US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019. U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter. The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Crash i


Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019. U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter. The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Crash i
US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, ethiopian, factor, aviation, boeing, plane, similar, think, strike, max, system, crash, bird, officials, stall, airlines


US aviation officials think a bird strike was factor in 737 Max crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019.

U.S. aviation officials believe a bird strike may have led to the deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max in March, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Boeing shares rose after the report Tuesday, gaining 1.2% by midday.

The fast-selling Boeing 737 Max airplanes have been grounded since shortly after that accident, which came less than five months after a similar crash in Indonesia. Together, the two crashes killed 346 people.

Crash investigators have indicated that bad sensor data triggered an anti-stall system aboard the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max that went down shortly after takeoff, a similar scenario to a crash of the same type of plane in Indonesia in October. The system automatically pushes the nose of the plane down if it perceives the aircraft is in a stall, the normal way to recover from such a position. That can be catastrophic if the plane is not in a stall, however.

Pilots in the two crashes were battling the system, known as MCAS, that repeatedly pushed the nose of their planes downward.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, ethiopian, factor, aviation, boeing, plane, similar, think, strike, max, system, crash, bird, officials, stall, airlines


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s


Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s
‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


'I don't need cash' — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. But he said the grounding after two deadly crashes has hurt business.

Europe’s largest discount airline, which ordered 135 Max 200 models with the option for 75 more, had been expecting to receive its first five between April and June but now expects them to be flying by November.

For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone.

“We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” “I don’t need cash,” he added, saying he wants movement on pricing. CFO Neil Sorahan told Reuters they plan to discuss “modest compensation.”

Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed a combined 346 people. Anti-stall software is suspected in the crashes.

The Federal Aviation Administration has come under fire as people questioned the agency’s oversight. The FAA’s internal probe of the 737 Max approval process reportedly found senior agency officials failed to review crucial assessments of the flight-control system.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes

Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors. On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots. How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers. To date, Boeing has flown th


Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors. On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots. How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers. To date, Boeing has flown th
Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, flight, updated, crashes, fatal, linked, max, antistall, crash, pilots, update, mcas, software, boeing, system, 737


Boeing says it has completed a software update for 737 Max anti-stall system linked to fatal crashes

Boeing said Thursday that it has completed a software update for its 737 Max planes, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again after aviation authorities grounded the jets around the world following two fatal crashes.

Boeing said it is planning to work with the Federal Aviation Administration to schedule a certification flight.

Shares of the airplane manufacturer rose after it released its statement, trading up 2.8 percent late in the session.

The nearly 400 Boeing 737 Max planes in airline fleets were grounded by aviation authorities in mid-March after a second deadly crash of the fast-selling plane in less than five months. Investigators in the latest crash, in Ethiopia, have pointed to an automated anti-stall system the that pilots battled in the last minutes of both crashes.

The system, known as MCAS, pushes the plane’s nose down repeatedly if the aircraft’s software senses it is going into a stall. That is a normal position to avoid a stall, but it can be catastrophic if the plane is not actually in a stall. Crash investigators have implicated the system in the Ethiopia crash and another 737 Max crash in October, saying it was triggered by bad data from the sensors.

On Thursday, Boeing said it has flown the 737 Max with the updated software for 360 hours on 207 flights. It also, as planned, has provided updating training materials for 737 Max pilots.

Some pilots complained that they were not told that the MCAS system was even on the planes, until after the October crash of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed all 189 on board. In order to transition from an older model of the Boeing 737 to the 737 Max, pilots said they were given training on a computer or tablet, with some courses that were less than an hour long. MCAS was not mentioned.

Boeing’s lack of disclosure has drawn scrutiny from lawmakers as well as the pilots. FAA’s acting chief, Daniel Elwell, at a House aviation panel’s hearing on Wednesday said the new MCAS system should have been included in pilot manuals.

How the Boeing 737 Max won approval from the FAA is the subject of several federal investigations and others by lawmakers.

Read Boeing’s full statement here:

Boeing has completed development of the updated software for the 737 MAX, along with associated simulator testing and the company’s engineering test flight. To date, Boeing has flown the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software for more than 360 hours on 207 flights. Boeing is now providing additional information to address Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requests that include detail on how pilots interact with the airplane controls and displays in different flight scenarios. Once the requests are addressed, Boeing will work with the FAA to schedule its certification test flight and submit final certification documentation. “With safety as our clear priority, we have completed all of the engineering test flights for the software update and are preparing for the final certification flight,” said Boeing Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg. “We’re committed to providing the FAA and global regulators all the information they need, and to getting it right. We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly. The accidents have only intensified our commitment to our values, including safety, quality and integrity, because we know lives depend on what we do.” In addition, Boeing has developed enhanced training and education materials that are now being reviewed with the FAA, global regulators, and airline customers to support return-to-service and longer-term operations. This includes a series of regional customer conferences being conducted around the world.

Correction: This story has been updated to note that Boeing conducted 207 test flights, not 270.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, completed, flight, updated, crashes, fatal, linked, max, antistall, crash, pilots, update, mcas, software, boeing, system, 737


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

What you need to know about Boeing’s 737 Max crisis

Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly


Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly
What you need to know about Boeing’s 737 Max crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: emma newburger leslie josephs, emma newburger, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, crisis, 737, crash, know, system, max, jets, need, boeing, pilots, planes, boeings


What you need to know about Boeing's 737 Max crisis

People walk past a part of the wreckage at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu, southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 10, 2019. Tiksa Negeri | Reuters

Boeing 737 Max planes around the world remain grounded more than two months after the second of two fatal crashes of the jets that killed a total of 346 people. Multiple investigations have since been opened, both into the crashes themselves and the regulatory process to approve the planes. Lawmakers and federal investigators are specifically examining how the Federal Aviation Administration in 2017 came to give a green light to the jet — a more fuel-efficient version of Boeing’s workhorse aircraft that’s been flying since the late 1960s — without disclosures to pilots about a new anti-stall system, which has since been implicated in the two air disasters. The Chicago-based manufacturer’s stock has lost more than 16%, closing at $353.81 Thursday, since the most recent crash, on March 10, as the number of probes and lawsuits grew and Boeing suspended deliveries of its best-selling jets. Here is a look at what is happening and what to expect with the 737 Max grounded as the busy summer travel season approaches.

Ongoing investigations

Multiple federal investigations are examining the Max and how it was approved by regulators, along with the planes’ new anti-stall system, known as MCAS. Boeing is also facing lawsuits from the families of crash victims. In March, the FBI joined an investigation of the certification process for the company’s 737 Max jets. House and Senate panels have each launched investigations. Boeing said Thursday it has developed a software update for the 737 Max, a key step in getting the aircraft flying again. The company said it completed more than 360 hours of testing on 207 flights with the updated software. It’s also developed new training materials that the FAA is reviewing. The FAA requested more information, including how the pilots would operate the controls and displays in different circumstances, Boeing said. “We’re committed to providing the FAA and global regulators all the information they need, and to getting it right,” said CEO Dennis Muilenburg in a statement on Thursday. “We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 MAX with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly.” Boeing aims to make the MCAS anti-stall system less powerful and give pilots greater control. Investigators have pointed to the system as a factor in the crashes, since the jets’ noses were repeatedly pushed down after the system was fed erroneous information from a sensor. The updated system will also use data from multiple sensors instead of one. It’s unclear how long the FAA will take to approve the fix and deem the planes safe to take to the skies again. In April, the FAA said Boeing’s update was “operationally suitable” in an initial review, and recommended that pilots take additional computer-based training for MCAS. Boeing has also taken a lot of heat following reports that it knew of problems with one of the safety features well before the two crashes, but did not disclose the issues to airlines or regulators until after the Lion Air crash in October.

A group of men and boys examine electronics taken from a pile of twisted metal gathered by workers during the continuing recovery efforts at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 on March 11, 2019 in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. Jemal Countess | Getty Images

The economic toll

Airlines have already missed out on hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue after aviation authorities ordered them to ground the planes. Southwest Airlines, which has 34 Boeing 737 Max jets in its fleet of about 750 planes, said the grounded jets contributed to $200 million in lost revenue during the first three months of the year. American Airlines, which has 24 of the jets, has canceled at least 15,000 flights through August so far. The cancellations due to the grounded Max each day equal about 2% of American’s daily summer flying and will reduce the airline’s pretax earnings this year by $350 million, the carrier said on April 26. Boeing said its costs in the first quarter rose by $1 billion from the groundings, though it can’t predict its financial performance for the rest of the year as deliveries of Max jets are on hold. It currently has a backlog of more than 4,000 orders for the 737 Max and recently cut monthly production of the jet from 52 to 42 planes in April. Analysts have speculated that the company faces billions of dollars in payments to airlines and families of crash victims. Several banks expect Boeing’s production cuts to hit U.S. GDP. Wells Fargo said in April that Boeing’s production cuts will reduce second-quarter GDP growth by 0.2%. Earlier in March, JP Morgan’s CEO said GDP could fall by 0.6% if production of the plane is halted temporarily. “Boeing’s production cuts are large enough to negatively impact incoming reads on the economy,” said Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House.

Scrambling to restore trust

Boeing has scrambled to persuade airlines and passengers to rally behind the Max jet following the company’s clumsy response to the two fatal crashes. In an effort to win back public trust, Boeing is reportedly hiring some major public relations firms to help reintroduce the jet. On an earnings call in April, Boeing CEO Muilenburg said that pilots would act as key messengers. “We think a key voice in all of this will be the pilots for our airlines, and their voice is very important,” he said. “That bond between the passenger and the pilot is one that’s critical, and so we’re working with our airline customers and those pilot voices to ensure that we can build on that going forward.”

Muilenburg hasn’t said there’s anything wrong with the 737 Max design. Pilots and airlines have complained to Boeing for failing to provide information about new software after the first crash in Indonesia, as well as incomplete information about safety features in the cockpit. Even assurances from Boeing and airlines that the planes are safe may not necessarily resonate with travelers. A Barclays’ survey of airline passengers that was published earlier this month showed that many people will avoid the 737 Max “for an extended period” once it’s allowed to fly again, with over half of respondents saying they’d choose a different aircraft if given the choice. However, some aviation experts have said the stigma associated with the Max, and damage to Boeing’s reputation, will likely dissipate over time. “If Boeing does what it needs to do to fix the problem, if the airline is certified by safety regulators and goes on to fly reliably, then the stigma that exists now will fade away,” Henry Harteveldt, president of Atmosphere Research Group, told CNBC in April.

What’s next


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: emma newburger leslie josephs, emma newburger, leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airlines, crisis, 737, crash, know, system, max, jets, need, boeing, pilots, planes, boeings


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November

Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times. The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported. The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known a


Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times. The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported. The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known a
Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, software, morning, crash, recording, audio, max, reveals, calls, know, resisted, pilots, meeting, fix, system, boeing, angry


Audio recording reveals Boeing resisted angry calls from pilots for 737 Max fix in November

Weeks after the first fatal crash of Boeing’s popular 737 Max aircraft in October, American Airlines pilots angrily pushed company officials to fix the anti-stall software that has now been implicated in two deadly Max crashes, the Dallas Morning News reported.

Pilots asked Boeing at a private meeting in November to take emergency action that would have likely grounded the Max, but Boeing officials resisted, according to an audio recording of the meeting reviewed by the Dallas Morning News and New York Times.

The meeting attendees included Mike Sinnett, a Boeing vice president; Craig Bomben, a top Boeing test pilot; and senior lobbyist John Moloney, the Times reported.

Sinnett reportedly told the pilots at the meeting that the company was working on a software fix that would be ready in as little as six weeks, and it would not rush the process, according to the Times. He also said it was unclear whether the new system was to blame in the Lion Air crash, which killed 189 people.

“No one has yet to conclude that the sole cause of this was this function on the airplane,” Sinnett said at the meeting, which took place at the Allied Pilots Association headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas. The group represents American Airlines pilots.

The Dallas Morning News said the union recorded the meeting without Boeing’s knowledge and shared the audio with reporters because it was concerned Boeing wasn’t treating the situation as an emergency at the time.

The pilots said they were not aware of the Max’s anti-stall software system, known as MCAS. And they were angry that the system was not disclosed to them until after the October crash in Indonesia.

“These guys didn’t even know the damn system was on the airplane — nor did anybody else,” American pilot Michael Michaelis said at the meeting.

Michaelis, the union’s head of safety, also said Boeing should push the Federal Aviation Administration to issue an additional emergency airworthiness directive in order to update the software.

“My question to you, as Boeing, is why wouldn’t you say this is the smartest thing to do?” Michaelis asked. “Say we’re going to do everything we can to protect that traveling public in accordance with what our pilots unions are telling us.”

Todd Wissing, another American pilot, was angry the MCAS system was not included in the Max training manual.

“I would think that there would be a priority of putting explanations of things that could kill you,” Wissing told Boeing executives.

Sinnett said the company did not believe that pilots needed to know about the software, since they were already trained on how to behave in emergency scenarios.

“I don’t know that understanding this system would’ve changed the outcome on this. In a million miles, you’re going to maybe fly this airplane, maybe once you’re going to see this, ever,” Sinnett said. “So we try not to overload the crews with information that’s unnecessary so they actually know the information we believe is important.”

Sinnett did acknowledge that Boeing was investigating potential errors in the jet’s design.

“One of the questions will be, is our design assumption wrong?” he said. “We’re going through that whole thought process of, were our assumptions really even valid when we did this?”

Boeing is still working on a software upgrade as the Max remains grounded through the summer. The company has revealed that it knew about the problem linked to sensors in the Max jet the year before the Lion Air crash, but did not issue a fix.

Weeks after a second Max crash in Ethiopia, which killed 157 people, Boeing acknowledged for the first time that bad data feeding into the MCAS system played a role in the crashes.

Read the original report in the Dallas Morning News


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, going, software, morning, crash, recording, audio, max, reveals, calls, know, resisted, pilots, meeting, fix, system, boeing, angry


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

FAA reportedly didn’t review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes. The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fle


The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes. The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fle
FAA reportedly didn’t review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, shed, system, reportedly, fatal, wall, senior, crashes, socalled, review, safety, faa, crucial, street, didnt, max


FAA reportedly didn't review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes

The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes.

The preliminary findings, reported by The Wall Street Journal, are the first to shed light on how the faulty design of the so-called MCAS system, which led to crashes that killed 346 people in October and March, remained in the Max fleet. Boeing’s Max jets have been grounded since March.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, shed, system, reportedly, fatal, wall, senior, crashes, socalled, review, safety, faa, crucial, street, didnt, max


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Airfares climb ahead of busy summer travel season

Earlier this week, one-way airfares for most U.S. routes went up $5, the first fare hike this year to affect a majority of domestic flights. The clincher came on Tuesday when Southwest Airlines, which has a long track record of resisting widespread increases in ticket prices, raised 180,000 individual fares by $5. While travelers may not like paying more for a plane ticket, the reality is airfares today are far lower than a few years ago. Berg attributes the lower prices to more competition on m


Earlier this week, one-way airfares for most U.S. routes went up $5, the first fare hike this year to affect a majority of domestic flights. The clincher came on Tuesday when Southwest Airlines, which has a long track record of resisting widespread increases in ticket prices, raised 180,000 individual fares by $5. While travelers may not like paying more for a plane ticket, the reality is airfares today are far lower than a few years ago. Berg attributes the lower prices to more competition on m
Airfares climb ahead of busy summer travel season Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: phil lebeau, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ahead, climb, busy, airlines, max, season, summer, ticket, berg, routes, travel, lower, southwest, domestic, airfares, fares


Airfares climb ahead of busy summer travel season

Don’t look now, U.S. airfares just went up.

Earlier this week, one-way airfares for most U.S. routes went up $5, the first fare hike this year to affect a majority of domestic flights. The clincher came on Tuesday when Southwest Airlines, which has a long track record of resisting widespread increases in ticket prices, raised 180,000 individual fares by $5.

“We’ve never met a Southwest-blessed fare increase that didn’t ultimately stick at the industry level,” wrote airline analyst Jamie Baker of J.P. Morgan. “Extensive matching has already occurred, including at Alaska, Delta and United.”

In April, the travel website Hopper, which tracks airfares, found the average domestic round-trip ticket sold for $229 and is expected to rise as high as $240 by June before pulling back. While travelers may not like paying more for a plane ticket, the reality is airfares today are far lower than a few years ago.

“We are seeing domestic airfare down compared to the last two or three years,” said Hayley Berg, economist for Hopper. Berg attributes the lower prices to more competition on many routes and the expansion of ultra-low-cost carriers such as Spirit Airlines.

The growth in low-cost fares has also been helped by established airlines such as American, Delta and United offering more low-price basic economy fares. The legacy airlines are intent on making sure they do not lose customers and market share to low-cost airlines.

While the industry is adding more flights this summer, Southwest, American and United are all adjusting their schedules because their Boeing 737 Max airplanes are grounded. Combined, the three airlines have parked more than 70 Max jets while Boeing works to fix the planes and get them recertified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Berg says the Max would have made up less than 5% of the daily departures for Southwest and American.

“Although it is a disruption to them, on the relative scale it is pretty small. So what we are seeing them do is shift capacity to their highest demand routes and cut back or cancel routes in the short term that are lower demand,” said Berg.

— CNBC’s Meghan Reeder contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: phil lebeau, scott olson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ahead, climb, busy, airlines, max, season, summer, ticket, berg, routes, travel, lower, southwest, domestic, airfares, fares


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more

Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018. Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service. “We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is


Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018. Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service. “We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roku, boeing, ceo, view, max, 737, washington, fliers, lululemon, biggest, calls, wall, weight, day, meat, avoid, analyst


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Boeing, Beyond Meat, Lululemon, Roku & more

Dennis Muilenburg, CEO of Boeing Inc. speaking at the Business Roundtable CEO Innovation Summit in Washington D.C. on Dec. 6th, 2018.

Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Tuesday:

Barclays downgraded Boeing to ‘equal weight’ from ‘overweight’

Barclays said it believes that fliers will avoid the Boeing 737 Max when it’s back in service.

“We expect the recovery of 737 MAX production to take longer than expected and our 2019-21 EPS & FCF forecasts are below consensus as a result. Our view is informed by our survey that indicates a large portion of fliers are likely to avoid 737 MAX for an extended period beyond when the grounding is lifted.”

Read more about this call here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-07  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roku, boeing, ceo, view, max, 737, washington, fliers, lululemon, biggest, calls, wall, weight, day, meat, avoid, analyst


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn’t necessary for safe operation of aircraft

Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft. The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. In 2017, w


Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft. The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. In 2017, w
Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn’t necessary for safe operation of aircraft Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-05  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, boeing, safe, alert, max, aoa, 737, operation, necessary, software, disabled, wasnt, air, aircraft, indicator, disagree


Boeing says disabled alert on 737 Max wasn't necessary for safe operation of aircraft

Boeing said Sunday a standard alert that had been disabled on the 737 Max jet due to a glitch was not necessary to safely operate the aircraft.

Boeing’s statement comes after Southwest Airlines, the company’s largest 737 Max customer, said Boeing did not inform it about the disabled alert until after the fatal crash of a Lion Air 737 Max in Indonesia last October.

Known as an angle-of-attack disagree light, the indicator flashes if an aircraft’s angle-of-attack sensors transmit faulty data about the pitch of the plane’s nose.

Boeing said the disagree light was included as a standard, stand-alone feature on the 737 Max, but it was linked to another optional feature called an angle-of-attack indicator. The disagree light would only work if airlines opted for the angle-of-attack indicator.

In 2017, well before the Lion Air crash, engineers discovered the 737 Max display software didn’t meet the requirements for the disagree alert. Boeing then followed its “standard process for determining the appropriate resolution of such issues,” the company said in a statement Sunday.

“That review, which involved, multiple company subject matter experts, determined that the absence of the AOA Disagree alert did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation,” the statement continued. “Accordingly, the review concluded, the existing functionality was acceptable until the alert and the indicator could be de-linked in the next planned display system software update.”

Though engineers were investigating, Boeing said senior company leadership wasn’t involved in the review and “first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident.”

The 737 Max was grounded by the FAA in March in the wake of two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Just months after the Lion Air crash, a Boeing 737 Max 8 went down just minutes after taking off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Several major airlines have extended Max flight cancellations through the summer. American has canceled Max flights through Aug. 19, totaling 115 flights per day, while Southwest has canceled through Aug. 5 and United through June 5.

In Sunday’s statement, Boeing said it discussed the status of the AOA disagree alert with the Federal Aviation Administration after the Lion Air crash. The company convened a safety review board in December 2018, which confirmed that the absence of the instrument did not present a safety issue, Boeing said.

Boeing plans to issue a software update to implement the AOA disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature when the Max returns to service.

Here is Boeing’s full statement:

On every airplane delivered to our customers, including the MAX, all flight data and information needed to safely operate the aircraft is provided in the flight deck on the primary flight deck displays. This information is provided full-time in the pilots’ primary field of view, and it always has been. Air speed, attitude, altitude, vertical speed, heading and engine power settings are the primary parameters the flight crews use to safely operate the airplane in normal flight. Stick shaker and the pitch limit indicator are the primary features used for the operation of the airplane at elevated angles of attack. All recommended pilot actions, checklists, and training are based upon these primary indicators. Neither the angle of attack indicator nor the AOA Disagree alert are necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. They provide supplemental information only, and have never been considered safety features on commercial jet transport airplanes. The Boeing design requirements for the 737 MAX included the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature, in keeping with Boeing’s fundamental design philosophy of retaining commonality with the 737NG. In 2017, within several months after beginning 737 MAX deliveries, engineers at Boeing identified that the 737 MAX display system software did not correctly meet the AOA Disagree alert requirements. The software delivered to Boeing linked the AOA Disagree alert to the AOA indicator, which is an optional feature on the MAX and the NG. Accordingly, the software activated the AOA Disagree alert only if an airline opted for the AOA indicator. When the discrepancy between the requirements and the software was identified, Boeing followed its standard process for determining the appropriate resolution of such issues. That review, which involved multiple company subject matter experts, determined that the absence of the AOA Disagree alert did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. Accordingly, the review concluded, the existing functionality was acceptable until the alert and the indicator could be delinked in the next planned display system software update. Senior company leadership was not involved in the review and first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident. Approximately a week after the Lion Air accident, on November 6, 2018, Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB), which was followed a day later by the FAA’s issuance of an Airworthiness Directive (AD). In identifying the AOA Disagree alert as one among a number of indications that could result from erroneous AOA, both the OMB and the AD described the AOA Disagree alert feature as available only if the AOA indicator option is installed. Boeing discussed the status of the AOA Disagree alert with the FAA in the wake of the Lion Air accident. At that time, Boeing informed the FAA that Boeing engineers had identified the software issue in 2017 and had determined per Boeing’s standard process that the issue did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation. In December 2018, Boeing convened a Safety Review Board (SRB) to consider again whether the absence of the AOA Disagree alert from certain 737 MAX flight displays presented a safety issue. That SRB confirmed Boeing’s prior conclusion that it did not. Boeing shared this conclusion and the supporting SRB analysis with the FAA. Boeing is issuing a display system software update, to implement the AOA Disagree alert as a standard, standalone feature before the MAX returns to service. When the MAX returns to service, all MAX production aircraft will have an activated and operable AOA Disagree alert and an optional angle of attack indicator. All customers with previously delivered MAX airplanes will have the ability to activate the AOA Disagree alert.

—CNBC’s Amanda Macia and Spencer Kimball contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-05  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, standard, boeing, safe, alert, max, aoa, 737, operation, necessary, software, disabled, wasnt, air, aircraft, indicator, disagree


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Watch Boeing’s annual shareholder meeting

[The stream is slated to start at 11:15 am ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] Boeing is hosting its shareholder annual meeting at its corporate headquarters in Chicago. Two leading shareholder advisory firms have proposed voting against reinstating CEO Dennis Muilenburg as executive chairman in the crash aftermath. The meeting also follows reports that Boeing failed to tell Southwest Airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration that the safety feature


[The stream is slated to start at 11:15 am ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] Boeing is hosting its shareholder annual meeting at its corporate headquarters in Chicago. Two leading shareholder advisory firms have proposed voting against reinstating CEO Dennis Muilenburg as executive chairman in the crash aftermath. The meeting also follows reports that Boeing failed to tell Southwest Airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration that the safety feature
Watch Boeing’s annual shareholder meeting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, max, shareholder, indonesia, muilenburg, watch, annual, jets, southwest, boeing, youtube, crash, meeting


Watch Boeing's annual shareholder meeting

[The stream is slated to start at 11:15 am ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

Boeing is hosting its shareholder annual meeting at its corporate headquarters in Chicago. Shareholders will likely be eager to hear more about the impact of the 737 Max groundings on the planemaker’s future business after the jet’s anti-stall software was implicated in the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

Two leading shareholder advisory firms have proposed voting against reinstating CEO Dennis Muilenburg as executive chairman in the crash aftermath. Muilenburg defended that title on the earnings call last week.

The meeting also follows reports that Boeing failed to tell Southwest Airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration that the safety feature that warns pilots about malfunctioning sensors had been deactivated on the Max jets. Southwest did not know about the deactivation until after the Lion Air flight crash in Indonesia, and said that Boeing indicated in its manual that the disagree lights were functional, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The jets have been grounded since mid-March.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: cnbccom staff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, max, shareholder, indonesia, muilenburg, watch, annual, jets, southwest, boeing, youtube, crash, meeting


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post