to better run their groups. For example, admins of private groups can set up membership approval forms, requiring applicants to answer a few simple questions that can be used to filter out any bots or unwanted users. “Before I was an admin, there used to be a lot of bots and trolls,” Aminzadeh said. “I added the questions for members who requested to join and they’d have to answer them. The questions were specific to the podcast so listeners would only be able to answer.”

Members of the Facebook group “Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley & Tanya Rad” at a meet-up in Los Angeles at the People’s Choice Awards in October 2019. Photo courtesy of Crystal Aminzadeh


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, group, company, social, changed, site, soundboks, tickets, zuckerberg, facebooks, 2016, groups, mark, election, users, shifted, focus, meaningful, facebook


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content

MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content. “To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum. The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day. While in Europe, Zuckerberg is


MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content.
“To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum.
The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day.
While in Europe, Zuckerberg is
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, going, online, ceo, social, users, term, tech, security, mark, munich, facebook, content, regulation, calls


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content

MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content.

“Even if I’m not going to agree with every regulation in the near term, I do think it’s going to be the thing that helps creates trust and better governance of the internet and will benefit everyone, including us over the long term,” Zuckerberg told an audience at the Munich Security Conference.

“In the absence of that kind of regulation, we will continue doing our best, we are going to build up the muscle to do it, to basically find stuff as proactively as possible,” he said, adding that he did not want Facebook to contribute to polarization or misinformation.

“To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum.

Facebook has dealt with a number of headaches over the past few years. The company had to overcome the fallout from Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, 2018’s Cambridge Analytica scandal and the launch of four separate antitrust-focused investigations in the U.S. into the company in 2019.

The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day. The social media giant has previously said that the number of users continues to grow, claiming 2.9 billion monthly users across its family of apps.

While in Europe, Zuckerberg is expected to take meetings with European politicians in Munich and Brussels to discuss data practices, regulation and tax reform.

“My goal for this next decade isn’t to be liked, but to be understood,” Zuckerberg said on the company’s earnings call in January.

Zuckerberg also spoke at the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit 2020 in Salt Lake City, Utah, earlier this month, saying that he expects the company’s new honesty-first approach is “going to piss off a lot of people.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, going, online, ceo, social, users, term, tech, security, mark, munich, facebook, content, regulation, calls


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mark Cuban auditioned for the 1996 drama ‘Twister’ but lost out to Philip Seymour Hoffman

After years of failed endeavors and experiencing setback after setback, Mark Cuban sold his first company, MicroSolutions, for $6 million in 1990. He even tried to get on the big screen: “I auditioned for the movie ‘Twister’ and got a callback.” Cuban, who was trying out to be the character Dusty, an enthusiastic storm chaser, ended up getting a second callback for the 1996 drama. Hoffman, who would go on to be nominated for four Academy Awards throughout his career, was “mis-cast,” Cuban joked.


After years of failed endeavors and experiencing setback after setback, Mark Cuban sold his first company, MicroSolutions, for $6 million in 1990.
He even tried to get on the big screen: “I auditioned for the movie ‘Twister’ and got a callback.”
Cuban, who was trying out to be the character Dusty, an enthusiastic storm chaser, ended up getting a second callback for the 1996 drama.
Hoffman, who would go on to be nominated for four Academy Awards throughout his career, was “mis-cast,” Cuban joked.
Mark Cuban auditioned for the 1996 drama ‘Twister’ but lost out to Philip Seymour Hoffman Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, setback, decided, 1996, philip, career, drama, company, mark, lost, cuban, youtube, hoffman, started, seymour, twister, stop, auditioned, sold


Mark Cuban auditioned for the 1996 drama 'Twister' but lost out to Philip Seymour Hoffman

After years of failed endeavors and experiencing setback after setback, Mark Cuban sold his first company, MicroSolutions, for $6 million in 1990. He was 32.

That’s when the newly minted millionaire decided to switch things up. “I started trading technology stocks — I did so well I turned that into a hedge fund and almost immediately sold that,” he said on an episode of GQ’s YouTube series “Actually Me,” in which he went undercover on the internet and responded to real comments from Twitter, Reddit, Quora and YouTube.

Cuban moved to Los Angeles “to live on the beach and just be retired.”

In LA, he signed up for acting classes as a way to meet people but decided to put his new skills to test and started auditioning for commercials. “I had to put the Taco Bell hat on and just act stupid,” he recalled. “I did some Ford commercials.”

He even tried to get on the big screen: “I auditioned for the movie ‘Twister’ and got a callback.”

Cuban, who was trying out to be the character Dusty, an enthusiastic storm chaser, ended up getting a second callback for the 1996 drama. But the casting team eventually selected the late Philip Seymour Hoffman for the role.

Hoffman, who would go on to be nominated for four Academy Awards throughout his career, was “mis-cast,” Cuban joked. “I was right for the role.”

Cuban’s acting stint didn’t last long. A few years after the 1996 audition, he co-founded a company called Audionet, which became Broadcast.com. During the dotcom boom, it grew to over 300 employees and in 1999 was acquired by Yahoo for $5.7 billion, making Cuban a billionaire at age 40.

Cuban, who now stars on “Shark Tank” and owns the Dallas Mavericks, never made it in Hollywood, but he wouldn’t change anything about his career path.

“Never stop learning. Never stop grinding,” he advises young people just starting out their careers. “Never stop loving every single minute of your life.”

Don’t miss: Mark Cuban shares his first jobs, from selling garbage bags to working at a deli

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, setback, decided, 1996, philip, career, drama, company, mark, lost, cuban, youtube, hoffman, started, seymour, twister, stop, auditioned, sold


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mark Cuban: Here’s what you give a billionaire on Valentine’s Day

What do you gift a billionaire who has it all for Valentine’s Day? That’s what one Twitter user recently asked Dallas Mavericks owner and “Shark Tank” star Mark Cuban. A little kindness, I think that’s what I want for Valentine’s Day.” Nice sells,” Cuban told Vanity Fair in a 2018 interview with the “Shark Tank” cast. “Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse.


What do you gift a billionaire who has it all for Valentine’s Day?
That’s what one Twitter user recently asked Dallas Mavericks owner and “Shark Tank” star Mark Cuban.
A little kindness, I think that’s what I want for Valentine’s Day.”
Nice sells,” Cuban told Vanity Fair in a 2018 interview with the “Shark Tank” cast.
“Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse.
Mark Cuban: Here’s what you give a billionaire on Valentine’s Day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, valentines, kindness, bam, cuban, nice, tank, shark, company, billionaire, heres, responded, mark, twitter


Mark Cuban: Here's what you give a billionaire on Valentine's Day

What do you gift a billionaire who has it all for Valentine’s Day?

That’s what one Twitter user recently asked Dallas Mavericks owner and “Shark Tank” star Mark Cuban. They got an answer when Cuban went undercover on the internet and responded to real comments from Twitter, Reddit, Quora and more for an episode of GQ’s “Actually Me.”

“Definitely not chocolates,” responded the self-made billionaire.

He doesn’t want anything material. Instead, “a nice hello goes a long way. A little kindness, I think that’s what I want for Valentine’s Day.”

He truly believes kindness will pay off. “One of the most underrated skills in business right now is being nice. Nice sells,” Cuban told Vanity Fair in a 2018 interview with the “Shark Tank” cast.

It’s a lesson the 61-year-old has learned firsthand over his lengthy career. “I wouldn’t have wanted to do business with me when I was in my 20s,” admitted Cuban, who started his first company, MicroSolutions, after being fired from a computer software company in his 20s. “Early on in my career, I was like bam, bam, bam, bam, bam — I might curse. I might get mad.

“And so I had to change, and I did, and it really paid off.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, day, valentines, kindness, bam, cuban, nice, tank, shark, company, billionaire, heres, responded, mark, twitter


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: ‘You only gotta be right once’

Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures. “It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4. Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed. While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys. “It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book.


Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures.
“It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4.
Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed.
While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys.
“It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book.
3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: ‘You only gotta be right once’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, book, wrote, sport, right, failed, fired, business, billionaire, cuban, times, selling, start, job, gotta, win, mark


3 times Mark Cuban failed before becoming a billionaire: 'You only gotta be right once'

Before Mark Cuban became a billionaire in 1999, he experienced a string of failures. But if you ask him, past mistakes don’t matter.

“It doesn’t matter how many times you f— up,” Cuban said on Barstool Sports’ “Pardon My Take” podcast on Feb. 4. “You only gotta be right once. Then everybody tells you how lucky you are.”

Cuban said people only focus on his big successes: first selling start-up MicroSolutions in 1990 to CompuServe for $6 million, and nine years later selling Broadcast.com to Yahoo for $5.7 billion in stock. They never talk about the hiccups that came first.

Cuban’s first fail happened while he was still in college.

“I started a bar, Motley’s Pub, when I wasn’t even of legal drinking age the summer before my senior year at Indiana University,” he wrote in his book “How to Win at the Sport of Business: If I Can Do It, You Can Do It.”

The campus bar was cited for having underage patrons and was shut down, according to the Dallas Morning News.

“No one really asks me how it turned out. It was great until we got busted for letting a 16-year-old win a wet T-shirt contest. (I swear I checked her ID, and it was good!),” he wrote in “How to Win at the Sport of Business.”

After graduating from Indiana University in 1981, Cuban had “quit or been fired from three straight jobs,” he said on an episode of ABC’s “Shark Tank.”

At 22, Cuban moved back to his hometown, Pittsburgh, got a job at Mellon Bank and ultimately quit because he didn’t like the CEO, he wrote in a piece for Forbes in 2013. He also worked for a TV repair franchise Tronics 2000, but that job didn’t work out either.

Then Cuban moved to Texas and tried to start a business selling powdered milk, which failed. After, Cuban landed a sales gig at computer company Your Business Software, but got fired for closing a deal without approval from the CEO (another fail). But getting fired led him to start his own computer systems company, MicroSolutions.

While living in Dallas, Cuban slept on the floor of a three-bedroom apartment where he lived with six other guys. He often came home to the lights turned off and he had his credit cards cut as he struggled to make ends meet, he said during an Oxford Union Q&A in 2017.

“No one really asks me about my adventures working for Mellon Bank, or Tronics 2000, or trying to start a business selling powdered milk (it was cheaper by the gallon, and I thought it tasted good enough),” he wrote in his book “How to Win at the Sport of Business.”

“They don’t ask me about getting fired from my job at Your Business Software for wanting to close a sale rather than open up the store. No one ever asks me about what it was like when I started MicroSolutions or how I used to count the months I was in business, hoping to outlast my previous endeavors and make this one a success.”

But according to Cuban, all that matters is one success.

“It doesn’t matter how many times you strike out,” he wrote in his book. “To be a success, you only have to be right once. One single time and you are set for life.”

Today, Cuban is worth $4.1 billion, according to Forbes.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-11  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, book, wrote, sport, right, failed, fired, business, billionaire, cuban, times, selling, start, job, gotta, win, mark


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackers

Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackersEquifax CEO Mark Begor joins “Closing Bell” for an exclusive interview on the indictment of Chinese military hackers.


Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackersEquifax CEO Mark Begor joins “Closing Bell” for an exclusive interview on the indictment of Chinese military hackers.
Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, joins, begor, equifax, interview, indictment, ceo, hackersequifax, mark, hackers, chinese


Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackers

Equifax CEO Mark Begor on Chinese hackers

Equifax CEO Mark Begor joins “Closing Bell” for an exclusive interview on the indictment of Chinese military hackers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, joins, begor, equifax, interview, indictment, ceo, hackersequifax, mark, hackers, chinese


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

From Jeff Bezos to Mark Cuban: What some of the world’s richest billionaires studied in college

Among the world’s top 10 richest people, half studied engineering or computer science. Sara BlakelyNet worth: $1.1 billionWhat she studied: legal communications Spanx founder and CEO Sara Blakely studied legal communications at Florida State University. Ray DalioNet worth: $18.7 billionWhat he studied: accounting Before founding Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, Dalio attended Long Island University and studied accounting. He then received his master’s in business administr


Among the world’s top 10 richest people, half studied engineering or computer science.
Sara BlakelyNet worth: $1.1 billionWhat she studied: legal communications Spanx founder and CEO Sara Blakely studied legal communications at Florida State University.
Ray DalioNet worth: $18.7 billionWhat he studied: accounting Before founding Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, Dalio attended Long Island University and studied accounting.
He then received his master’s in business administr
From Jeff Bezos to Mark Cuban: What some of the world’s richest billionaires studied in college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, cuban, degree, jeff, business, richest, school, studied, billionaires, worth, computer, science, billionwhat, worlds, college, university, mark


From Jeff Bezos to Mark Cuban: What some of the world's richest billionaires studied in college

Most billionaires have a college degree. And in the U.S., the technology is industry is “a major wealth” engine and one of the top industries to produce billionaires, according to the Wealth-X’s 2019 Billionaire Census report. So if you aspire to be a billionaire one day, does it matter what you study in college? Maybe so. Among the world’s top 10 richest people, half studied engineering or computer science. But some billionaires did study other things. Here’s what some of America’s most famous billionaires studied in school.

Jeff Bezos

Net worth: $125.8 billion

What he studied: electrical engineering and computer science Before he became CEO of Amazon (and the world’s richest person), Bezos graduated from Princeton University in 1986 with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science, after changing his major from physics. Had Amazon not worked out, Bezos would have put his degree to good use: “I would be an extremely happy software programmer somewhere,” he said at a fireside chat in India on Jan. 14. He would, however, be a lot less rich – today, the average salary for a software programmer is around $92,000 per year, according to Glassdoor.

Bill Gates

Mark Cuban

Net worth: $4.1 billion

What he studied: management and administration

Mark Cuban on ABC’s “Shark Tank” Jessica Brooks

After attending night classes at the University of Pittsburgh during his junior year of high school, Mark Cuban was able to graduate a year early, according to podcast “Your Turn with Corby Davidson,” and start his freshman year at the University of Pittsburgh at 17. After a year, Cuban transferred to Indiana University in Bloomington, because it had the cheapest tuition among the top 10 business programs at the time. Cuban graduated from its Kelley School of Business with a bachelor’s degree in management and administration. Although Cuban supports getting a college degree, “I am not a fan of getting MBAs,” he said at a Turning Point USA event in 2018. “There are so many online ways to learn and I think you can get far more experience in the workforce and learn more and be in a better position to succeed,” he said. “[T]here are so many online MBA equivalents that if you are disciplined enough, you can do it for a lot less money and still get a quality education.”

Sara Blakely

Net worth: $1.1 billion

What she studied: legal communications Spanx founder and CEO Sara Blakely studied legal communications at Florida State University. After receiving her bachelor’s degree in 1993, Blakely wanted to follow in her father’s footsteps and become a trial attorney — but things didn’t go as planned. Blakely took the LSAT exam twice but scored poorly both times, despite studying her “a– off,” according to “Getting There: A Book of Mentors.”

Warren Buffett

Net worth: $89.8 billion

What he studied: business administration and economics Warren Buffett originally enrolled at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania at age 16 and studied business, but he transferred to the University of Nebraska to finish his undergraduate degree in three years. “I didn’t want to go to college,” Buffett told Bloomberg in 2016. “After the first year [at Wharton] I wanted to quit and go into business. My dad said, ‘Well, give it one more year.’ So I went the second year, and I said ‘I still want to quit.'” Buffett graduated and has spoken highly of his time at Nebraska: ″[T]here wasn’t a class that disappointed me,” he said in a 2001 article in Nebraska Business magazine. After being rejected by Harvard Business School, Buffett attended Columbia University and received a master’s degree in economics. “If you are interested in business, or likely to be in business, an MBA is very useful,” he said in 2001.

Ray Dalio

Net worth: $18.7 billion

What he studied: accounting Before founding Bridgewater Associates, the world’s largest hedge fund, Dalio attended Long Island University and studied accounting. He then received his master’s in business administration from Harvard Business School in 1973. But his advice for college students isn’t all about what to study: “Party like crazy and don’t make the grades your highest priority,” Dalio said on Reddit in 2019. “Make the friendships and your experiences most important.”

Mark Zuckerberg

Net worth: $77.6 billion

What he studied: computer science and psychology Zuckerberg studied computer science and psychology at Harvard University before dropping out to pursue Facebook. And the CEO had an interest in computers from an early age. At around 12-years-old, Zuckerberg coded Zucknet, a messaging program for his father’s dental office, he said on the Masters of Scale podcast in 2017. As a high school student at the Phillips Exeter Academy, Zuckerberg and his friend, Adam D’Angelo, created Synapse, an MP3 player “that would keep track of every song the user played on a computer” and make targeted playlists, according to The Harvard Crimson. Huge companies, including Microsoft, wanted to buy the online MP3 player, but Zuckerberg and D’Angelo declined. The two wanted to go to college.

Oprah Winfrey


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bezos, cuban, degree, jeff, business, richest, school, studied, billionaires, worth, computer, science, billionwhat, worlds, college, university, mark


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mark Cuban had $82,000 stolen from his first company and it was ‘the best thing that ever happened to us’

The 61-year-old owns the Dallas Mavericks, stars on ABC’s “Shark Tank” and is worth an estimated $4.1 billion. So, within one day, we went from having $84,000 in the bank to having $2,000 in the bank.” Cuban went to the bank to try and get his money back, but it was gone. And then that company turned into a $30 million company that turned into another company that turned into streaming that turned into the Mavs.” In January 2000, Cuban paid $285 million for a majority stake in the Dallas Maveric


The 61-year-old owns the Dallas Mavericks, stars on ABC’s “Shark Tank” and is worth an estimated $4.1 billion.
So, within one day, we went from having $84,000 in the bank to having $2,000 in the bank.”
Cuban went to the bank to try and get his money back, but it was gone.
And then that company turned into a $30 million company that turned into another company that turned into streaming that turned into the Mavs.”
In January 2000, Cuban paid $285 million for a majority stake in the Dallas Maveric
Mark Cuban had $82,000 stolen from his first company and it was ‘the best thing that ever happened to us’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, turned, having, cuban, best, mark, happened, company, dallas, renee, mavericks, bank, 82000, went, stolen, million


Mark Cuban had $82,000 stolen from his first company and it was 'the best thing that ever happened to us'

Mark Cuban is one of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs. The 61-year-old owns the Dallas Mavericks, stars on ABC’s “Shark Tank” and is worth an estimated $4.1 billion.

His career, though, has had its fair share of lows. In his early 20s, Cuban was too broke to open a bank account and shared a $600-a-month three-bedroom apartment with five other guys. Cuban slept on either the floor or couch.

He even had $82,000 stolen from the first company he started, MicroSolutions.

“I was 24 at the time and we had $84,000 in the bank,” he recalls on an episode of the podcast “Pardon My Take.” He was young and confident: “We had it all set up. I thought I used everything I learned at Indiana Business School and I’m like, OK for our accounts payable, we print out the checks to the vendor and we just give it to Renee and Renee is going to put it into little see-through envelopes, lick ’em, mail ’em.”

Renee, his receptionist at the time, didn’t do that: According to Cuban, she forged the checks using correction fluid and a typewriter: “[She] whites it out, puts her name on it, takes it to the bank, the bank cashes it. So, within one day, we went from having $84,000 in the bank to having $2,000 in the bank.”

Cuban went to the bank to try and get his money back, but it was gone.

“It was f—– up,” he says, “but the best thing that ever happened to us because it made us get our s— together. And then that company turned into a $30 million company that turned into another company that turned into streaming that turned into the Mavs.”

Sure enough, Cuban sold MicroSolutions to CompuServe for $6 million in 1990, making him a millionaire at 32. A few years later, he co-founded a company called Audionet, which became Broadcast.com. In 1999, it was acquired by Yahoo for $5.7 billion, and Cuban became a billionaire at 40. In January 2000, Cuban paid $285 million for a majority stake in the Dallas Mavericks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thing, turned, having, cuban, best, mark, happened, company, dallas, renee, mavericks, bank, 82000, went, stolen, million


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Mark Cuban: This is how you get through your lowest point

Mark Cuban is worth $4.1 billion, according to Forbes, but it wasn’t always so clear he’d be successful. It was nasty,” Cuban said during an Oxford Union Q&A session in 2017. You have to get back to work, and you have to go after it, and you have to make the best of it,” he said during the Oxford Union Q&A. Or take the time Cuban says a receptionist at his then-fledgling first company, MicroSolutions, stole more than $82,000 from the business by forging checks — “$82,000 of the $84,000 we had wa


Mark Cuban is worth $4.1 billion, according to Forbes, but it wasn’t always so clear he’d be successful.
It was nasty,” Cuban said during an Oxford Union Q&A session in 2017.
You have to get back to work, and you have to go after it, and you have to make the best of it,” he said during the Oxford Union Q&A.
Or take the time Cuban says a receptionist at his then-fledgling first company, MicroSolutions, stole more than $82,000 from the business by forging checks — “$82,000 of the $84,000 we had wa
Mark Cuban: This is how you get through your lowest point Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, went, point, cuban, way, lowest, wrong, mark, bank, things, union, going, oxford


Mark Cuban: This is how you get through your lowest point

Mark Cuban is worth $4.1 billion, according to Forbes, but it wasn’t always so clear he’d be successful.

“Nobody had high hopes for me,” Cuban said during an episode of ABC’s “Shark Tank” in April. “But I was a hustler.”

Cuban had some challenging times.

In his 20s, he was sleeping on the floor of a three-bedroom Dallas apartment with six guys. “I had one towel that I stole from a hotel that had holes in it. It was nasty,” Cuban said during an Oxford Union Q&A session in 2017. “There were times when I came home, the lights were turned off; I had my credit cards cut, you name it.”

And there was a time he couldn’t even make the $200 minimum to get a bank account.

But Cuban always found a way to get through the hard times and low points, thanks to his attitude: “S— happens. You have to get back to work, and you have to go after it, and you have to make the best of it,” he said during the Oxford Union Q&A.

Take for example, when he struggled to get financing to buy a car.

“There was a car on the roadway that I kind of liked, and it was obviously abandoned,” Cuban said. “I hunted down the bank that had done the financing for it, and said, ‘I think I found a car that you financed. Can I have it?’ That’s how I got a car.”

Or take the time Cuban says a receptionist at his then-fledgling first company, MicroSolutions, stole more than $82,000 from the business by forging checks — “$82,000 of the $84,000 we had was gone,” Cuban said during the Oxford Union Q&A.

Cuban said he went to the bank to try and get his money back.

“The manager of the bank basically [laughed] me out of his office, telling me that I ‘didn’t have a pot to piss in.’ That I could sue him, or whatever I wanted, but I was out the money.”

Cuban remembered waking up some days, “going ‘oh my god, is this going to happen,'” questioning if he’d ever achieve success.

But he stayed motivated by being positive and remembering his strengths.

“I was just like, ‘I just have to keep on grinding,'” Cuban said during the 2017 Q&A. “And that’s always worked out for me. Even when things were the toughest, my attitude has just been enjoy your life, smile, fight your way through it, and remember what you’re good at.”

According to Cuban, he knew he was good at “tech, selling, working longer hours than everybody else,” but more importantly, “I was even better at enjoying what I was doing,” he said. “I just kept on reminding myself to enjoy.”

“For whatever reason, I never got pissed, I never got upset,” Cuban said during the Q&A. “I was just like, ‘This is it. I just gotta go. I just gotta do. I just have to keep on grinding.'”

He said he learned that despite doing everything right, like going to college and learning about business, sometimes things just go wrong anyway.

“What I learned from all that was there’s always gonna be setbacks….There’s always gonna be things you don’t anticipate,” he said during the Q&A.

“Even when you have every ‘i’ dotted and every ‘t’ crossed, something is going to go wrong. And when it does, you just have to fight through it and grind through it. Remember what it is that makes you special and what it is that makes you confident to do what you do, and do more of it.”

Cuban went on to sell MicroSystems for $6 million in 1990 to CompuServe. Five years later, he and a friend, Todd Wagner, started Broadcast.com, which was later acquired by Yahoo in 1999 for $5.7 billion in stock.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

See also:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, went, point, cuban, way, lowest, wrong, mark, bank, things, union, going, oxford


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Jeff Bezos sells $1.8 billion worth of Amazon stock as it closes above $1 trillion market cap

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos sold more than $1.8 billion of shares in his company over the past week, according to financial filings. In total, Bezos sold 905,456 shares in the company for $1.84 billion, according to the filings. The sale disclosure comes as Amazon’s closing price vaulted the company’s market capitalization over $1 trillion, a mark that it first touched in intraday trading in 2018. The company re-joins fellow tech giants Apple, Microsoft and Google parent company Alphabet, all of which


Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos sold more than $1.8 billion of shares in his company over the past week, according to financial filings.
In total, Bezos sold 905,456 shares in the company for $1.84 billion, according to the filings.
The sale disclosure comes as Amazon’s closing price vaulted the company’s market capitalization over $1 trillion, a mark that it first touched in intraday trading in 2018.
The company re-joins fellow tech giants Apple, Microsoft and Google parent company Alphabet, all of which
Jeff Bezos sells $1.8 billion worth of Amazon stock as it closes above $1 trillion market cap Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, sells, closes, company, billion, filingsthe, shares, worth, stock, bezos, trillion, amazon, cap, jeff, sales, trading, sold, market


Jeff Bezos sells $1.8 billion worth of Amazon stock as it closes above $1 trillion market cap

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos sold more than $1.8 billion of shares in his company over the past week, according to financial filings.

The series of sales began on Jan. 31, the filings show, and continued through Feb. 3, and were executed under a pre-arranged trading plan. In total, Bezos sold 905,456 shares in the company for $1.84 billion, according to the filings.

The sale disclosure comes as Amazon’s closing price vaulted the company’s market capitalization over $1 trillion, a mark that it first touched in intraday trading in 2018. The company re-joins fellow tech giants Apple, Microsoft and Google parent company Alphabet, all of which have topped the trillion-dollar mark in recent days.

Bezos made similarly massive sales of Amazon stock in 2019 and 2017, and has said he sells at least $1 billion of Amazon stock a year to fund his rocket startup, Blue Origin.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mark, sells, closes, company, billion, filingsthe, shares, worth, stock, bezos, trillion, amazon, cap, jeff, sales, trading, sold, market


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post