Boeing invites pilots, regulators to briefing as it looks to return 737 MAX to service

Boeing said it invited more than 200 global airline pilots, technical leaders and regulators for an information session on Wednesday as it looks to return the 737 MAX to commercial service. The meeting is a sign that Boeing’s planned software patch is nearing completion, though it will still need regulatory approval. The 737 MAX is Boeing’s best-selling plane, with orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices. Teams from the three U.S. airlines that own 737 MAX jets participated in a sessi


Boeing said it invited more than 200 global airline pilots, technical leaders and regulators for an information session on Wednesday as it looks to return the 737 MAX to commercial service. The meeting is a sign that Boeing’s planned software patch is nearing completion, though it will still need regulatory approval. The 737 MAX is Boeing’s best-selling plane, with orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices. Teams from the three U.S. airlines that own 737 MAX jets participated in a sessi
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: mike kane, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, briefing, invites, boeing, crash, send, ethiopian, service, return, 737, software, looks, max, airlines, planned, regulators, pilots


Boeing invites pilots, regulators to briefing as it looks to return 737 MAX to service

Boeing said it invited more than 200 global airline pilots, technical leaders and regulators for an information session on Wednesday as it looks to return the 737 MAX to commercial service.

The meeting is a sign that Boeing’s planned software patch is nearing completion, though it will still need regulatory approval.

Over the weekend, Ethiopian Airlines executives had questioned whether Boeing had told pilots enough about “aggressive” software that pushes the plane’s nose down, a focus of investigation into a deadly crash in Ethiopia this month that led to the global grounding of 737 MAX jets.

The informational session in Renton, Washington on Wednesday is part of a plan to reach all current and many future 737 MAX operators and their home regulators to discuss software and training updates to the jet, Boeing said in a statement.

Garuda Indonesia, which on Friday said it planned to cancel its order for 49 737 MAX jets citing a loss of passenger trust after the crashes, was invited to the briefing, CEO Ari Askhara told Reuters on Monday.

“We were informed on Friday, but because it is short notice we can’t send a pilot there,” he said, adding the airline had requested a webinar with Boeing but that idea had been rejected.

A Boeing spokeswoman said the Wednesday event was one of a series of in-person information sessions.

“We have been scheduling and will continue to arrange additional meetings to communicate with all current and many future MAX customers and operators,” she said.

Garuda has only one 737 MAX and had been reconsidering its order before the Ethiopian crash, as has fellow Indonesian carrier Lion Air, which experienced a deadly crash in October.

Lion Air Managing Director Daniel Putut said Boeing had informed the airline of the Wednesday meeting but it might not attend. He declined to provide further comment.

Singapore Airlines said on Monday its offshoot SilkAir, which operates the 737 MAX, had received the invitation to the Wednesday event and would send representatives.

Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore representatives will also attend, a spokeswoman for the regulator said.

Korean Air Lines Co Ltd, which before the grounding had been due to receive its first 737 MAX in April, said it planned to send pilots to Renton. South Korean low-cost carrier Eastar Jet will send two pilots, a spokesman said.

Ethiopian Airlines did not respond immedidately to a request for comment about the meeting.

The 737 MAX is Boeing’s best-selling plane, with orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices.

Teams from the three U.S. airlines that own 737 MAX jets participated in a session in Renton reviewing a planned software upgrade on Saturday.

A U.S. official briefed on the matter Saturday said the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not yet signed off on the software upgrade and training but the goal is to review them in coming weeks and approve them by April.

It remained unclear whether the software upgrade, called “design changes” by the FAA, will resolve concerns stemming from the ongoing investigation into the March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 on board.

“After the crash it came to our attention that the system is aggressive,” Yohannes Hailemariam, vice president for flight operations at Ethiopian, told local reporters speaking in the Amharic language.

“It gives a message of stalling and it takes immediate action which is faster than the action which pilots were briefed to take by Boeing,” said Yohannes, himself a pilot with over 30 years of experience, including flying Boeing’s 777 and 787.

The U.S. official said planned changes included 15 minutes of training to help pilots deactivate the anti-stall system known as MCAS in the event of faulty sensor data or other issues. It also included some self-guided instruction, the official added.

American Airlines said Sunday it will extend flight cancellations through April 24 because of the grounding of the 737 MAX and cut some additional flights.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: mike kane, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, briefing, invites, boeing, crash, send, ethiopian, service, return, 737, software, looks, max, airlines, planned, regulators, pilots


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Ethiopian Airlines still ‘believes in Boeing’ despite 737 Max crash, CEO says

The chief executive of Ethiopian airlines has said his company “believes in Boeing,” despite a tragic crash just over two weeks ago. A Boeing 737 Max 8 plane killed all 157 people on board on March 10 just minutes into its flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi. Questions over the Boeing plane have arisen amid similarities with the crash of a Lion Air 737 Max plane in Indonesia last October that killed 189 people. “Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. Gebremariam also defended his


The chief executive of Ethiopian airlines has said his company “believes in Boeing,” despite a tragic crash just over two weeks ago. A Boeing 737 Max 8 plane killed all 157 people on board on March 10 just minutes into its flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi. Questions over the Boeing plane have arisen amid similarities with the crash of a Lion Air 737 Max plane in Indonesia last October that killed 189 people. “Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. Gebremariam also defended his
Ethiopian Airlines still ‘believes in Boeing’ despite 737 Max crash, CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: david reid, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, despite, crash, executive, believes, max, ethiopian, plane, issued, airlines, ceo, boeing, 737, killed


Ethiopian Airlines still 'believes in Boeing' despite 737 Max crash, CEO says

The chief executive of Ethiopian airlines has said his company “believes in Boeing,” despite a tragic crash just over two weeks ago.

A Boeing 737 Max 8 plane killed all 157 people on board on March 10 just minutes into its flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi.

Questions over the Boeing plane have arisen amid similarities with the crash of a Lion Air 737 Max plane in Indonesia last October that killed 189 people.

“Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. They have been a partner of ours for many years,” Tewolde Gebremariam wrote in a statement Monday.

The executive added that he did not want to yet speculate on the cause of the Ethiopian crash but said the investigation was well underway and he expected to discover the truth.

Gebremariam also defended his airline’s training procedure, noting that Ethiopian pilots who flew the 737 Max 8 were fully trained on a service bulletin issued by Boeing and the Emergency Airworthiness Directive issued by the USA Federal Aviation Authority (FAA).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: david reid, anadolu agency, getty images
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Airlines warn of cancellations as Boeing readies 737 Max software fix

Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane. Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines


Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane. Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: leslie josephs, ralph freso, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulators, crash, changes, max, readies, warn, cancellations, airlines, renton, software, planes, fix, boeing, 737


Airlines warn of cancellations as Boeing readies 737 Max software fix

Airlines are preparing for more flight cancellations as Boeing readies a software fix for its best-selling 737 Max planes following two fatal crashes of the aircraft that prompted regulators around the world to ground the plane.

Pilots from U.S. carriers on Saturday tested Boeing’s software changes to the automatic anti-stall system in Renton, Washington, where Boeing assembles the 737 Max planes. Representatives from Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines — the U.S. airlines that fly the 737 Max — also met with Boeing officials about the software changes and additional pilot training.

The U.S. government ordered airlines to suspend flights using the Boeing 737 Max plane, joining dozens of other countries in taking that step amid concerns about the similarities between the March 10 crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max and a Lion Air crash in October, which together killed 346 people.

Boeing late Sunday said it invited more than 200 airline pilots and regulators to Renton last Wednesday to “share more details about our plan for supporting the safe return of the 737 MAX to commercial service.”

The Federal Aviation Administration expects to get a look at the software early in the week, according to a person familiar with the matter. The agency needs to certify Boeing’s changes before it can be added to the aircraft.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: leslie josephs, ralph freso, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, regulators, crash, changes, max, readies, warn, cancellations, airlines, renton, software, planes, fix, boeing, 737


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American Airlines is cancelling 90 flights a day as Boeing 737 Max remains grounded

American Airlines is cancelling 90 flights per day through April 24 as a result of the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft. The airline, which had been flying 24 of the Boeing planes, said the cancellations were being made in an effort to provide more certainty and avoid last minute flight disruptions. American said it continues to await information from the Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, National Transportation Safety Board, other regulatory authorities and


American Airlines is cancelling 90 flights per day through April 24 as a result of the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft. The airline, which had been flying 24 of the Boeing planes, said the cancellations were being made in an effort to provide more certainty and avoid last minute flight disruptions. American said it continues to await information from the Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, National Transportation Safety Board, other regulatory authorities and
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: eric rosenbaum, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plane, flights, transportation, planes, 737, grounded, cancelling, airlines, aviation, indonesia, max, boeing, american, day, remains, 90, provide, customers


American Airlines is cancelling 90 flights a day as Boeing 737 Max remains grounded

American Airlines is cancelling 90 flights per day through April 24 as a result of the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

The airline, which had been flying 24 of the Boeing planes, said the cancellations were being made in an effort to provide more certainty and avoid last minute flight disruptions.

“By proactively canceling these flights, we are able to provide better service to our customers with availability and rebooking options,” American said in a statement.

American said it continues to await information from the Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, National Transportation Safety Board, other regulatory authorities and Boeing that would permit the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in its fleet to resume flying.

The Boeing 737 Max was grounded by aviation authorities across the world, including the FAA, after two similar crashes in recent months that have implicated a flight software system on the plane known as MCAS.

The Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed on Mar. 10, killing all 157 aboard, and the Lion Air plane that went down in Indonesia on Oct. 29, which killed all 189 passengers and crew, were both 737 Max jets.

The two incidents have also led the Department of Transportation to ask for an audit of the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of the 737 Max 8 planes, while the FBI has reportedly joined in a criminal investigation of the certification process for the jets.

As regulators and lawmakers continue to investigate the plane, Garuda Indonesia became the first airline to attempt to cancel its order for 737 Max planes on Friday, a deal worth nearly $6 billion.

American’s reservations team is contacting affected customers directly by email or telephone. “We know these cancellations and changes may affect some of our customers, and we are working to limit the impact to the smallest number of customers.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: eric rosenbaum, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plane, flights, transportation, planes, 737, grounded, cancelling, airlines, aviation, indonesia, max, boeing, american, day, remains, 90, provide, customers


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Indonesian airline Garuda is canceling its order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets

Airline Garuda Indonesia said Friday it is requesting a cancellation to its current order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets. Reuters, citing Garuda’s CFO, said the company may change its 737 Max order to another type of Boeing jet. In response to CNBC’s request for comment, Garuda spokesman Ikhsan Rosan said the airline sent a letter to Boeing on March 14 to cancel its order for the 737 Max jets. Garuda currently only has one Boeing 737 Max 8 in its fleet, according to Reuters. The Indonesian airline i


Airline Garuda Indonesia said Friday it is requesting a cancellation to its current order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets. Reuters, citing Garuda’s CFO, said the company may change its 737 Max order to another type of Boeing jet. In response to CNBC’s request for comment, Garuda spokesman Ikhsan Rosan said the airline sent a letter to Boeing on March 14 to cancel its order for the 737 Max jets. Garuda currently only has one Boeing 737 Max 8 in its fleet, according to Reuters. The Indonesian airline i
Indonesian airline Garuda is canceling its order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: yen nee lee, matt mills mcknight
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, canceling, max, 737, order, indonesian, 49, cancel, garuda, boeing, indonesia, wanted, jets, airline


Indonesian airline Garuda is canceling its order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets

Airline Garuda Indonesia said Friday it is requesting a cancellation to its current order for 49 Boeing 737 Max jets.

Newswires Reuters and AFP both reported the company’s plans.

Reuters, citing Garuda’s CFO, said the company may change its 737 Max order to another type of Boeing jet. The national carrier of Indonesia did not explain why it no longer wanted the planes.

In response to CNBC’s request for comment, Garuda spokesman Ikhsan Rosan said the airline sent a letter to Boeing on March 14 to cancel its order for the 737 Max jets. Garuda has not heard back from Boeing, but the aircraft manufacturer will visit Jakarta on March 28 for “further discussion,” said Rosan.

Garuda currently only has one Boeing 737 Max 8 in its fleet, according to Reuters.

The Indonesian airline is the first to publicly confirmed plans to cancel an order for the Boeing jets after two fatal crashes involving the 737 Max 8. The planes have been grounded by authorities in multiple countries — including in the U.S., Europe, China and Indonesia.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-22  Authors: yen nee lee, matt mills mcknight
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, canceling, max, 737, order, indonesian, 49, cancel, garuda, boeing, indonesia, wanted, jets, airline


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Crashed jets reportedly lacked key safety features because Boeing charged extra for them

The angle of attack indicator determines how much the plane’s nose is tilted, and the disagree light is activated if the jet’s sensors are giving contradictory signals. Boeing will now make the disagree light free of charge on all new 737 Max planes, after the deadly crashes caused all the Max planes to be grounded, according to the Times. The angle of attack indicator will remain an option that airlines can purchase, the report said. Neither safety feature was mandated by the Federal Aviation A


The angle of attack indicator determines how much the plane’s nose is tilted, and the disagree light is activated if the jet’s sensors are giving contradictory signals. Boeing will now make the disagree light free of charge on all new 737 Max planes, after the deadly crashes caused all the Max planes to be grounded, according to the Times. The angle of attack indicator will remain an option that airlines can purchase, the report said. Neither safety feature was mandated by the Federal Aviation A
Crashed jets reportedly lacked key safety features because Boeing charged extra for them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, attack, extra, lacked, max, reportedly, jets, angle, boeing, airlines, key, pilots, times, 737, safety, crashed, features, charged


Crashed jets reportedly lacked key safety features because Boeing charged extra for them

Boeing shares plummet after a deadly crash of 737 jet — Here’s what three experts say shareholders should watch 2 Hours Ago | 01:46

Boeing jets in Ethiopia and Indonesia lacked two safety features in their cockpits because the company charged extra to install them.

The features could have helped pilots detect erroneous readings, which some experts believe might be connected to the planes’ failures, The New York Times reports.

Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, which crashed within five months of each other, were brand new but were not equipped with an angle of attack indicator or an angle of attack disagree light, the paper said. The angle of attack indicator determines how much the plane’s nose is tilted, and the disagree light is activated if the jet’s sensors are giving contradictory signals.

Boeing will now make the disagree light free of charge on all new 737 Max planes, after the deadly crashes caused all the Max planes to be grounded, according to the Times. The angle of attack indicator will remain an option that airlines can purchase, the report said. The company is also planning a new software update.

Neither safety feature was mandated by the Federal Aviation Administration, but experts say it is key to flight safety.

“They’re critical, and cost almost nothing for the airlines to install,” Bjorn Fehrm, an analyst at aviation consultancy Leeham, told the Times. “Boeing charges for them because it can. But they’re vital for safety.”

Boeing did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment. Ethiopian Airlines said in a statement Thursday that its pilots had been following FAA and Boeing guidance.

“Ethiopian Airlines pilots completed the Boeing recommended and FAA approved differences training from the B-737 NG aircraft to the B-737 MAX aircraft before the phase in of the B-737-8 MAX fleet to the Ethiopian operation and before they start flying the B-737-8 MAX,” the airline said in a statement.

“We urge all concerned to refrain from making such uninformed, incorrect, irresponsible and misleading statements during the period of the accident investigation. International regulations require all stakeholders to wait patiently for the result of the investigation,” it said.

It’s still unclear what caused the crashes. Investigators are looking into whether a new software system added to combat stalls in Boeing’s 737 Max series might have been a trigger, as well as faulty data from sensors on the Lion Air plane that might have caused a system malfunction.

Dennis A. Muilenburg, Boeing’s CEO, said the company was working on making the 737 Max safer.

“As part of our standard practice following any accident, we examine our aircraft design and operation, and when appropriate, institute product updates to further improve safety,” he said in a statement Sunday.

An email sent to Lion Air, outside regular business hours, was not immediately answered.

The full New York Times story can be found on its website.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21  Authors: emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, planes, attack, extra, lacked, max, reportedly, jets, angle, boeing, airlines, key, pilots, times, 737, safety, crashed, features, charged


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Boeing CEO restates ‘relentless commitment’ to safety

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months. Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boe


Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months. Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boe
Boeing CEO restates ‘relentless commitment’ to safety Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: leslie josephs, joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commitment, boeing, relentless, planes, air, max, lion, restates, ceo, safety, flight, ethiopian, 737


Boeing CEO restates 'relentless commitment' to safety

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg restated the aircraft maker’s commitment to safety on Monday night, as concerns grow about the second deadly crash of the manufacturer’s top selling Boeing 737 Max planes in less than five months.

The executive said that Boeing will maintain its “relentless commitment to make safe airplanes even safer.”

“We also understand and regret the challenges for our customers and the flying public caused by the fleet’s grounding,” Muilenburg added.

His comments come after French and Ethiopian investigators said data extracted from the black boxes of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed March 10 showed “clear similarities” with a deadly Lion Air flight that plunged into the Java Sea in October.

Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Boeing 737 Max planes last week after the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which killed all 157 people on board.

Boeing and Muilenburg are under increased scrutiny following the two crashes, which killed 346 people. Investigators in the Indonesia crash have indicated the pilots struggled with an automated anti-stall system that Boeing added to the 737 Max planes. That system causes the nose of the plane to point downward, the way airplanes can recover from a stall, but can have catastrophic results if the planes’ sensors receive erroneous information.

Many pilots were not aware the system existed until after the Lion Air crash and said they did not receive in-depth training to transition to the Boeing 737 Max from older models of the plane.

Boeing last week said it was working on a software fix for the planes as well as updated pilot training and manuals.

The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous people familiar with the matter, reported Sunday that a grand jury issued a subpoena to “at least one person” involved in the development of the plane. It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. It was also confirmed by a source to CNBC.

The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes.

More than 370 of the Boeing 737 Max planes are in airline fleets worldwide and Boeing has more than 4,600 on order.

Shares of Boeing, a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, edged lower by 0.25 percent in after-hours trading. The stock fell 1.8 percent Monday to close at $372.28, sharply lower than the 52-week high of $446.01 it reached at the beginning of March.

Read the full statement below.

We know lives depend on the work we do, and our teams embrace that responsibility with a deep sense of commitment every day. Our purpose at Boeing is to bring family, friends and loved ones together with our commercial airplanes—safely. The tragic losses of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and Lion Air Flight 610 affect us all, uniting people and nations in shared grief for all those in mourning. Our hearts are heavy, and we continue to extend our deepest sympathies to the loved ones of the passengers and crew on board. Safety is at the core of who we are at Boeing, and ensuring safe and reliable travel on our airplanes is an enduring value and our absolute commitment to everyone. This overarching focus on safety spans and binds together our entire global aerospace industry and communities. We’re united with our airline customers, international regulators and government authorities in our efforts to support the most recent investigation, understand the facts of what happened and help prevent future tragedies. Based on facts from the Lion Air Flight 610 accident and emerging data as it becomes available from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accident, we’re taking actions to fully ensure the safety of the 737 MAX. We also understand and regret the challenges for our customers and the flying public caused by the fleet’s grounding. Work is progressing thoroughly and rapidly to learn more about the Ethiopian Airlines accident and understand the information from the airplane’s cockpit voice and flight data recorders. Our team is on-site with investigators to support the investigation and provide technical expertise. The Ethiopia Accident Investigation Bureau will determine when and how it’s appropriate to release additional details. Boeing has been in the business of aviation safety for more than 100 years, and we’ll continue providing the best products, training and support to our global airline customers and pilots. This is an ongoing and relentless commitment to make safe airplanes even safer. Soon we’ll release a software update and related pilot training for the 737 MAX that will address concerns discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident. We’ve been working in full cooperation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Transportation and the National Transportation Safety Board on all issues relating to both the Lion Air and the Ethiopian Airlines accidents since the Lion Air accident occurred in October last year. Our entire team is devoted to the quality and safety of the aircraft we design, produce and support. I’ve dedicated my entire career to Boeing, working shoulder to shoulder with our amazing people and customers for more than three decades, and I personally share their deep sense of commitment. Recently, I spent time with our team members at our 737 production facility in Renton, Wash., and once again saw firsthand the pride our people feel in their work and the pain we’re all experiencing in light of these tragedies. The importance of our work demands the utmost integrity and excellence—that’s what I see in our team, and we’ll never rest in pursuit of it. Our mission is to connect people and nations, protect freedom, explore our world and the vastness of space, and inspire the next generation of aerospace dreamers and doers—and we’ll fulfill that mission only by upholding and living our values. That’s what safety means to us. Together, we’ll keep working to earn and keep the trust people have placed in Boeing.

— CNBC’s Phil LeBeau contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: leslie josephs, joanna tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, commitment, boeing, relentless, planes, air, max, lion, restates, ceo, safety, flight, ethiopian, 737


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French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer


It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer
French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investigator, older, boeing, clear, plane, max, lion, justice, similarities, transportation, journal, french, system, crashes, 737


French investigator: Clear similarities between Boeing 737 Max crashes

The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous people familiar with the matter, reported Sunday that a grand jury issued a subpoena to “at least one person” involved in the development of the plane. It said a prosecutor from the criminal division of the Justice Department was listed as a contact. The Journal also said that the Transportation Department’s watchdog was scrutinizing the FAA’s certification of the new 737 planes. Boeing had added an automatic anti-stall system to the Max jets when they went into service in 2017 that was not on older 737 aircraft. Indonesia investigators have indicated that as a possible factor in the Lion Air crash in October.

Pilots said they were not informed about the new system until after the Lion Air crash. Many were given a roughly hourlong iPad training class to transition from older Boeing 737s to the 737 Max, according to Dennis Tajer, a Boeing 737 pilot and spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, which represents American Airlines pilots.

Boeing shares were down more than 2.6 percent in afternoon trading Monday, shaving nearly 60 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as the day’s biggest loser in the index.

The FAA, Justice Department and the Transportation Department’s Office of Inspector General declined to comment. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

WATCH: Why Boeing and Airbus dominate 99% of the large plane market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: leslie josephs, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images
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US DOT probes FAA’s approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ

Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours. When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesm


Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours. When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesm
US DOT probes FAA’s approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, dot, crashes, boeing, planes, investigation, probes, approval, department, journal, report, max, plane, wsj, faas, justice, reported


US DOT probes FAA's approval of Boeing 737 Max planes in crashes: WSJ

The U.S. Department of Transportation is investigating whether there were lapses in the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of Boeing planes involved in two recent fatal crashes, The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

The DOT probe was launched after a new Boeing 737 Max 8 operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed into the Java Sea in October last year, according to the Journal, which cited people familiar with the inquiry. None of the 189 people on board survived.

Earlier this month, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said on Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian incident.

The Journal reported in an update to the article that a grand jury in Washington issued a broad subpoena one day after the Ethiopian Airlines crash to at least one person involved in the development of the Boeing 737 Max. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages.

It is not clear whether the probe by the Justice Department is related to the DOT’s investigation, according to the Journal report. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment which was sent outside U.S. office hours.

Shares of Boeing, a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, rose 1.52 percent to $378.99 on Friday but have fallen sharply from their 52-week high of $446.01 reached earlier this month.

The DOT investigation is concentrated on a flight safety system suspected of playing a role in the fatal crash in Indonesia, the Journal reported. The WSJ reported in November last year that Boeing failed to warn the airline industry about a potentially dangerous feature in its new flight-control system.

When contacted for comment on the Journal report, an FAA spokesman referred CNBC to the DOT instead. The transportation department did not immediately reply to CNBC’s request for comment, which was sent outside U.S. office hours.

After two fatal crashes in less than six months involving the same plane model, authorities around the world — including the U.S., Europe, China and Indonesia — grounded Boeing 737 Max planes.

For the full report on the DOT’s investigation, read The Wall Street Journal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 737, dot, crashes, boeing, planes, investigation, probes, approval, department, journal, report, max, plane, wsj, faas, justice, reported


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US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft: WSJ

Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. It is not clea


Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages. It is not clea
US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, subpoena, development, ethiopian, boeings, department, boeing, journal, wsj, 737, plane, justice, clear, data, scrutinizing, aircraft


US is scrutinizing the development of Boeing's 737 Max aircraft: WSJ

Five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max 8 plane crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 people on the Ethiopian Airlines plane. Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges said Sunday that preliminary data retrieved from the plane’s flight data recorder showed “a clear similarity” with the Indonesian crash.

The Journal reported in an update to the article that a grand jury in Washington issued a broad subpoena one day after the Ethiopian Airlines crash to at least one person involved in the development of the Boeing 737 Max. The subpoena, which reportedly involves a prosecutor from the Justice Department, was said to seek relevant documents, such as emails and other messages.

It is not clear whether the probe by the Justice Department is related to the DOT’s investigation, according to the Journal report. The Justice Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment, sent outside U.S. office hours.

WATCH: Why Airbus and Boeing dominate 99% of the large plane market


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: yen nee lee, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, max, subpoena, development, ethiopian, boeings, department, boeing, journal, wsj, 737, plane, justice, clear, data, scrutinizing, aircraft


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