EU’s Juncker ‘not very optimistic’ on Brexit deal after meeting with UK leader May

Europe’s top civil servant has said he is “not very optimistic” about Britain’s chances of leaving the European Union with a deal. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker met British Prime Minister Theresa May in Brussels on Wednesday evening but on Thursday morning warned a committee that he still “cannot exclude” a no-deal exit. But I am not very optimistic when it comes to this issue,” said Juncker. U.K. leader May has agreed a deal to exit the European Union with Brussels but has s


Europe’s top civil servant has said he is “not very optimistic” about Britain’s chances of leaving the European Union with a deal. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker met British Prime Minister Theresa May in Brussels on Wednesday evening but on Thursday morning warned a committee that he still “cannot exclude” a no-deal exit. But I am not very optimistic when it comes to this issue,” said Juncker. U.K. leader May has agreed a deal to exit the European Union with Brussels but has s
EU’s Juncker ‘not very optimistic’ on Brexit deal after meeting with UK leader May Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: david reid, barcroft media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, optimistic, juncker, exit, european, leader, social, brexit, eus, meeting, majority, union, deal, sterling, uk, warned


EU's Juncker 'not very optimistic' on Brexit deal after meeting with UK leader May

Europe’s top civil servant has said he is “not very optimistic” about Britain’s chances of leaving the European Union with a deal.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker met British Prime Minister Theresa May in Brussels on Wednesday evening but on Thursday morning warned a committee that he still “cannot exclude” a no-deal exit.

“My efforts are oriented in a way that the worst can be avoided. But I am not very optimistic when it comes to this issue,” said Juncker.

“In the British parliament every time they are voting, there is a majority against something, there is no majority in favor of something,” he told a session of the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

U.K. leader May has agreed a deal to exit the European Union with Brussels but has so far failed to gain the required support needed from U.K. lawmakers.

Describing Brexit as an act of “deconstruction,” Juncker also warned that Britain’s exit could have “terrible economic and social consequences” for both the U.K. and continental Europe.

Shortly after the comments, sterling dipped briefly before regaining ground. At around 11 a.m. GMT, sterling was trading 0.15 percent higher at $1.306.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: david reid, barcroft media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, optimistic, juncker, exit, european, leader, social, brexit, eus, meeting, majority, union, deal, sterling, uk, warned


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Facebook’s Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news. Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online. “I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regula


Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news. Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online. “I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regula
Facebook’s Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, regulation, discuss, firms, social, facebook, facebooks, tech, meet, meeting, wright, uk, minister, culture, media, safe


Facebook's Zuckerberg to meet with UK culture minister to discuss regulation

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg is meeting with a British official Thursday to discuss internet regulation and fake news.

Zuckerberg will speak with U.K. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright at the firm’s headquarters in Menlo Park, California, about a U.K. government plan to regulate tech companies over how they tackle harmful content online.

Another topic high on the agenda will be the spread of disinformation on the web, a government spokesperson said, an issue the social network has faced heightened scrutiny over globally.

“I look forward to meeting Mr. Zuckerberg to discuss what more Facebook can do to help keep people safe on their platforms, as we prepare a new regulatory framework that will reinforce Facebook’s and other tech firms’ responsibility to keep us safe,” Wright said in a statement Thursday.

Britain’s Home Office and the culture department are due to release a white paper where they will lay out their strategy to counter issues like cyberbullying and child abuse content online. Reports have said the report could include a proposed regulator similar to Ofcom, the media watchdog, to monitor social media.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-21  Authors: ryan browne, chesnot, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, regulation, discuss, firms, social, facebook, facebooks, tech, meet, meeting, wright, uk, minister, culture, media, safe


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We’re about to find out why the Federal Reserve did its policy U-turn which sent markets higher

Investors will learn more Wednesday about why Federal Reserve officials did an apparent U-turn in policy three weeks ago when they signaled a much easier stance regarding interest rates. Minutes from the Jan. 29-30 meeting of the policymaking Federal Open Market Committee will be released at 2 p.m. At the meeting, the committee voted not to increase the benchmark interest rate, but signaled a “patient” approach to future hikes. While a minutes release might seem an otherwise mundane dig through


Investors will learn more Wednesday about why Federal Reserve officials did an apparent U-turn in policy three weeks ago when they signaled a much easier stance regarding interest rates. Minutes from the Jan. 29-30 meeting of the policymaking Federal Open Market Committee will be released at 2 p.m. At the meeting, the committee voted not to increase the benchmark interest rate, but signaled a “patient” approach to future hikes. While a minutes release might seem an otherwise mundane dig through
We’re about to find out why the Federal Reserve did its policy U-turn which sent markets higher Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: jeff cox, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sent, policy, interest, rate, markets, powell, signaled, meeting, uturn, monetary, federal, fed, reserve, world, communication, higher


We're about to find out why the Federal Reserve did its policy U-turn which sent markets higher

Investors will learn more Wednesday about why Federal Reserve officials did an apparent U-turn in policy three weeks ago when they signaled a much easier stance regarding interest rates.

Minutes from the Jan. 29-30 meeting of the policymaking Federal Open Market Committee will be released at 2 p.m. ET. At the meeting, the committee voted not to increase the benchmark interest rate, but signaled a “patient” approach to future hikes. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said afterward that it would take a shift in data to convince him that more moves would be needed.

Market participants will be digging closely through the meeting summary for clues on how the Fed views its interest rate framework, the assessment on the economy, and the plans it has for the $3.8 trillion in bonds it is holding on its balance sheet.

While a minutes release might seem an otherwise mundane dig through monetary policy, the Powell Fed has put a special emphasis on communication. The chairman now will hold news conferences after each meeting to explain Fed actions to the public, and he has kept up a busy schedule meeting with lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

“More communication is better,” Bill English, a 20-year Fed veteran and current professor at the Yale School of Management, said in an interview. “Things can be misunderstood and communication can go badly, but the response to that should be more communication and trying to clarify, and not communicating less. The world of a generation ago when the Fed didn’t communicate much about monetary policy at all isn’t actually a very desirable world for doing monetary policy.”

Fed officials have been pretty clear lately about their intentions on interest rates. Less certain is what the central bank will do with the balance sheet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: jeff cox, saul loeb, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sent, policy, interest, rate, markets, powell, signaled, meeting, uturn, monetary, federal, fed, reserve, world, communication, higher


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Starboard Value has 1 million-share stake in Bristol-Myers Squibb, has met with management

Starboard’s stake is just a fraction of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s 1.63 billion shares outstanding, but the fund has filed with regulators for the ability to buy more shares. The fund also has held meetings with management, Bristol-Myers Squibb said. Bristol-Myers Squibb said Starboard acquired its shares on Jan. 31, the same day its nomination window closed. The Celgene deal is aimed at giving Bristol-Myers Squibb more cancer drugs at a time when its immuno-oncology portfolio struggles to keep up w


Starboard’s stake is just a fraction of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s 1.63 billion shares outstanding, but the fund has filed with regulators for the ability to buy more shares. The fund also has held meetings with management, Bristol-Myers Squibb said. Bristol-Myers Squibb said Starboard acquired its shares on Jan. 31, the same day its nomination window closed. The Celgene deal is aimed at giving Bristol-Myers Squibb more cancer drugs at a time when its immuno-oncology portfolio struggles to keep up w
Starboard Value has 1 million-share stake in Bristol-Myers Squibb, has met with management Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren hirsch, david grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stake, management, billion, millionshare, fund, squibb, meeting, deal, starboard, celgene, vote, met, shares, value, bristolmyers


Starboard Value has 1 million-share stake in Bristol-Myers Squibb, has met with management

Bristol-Myers Squibb confirmed on Wednesday that activist hedge fund Starboard Value owns a 1 million share stake in the company and said separately its $74 billion deal to acquire cancer drugmaker Celgene is “on track” to close during the third quarter.

Starboard’s stake is just a fraction of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s 1.63 billion shares outstanding, but the fund has filed with regulators for the ability to buy more shares. The fund also has held meetings with management, Bristol-Myers Squibb said.

Shares of the drugmaker stock traded flat Wednesday.

Starboard has not publicly stated its stance on Bristol-Myers’ acquisition of Celgene, but activists have in the past taken stakes in companies to scuttle deals. Reuters reported last week the hedge fund is gauging investor support for the Celgene deal.

Bristol-Myers Squibb said Starboard acquired its shares on Jan. 31, the same day its nomination window closed. Starboard has nominated for the Bristol-Myers board Starboard CEO and co-founder, Jeffrey Smith, as well as John Leonard, James Tyree, Steven Shulman and Janet Vergis.

Bristol-Myers Squibb’s annual shareholder meeting is not yet scheduled, but it will occur after its special meeting to vote on the Celgene acquisition on April 12. The planned date for the meeting remains unchanged, keeping the deal on track for its expected closure by the company’s third quarter.

Analysts at BMO earlier this month said they believe the “probability of a third-party buyer for Bristol-Myers Squibb” before the April vote is “very low,” adding that “we do not believe a potential activist can change that.”

The Celgene deal is aimed at giving Bristol-Myers Squibb more cancer drugs at a time when its immuno-oncology portfolio struggles to keep up with rival Merck’s. Bristol-Myers Squibb on Wednesday underlined the benefits it sees in the deal, citing increased scale and a broader pipeline in the near and long term. It said that Celgene expects six near-term product launches that present “more than $15 billion in revenue potential.”

Starboard did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren hirsch, david grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stake, management, billion, millionshare, fund, squibb, meeting, deal, starboard, celgene, vote, met, shares, value, bristolmyers


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The next big market catalyst will be what the Fed says about its balance sheet this week

The market has reason to believe that the Fed is going to stop raising interest rates for a while. Less certain is what the central bank will do with the $4 trillion of bonds left on its balance sheet. “The minutes from the two preceding meetings – November and December – included important sections on the balance sheet,” Lewis Alexander, chief economist at Nomura, said in a note. “We believe the corresponding section of the January minutes will confirm the Committee’s plans to end balance sheet


The market has reason to believe that the Fed is going to stop raising interest rates for a while. Less certain is what the central bank will do with the $4 trillion of bonds left on its balance sheet. “The minutes from the two preceding meetings – November and December – included important sections on the balance sheet,” Lewis Alexander, chief economist at Nomura, said in a note. “We believe the corresponding section of the January minutes will confirm the Committee’s plans to end balance sheet
The next big market catalyst will be what the Fed says about its balance sheet this week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: jeff cox, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, week, balance, reserves, process, catalyst, market, minutes, sheet, fed, meeting, big, rates


The next big market catalyst will be what the Fed says about its balance sheet this week

The market has reason to believe that the Fed is going to stop raising interest rates for a while. Less certain is what the central bank will do with the $4 trillion of bonds left on its balance sheet.

That latter issue is likely to take focus Wednesday when the Federal Open Market Committee releases notes from its January meeting. At that meeting, Chairman Jerome Powell and his fellow committee members made it clear that they would be “patient” with rate hikes and that for now policy tightening will be on pause.

However, while Powell indicated he would be watching how the process unfolds, there were no indications the roll-off would slow.

The Fed currently allows up to $50 billion a month in proceeds from Treasurys and mortgage-backed securities, though it does not regularly hit that number. Since the process began the bond portfolio has shrunk by more than $400 billion. The balance sheet had once stood at $4.5 trillion, the product of three rounds of bond buying — quantitative easing — the Fed instituted to lower long-term rates and pull the economy out of the financial crisis.

Market participants are now wondering how much further the Fed will go. The minutes from the meeting, which helped spark a stock market rally, will be looked at closely.

“The minutes from the two preceding meetings – November and December – included important sections on the balance sheet,” Lewis Alexander, chief economist at Nomura, said in a note. “We believe the corresponding section of the January minutes will confirm the Committee’s plans to end balance sheet normalization by end-2019.”

Several Fed officials have pointed to the end of the year as a likely point for the process to end, but even that remains in flux.

The key in the discussions thus far is the level of reserves at which the banking industry feels comfortable. The decline in the balance sheet corresponds with a lower level of reserves. Currently, banks are holding about $1.64 trillion in reserves, or nearly $1.5 trillion above the required level.

Many Fed watchers think the final level will be somewhere just in excess of $1 trillion, though some see it higher.

“Once we reach $1.1 [trillion] of reserves, the normalization is done,” wrote Jabaz Mathai, head of U.S. rates strategy at Citigroup.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: jeff cox, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, week, balance, reserves, process, catalyst, market, minutes, sheet, fed, meeting, big, rates


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Fed’s Williams says new economic outlook necessary for rate hikes

“I don’t think that it would take a big change, but it would be a different outlook either for growth or inflation” to return to hiking rates, Williams, one three Fed vice chairs and a key voice on rate policy, told Reuters. The Fed could also keep levels of bank reserves on its books that are far closer to current levels than previously thought, Williams said. Williams estimated the so-called balance sheet rolloff could end when bank reserves get to “maybe $1 trillion of reserves or somewhat mo


“I don’t think that it would take a big change, but it would be a different outlook either for growth or inflation” to return to hiking rates, Williams, one three Fed vice chairs and a key voice on rate policy, told Reuters. The Fed could also keep levels of bank reserves on its books that are far closer to current levels than previously thought, Williams said. Williams estimated the so-called balance sheet rolloff could end when bank reserves get to “maybe $1 trillion of reserves or somewhat mo
Fed’s Williams says new economic outlook necessary for rate hikes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: seongjoon cho, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reserves, feds, end, growth, hikes, rates, fed, outlook, meeting, bank, rate, economic, policymakers, policy, williams, necessary


Fed's Williams says new economic outlook necessary for rate hikes

New York Fed President John Williams on Tuesday said he was comfortable with the level U.S. interest rates are at now, and sees no need to raise them again unless growth or inflation shift to an unexpectedly higher gear.

In an interview with Reuters, Williams said he felt rates had reached his current view of a lower “neutral” level, with growth and unemployment leveling off and inflation, if anything, a bit weaker than hoped for.

Asked if it would take some sort of shock to resume rate increases, he said it would require one or more of those factors to surprise to the upside.

“I don’t think that it would take a big change, but it would be a different outlook either for growth or inflation” to return to hiking rates, Williams, one three Fed vice chairs and a key voice on rate policy, told Reuters.

Williams’ comments, made just weeks after the central bank paused its once quarterly rate hikes, underscore just how high the bar would be for tighter monetary policy, and suggest that such a move may not come any time soon.

The Fed could also keep levels of bank reserves on its books that are far closer to current levels than previously thought, Williams said.

Along with its rate-hike holiday, policymakers are currently finalizing plans on how they would end the reduction of their balance sheet, which includes holdings of bank reserves bulked up in part by the Fed’s need for cash to buy bonds to halt the global financial crisis a decade ago.

Williams estimated the so-called balance sheet rolloff could end when bank reserves get to “maybe $1 trillion of reserves or somewhat more than that,” about $600 billion less than current levels.

The figure is “a guess today of the amount of reserves that will be held in the system in the future – but again we are learning and will get a finer touch on that,” he said.

Williams, who is vice chairman of the rate-setting Federal Open Market Committee and votes whenever that group meets, said policymakers are “in a very good place” on policy, with rates around neutral, the U.S. economy in a strong place and pressures on prices subdued.

“Monetary policy is where it should be,” he said. “It’s around my view of what neutral interest rates are.”

After its most recent meeting, Fed policymakers signaled their three-year drive to tighten monetary policy may be at an end due to a suddenly cloudy outlook for the U.S. economy, a global growth slowdown and impasses over trade and government budget negotiations.

The Fed increased interest rates three times in 2017 and four times last year, pushing them up to 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent at its final 2018 meeting in December.

Further details on that policy meeting at the end of January are expected when the Fed releases records from its deliberations on Wednesday. In recent days Cleveland Federal Reserve President Loretta Mester and Fed Governor Lael Brainard both said they supported ending the U.S. central bank’s unwinding of its bond holdings this year. The Fed’s balance sheet ballooned to over $4 trillion in the wake of the 2007-09 recession but policymakers began trimming its bond holdings in the final months of 2017. Further details on that policy meeting at the end of January are expected when the Fed releases records from its deliberations on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: seongjoon cho, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reserves, feds, end, growth, hikes, rates, fed, outlook, meeting, bank, rate, economic, policymakers, policy, williams, necessary


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The Fed could move markets this week when it tells us what it was thinking at the January meeting

The Fed calmed the markets in late January when it said it could stop raising interest rates, but investors are watching the release of its meeting minutes for any sign the Fed could veer off its easy path. “It’s hard to imagine the Fed sounding as dovish in the minutes, as [Fed Chair Jerome] Powell sounded in the briefing . In what felt like an about face from its December meeting, Powell also emphasized that the Fed would be flexible with its balance sheet. Stocks were higher in the past week,


The Fed calmed the markets in late January when it said it could stop raising interest rates, but investors are watching the release of its meeting minutes for any sign the Fed could veer off its easy path. “It’s hard to imagine the Fed sounding as dovish in the minutes, as [Fed Chair Jerome] Powell sounded in the briefing . In what felt like an about face from its December meeting, Powell also emphasized that the Fed would be flexible with its balance sheet. Stocks were higher in the past week,
The Fed could move markets this week when it tells us what it was thinking at the January meeting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: patti domm, yuri gripas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, meeting, retail, coming, tells, minutes, week, fed, sales, sheet, balance, markets, thinking


The Fed could move markets this week when it tells us what it was thinking at the January meeting

The Fed calmed the markets in late January when it said it could stop raising interest rates, but investors are watching the release of its meeting minutes for any sign the Fed could veer off its easy path.

“It’s hard to imagine the Fed sounding as dovish in the minutes, as [Fed Chair Jerome] Powell sounded in the briefing . We do think the minutes will be bearish. As far as the general tenor, it’s hard to see it more dovish than it was on Jan. 30,” said Michael Schumacher, director strategy at Wells Fargo.

The Fed, at that meeting, held rates steady and emphasized it could pause in its rate hiking cycle. In what felt like an about face from its December meeting, Powell also emphasized that the Fed would be flexible with its balance sheet. The Fed releases the minutes of its meeting Wednesday afternoon.

Positive comments on trade talks between U.S. and Chinese officials, and a commitment to continue talks in the coming week helped boost stocks Friday and could continue to support the market in the week ahead. Investors were also watching for more information on a Commerce Department report, which could be viewed as a market negative if it recommended tariffs on European automobiles. The president has 90 days from this weekend to act on the report.

Stocks were higher in the past week, even with Thursday’s sell off on stunningly weak December retail sales data. The S&P 500 was up 2.5 percent to 2,775, and the Dow was at 25,883, up 3 percent for the week.

After December retail sales slumped 1.7 percent, Walmart earnings on Tuesday will be even more important. The retail sales data was contrary to other reports from retailers and others that showed solid holiday sales, so Walmart’s comments about what it is seeing now as well as during the end of the fourth quarter will be important.

“We’re going to watch them very closely, and that’s because of the retail sales number. The government shutdown, plus the market going down, everyone talking about a recession coming. Did people cut back spending a little bit? Was it real?” said Vinay Pande, head of trading strategies at UBS Global Wealth Management.

Walmart’s comparable store sales in the fourth quarter were expected to be up about 3 percent, and its earnings per share are expected to be flat at $1.33, according to FactSet.

Economists cut their expectations for fourth quarter growth to under 2.5 percent after the retail sales number, which was viewed as suspect by some. Goldman Sachs economists called the report an outlier, and said that as much of 1 percentage point of the drop is unexplained.

“Some special factors likely contributed to the fall in core retail sales, including an early Thanksgiving, the December stock-market sell-off, and the start of the government shutdown,” it said.

So the coming week’s data will also be important, including weekly jobless claims Thursday, which were higher for a third week this past week. The concern is that rising claims could be an early warning sign of a slowdown in the labor market.

“Unemployment claims are rising, at the same time employment growth and income growth are not suggesting this is the case,” said Pande.

Data on home builder sentiment comes out Tuesday morning, and existing home sales and unemployment claims Thursday.

Pande said the market broke out in the past week from a sideways trade it fell into earlier in the month. “Until last week, we just went back to the status quo of November,” he said, adding the sell off in December was way overdone. The market has been at an impasse between the lift from value, and the drag from what he called the idiosyncratic risks, like trade, the shutdown threat and other geopolitical risk.

“I think the balance shifted a bit. The bad news on the idiosyncratic front is being overwhelmed by the less bad,” Pande said.

Pande said there’s a risk that investors will read the Fed’s minutes in the coming week a little more hawkish than it intends.

There could be discussion in the minutes about the balance sheet unwind, which some traders fear has been making markets less liquid.

At the Jan. 30 meeting and before, Powell had backtracked on a comment he made after the December meeting that the unwind was on “autopilot.”

“It’s not a gigantic concession to say I’m flexible. This QT was going to end at any rate at the end of the year,” said Pande, adding “we could misinterpret the minutes.”

Schumacher said the bond market will be looking for details on which securities the Fed might be rolling off of its balance sheet and which it will be replacing with new purchases, as their holdings mature.

“We think potentially the biggest move in the bond market as far as the minutes go is the composition of the balance sheet. It’s not so much the equilibrium number, or when the Fed gets there…There’s been talk that the Fed should shorten the duration of its Treasurys. That should mean a steeper curve and higher long term yields,” Schumacher said. If the Fed does signal it wants to hold shorter-duration securities, yields on the 10-year and 30-year bond could rise.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: patti domm, yuri gripas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, market, meeting, retail, coming, tells, minutes, week, fed, sales, sheet, balance, markets, thinking


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Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater


When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated. The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet. “It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January. “(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater
Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


Barney Swan skied Antarctica with clean energy to fight climate change

When Barney Swan walked out of a meeting with NASA in 2016, he felt frustrated.

The then-23-year-old and a handful of colleagues had just partaken in a presentation highlighting the destructive impact Antarctica’s collapsing ice shelves are having on the planet.

“It was terrifying, actually terrifying,” Swan said, recalling that meeting during a UN-partnered sustainability conference in in Singapore in January.

“(Antarctica has) 90 percent of the world’s ice, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater is locked within that ice,” he said. “That place has the capacity alone to raise our sea level 20 feet, globally.”

“I walked out of that meeting with NASA feeling almost disabled,” said Swan.

But he didn’t let the experience deter him. Instead, Swan decided to do something about it: He teamed up with his father, Robert Swan — the first man to ski to both the South Pole and the North Pole in the late 1980s — and set out on an epic journey to prove that sustainability can be achieved on a large scale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: shirley tay, barney swan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worlds, sustainability, climate, swan, clean, change, barney, antarctica, meeting, terrifying, pole, ice, skied, energy, unpartnered, fight, nasa, walked


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Watch: Charlie Munger speaks at the Daily Journal annual meeting

Warren Buffett’s longtime business partner Charlie Munger will on Thursday address shareholders of the Daily Journal, the Los Angeles-based publishing company where he serves as chairman. Munger is one of the most celebrated investors in history and played a crucial role in Buffett’s success. From 1962 to 1975, Munger’s investment partnership generated 20 percent annual returns versus the S&P 500’s 5 percent. Read more about his investment strategy here . The billionaire’s annual comments from t


Warren Buffett’s longtime business partner Charlie Munger will on Thursday address shareholders of the Daily Journal, the Los Angeles-based publishing company where he serves as chairman. Munger is one of the most celebrated investors in history and played a crucial role in Buffett’s success. From 1962 to 1975, Munger’s investment partnership generated 20 percent annual returns versus the S&P 500’s 5 percent. Read more about his investment strategy here . The billionaire’s annual comments from t
Watch: Charlie Munger speaks at the Daily Journal annual meeting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, charlie, munger, watch, buffetts, shareholders, youtube, speaks, investment, meeting, strategy, mungers, annual, daily, journal


Watch: Charlie Munger speaks at the Daily Journal annual meeting

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Warren Buffett’s longtime business partner Charlie Munger will on Thursday address shareholders of the Daily Journal, the Los Angeles-based publishing company where he serves as chairman.

The billionaire Munger, who turned 95 on New Year’s Day, is credited by the Oracle of Omaha for transforming Buffett’s initial bargain-based buying strategy and molding it into a long-term value strategy. Munger and Buffett have been partners for about 60 years.

Munger will speak with CNBC’s Becky Quick following his annual speech.

Munger is one of the most celebrated investors in history and played a crucial role in Buffett’s success. Munger’s investing prowess preceded his move to Buffett’s Berkshire. From 1962 to 1975, Munger’s investment partnership generated 20 percent annual returns versus the S&P 500’s 5 percent. Read more about his investment strategy here .

The billionaire’s annual comments from the Daily Journal meeting, where he takes questions from shareholders, have been shared on Wall Street among his many followers for years.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, charlie, munger, watch, buffetts, shareholders, youtube, speaks, investment, meeting, strategy, mungers, annual, daily, journal


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Trump: ‘I’m not happy’ with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely

The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend. I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.” The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding


The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend. I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.” The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding
Trump: ‘I’m not happy’ with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happy, border, security, agreement, im, funding, president, sign, shutdown, closure, youre, deal, meeting, think, looks, unlikely, trump


Trump: 'I'm not happy' with border security deal, but another shutdown looks unlikely

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he has reservations about a tentative federal spending deal, but he does not think parts of the government will shut down for the second time since December.

The president did not immediately commit to signing the agreement reached late Monday to prevent a partial government closure this weekend.

“The answer is no. … I’m not happy” about the agreement, Trump said during a Cabinet meeting. However, he added, “I don’t think you’re going to see a shutdown.”

Bipartisan appropriators emerged from a meeting Monday night saying they have a deal in principle to keep the government running past a midnight Friday deadline. The measure would put about $1.4 billion toward physical border barriers, but not a wall as the president has demanded. It includes money for 55 new miles of bollard fencing on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Despite the apparent breakthrough in Congress, Trump’s stance leaves the fate of government funding uncertain as another shutdown draws closer. While the president’s political motives for letting funding lapse have lessened since the last closure, there is no guarantee that he will sign what lawmakers approve.

Republicans will nudge Trump to keep the government open. On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters that “it’s not everything the president hoped to get, but I think it’s a good step in the right direction. I hope he’ll decide to sign it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: jacob pramuk, getty images, joe raedle
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happy, border, security, agreement, im, funding, president, sign, shutdown, closure, youre, deal, meeting, think, looks, unlikely, trump


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