Facebook is taking a page out of Google’s playbook to stop fake news from going viral

Facebook on Wednesday announced a slew of new features in its ongoing fight against fake news, and one of them is taken directly from the playbook of bitter rival Google. For this, Facebook is crawling and indexing the entire internet to identify and web sites that receive a disproportionate amount of their traffic from the social network. Back then, PageRank would take into account the number of websites and the quality of websites that linked to a web page to determine how high to rank it in s


Facebook on Wednesday announced a slew of new features in its ongoing fight against fake news, and one of them is taken directly from the playbook of bitter rival Google. For this, Facebook is crawling and indexing the entire internet to identify and web sites that receive a disproportionate amount of their traffic from the social network. Back then, PageRank would take into account the number of websites and the quality of websites that linked to a web page to determine how high to rank it in s
Facebook is taking a page out of Google’s playbook to stop fake news from going viral Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feed, fake, website, search, facebook, googles, lowquality, social, playbook, going, stop, web, websites, page, pagerank, viral, taking, results


Facebook is taking a page out of Google's playbook to stop fake news from going viral

Facebook on Wednesday announced a slew of new features in its ongoing fight against fake news, and one of them is taken directly from the playbook of bitter rival Google.

The social media company said it will use a new approach called Click-Gap to reduce the amount of low-quality content, such as fake news, that users see on News Feed. For this, Facebook is crawling and indexing the entire internet to identify and web sites that receive a disproportionate amount of their traffic from the social network. Then, it will lower the prominence of posts from these sites.

The idea is that if a website is relying primarily on Facebook links to get viewers, and is not getting more links from other parts of the web — such as Google, Reddit, Bing or Yahoo — that’s a signal that the website has poor content. Or, as Facebook puts it, “This can be a sign that the domain is succeeding on News Feed in a way that doesn’t reflect the authority they’ve built outside it and is producing low-quality content.”

This approach is reminiscent of the famous Google PageRank algorithm that the search company used to rank results when it first launched in 1998. Back then, PageRank would take into account the number of websites and the quality of websites that linked to a web page to determine how high to rank it in search results.

With Click-Gap, Facebook is using a PageRank copycat to filter low-quality results to the depths of News Feed, reducing the number of people who will see those posts.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, feed, fake, website, search, facebook, googles, lowquality, social, playbook, going, stop, web, websites, page, pagerank, viral, taking, results


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Records of millions of Facebook users are reportedly found on Amazon’s cloud servers

UpGuard said it found a database backup for a Facebook-integrated app called “At the Pool,” which included passwords for that app, among other details. This database contained passwords for just 22,000 users, according to UpGuard. “Storing information you get from Facebook on insecure locations is specifically prohibited by our policies,” Facebook told CNBC. Cultura Colectiva said it was “concerned about the privacy and security” of its users’ data. We are aware of the potential uses of data in


UpGuard said it found a database backup for a Facebook-integrated app called “At the Pool,” which included passwords for that app, among other details. This database contained passwords for just 22,000 users, according to UpGuard. “Storing information you get from Facebook on insecure locations is specifically prohibited by our policies,” Facebook told CNBC. Cultura Colectiva said it was “concerned about the privacy and security” of its users’ data. We are aware of the potential uses of data in
Records of millions of Facebook users are reportedly found on Amazon’s cloud servers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: lauren feiner, jordan novet, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images, courtesy of facebook
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, data, amazons, company, users, records, servers, upguard, reportedly, s3, cloud, privacy, facebook, access, app, millions


Records of millions of Facebook users are reportedly found on Amazon's cloud servers

UpGuard is a commercial firm that sells products for companies to prevent and detect data exposures.

The company said in a blog post that the data it found on Amazon’s S3 service included over 540 million records with Facebook user information like comments, reactions and account names that appear to have been uploaded by Mexico-based media company Cultura Colectiva.

UpGuard said it found a database backup for a Facebook-integrated app called “At the Pool,” which included passwords for that app, among other details. This database contained passwords for just 22,000 users, according to UpGuard. That app ceased operations in 2014, UpGuard said.

UpGuard did not find Facebook passwords.

The data was stored in unsecured portions of Amazon’s cloud service that could easily be accessed by outsiders if they had the right information and knew where to look, UpGuard said.

“[AWS] S3 buckets usually have a name,” said UpGuard’s vice president of product Greg Pollock. “In this case, the names were Yeti DB and the other one was CC Data Lake. If you guessed those names and have access to a browser, that’s how easy it is.”

A Facebook spokesperson said the company is investigating the case, and added that UpGuard had not reached out to the company directly as far as she knew. The spokesperson claimed Facebook first became aware of the exposure when a Bloomberg reporter reached out about the story it planned to write on UpGuard’s findings.

“Storing information you get from Facebook on insecure locations is specifically prohibited by our policies,” Facebook told CNBC.

In a statement, Amazon noted that certain security safeguards of AWS can be overridden by customers, such as the app makers in this case:

AWS customers own and fully control their data. When we receive an abuse report concerning content that is not clearly illegal or otherwise prohibited, we notify the customer in question and ask that they take appropriate action, which is what happened here. While Amazon S3 is secure by default, we offer the flexibility to change our default configurations to suit the many use cases in which broader access is required, such as building a website or hosting publicly downloadable content. As is the case on premises or anywhere else, application builders must ensure that changes they make to access configurations are protecting access as intended.

Cultura Colectiva said it was “concerned about the privacy and security” of its users’ data. The company also said in its statement:

The UpGuard Cyber Risk team revealed that some of our datasets containing publicly available data were exposed, which included 540 million interactions such as likes, comments, and reactions. However, neither sensitive nor private data, like emails or passwords, were amongst those because we do not have access to that kind of data, so we did not put our users’ privacy and security at risk. We are aware of the potential uses of data in current times, so we have reinforced our security measures to protect the data and privacy of our Facebook fanpages’ users.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: How Facebook makes money by targeting ads directly to you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: lauren feiner, jordan novet, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images, courtesy of facebook
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, data, amazons, company, users, records, servers, upguard, reportedly, s3, cloud, privacy, facebook, access, app, millions


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‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit


Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say. Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether. WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit
‘It’s terrible — the Brits were lied to’: Americans give their verdict on Brexit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


'It's terrible — the Brits were lied to': Americans give their verdict on Brexit

Brexit might be changing the course of British and European history but that hasn’t stopped the Americans taking an interest — and having a say.

President Donald Trump has been characteristically forthright, commenting on both the opportunity that leaving the 28-member union could bring to the U.K. and U.S.’ relationship, and also on how badly he thought British Prime Minister Theresa May had handled the negotiations.

Brexit faced a crucial week this week as May tried to get her Brexit deal approved by the U.K. Parliament. It failed to win enough support from British lawmakers for a second time but MPs also then voted to reject the option of leaving the EU without a deal. They are next going to vote on whether to delay Brexit altogether.

WATCH: Niall Ferguson: Brexit has turned into a student asking for a paper extension


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: holly ellyatt, jordan malter, james d morgan, getty images entertainment, getty images, wiktor szymanowicz, barcroft media, marlene awaad, bloomberg, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, union, week, uk, deal, british, americans, verdict, terrible, brits, leaving, win, voted, brexit, lied, vote


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Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication. It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg. The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that note, Zuckerberg made one par


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication. It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg. The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that note, Zuckerberg made one par
Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, really, note, zuckerbergs, given, zuckerberg, content, search, believe, reason, company, things, private


Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication.

Zuckerberg’s new stance was delivered in a 3,000-word note titled “A Privacy-Focused Vision for Social Networking.” The note outlines the framework with which the company will integrate the private messaging features of its Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp apps, and it comes after a grueling 2018 in which the company was plagued by multiple scandals related to user privacy.

“I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it and won’t all stick around forever,” Zuckerberg wrote.

It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg.

Zuckerberg has done his best to emulate Steve Jobs through his penmanship in notes like the one we saw this week or his showmanship on stage at events like the company’s annual F8 conference, yet his company’s actions rarely deliver on his words. And there are plenty of examples of this.

When it comes to privacy, there are numerous examples throughout Facebook’s history where Zuckerberg has made bold claims about Facebook privacy only to be proven wrong over and over.

But it’s not just privacy issues. There are plenty of other examples where Zuckerberg has promised bold new products — like he did in his essay Wednesday — and failed to deliver.

The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. Zuckerberg got up before a crowd of journalists to announce “graph search.” This was supposed to be a new breakthrough in search engines. It was a search engine you could ask hyper-specific questions to and receive personalized results. You could ask it questions like “music listened to by my friends who listen to Beyonce” or “my friends who live in Houston” and get exactly what you asked for. That’s what Zuckerberg promised, but it never came to be. Just try to ask Facebook’s search these questions. Search has improved since this announcement, but the results are not what he promised.

Something similar happened later in 2013 when the company announced Facebook Home, a custom version of Android that would launch on the HTC First smartphone. Zuckerberg got on stage to announce both products to much fanfare. This was Facebook’s grand entry into the mobile market. Instead, the phone and the software were instant flops, and Facebook didn’t take long to abandon the project, with AT&T slashing the price of the HTC First from $99 to just 99 cents within weeks of its launch.

In more recent years, Zuckerberg’s words have rung hollow when it comes to his promises for improving the way people talk and connect on the service.

If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that 6,000-word essay, Zuckerberg made multiple promises about improving Facebook after the company came under fire for its failure to address fake news ahead of the 2016 U.S. election. In that note, Zuckerberg made one particular promises that stands out.

He wrote about using artificial intelligence to keep Facebook a community free from bullying and harassment. This promise has failed on two counts. For starters, Facebook is still littered with issues of bullying and harassment, and it’s especially a problem for younger users on Instagram. Secondly, Facebook is not yet at a point where it can rely on AI to remove content that shouldn’t be allowed on the service. The company uses AI for much of its content moderation, but it still relies on thousands of low-paid contractors working in subpar conditions and exposing themselves to content that scars them, as Casey Newton of The Verge demonstrated in his excellent profile of Facebook’s content moderators.

And then there was Zuckerberg’s News Feed algorithm change of 2018. At the time, Zuckerberg announced that Facebook would make “a major change” to how Facebook was built so that the company prioritized “meaningful social interactions” over “relevant content.” In layman’s terms, this meant showing users more content about their friends and less content from publishers. The change certainly had a major impact — just look at the recent layoffs at digital news outlets like Mic and BuzzFeed, two publishers whose business models had relied on traffic from Facebook. And yet, does it really feel like News Feed has improved or been filled with meaningful social interactions? Mine certainly hasn’t. One quick look at my feed and my top posts are a news article, an ad, a news article, a news article and some “friend” I can’t remember who changed his profile picture.

At least year’s F8 conference, Zuckerberg took the stage and promised the company would release a feature called Clear History that would give users more control over the data Facebook has on them. The feature was thought up just prior to F8, according to a BuzzFeed report, and nearly one year later, it has yet to be released. The company said recently that Clear History will arrive sometime in 2019, but no set date has been given.

This is why I don’t expect much from Zuckerberg’s latest promise. The note itself is laced with caveats that should temper expectations. For starters, Zuckerberg says this more private version of Facebook is a work in process that will take a few years to come to fruition. And Zuckerberg himself addresses doubt in his note.

I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing. But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.

And although Facebook may be expanding its focus on private communication, the company has no plans to get rid of its existing public products like News Feed and Instagram, according to an interview Zuckerberg gave to Wired.

Asked in that interview what he will do to guarantee this privacy-focused vision is carried out, Zuckerberg sidestepped the question and gave no guarantees.

Here’s what he said:

You have no idea how hard it is. Yes, there’s a lot of work that goes into getting the teams aligned and getting the right leaders in place who believe in these priorities, and being able to execute on that. And even the process of writing something like this is really helpful, because you can talk about a lot of things in the abstract. But it’s not until you actually put it down on paper and say, “Yeah, here are the trade-offs. We’re going to focus on reducing the permanence of how much data we have around, and that’s going to make these things harder.” Then you get all these teams inside the company that come out of the woodwork with all the issues that that’s going to cause for other things that we really care about. You know, whether that’s research that was surfaced about how much people care and value making a record of their lives over time, so making it so that more of the content would be archived automatically would be problematic for them, or different kinds of things. But that whole process has been really helpful for figuring out and distilling the vision of where we want to get. And it basically got us to this point where we feel like we’re ready to put a flag in the ground and say, “This is where we want to go.” This isn’t a product announcement, it’s a statement of the principles that we think are necessary to build this privacy-focused social platform. But now I think we’re going to really start the harder process, over the next year or so, of flushing out what all these things mean as the aspects of this start to get rolled out in the different products.

Perhaps this will be the time Zuckerberg finally delivers on a promise, but don’t get your hopes up.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, really, note, zuckerbergs, given, zuckerberg, content, search, believe, reason, company, things, private


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Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication. It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg. The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that note, Zuckerberg made one par


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication. It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg. The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that note, Zuckerberg made one par
Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, really, note, zuckerbergs, given, zuckerberg, content, search, believe, reason, company, things, private


Zuckerberg has given us no reason to believe him

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday made a major proclamation: The future of Facebook is one focused on private communication.

Zuckerberg’s new stance was delivered in a 3,000-word note titled “A Privacy-Focused Vision for Social Networking.” The note outlines the framework with which the company will integrate the private messaging features of its Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp apps, and it comes after a grueling 2018 in which the company was plagued by multiple scandals related to user privacy.

“I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it and won’t all stick around forever,” Zuckerberg wrote.

It’s a nice vision, but if history is any indicator, there’s no reason to believe Zuckerberg.

Zuckerberg has done his best to emulate Steve Jobs through his penmanship in notes like the one we saw this week or his showmanship on stage at events like the company’s annual F8 conference, yet his company’s actions rarely deliver on his words. And there are plenty of examples of this.

When it comes to privacy, there are numerous examples throughout Facebook’s history where Zuckerberg has made bold claims about Facebook privacy only to be proven wrong over and over.

But it’s not just privacy issues. There are plenty of other examples where Zuckerberg has promised bold new products — like he did in his essay Wednesday — and failed to deliver.

The first time Zuckerberg hyped a Facebook announcement only to let everyone down over a long period of waiting was back in 2013. Zuckerberg got up before a crowd of journalists to announce “graph search.” This was supposed to be a new breakthrough in search engines. It was a search engine you could ask hyper-specific questions to and receive personalized results. You could ask it questions like “music listened to by my friends who listen to Beyonce” or “my friends who live in Houston” and get exactly what you asked for. That’s what Zuckerberg promised, but it never came to be. Just try to ask Facebook’s search these questions. Search has improved since this announcement, but the results are not what he promised.

Something similar happened later in 2013 when the company announced Facebook Home, a custom version of Android that would launch on the HTC First smartphone. Zuckerberg got on stage to announce both products to much fanfare. This was Facebook’s grand entry into the mobile market. Instead, the phone and the software were instant flops, and Facebook didn’t take long to abandon the project, with AT&T slashing the price of the HTC First from $99 to just 99 cents within weeks of its launch.

In more recent years, Zuckerberg’s words have rung hollow when it comes to his promises for improving the way people talk and connect on the service.

If you thought Zuckerberg’s note this week was long, just look at the mammoth manifesto he wrote in 2017. In that 6,000-word essay, Zuckerberg made multiple promises about improving Facebook after the company came under fire for its failure to address fake news ahead of the 2016 U.S. election. In that note, Zuckerberg made one particular promises that stands out.

He wrote about using artificial intelligence to keep Facebook a community free from bullying and harassment. This promise has failed on two counts. For starters, Facebook is still littered with issues of bullying and harassment, and it’s especially a problem for younger users on Instagram. Secondly, Facebook is not yet at a point where it can rely on AI to remove content that shouldn’t be allowed on the service. The company uses AI for much of its content moderation, but it still relies on thousands of low-paid contractors working in subpar conditions and exposing themselves to content that scars them, as Casey Newton of The Verge demonstrated in his excellent profile of Facebook’s content moderators.

And then there was Zuckerberg’s News Feed algorithm change of 2018. At the time, Zuckerberg announced that Facebook would make “a major change” to how Facebook was built so that the company prioritized “meaningful social interactions” over “relevant content.” In layman’s terms, this meant showing users more content about their friends and less content from publishers. The change certainly had a major impact — just look at the recent layoffs at digital news outlets like Mic and BuzzFeed, two publishers whose business models had relied on traffic from Facebook. And yet, does it really feel like News Feed has improved or been filled with meaningful social interactions? Mine certainly hasn’t. One quick look at my feed and my top posts are a news article, an ad, a news article, a news article and some “friend” I can’t remember who changed his profile picture.

At least year’s F8 conference, Zuckerberg took the stage and promised the company would release a feature called Clear History that would give users more control over the data Facebook has on them. The feature was thought up just prior to F8, according to a BuzzFeed report, and nearly one year later, it has yet to be released. The company said recently that Clear History will arrive sometime in 2019, but no set date has been given.

This is why I don’t expect much from Zuckerberg’s latest promise. The note itself is laced with caveats that should temper expectations. For starters, Zuckerberg says this more private version of Facebook is a work in process that will take a few years to come to fruition. And Zuckerberg himself addresses doubt in his note.

I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing. But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.

And although Facebook may be expanding its focus on private communication, the company has no plans to get rid of its existing public products like News Feed and Instagram, according to an interview Zuckerberg gave to Wired.

Asked in that interview what he will do to guarantee this privacy-focused vision is carried out, Zuckerberg sidestepped the question and gave no guarantees.

Here’s what he said:

You have no idea how hard it is. Yes, there’s a lot of work that goes into getting the teams aligned and getting the right leaders in place who believe in these priorities, and being able to execute on that. And even the process of writing something like this is really helpful, because you can talk about a lot of things in the abstract. But it’s not until you actually put it down on paper and say, “Yeah, here are the trade-offs. We’re going to focus on reducing the permanence of how much data we have around, and that’s going to make these things harder.” Then you get all these teams inside the company that come out of the woodwork with all the issues that that’s going to cause for other things that we really care about. You know, whether that’s research that was surfaced about how much people care and value making a record of their lives over time, so making it so that more of the content would be archived automatically would be problematic for them, or different kinds of things. But that whole process has been really helpful for figuring out and distilling the vision of where we want to get. And it basically got us to this point where we feel like we’re ready to put a flag in the ground and say, “This is where we want to go.” This isn’t a product announcement, it’s a statement of the principles that we think are necessary to build this privacy-focused social platform. But now I think we’re going to really start the harder process, over the next year or so, of flushing out what all these things mean as the aspects of this start to get rolled out in the different products.

Perhaps this will be the time Zuckerberg finally delivers on a promise, but don’t get your hopes up.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-07  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, really, note, zuckerbergs, given, zuckerberg, content, search, believe, reason, company, things, private


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Facebook’s Zuckerberg spells out vision for a ‘privacy-focused’ internet after a year of turmoil

The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers. Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications. “But we


The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers. Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications. “But we
Facebook’s Zuckerberg spells out vision for a ‘privacy-focused’ internet after a year of turmoil Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, messaging, plans, vision, privacyfocused, facebook, turmoil, zuckerberg, services, wrote, privacy, spells, facebooks, internet, private, weve


Facebook's Zuckerberg spells out vision for a 'privacy-focused' internet after a year of turmoil

“I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever,” Zuckerberg said on his Facebook post. “This is the future I hope we will help bring about.”

The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers.

“Today if you want to message people on Facebook you have to use Messenger, on Instagram you have to use Direct, and on WhatsApp you have to use WhatsApp,” he wrote. “We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer.”

Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications.

“I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing,” Zuckerberg wrote. “But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, messaging, plans, vision, privacyfocused, facebook, turmoil, zuckerberg, services, wrote, privacy, spells, facebooks, internet, private, weve


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Facebook’s Zuckerberg spells out vision for a ‘privacy-focused’ internet after a year of turmoil

The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers. Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications. “But we


The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers. Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications. “But we
Facebook’s Zuckerberg spells out vision for a ‘privacy-focused’ internet after a year of turmoil Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, messaging, plans, vision, privacyfocused, facebook, turmoil, zuckerberg, services, wrote, privacy, spells, facebooks, internet, private, weve


Facebook's Zuckerberg spells out vision for a 'privacy-focused' internet after a year of turmoil

“I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever,” Zuckerberg said on his Facebook post. “This is the future I hope we will help bring about.”

The note detailed how Zuckerberg and his team are thinking about plans to integrate the messaging functions of the three main services. Zuckerberg said a lot of the work is still in its early stages, but he added that Facebook plans to consult with outside experts as it’s built out. Facebook has been beset by privacy scandals over the past year, and has faced backlash from users and lawmakers.

“Today if you want to message people on Facebook you have to use Messenger, on Instagram you have to use Direct, and on WhatsApp you have to use WhatsApp,” he wrote. “We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer.”

Zuckerberg said the new service will prioritize user safety and encrypt private communications.

“I understand that many people don’t think Facebook can or would even want to build this kind of privacy-focused platform — because frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services, and we’ve historically focused on tools for more open sharing,” Zuckerberg wrote. “But we’ve repeatedly shown that we can evolve to build the services that people really want, including in private messaging and stories.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: salvador rodriguez, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, messaging, plans, vision, privacyfocused, facebook, turmoil, zuckerberg, services, wrote, privacy, spells, facebooks, internet, private, weve


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Tokyo court grants bail to ex-Nissan Chairman Ghosn after more than 3 months in jail

A Tokyo court on Tuesday granted bail to Carlos Ghosn, the ousted chairman of Nissan Motor Co Ltd who is fighting charges of financial misconduct, after more than three months in detention, Ghosn’s lawyer said. Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported that bail for Ghosn, who has been has been in custody at a detention center in Tokyo, was set at 1 billion yen ($8.94 million), and that he could be released as early as Tuesday. Ghosn has been in custody since his initial arrest in late November o


A Tokyo court on Tuesday granted bail to Carlos Ghosn, the ousted chairman of Nissan Motor Co Ltd who is fighting charges of financial misconduct, after more than three months in detention, Ghosn’s lawyer said. Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported that bail for Ghosn, who has been has been in custody at a detention center in Tokyo, was set at 1 billion yen ($8.94 million), and that he could be released as early as Tuesday. Ghosn has been in custody since his initial arrest in late November o
Tokyo court grants bail to ex-Nissan Chairman Ghosn after more than 3 months in jail Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grants, court, tokyo, yen, nissan, exnissan, bail, chairman, ghosns, detention, custody, wrongdoingthe, jail, ghosn, months


Tokyo court grants bail to ex-Nissan Chairman Ghosn after more than 3 months in jail

A Tokyo court on Tuesday granted bail to Carlos Ghosn, the ousted chairman of Nissan Motor Co Ltd who is fighting charges of financial misconduct, after more than three months in detention, Ghosn’s lawyer said.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported that bail for Ghosn, who has been has been in custody at a detention center in Tokyo, was set at 1 billion yen ($8.94 million), and that he could be released as early as Tuesday.

Ghosn has been in custody since his initial arrest in late November over allegations he under-reported his compensation at Nissan for nearly a decade through 2018. He also has been charged with aggravated breach of trust.

The ex-chairman of Nissan, Mitsubishi Motors and France’s Renault has denied wrongdoing.

The court decision comes a day after the head of Ghosn’s newly appointed legal team, said he was optimistic the detained executive could win bail with a promise to submit to surveillance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-05  Authors: marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grants, court, tokyo, yen, nissan, exnissan, bail, chairman, ghosns, detention, custody, wrongdoingthe, jail, ghosn, months


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Here’s how much you’d have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month

For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I really didn’t miss it at all.” “This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. The Facebook s


For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I really didn’t miss it at all.” “This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. The Facebook s
Here’s how much you’d have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, way, youd, heres, facebook, pay, deactivate, spokesperson, really, didnt, users, study, social, lot


Here's how much you'd have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month

Facebook currently has a market capitalization of $463 billion. But what’s Facebook worth to you?

A study released in January found out how much people would need to be paid to deactivate their Facebook accounts for four weeks: “The median valuation was around $100 dollars a month,” Stanford economics professor, Matthew Gentzkow, who co-authored the study told Recode.

“But there’s a lot of spread,” said Gentzkow. “There’s a lot of people all the way from $0 to $100, and then a lot of people who gave really big numbers. Sort of like, ‘You couldn’t pay me enough to give up Facebook.’

“I can’t say conclusively, ‘Has Facebook proven good or bad for society?’ [but] what is clear is that the people who use it value it a lot,” Gentzkow said.

The study, which was published in the National Bureau of Economic Research, was authored by four professors, three from Stanford and one from New York University. For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. Some were not paid to deactivate (the control group) and other were paid.

Fifty-eight percent of study participants were willing to deactivate for less than $102.

And for the average person in the paid group, deactivating Facebook freed up to an hour per day of their time, the study says.

Being off Facebook also generally contributed to a better subjective well-being, the study found.

“Deactivation caused small but significant improvements in well-being, and in particular on self-reported happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and anxiety,” the study said.

“I was way less stressed. I wasn’t attached to my phone as much as I was before,” one study participant reported. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I felt more content. I think I was in a better mood generally. I thought I would miss seeing everyone’s day-to-day activities… I really didn’t miss it at all.”

Another said the time that had been devoted to Facebook was redistributed to offline activities: “I realized how much time I was wasting. I now have time for other things. I’ve been reading books and playing the piano which I used to do daily until the phone took over.”

For some, however, the time off of Facebook was isolating. “I was shut off from those [online] conversations, or just from being an observer of what people are doing or thinking. . . I didn’t like it at first at all, I felt very cut off from people that I like. . . I didn’t like it because I spend a lot of time by myself anyway, I’m kind of an introvert, so I use Facebook in a social aspect in a very big way,” one study participant responded.

“This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. “Our teams have been working hard on these issues. We’ve introduced several new tools so people can take greater control of their experience and made product updates to increase the number of meaningful conversations and connections people have on Facebook. We have more work to do, but we’re making steady progress.”

Those tools include controls allowing users to manage the time they spend on Facebook and a privacy check up, which lets users to review and change the settings that determine who you share what with, the Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It.

The Facebook spokesperson also pointed out some study results were positive: “Our results leave little doubt that Facebook produces large benefits for its users,” the conclusion of the study says. “Any discussion of social media’s downsides should not obscure the basic fact that it fulfills deep and widespread needs.” These comments were “encouraging,” said the spokesperson.

Benefits mentioned in the study include Facebook being a source of news and information, a source of entertainment, a tool to help organize events or groups or a social outlet for those who feel otherwise isolated.

See also:

Sam Adams founder: Unless you’re a sociopath, being happy is better than being rich

Bill Gates: These breakthrough technologies are going to profoundly change the world

Self-made millionaire: ‘Following your passion is bulls—‘ — do this instead


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, way, youd, heres, facebook, pay, deactivate, spokesperson, really, didnt, users, study, social, lot


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Here’s how much you’d have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month

For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I really didn’t miss it at all.” “This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. The Facebook s


For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I really didn’t miss it at all.” “This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. The Facebook s
Here’s how much you’d have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, way, youd, heres, facebook, pay, deactivate, spokesperson, really, didnt, users, study, social, lot


Here's how much you'd have to pay people to deactivate Facebook for a month

Facebook currently has a market capitalization of $463 billion. But what’s Facebook worth to you?

A study released in January found out how much people would need to be paid to deactivate their Facebook accounts for four weeks: “The median valuation was around $100 dollars a month,” Stanford economics professor, Matthew Gentzkow, who co-authored the study told Recode.

“But there’s a lot of spread,” said Gentzkow. “There’s a lot of people all the way from $0 to $100, and then a lot of people who gave really big numbers. Sort of like, ‘You couldn’t pay me enough to give up Facebook.’

“I can’t say conclusively, ‘Has Facebook proven good or bad for society?’ [but] what is clear is that the people who use it value it a lot,” Gentzkow said.

The study, which was published in the National Bureau of Economic Research, was authored by four professors, three from Stanford and one from New York University. For the study, researchers recruited 2,844 Facebook users and asked some of them to deactivate their Facebook account for four weeks, starting shortly after the 2018 U.S. midterm elections on Nov. 6. Some were not paid to deactivate (the control group) and other were paid.

Fifty-eight percent of study participants were willing to deactivate for less than $102.

And for the average person in the paid group, deactivating Facebook freed up to an hour per day of their time, the study says.

Being off Facebook also generally contributed to a better subjective well-being, the study found.

“Deactivation caused small but significant improvements in well-being, and in particular on self-reported happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and anxiety,” the study said.

“I was way less stressed. I wasn’t attached to my phone as much as I was before,” one study participant reported. “And I found I didn’t really care so much about things that were happening [online] because I was more focused on my own life… I felt more content. I think I was in a better mood generally. I thought I would miss seeing everyone’s day-to-day activities… I really didn’t miss it at all.”

Another said the time that had been devoted to Facebook was redistributed to offline activities: “I realized how much time I was wasting. I now have time for other things. I’ve been reading books and playing the piano which I used to do daily until the phone took over.”

For some, however, the time off of Facebook was isolating. “I was shut off from those [online] conversations, or just from being an observer of what people are doing or thinking. . . I didn’t like it at first at all, I felt very cut off from people that I like. . . I didn’t like it because I spend a lot of time by myself anyway, I’m kind of an introvert, so I use Facebook in a social aspect in a very big way,” one study participant responded.

“This is one study of many on this topic and it should be considered that way,” a Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It. “Our teams have been working hard on these issues. We’ve introduced several new tools so people can take greater control of their experience and made product updates to increase the number of meaningful conversations and connections people have on Facebook. We have more work to do, but we’re making steady progress.”

Those tools include controls allowing users to manage the time they spend on Facebook and a privacy check up, which lets users to review and change the settings that determine who you share what with, the Facebook spokesperson tells CNBC Make It.

The Facebook spokesperson also pointed out some study results were positive: “Our results leave little doubt that Facebook produces large benefits for its users,” the conclusion of the study says. “Any discussion of social media’s downsides should not obscure the basic fact that it fulfills deep and widespread needs.” These comments were “encouraging,” said the spokesperson.

Benefits mentioned in the study include Facebook being a source of news and information, a source of entertainment, a tool to help organize events or groups or a social outlet for those who feel otherwise isolated.

See also:

Sam Adams founder: Unless you’re a sociopath, being happy is better than being rich

Bill Gates: These breakthrough technologies are going to profoundly change the world

Self-made millionaire: ‘Following your passion is bulls—‘ — do this instead


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, marlene awaad, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, way, youd, heres, facebook, pay, deactivate, spokesperson, really, didnt, users, study, social, lot


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