Global investors are coming back to Chinese markets, says JP Morgan executive

Investors are expecting a bottoming out for Asian economies in the next few months, boosting recent gains in regional markets including those in China, a J.P. Morgan Chase executive said Tuesday. Equity market investors are looking ahead for more positive news, said Ulrich, with Beijing’s stimulus measures set to have a more pronounced impact on corporate earnings in May and June. Global institutional investors are looking at fast-growth industries such as technology, new energy vehicles, artifi


Investors are expecting a bottoming out for Asian economies in the next few months, boosting recent gains in regional markets including those in China, a J.P. Morgan Chase executive said Tuesday. Equity market investors are looking ahead for more positive news, said Ulrich, with Beijing’s stimulus measures set to have a more pronounced impact on corporate earnings in May and June. Global institutional investors are looking at fast-growth industries such as technology, new energy vehicles, artifi
Global investors are coming back to Chinese markets, says JP Morgan executive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: huileng tan, wang gang, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, measures, jp, chinese, months, investment, investors, slowdown, looking, executive, global, market, ulrich, markets, morgan


Global investors are coming back to Chinese markets, says JP Morgan executive

Investors are expecting a bottoming out for Asian economies in the next few months, boosting recent gains in regional markets including those in China, a J.P. Morgan Chase executive said Tuesday.

That comes as Beijing recently took policy measures — such as fast-tracking infrastructure projects and cutting taxes and banks’ reserve requirements — to boost growth.

“Even though, so far, the results have not been extremely apparent, but in the next several months I think these measures will begin to bear fruit,” said Jing Ulrich, managing director and vice chairman for Asia Pacific at J.P. Morgan Chase.

Equity market investors are looking ahead for more positive news, said Ulrich, with Beijing’s stimulus measures set to have a more pronounced impact on corporate earnings in May and June.

Indeed, many global investors who have been underweight on China — due to a host of concerns including high debt levels, slowing growth and bond defaults — are now coming back into the market because of its lower valuations compared to a few years ago, Ulrich told CNBC.

The Shanghai composite has jumped more than 10 percent so far in 2019.

Global institutional investors are looking at fast-growth industries such as technology, new energy vehicles, artificial intelligence and the internet, said Ulrich.

“These areas are very resilient despite a slowdown in the general economy,” she said.

Also driving investment is personal consumption growing at a “very healthy” clip even amid a slowdown in Chinese GDP growth, she said.

Ulrich tipped areas such as health care and education as standout industries for investment even in the current state of the global economy.

“Technology, consumption will be performing much better compared to the old economy counterparts where you have over-capacity and over-leverage,” she said.

—Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: huileng tan, wang gang, visual china group, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coming, measures, jp, chinese, months, investment, investors, slowdown, looking, executive, global, market, ulrich, markets, morgan


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Stocks rally on US-China trade deal but bond investors fear recession

“I think there’s a couple of things in the bond market that don’t connect to reality the way the equity market sees it,” said Hogan. Conversely, “I don’t think the bond market is behind that narrative,” Hogan added. “The bond market is looking at the economic data stream and reflecting on the negatives.” “Is the bond market expressing the longer term consensus? That is how the bond market is now responding to weak data — as if it is forecasting an economic storm, or even recession that may not c


“I think there’s a couple of things in the bond market that don’t connect to reality the way the equity market sees it,” said Hogan. Conversely, “I don’t think the bond market is behind that narrative,” Hogan added. “The bond market is looking at the economic data stream and reflecting on the negatives.” “Is the bond market expressing the longer term consensus? That is how the bond market is now responding to weak data — as if it is forecasting an economic storm, or even recession that may not c
Stocks rally on US-China trade deal but bond investors fear recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: patti domm, ralph orlowski, bloomberg, getty images, -chris rupkey, chief financial economist, mufg union bank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, uschina, trade, fear, bond, trading, think, market, rates, growth, investors, stock, deal, stocks, pande, rally, fed


Stocks rally on US-China trade deal but bond investors fear recession

Trade talks between the U.S. and China appear to be making some progress and are scheduled to continue in the coming week. That has helped lift stocks, with the S&P 500 up 2.5 percent and the Dow gaining 3 percent in the past week.

The Federal Reserve’s about-face on policy in January has also helped lift stocks and keep bond yields low. After its Jan. 30 meeting, the central bank indicated it is not in a hurry to raise interest rates, and that it could slow down the process to reduce its balance sheet.

For their part, stock investors love low interest rates and an easy Fed. Lower rates also means bond yields do not need to move higher, particularly in an economy that is growing slower with no inflation pressures.

Important for investors is that when these two markets trade in the same direction, there ultimately is a breakout and one dictates direction.

“I think there’s a couple of things in the bond market that don’t connect to reality the way the equity market sees it,” said Hogan.

In his view, the stock market is moving higher based on three assumptions: An end to the U.S.-China trade fight, an accomodative Fed, and continued economic stability in both the U.S. and China.

Conversely, “I don’t think the bond market is behind that narrative,” Hogan added. “The bond market is looking at the economic data stream and reflecting on the negatives.”

Vinay Pande, head of trading strategies at UBS Global Wealth Management, said that the bond market is not trading as if it were reflecting the same growth expectations of the stock market. “Most economists think the economy is slowing, but we don’t know how much it’s slowing. That’s a bit of an issue for the Fed, and that’s why they’re going to be on hold.”

He explained that currently, bonds look as if they see growth a full percentage point below what economists have forecast. The median fourth quarter GDP growth forecast is 2.4 percent, while first quarter is 2 percent, according to CNBC/Moody’s Analytics Rapid Update.

“Is the bond market expressing the longer term consensus? No, it’s not,” said Pande. “The bond market is really trading like it’s a reinsurance market,” where reinsurers will raise prices with each successive event: If there were hurricanes five years in a row, they would still charge as though another hurricane was expected in the sixth year.

That is how the bond market is now responding to weak data — as if it is forecasting an economic storm, or even recession that may not come.

“There’s a muscle memory to this,” Pande added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: patti domm, ralph orlowski, bloomberg, getty images, -chris rupkey, chief financial economist, mufg union bank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, recession, uschina, trade, fear, bond, trading, think, market, rates, growth, investors, stock, deal, stocks, pande, rally, fed


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Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet

While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy. It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. “I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 bill


While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy. It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. “I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 bill
Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, bankers, think, ma, money, quiet, google, market, stay, tech, billion, internet, spent, salesforce, enterprise, ryan, software, facebook, making


Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet

While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy.

“In some ways, consumer internet is a relatively sporadic M&A market,” said Colin Ryan, co-lead for Americas mergers and acquisitions at Goldman Sachs, at the bank’s Technology and Internet Conference in San Francisco this week.

It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. To the average consumer, MuleSoft and Red Hat may not be household names, but they’ve been huge deals for Salesforce and IBM, respectively, and have created fat paydays for M&A bankers. Private equity firms, meanwhile, have been actively buying up smaller cloud players.

“I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said.

Last year was huge in software. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 billion. Additionally, Microsoft spent $7.5 billion on GitHub and Salesforce shelled out $6.5 billion on MuleSoft.

Newly public companies are also making big purchases. For instance, Twilio recently acquired SendGrid for $2 billion in stock.

Ryan said that with stock prices surging for emerging software companies, their valuations are a “good currency to go and pursue M&A to grow their business.”

And in the future, the biggest cloud providers could get more active in deals.

“I think there’s a real opportunity to capture some of – I’ll call it economic opportunity that exists up the stack beyond the infrastructure layer, whether in applications or somewhere between the two,” Ryan said.

WATCH: M&A activity will continue pace in this market, says Goldman CEO David Solomon


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, bankers, think, ma, money, quiet, google, market, stay, tech, billion, internet, spent, salesforce, enterprise, ryan, software, facebook, making


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Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors

Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep. “I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to


Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep. “I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to
Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: christina farr, greg yap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, aging, hes, trying, mother, market, yap, monitoring, living, health, sensors, son, investors, americans, tech


Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors

Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility.

On days he can’t visit his mom and doesn’t hear from her, he still wants to know how she’s doing. So he’s combining his personal concerns as a son with his job as an investor and experimenting with new technologies that can give him some peace of mind without invading his mother’s privacy.

Beyond mainstream devices like Amazon’s Echo, which can set medication reminders, Apple’s smartwatch with fall detection and the Nest thermostat’s motion sensors, Yap has been trying new products specifically designed to monitor aging parents. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep.

“I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. “The technology is not yet idiot-proof though.”

There’s a demographic reason why Yap sees as a big opportunity. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to live independently rather than in assisted living as part of the “aging in place” trend. Still, they’re more likely to have chronic illnesses to manage and are at higher risk of a serious medical event, like a fall, heart attack or stroke.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: christina farr, greg yap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, aging, hes, trying, mother, market, yap, monitoring, living, health, sensors, son, investors, americans, tech


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Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors

Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep. “I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to


Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep. “I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to
Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: christina farr, greg yap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, aging, hes, trying, mother, market, yap, monitoring, living, health, sensors, son, investors, americans, tech


Aging Americans are a big market for tech investors

Greg Yap is a venture capitalist looking for the next big thing in digital health. At age 45, he’s also the father of young kids and the son of an aging mother, who lives nearby in an independent living facility.

On days he can’t visit his mom and doesn’t hear from her, he still wants to know how she’s doing. So he’s combining his personal concerns as a son with his job as an investor and experimenting with new technologies that can give him some peace of mind without invading his mother’s privacy.

Beyond mainstream devices like Amazon’s Echo, which can set medication reminders, Apple’s smartwatch with fall detection and the Nest thermostat’s motion sensors, Yap has been trying new products specifically designed to monitor aging parents. One example is Silver Mother, which incorporates sensors on pill boxes, front doors and mattresses for remote monitoring of health, safety and sleep.

“I’ve been trying a few sensors out to approximate this monitoring function,” Yap said. “The technology is not yet idiot-proof though.”

There’s a demographic reason why Yap sees as a big opportunity. More Americans in their 60s and 70s are opting to live independently rather than in assisted living as part of the “aging in place” trend. Still, they’re more likely to have chronic illnesses to manage and are at higher risk of a serious medical event, like a fall, heart attack or stroke.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: christina farr, greg yap
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, aging, hes, trying, mother, market, yap, monitoring, living, health, sensors, son, investors, americans, tech


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Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet

While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy. It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. “I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 bill


While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy. It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. “I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 bill
Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, bankers, companies, software, market, quiet, facebook, ryan, internet, spent, google, billion, think, salesforce, ma, money, enterprise, tech, stay


Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet

While big internet companies like Facebook and Google have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy.

“In some ways, consumer internet is a relatively sporadic M&A market,” said Colin Ryan, co-lead for Americas mergers and acquisitions at Goldman Sachs, at the bank’s Technology and Internet Conference in San Francisco this week.

It’s been five years since Facebook purchased WhatsApp and Oculus, and about the same amount of time since Google bought Nest. To the average consumer, MuleSoft and Red Hat may not be household names, but they’ve been huge deals for Salesforce and IBM, respectively, and have created fat paydays for M&A bankers. Private equity firms, meanwhile, have been actively buying up smaller cloud players.

“I think the real heart of the M&A market is actually much more enterprise-focused,” Ryan said.

Last year was huge in software. IBM spent $34 billion on Red Hat, Broadcom bought CA for $18.9 billion and SAP purchased Qualtrics for $8 billion. Additionally, Microsoft spent $7.5 billion on GitHub and Salesforce shelled out $6.5 billion on MuleSoft.

Newly public companies are also making big purchases. For instance, Twilio recently acquired SendGrid for $2 billion in stock.

Ryan said that with stock prices surging for emerging software companies, their valuations are a “good currency to go and pursue M&A to grow their business.”

And in the future, the biggest cloud providers could get more active in deals.

“I think there’s a real opportunity to capture some of – I’ll call it economic opportunity that exists up the stack beyond the infrastructure layer, whether in applications or somewhere between the two,” Ryan said.

WATCH: M&A activity will continue pace in this market, says Goldman CEO David Solomon


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, bankers, companies, software, market, quiet, facebook, ryan, internet, spent, google, billion, think, salesforce, ma, money, enterprise, tech, stay


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It’s too early to turn bullish on stocks, Louise Yamada warns

Louise Yamada believes the market downturn is not securely in the past. Yamada, who runs Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, acknowledges that 2800 is a key level on the S&P 500. “If you look back at the 2015 chart, there it went through it considerably three times and couldn’t progress much beyond it,” said Yamada. The S&P 500 hit its all-time high of 2940 on Sept. 21, 2018. Since the December low, the S&P 500 has surged 18 percent and closed Friday at 2775.60.


Louise Yamada believes the market downturn is not securely in the past. Yamada, who runs Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, acknowledges that 2800 is a key level on the S&P 500. “If you look back at the 2015 chart, there it went through it considerably three times and couldn’t progress much beyond it,” said Yamada. The S&P 500 hit its all-time high of 2940 on Sept. 21, 2018. Since the December low, the S&P 500 has surged 18 percent and closed Friday at 2775.60.
It’s too early to turn bullish on stocks, Louise Yamada warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: stephanie landsman, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, michael nagle, jacob w frank, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, market, louise, low, stocks, sp, high, 500, turn, early, yamada, rally, bullish, look, 2800


It's too early to turn bullish on stocks, Louise Yamada warns

Louise Yamada believes the market downturn is not securely in the past.

According to the Wall Street technician, a retest of the December low is possible.

“It’s too soon to know from our perspective whether it’s a rally in a bear market or an extension of the 2009 bull because rallies can retrace through to the high and still fail,” she said Thursday on CNBC’s “Futures Now.”

Yamada, who runs Louise Yamada Technical Research Advisors, acknowledges that 2800 is a key level on the S&P 500. But she contends getting through that threshold doesn’t ensure stocks are out of the woods.

“[You] still have to look at the characteristic of the market as it approaches the old high because sometimes it can roll over once again,” she said.

She uses 2015 as an example of a rally that failed to hold.

“If you look back at the 2015 chart, there it went through it considerably three times and couldn’t progress much beyond it,” said Yamada. “So, I think we’re due for a little testing.”

The S&P 500 hit its all-time high of 2940 on Sept. 21, 2018. By December, the index was getting battered by a deep correction — with the biggest plunge happening on Christmas Eve.

Since the December low, the S&P 500 has surged 18 percent and closed Friday at 2775.60.

“The best case would be for the markets to go sideways here between 2600 and 2800 which would be constructive and allow for a period of repair which thereafter a push through 2800 could be more meaningful,” Yamada said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-17  Authors: stephanie landsman, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images, michael nagle, jacob w frank, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, warns, market, louise, low, stocks, sp, high, 500, turn, early, yamada, rally, bullish, look, 2800


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Russell’s Douglas Gordon: Historic rally may set investors up for pain

Money manager urges investors to rebalance portfolios as stocks surge 4:28 PM ET Fri, 15 Feb 2019 | 01:14Money manager Douglas Gordon is worried about a potentially widespread problem in long-term investors’ portfolios. Gordon, who’s instrumental in building Russell Investments’ asset allocation strategies, believes many investors haven’t rebalanced their portfolios to reflect the historic 2019 stock market rally. According to Gordon, the market rally’s robust gains are tilting investors too far


Money manager urges investors to rebalance portfolios as stocks surge 4:28 PM ET Fri, 15 Feb 2019 | 01:14Money manager Douglas Gordon is worried about a potentially widespread problem in long-term investors’ portfolios. Gordon, who’s instrumental in building Russell Investments’ asset allocation strategies, believes many investors haven’t rebalanced their portfolios to reflect the historic 2019 stock market rally. According to Gordon, the market rally’s robust gains are tilting investors too far
Russell’s Douglas Gordon: Historic rally may set investors up for pain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: stephanie landsman, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, andrew harrer, brendan mcdermid, don emmert, afp, kcna, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, markets, market, whos, portfolios, russells, douglas, manager, historic, rally, pain, right, gordon, set, investors


Russell's Douglas Gordon: Historic rally may set investors up for pain

Money manager urges investors to rebalance portfolios as stocks surge 4:28 PM ET Fri, 15 Feb 2019 | 01:14

Money manager Douglas Gordon is worried about a potentially widespread problem in long-term investors’ portfolios.

Gordon, who’s instrumental in building Russell Investments’ asset allocation strategies, believes many investors haven’t rebalanced their portfolios to reflect the historic 2019 stock market rally.

According to Gordon, the market rally’s robust gains are tilting investors too far into stocks.

The bottom line: If there’s another pullback, it’ll leave them wide open to losses that may have been avoidable.

“It’s a good time to re-assess where you’re at with respect to being diversified in a multi-asset solution,” the firm’s senior portfolio manager said Friday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation.”

Since the Christmas Eve plunge, the S&P 500 has soared 18 percent. Because of the market’s sharp rebound, Gordon suspects a 3 to 5 percent sell-off could strike stocks in the coming weeks.

For protection, Gordon recommends taking some profits from the historic rally. Plus, he’d consider going overseas, a strategy he’s employing right now as part of a balanced allocation strategy.

“I’d probably right now prefer to take my higher beta exposures maybe in EM [emerging markets],” said Gordon, who’s responsible for $48.5 billion of the firm’s assets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: stephanie landsman, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, andrew harrer, brendan mcdermid, don emmert, afp, kcna, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, markets, market, whos, portfolios, russells, douglas, manager, historic, rally, pain, right, gordon, set, investors


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These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market

Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news. A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. For example, a user can now see ho


Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news. A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. For example, a user can now see ho
These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: annie nova, source, hidden levers, cathy curtis, -thomas verbraken, executive director of risk management at msci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investments, user, market, threats, upside, unpleasant, updated, unleash, used, unknown, prepare, way, tools, lurking, war, investors


These tools can prepare investors for threats lurking in the market

Investors are often told that uncertainty is inevitable. No risk, no reward. Well, for those whose stomachs harden at the unknown, there’s some good news.

A growing number of tools prepare you for the threats lurking around the market, from a trade war to climate change, by letting you test them out on your investments before they ever happen. Many of these programs are only available to you through a financial advisor, though at least one company is discussing a way to develop an app that would be accessible to anyone.

“Examining real-life scenarios allows you to understand ahead of time what type of potential downside and upside you have,” said David Ristau, director of business development at HiddenLevers.

HiddenLevers, based in Atlanta and used by some 3,000 advisors, has a library of unpleasant possibilities it can unleash on your portfolio. The pool is constantly updated. For example, a user can now see how a second government shutdown would rattle their investments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: annie nova, source, hidden levers, cathy curtis, -thomas verbraken, executive director of risk management at msci
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investments, user, market, threats, upside, unpleasant, updated, unleash, used, unknown, prepare, way, tools, lurking, war, investors


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Why California’s new solar mandate could cost new homeowners up to an extra $10,000

Starting next year, every new home built in California will have something extra on top. Recently, California became the first state in the nation to make solar mandatory for new houses. Beginning in 2020, newly constructed homes must have solar panels, which could be costly for homeowners: According to California’s Energy Commission (CEC), that mandate will add between $8,000 and $10,000 to the cost of a new home. Still, the requirement does add a costly additional expense to already pricey new


Starting next year, every new home built in California will have something extra on top. Recently, California became the first state in the nation to make solar mandatory for new houses. Beginning in 2020, newly constructed homes must have solar panels, which could be costly for homeowners: According to California’s Energy Commission (CEC), that mandate will add between $8,000 and $10,000 to the cost of a new home. Still, the requirement does add a costly additional expense to already pricey new
Why California’s new solar mandate could cost new homeowners up to an extra $10,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: trent gillies, de young properties
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandate, homes, requirement, add, market, hale, cost, extra, californias, homeowners, 10000, real, estate, solar, told


Why California's new solar mandate could cost new homeowners up to an extra $10,000

Starting next year, every new home built in California will have something extra on top.

Recently, California became the first state in the nation to make solar mandatory for new houses. Beginning in 2020, newly constructed homes must have solar panels, which could be costly for homeowners: According to California’s Energy Commission (CEC), that mandate will add between $8,000 and $10,000 to the cost of a new home.

CEC estimates suggest that the solar addition will increase the average monthly mortgage payment by $40, but new homeowners will save an average of $80 a month on their heating, cooling and lighting bills.

Still, the requirement does add a costly additional expense to already pricey new homes in one of the richest real estate markets in the country.

Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com, told CNBC’s “On the Money” that the new solar requirement could undermine a segment of the real estate market that’s struggled to add to new homes relative to demand.

The added costs could hit “the affordable side of the market,” she said, where prices on available homes have been under pressure.

“It’s a very different perspective depending on if you’re looking for affordable homes, or pricier homes,” Hale told CNBC. “It’s already difficult for builders to build, and I think this is just going to exacerbate that problem.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: trent gillies, de young properties
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mandate, homes, requirement, add, market, hale, cost, extra, californias, homeowners, 10000, real, estate, solar, told


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