Two simple insurance charges you need to understand when choosing health coverage

Health insurance can get pretty complicated. Two of the most important terms in health insurance are premiums and deductibles. For many people who work for companies that offer health insurance, the premium comes out of your paycheck automatically. You might want to pick a plan like this if you know you will have significant medical costs next year. And the reverse is usually true too: Lower monthly premiums usually mean a higher deductible.


Health insurance can get pretty complicated. Two of the most important terms in health insurance are premiums and deductibles. For many people who work for companies that offer health insurance, the premium comes out of your paycheck automatically. You might want to pick a plan like this if you know you will have significant medical costs next year. And the reverse is usually true too: Lower monthly premiums usually mean a higher deductible.
Two simple insurance charges you need to understand when choosing health coverage Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: mackenzie sigalos, jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, premium, medical, coverage, health, charges, need, choosing, pay, month, insurance, understand, monthly, simple, terms, costs, premiums


Two simple insurance charges you need to understand when choosing health coverage

Health insurance can get pretty complicated. Typically, the point is to pay some money every month so that when you have an accident or get sick, your medical costs aren’t so expensive that they bankrupt you.

Two of the most important terms in health insurance are premiums and deductibles.

Your premium is that monthly cost. For many people who work for companies that offer health insurance, the premium comes out of your paycheck automatically.

Your deductible is very different. It’s a number that signifies an annual threshold, and it’s distinct for every plan.

Let’s say it’s $1,000. That’s the amount of money that you need to spend out of pocket on health care each year before your insurance starts covering your bills. Deductibles may range from a couple hundred dollars to several thousand.

These terms are related in one simple way — plans with higher monthly premiums (meaning you’re paying more every month), often have a lower deductible (meaning your insurance company will start paying sooner). You might want to pick a plan like this if you know you will have significant medical costs next year.

And the reverse is usually true too: Lower monthly premiums usually mean a higher deductible. This is probably better for healthy people who are willing to take a little more risk with their costs.

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Here’s how that works in practice:

Let’s say you pay a $100 premium every month and you have a $1,000 annual deductible.

You hurt your knee, go to the doctor, and find out you need to repair a torn meniscus.

The surgery costs $5,000.

You pay the first $1,000. As long as the procedure is in network, then your insurance starts to kick in.

Most plans pay a percentage of the remaining balance, typically around 80%. So of the $4,000 you still owe, your insurer will cover $3,200.

That brings your total medical bill up to $1,800, even though the whole surgery costs $5,000.

Of course, there are other costs and terms to keep in mind when talking health insurance, like copays and coinsurance, out-of-pocket limits, and knowing how your plan differs for providers in-network or out-of-network. But that’s for another video.

In the meantime, here’s to a healthier you.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: mackenzie sigalos, jordan malter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, premium, medical, coverage, health, charges, need, choosing, pay, month, insurance, understand, monthly, simple, terms, costs, premiums


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Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai


If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai
Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help.

As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo.

But what users can’t do yet is connect with a doctor or a therapist through the device, and it might be a few years before they can. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors.

Developers focused on digital health have concerns about using home speakers like the Echo and Google Home for medical consults because privacy issues continue to emerge and there’s too much risk in sensitive health information falling into the wrong hands. Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that thousands of employees listen in to snippets of conversations on Alexa to supposedly improve the product experience.

“It’s tricky,” said Robbie Cape, CEO of 98point6, a Seattle-based company that provides virtual medical consults via smartphones and the web. “To uphold user trust, I can imagine that Amazon Alexa would need to confirm they’re talking to the right person, but also that there’s no one else in the room listening to the conversation.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


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Health care is one of Apple’s most lucrative opportunities: Morgan Stanley

Apple’s opportunity in health care is so large with the Apple Watch that the company should soon generate tens of billions of dollars a year in annual revenue from wearables and health services, according to a new report from Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley’s estimate is that health for Apple will top $15 billion in sales by 2021, based on the popularity of the Apple Watch and its health features, like monitoring heart rate and steps. “At the mid-point, Apple’s health efforts could result in ~$90


Apple’s opportunity in health care is so large with the Apple Watch that the company should soon generate tens of billions of dollars a year in annual revenue from wearables and health services, according to a new report from Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley’s estimate is that health for Apple will top $15 billion in sales by 2021, based on the popularity of the Apple Watch and its health features, like monitoring heart rate and steps. “At the mid-point, Apple’s health efforts could result in ~$90
Health care is one of Apple’s most lucrative opportunities: Morgan Stanley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: christina farr, karl mondon, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stanley, care, opportunities, apple, health, medical, company, apples, watch, lucrative, revenue, report, morgan, blood


Health care is one of Apple's most lucrative opportunities: Morgan Stanley

Apple’s opportunity in health care is so large with the Apple Watch that the company should soon generate tens of billions of dollars a year in annual revenue from wearables and health services, according to a new report from Morgan Stanley.

It’s a nascent space for Apple and hard to predict how much money the company will make from health services as it potentially dives deeper into monitoring features such as blood glucose and blood pressure, the investment bank wrote on Monday.

Morgan Stanley’s estimate is that health for Apple will top $15 billion in sales by 2021, based on the popularity of the Apple Watch and its health features, like monitoring heart rate and steps. The very high end of Morgan Stanley’s estimate range is $313 billion by 2027, which is a particularly lofty figure since Apple’s total revenue last year was $266 billion.

“At the mid-point, Apple’s health efforts could result in ~$90B of annual revenue by 2027, roughly ~35% of its current revenue base,” the report says.

Apple has a few key advantages over its technology rivals, including Alphabet and Microsoft, as it looks to move into the medical market and attack the $3.5 trillion health-care industry, the report says. Privacy is among the most important benefits. For instance, Apple was able to recruit 400,000 people in less than a year for its Apple Watch heart health study with Stanford University, suggesting that people are willing to share their medical information with Apple.

Beyond consumer device sales, the company has started to sign deals with health insurers who are willing to pay for some portion of the Apple Watch on behalf of their members. Apple has already inked that type of partnership with Aetna. It’s also currently in talks with private Medicare plans, which could mean increased access to the Apple Watch for seniors.

“Medicare has the most concentrated pools of money and is the least complicated to navigate,” the Morgan Stanley analysts wrote.

The company also has revenue potential in the electronic medical records market.

IPhone users will have access to the Apple’s health app, which allows customers to pull together medical information from dozens of hospitals and clinics. In its current form, the feature is designed for consumers, because it’s a huge challenge for people to aggregate their lab reports, immunization records and more.

Morgan Stanley said it could turn into a real business if Apple starts pulling together data and selling reports to health systems. To maintain consumer trust, Apple would have to effectively pitch it as a way for hospitals and clinics to gain insights into broad populations while protecting the data of individual patients.

The report listed five other things Apple could do that would generate a lot of investor interest:

Introduce new medical wearables.

Add medical grade monitoring, like sleep, blood glucose or blood pressure.

Make the Apple Watch readily available through insurance companies as a benefit that’s reimbursed.

Start its own employer joint venture or join a group like Haven, which currently consists of Amazon, J.P. Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway. Apple already runs its own employee medical clinics, dubbed AC Wellness.

Acquire a health care company.

Apple has publicly stayed mum about those topics, and a company spokesperson declined to comment on the report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: christina farr, karl mondon, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stanley, care, opportunities, apple, health, medical, company, apples, watch, lucrative, revenue, report, morgan, blood


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‘Alexa, find me a doctor’: Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills

Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector. As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant. Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate ag


Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector. As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant. Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate ag
‘Alexa, find me a doctor’: Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: christina farr, todd haselton, daniel berman, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voice, amazon, alexa, skills, medical, jiang, care, adds, health, information, hipaa, team, manage, doctor


'Alexa, find me a doctor': Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills

Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector.

As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant.

Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate agreements with health providers under HIPAA, which means third-party health developers who follow certain guidelines can meet the rules and requirements that govern how sensitive health information is transmitted and received. HIPAA, or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is designed to protect patients in cases where their personal health information is shared with a health care organization, like a hospital.

Voice technology has been heralded as a major breakthrough for the health field, particularly for seniors, kids and those with mobility problems. As a result, Amazon, and its rival Alphabet, have been increasingly focused on the needs of these populations, who view voice assistant devices as an important way to manage their medications, communicate with loved ones, and alert emergency services.

Amazon Alexa’s health and wellness team has been working for months on HIPAA compliance, and its team includes Missy Krasner, who previously ran Box’s health care efforts, and Rachel Jiang, who previously worked at Microsoft and Facebook. Jiang announced via the Alexa developer blog that six health partners have been selected for the invitation-only program, and it expects to grow that number in the coming months.

“These new skills are designed to help customers manage a variety of healthcare needs at home simply using voice – whether it’s booking a medical appointment, accessing hospital post-discharge instructions, checking on the status of a prescription delivery, and more,” Jiang wrote in the post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: christina farr, todd haselton, daniel berman, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voice, amazon, alexa, skills, medical, jiang, care, adds, health, information, hipaa, team, manage, doctor


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Kirsten Gillibrand husband’s stake in medical company raises questions

Democratic presidential contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s husband has for more than a decade held a financial stake in an obscure medical device company, even as the New York lawmaker voted in favor of legislation that expedited the approval process for such devices. The couple, married nearly two decades ago, does not appear to have made any money from the stake in the company. Gillibrand was the first declared presidential candidate to release last year’s tax returns. “Senator Gillibrand was


Democratic presidential contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s husband has for more than a decade held a financial stake in an obscure medical device company, even as the New York lawmaker voted in favor of legislation that expedited the approval process for such devices. The couple, married nearly two decades ago, does not appear to have made any money from the stake in the company. Gillibrand was the first declared presidential candidate to release last year’s tax returns. “Senator Gillibrand was
Kirsten Gillibrand husband’s stake in medical company raises questions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: tucker higgins, kena betancur, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, windcrest, tax, husbands, raises, whittaker, returns, questions, medical, gillibrand, device, stake, company, kirsten, senator


Kirsten Gillibrand husband's stake in medical company raises questions

Democratic presidential contender Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s husband has for more than a decade held a financial stake in an obscure medical device company, even as the New York lawmaker voted in favor of legislation that expedited the approval process for such devices.

Gillibrand’s husband Jonathan is an investor in WindCrest LLC, which in 2012 filed patent applications for its flagship invention, a tiny device designed to help guide wires in delicate surgeries. The company’s business partners were still seeking to commercialize it as recently as this week, they told CNBC.

The couple, married nearly two decades ago, does not appear to have made any money from the stake in the company. Gillibrand has said in financial disclosures that the investment is worth less than $50,000. She has disclosed the stake every year she has been in office.

But what those disclosures don’t reveal is that the money-losing venture could one day turn a profit, thanks to its invention. That payday, however, will require securing a deal with a device manufacturer, according to the Cleveland Clinic, which partnered with WindCrest on the invention.

The investment, though legal, raises questions about whether Gillibrand will profit from an industry she has played a role in regulating as a senator, and which she could influence as president.

And Gillibrand’s reluctance to discuss it could weaken one of her chief arguments against President Donald Trump, whose opaque business dealings have earned scrutiny from Democrats and good government groups, and who has declined to release his tax returns.

Gillibrand has made financial transparency a key element of her campaign, and just this week made a splash by releasing her 2018 tax returns and calling on her 2020 rivals to do the same.

While Gillibrand’s husband’s stake in the WindCrest is mentioned in their joint tax filing released Wednesday, the senator does not appear to have publicly discussed the nature of its work. Gillibrand was the first declared presidential candidate to release last year’s tax returns. When she did so, she urged her fellow Democratic contenders to do the same in the interest of transparency.

The senator’s campaign declined to comment on the record for this story. An aide told CNBC that the investment was made by Jonathan Gillibrand in 2005, that the couple has not made a profit on it, and that Jonathan has only ever had a “small minority share in the company.”

“To Jonathan’s understanding, the investment is of little to no value,” the aide said. “Senator Gillibrand was proud to release her tax returns first, and believes that radical transparency is important as an elected official.”

Little has been reported about WindCrest, which claims to work “to advance the medical device industry and the care of patients” on its website. An email sent to the company bounced back, and a phone call went straight to the voicemail inbox of a separate company called Whittaker Solutions.

Allison Marshall Whittaker, listed as the owner of Whittaker Solutions and a member of WindCrest LLC on her LinkedIn page, declined to comment.

Whittaker provides “design, business, medical & equine info,” according to its Delaware corporate charter, as well as “strategic analysis consulting services to businesses and individuals.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: tucker higgins, kena betancur, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, windcrest, tax, husbands, raises, whittaker, returns, questions, medical, gillibrand, device, stake, company, kirsten, senator


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This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop


Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills. The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills. (Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.) If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cop
This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here’s how to make sure you’re in good shape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


This is the No. 1 reason Americans file for bankruptcy—here's how to make sure you're in good shape

Even with health insurance, more and more individuals are finding that they cannot afford their medical bills.

A recent study published as an editorial in the American Journal of Public Health found that 66.5 percent of all bankruptcies filed by Americans were tied to medical issues (due to high costs or time out of work). The data showed that an estimated 530,000 families turn to bankruptcy each year because of high medical bills.

(Other reasons behind bankruptcy included high mortgages or foreclosure, spending or living beyond one’s means, student loans and divorce.)

“Despite gains in coverage and access to care from the Affordable Care Act, our findings suggest that it did not change the proportion of bankruptcies with medical causes,” the authors wrote.

Even worse, 57 percent of American adults say they’ve been surprised by a medical bill they thought would be covered by insurance, according to a survey from the research group NORC at the University of Chicago. This leaves many scrambling to find a way to pay their bills — on top essential expenses like mortgage, food and utility costs.

Unfortunately, those who can’t pay off debt fast enough eventually have their bills turned over to a collection agency, which is bad news for their credit score. If you’re drowning in medical bills, the important thing here is to know that you have options. Here are some helpful tips to help you cope with high medical bills:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-19  Authors: jennifer streaks, caitlin rhea spaulding
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, bankruptcyheres, youre, shape, high, bills, bankruptcy, insurance, american, pay, reason, file, sure, bankruptcies, good, medical, health, americans


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Marijuana grower Tilray rallies after sales more than double

Shares of Tilray jumped after the company reported that its cannabis sales more than doubled over the last year. Tilray on Monday reported fourth-quarter revenue of $15.5 million, buoyed 2018 sales to $43.1 million — up 110 percent from last year. First, it expanded its alliance with Sandoz, a division of Swiss drugmaker Novartis, in an effort to increase access to medical cannabis to patients around the world. Tilray said it plans to work with Novartis’ generic drug business and supply non-smok


Shares of Tilray jumped after the company reported that its cannabis sales more than doubled over the last year. Tilray on Monday reported fourth-quarter revenue of $15.5 million, buoyed 2018 sales to $43.1 million — up 110 percent from last year. First, it expanded its alliance with Sandoz, a division of Swiss drugmaker Novartis, in an effort to increase access to medical cannabis to patients around the world. Tilray said it plans to work with Novartis’ generic drug business and supply non-smok
Marijuana grower Tilray rallies after sales more than double Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marijuana, rallies, double, million, medical, strategic, share, tilray, cannabis, grower, sales, reported, company, quarter


Marijuana grower Tilray rallies after sales more than double

Shares of Tilray jumped after the company reported that its cannabis sales more than doubled over the last year.

Tilray on Monday reported fourth-quarter revenue of $15.5 million, buoyed 2018 sales to $43.1 million — up 110 percent from last year. The surge was driven by bulk sales, the first months of the legal adult-use market in Canada and accelerated wholesale exports, according to its latest financial update. Analysts had expected fourth-quarter sales of $14.1 million.

In premarket trading Tuesday, the British Columbia-based company’s stock was up nearly 3 percent.

“Our team made significant progress on our long-term initiatives including increasing production capacity, expanding and strengthening strategic partnerships, and acquiring complementary businesses to accelerate our future growth and leadership position in medical and adult-use cannabis,” Tilray CEO Brendan Kennedy said of the company’s financial report.

Net loss for the quarter was $31 million, or 33 cents per share, compared to $3 million, or 4 cents per share, for the prior-year period. The company also said that the number of kilograms of cannabis and derivative products increased nearly three-fold to 2,053 from 694 kilograms compared to the fourth quarter of 2017.

Kilograms sold in 2018 increase over two-fold to 6,478 from 3,024 in the prior year.

The most recent quarter was busy for Tilray, which expanded strategic partnerships with a number of global partners.

First, it expanded its alliance with Sandoz, a division of Swiss drugmaker Novartis, in an effort to increase access to medical cannabis to patients around the world. Tilray said it plans to work with Novartis’ generic drug business and supply non-smokable and non-combustible medical cannabis products where legal.

The Canadian company also disclosed a research and development partnership with Budweiser-parent AB InBev focused on non-alcohol THC and CBD beverages. Each company intends to invest up to $50 million, for a total of up to $100 million, Tilray said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-18  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marijuana, rallies, double, million, medical, strategic, share, tilray, cannabis, grower, sales, reported, company, quarter


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Amazon takes another step into the medical space by accepting pre-tax health spending accounts

Amazon’s rival Walmart, which currently offers pharmacy services, also has a storefront for HSA and FSA products. The company also acquired an internet pharmacy company, PillPack, in the summer of 2018, signaling an interest in adding prescription medicines to its marketplace. But PillPack, which primarily serves older customers who take multiple medications, hasn’t been fully integrated into Amazon and still operates independently. To sell prescription medicines, Amazon will need to work with m


Amazon’s rival Walmart, which currently offers pharmacy services, also has a storefront for HSA and FSA products. The company also acquired an internet pharmacy company, PillPack, in the summer of 2018, signaling an interest in adding prescription medicines to its marketplace. But PillPack, which primarily serves older customers who take multiple medications, hasn’t been fully integrated into Amazon and still operates independently. To sell prescription medicines, Amazon will need to work with m
Amazon takes another step into the medical space by accepting pre-tax health spending accounts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: christina farr, lindsey wasson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accepting, medicines, prescription, spending, services, medical, pillpack, amazon, pharmacy, space, takes, pretax, hsa, accounts, fsa, health, learn, step


Amazon takes another step into the medical space by accepting pre-tax health spending accounts

Amazon’s rival Walmart, which currently offers pharmacy services, also has a storefront for HSA and FSA products.

The company also acquired an internet pharmacy company, PillPack, in the summer of 2018, signaling an interest in adding prescription medicines to its marketplace. It now has a leader for that pharmacy business, a veteran who helped build Amazon’s Kindle self-publishing platform. But PillPack, which primarily serves older customers who take multiple medications, hasn’t been fully integrated into Amazon and still operates independently.

Prescription drugs is a notoriously challenging product to offer, given the complex web of intermediaries that sit between the drug manufacturer and the pharmacy. To sell prescription medicines, Amazon will need to work with middlemen, known as pharmacy benefits managers, in order to take a customer’s insurance.

Some health experts suggest that the move into adding HSA and FSA cards is a smart method for Amazon to learn more about people’s spending on health.

“It’s a back end way for Amazon to learn about consumer purchasing behavior of health care products and services, as it moves more deeply into the space,” said Michael Yang, a health-tech investor with Omers Ventures.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: christina farr, lindsey wasson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, accepting, medicines, prescription, spending, services, medical, pillpack, amazon, pharmacy, space, takes, pretax, hsa, accounts, fsa, health, learn, step


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Walmart sends employees to top hospitals out of state for treatment

Bill, an employee at Walmart, had been suffering from mild neck pain and a tremor in his hands. A local surgeon recommended spine surgery as the next course of action. He saw a team of clinicians at Geisinger Medical Center, a top hospital system in Pennsylvania. In the end, Bill’s story, which both Geisinger and Walmart shared this week with permission, was a win for everyone. But it also speaks to a larger trend: U.S. employers are getting increasingly fed up with the myriad problems with the


Bill, an employee at Walmart, had been suffering from mild neck pain and a tremor in his hands. A local surgeon recommended spine surgery as the next course of action. He saw a team of clinicians at Geisinger Medical Center, a top hospital system in Pennsylvania. In the end, Bill’s story, which both Geisinger and Walmart shared this week with permission, was a win for everyone. But it also speaks to a larger trend: U.S. employers are getting increasingly fed up with the myriad problems with the
Walmart sends employees to top hospitals out of state for treatment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: christina farr, beth hall, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, medical, geisinger, work, paid, surgery, treatment, workers, spine, hospitals, employees, system, health, walmart, state, sends


Walmart sends employees to top hospitals out of state for treatment

Bill, an employee at Walmart, had been suffering from mild neck pain and a tremor in his hands. A local surgeon recommended spine surgery as the next course of action.

Walmart decided to send him and his wife on a flight to a hospital in another state, all expenses paid, so he could get a second opinion. He saw a team of clinicians at Geisinger Medical Center, a top hospital system in Pennsylvania. They noticed a subtle shuffle in his step and diagnosed him with Parkinson’s Disease.

The employee avoided a painful, expensive surgery that he did not need. Walmart (which is self-insured) saved about $30,000 it would have paid for that surgery, and it also benefited when Bill went back to work after his symptoms improved. Geisinger got paid for the consult.

In the end, Bill’s story, which both Geisinger and Walmart shared this week with permission, was a win for everyone.

But it also speaks to a larger trend: U.S. employers are getting increasingly fed up with the myriad problems with the U.S. medical system. Companies pay for about 49 percent of Americans’ health care, and are facing rising costs without any real improvements in outcomes.

So Walmart and its partners published a case study detailing their approach in Harvard Business Review, in an effort to disseminate its ideas more broadly.

Walmart’s Lisa Woods, who wrote the piece with Jonathan Slotkin, a director of spine surgery at Geisinger, and Ruth Coleman, a health executive and nurse, described how they’ve succeeded by focusing on more than just lowering costs. They also looked for ways to improve overall health outcomes for their workers, so they could return to work, including by offering travel programs for workers to see doctors at top hospitals who were not incentivized to push for an unnecessary surgery.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: christina farr, beth hall, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, medical, geisinger, work, paid, surgery, treatment, workers, spine, hospitals, employees, system, health, walmart, state, sends


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The 15 best medical schools in the US, according to US News & World Report

Each year, U.S. News & World Report ranks the best medical schools in the country based on variables such as peer assessments, amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants funds awarded and faculty-to-student ratio. This year, the top-ranked schools include prestigious private institutions as well as public universities. The list also makes clear just how hard it is to get into medical school today — 13 of the top 15 medical schools admit less than 6 percent of applicants. “Medi


Each year, U.S. News & World Report ranks the best medical schools in the country based on variables such as peer assessments, amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants funds awarded and faculty-to-student ratio. This year, the top-ranked schools include prestigious private institutions as well as public universities. The list also makes clear just how hard it is to get into medical school today — 13 of the top 15 medical schools admit less than 6 percent of applicants. “Medi
The 15 best medical schools in the US, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: abigail hess, reuters brian snyder, jim r bounds, bloomberg, getty images, ariana lindquist, smith collection gado getty images, dina rudick the boston globe via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, world, according, medical, undergraduate, report, universities, traveling, variables, admissions, schools, best


The 15 best medical schools in the US, according to US News & World Report

Each year, U.S. News & World Report ranks the best medical schools in the country based on variables such as peer assessments, amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants funds awarded and faculty-to-student ratio.

This year, the top-ranked schools include prestigious private institutions as well as public universities. The list also makes clear just how hard it is to get into medical school today — 13 of the top 15 medical schools admit less than 6 percent of applicants.

“Medical schools set up a great number of hoops for applicants to jump through: a prescribed undergraduate curriculum with numerous prerequisites, the MCAT exam, a complex and multi-part application, traveling to interviews, exhaustive days interviewing and a constant requirement for professionalism throughout,” Dr. McGreggor Crowley, an admissions counselor at admissions consulting firm IvyWise, tells U.S. News.

Here are the 15 best medical schools — and what it takes to get in — according to U.S. News:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: abigail hess, reuters brian snyder, jim r bounds, bloomberg, getty images, ariana lindquist, smith collection gado getty images, dina rudick the boston globe via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 15, world, according, medical, undergraduate, report, universities, traveling, variables, admissions, schools, best


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