Microsoft is bringing out the big guns against Slack with new global ad campaign for Teams

Microsoft is launching a major new ad campaign for Teams, its work-communication app, which has been duking it out with Slack for dominance in the workplace. A new global ad campaign from Microsoft will aim to sell “The Power of Teams,” juxtaposing old-school conference room meetings, complete with packets of printed-out charts and spilled coffee as phones are passed, versus what the company pitches as a new way of working. Slack shares dropped after CNBC reported news of the Microsoft ad campai


Microsoft is launching a major new ad campaign for Teams, its work-communication app, which has been duking it out with Slack for dominance in the workplace.
A new global ad campaign from Microsoft will aim to sell “The Power of Teams,” juxtaposing old-school conference room meetings, complete with packets of printed-out charts and spilled coffee as phones are passed, versus what the company pitches as a new way of working.
Slack shares dropped after CNBC reported news of the Microsoft ad campai
Microsoft is bringing out the big guns against Slack with new global ad campaign for Teams Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, teams, microsoft, big, million, meetings, global, users, bringing, guns, campaign, active, slack


Microsoft is bringing out the big guns against Slack with new global ad campaign for Teams

Microsoft is launching a major new ad campaign for Teams, its work-communication app, which has been duking it out with Slack for dominance in the workplace.

A new global ad campaign from Microsoft will aim to sell “The Power of Teams,” juxtaposing old-school conference room meetings, complete with packets of printed-out charts and spilled coffee as phones are passed, versus what the company pitches as a new way of working. The company worked with its agency, Interpublic’s McCann, on the campaign. It will launch in the U.S. on Sunday during the NFL playoffs and will include TV ads, podcasts, digital and out-of-home placements. The campaign will launch in February in the U.K., France and Germany.

Slack shares dropped after CNBC reported news of the Microsoft ad campaign, and are now down more than 2% on the day.

Teams, which launched in 2016, is a collaboration tool that offers chat, meetings, calling and file collaboration. Microsoft said in November that it had more than 20 million daily active users, a 54% increase from its prior announcement about usage and apparently more than Slack, which said in October it had 12 million daily active users. That raised some questions from analysts (and Slack) about what Microsoft considers an active user, but the tech giant argued its metrics were fair, saying that just because Teams is installed on a PC and automatically opens on start-up doesn’t mean the person gets counted as a user.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, teams, microsoft, big, million, meetings, global, users, bringing, guns, campaign, active, slack


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Lyft, Google and Facebook executives share their best tips for staying productive in the new year

Staying focused and productive at work is far from easy, especially with distractions all day, from emails to phone calls and meetings. In fact, according to software company Adobe, office workers in the U.S. spend approximately five hours per day checking emails. And, according to consulting firm Korn Ferry, professionals spend an excessive amount of time distracted by meetings as well. During this time, Svercheck says, “I really try to group all of my email traffic [together]. Facebook’s vice


Staying focused and productive at work is far from easy, especially with distractions all day, from emails to phone calls and meetings.
In fact, according to software company Adobe, office workers in the U.S. spend approximately five hours per day checking emails.
And, according to consulting firm Korn Ferry, professionals spend an excessive amount of time distracted by meetings as well.
During this time, Svercheck says, “I really try to group all of my email traffic [together].
Facebook’s vice
Lyft, Google and Facebook executives share their best tips for staying productive in the new year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, facebook, meetings, google, lyft, tips, work, really, executives, things, product, think, try, staying, best, share, day, schedule


Lyft, Google and Facebook executives share their best tips for staying productive in the new year

Staying focused and productive at work is far from easy, especially with distractions all day, from emails to phone calls and meetings. In fact, according to software company Adobe, office workers in the U.S. spend approximately five hours per day checking emails. And, according to consulting firm Korn Ferry, professionals spend an excessive amount of time distracted by meetings as well. In its survey of more than 1,900 professionals, Korn Ferry found that the majority of workers feel they are being forced into useless meetings, with 67% saying that too much time in a meeting distracts them from doing their best work. “Too often, the answer to any work issue is ‘Let’s meet,'” Korn Ferry senior client partner Cathi Rittelmann told CNBC Make It in November. “While collaboration is absolutely what drives innovation and success in today’s global marketplace, it’s time to get creative with how we use our time together.” Below, CNBC Make It spoke to three tech executives about how they best manage their schedules so that they’re able to stay as productive as possible, despite workplace distractions.

Lyft’s general counsel Kristin Svercheck:

Lyft’s general counsel Kristin Sverchek. Photo credit: Lyft

Her tip: Schedule productive work time in at least 90-minute increments “I really am vigilant about trying to schedule some proactive [work] time because if I don’t seriously protect my calendar, my day would be back-to-back meetings with no work time in between,” she says. “So, I would say I am fairly aggressive with turning meetings down, prioritizing, rescheduling and making sure that I have that proactive time.” During this time, Svercheck says, “I really try to group all of my email traffic [together]. I’m one of these people who is fairly responsive to email, but I will be checking it only at certain times so I can dash off a bunch of responses at once, rather than letting emails sidetrack my day.” She adds, “I’m also vigilant about making sure that when I have that proactive time blocked off, I try not to do it in little 30-minute increments here and there. I try to do it for at least an hour and a half, but even ideally longer than that, because that’s when I’m really able to switch my brain from meeting with people mode to actually deep thinking mode. And, I think the only way you can do that is with a little bit of free time ahead of you so that you’re not just trying to turn things around and move on to the next thing.”

Google’s head of product inclusion Annie Jean-Baptiste:

Google’s head of product inclusion Annie Jean-Baptiste. Photo credit: Google

Her tip: Schedule time to think about big picture ideas “I like to block off time for wellness, especially in the mornings. So, I sometimes use a code name for that session,” she says. “I think it’s just really important to block time off if you can for just thinking. I feel that a lot of times we can get bogged down with meetings and things like that, but you need to give your brain space to innovate and to think through and to kind of process everything that you’re learning and doing.” Jean-Baptiste adds, “I block off up to two hours every morning, and I try to find chunks of time each week where I can not have meetings so that I can think through kind of like strategic and big ideas, or just brainstorm and write things down that would be cool to think about. So, I think it’s not only important to have physical exercise, but mental [exercise] as well.”

Facebook’s vice president of product design Julie Zhuo:

Facebook’s VP of Product Julie Zhuo Photo credit: Julie Zhuo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-02  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, productive, facebook, meetings, google, lyft, tips, work, really, executives, things, product, think, try, staying, best, share, day, schedule


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Trump aides hold daily meetings on vaping as White House scrambles to formulate policy

From left: White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks to Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) and President Donald Trump, during a listening session on youth vaping and the electronic cigarette epidemic inside the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington,, November 22, 2019. The White House, grappling with the outbreak of a deadly lung disease associated with vaping, has been holding daily meetings on the issue for over two weeks, according to a senior administration official. The daily meeting ty


From left: White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks to Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) and President Donald Trump, during a listening session on youth vaping and the electronic cigarette epidemic inside the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington,, November 22, 2019.
The White House, grappling with the outbreak of a deadly lung disease associated with vaping, has been holding daily meetings on the issue for over two weeks, according to a senior administration official.
The daily meeting ty
Trump aides hold daily meetings on vaping as White House scrambles to formulate policy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: yelena dzhanova eamon javers, yelena dzhanova, eamon javers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, disease, scrambles, white, daily, trump, policy, house, outbreak, officials, formulate, deadly, vaping, health, meetings, thc


Trump aides hold daily meetings on vaping as White House scrambles to formulate policy

From left: White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks to Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) and President Donald Trump, during a listening session on youth vaping and the electronic cigarette epidemic inside the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington,, November 22, 2019.

The White House, grappling with the outbreak of a deadly lung disease associated with vaping, has been holding daily meetings on the issue for over two weeks, according to a senior administration official.

President Donald Trump is expected to participate in the final meeting of the year on the public health emergency sometime before Christmas, the administration official said.

The daily meeting typically occurs in the Roosevelt Room in the White House West Wing, and is open to Health and Human Services officials, senior administration officials and junior aides who may have an interest in the issue.

First Lady Melania Trump is also playing a role in shaping the administration’s response. “She has said she wants to be involved,” the official said.

Trump in September called for a ban on flavored e-cigarettes but backed off over concern about job losses at the thousands of vape shops nationwide and potential voter backlash. The White House has been under pressure from both vaping advocates and health groups to take action.

Concerns about e-cigarettes peaked over the summer amid an outbreak of a deadly vaping-related illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in early December that 52 people have died from the disease and 2,409 people have been hospitalized. Health officials have since narrowed their focus on THC vaping products.

Numerous state attorneys general opened investigations into e-cigarette maker Juul following the reports. California, New York, North Carolina, Illinois and Washington, D.C., have filed lawsuits against the company, alleging its advertising contributed to a surge of underage vaping in the United States.

Juul has suspended advertising in the United States and paused sales of all but two flavors.

In October, the FDA warned people to avoid using vaping products containing chemical THC and not to buy or use vaping products from “unknown sources” or “any kind obtained off the street.”

Dank Vapes is the most commonly used THC product among patients who developed a deadly vaping illness, though it’s “unlikely” that a single brand caused the national outbreak, the CDC said on Dec. 6.

— CNBC’s Angelica LaVito contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: yelena dzhanova eamon javers, yelena dzhanova, eamon javers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hold, disease, scrambles, white, daily, trump, policy, house, outbreak, officials, formulate, deadly, vaping, health, meetings, thc


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TikTok chief, facing criticism over China ties, cancels meetings with US lawmakers

TikTok chief Alex Zhu is postponing meetings with U.S. lawmakers that were originally expected to take place this week, the company confirmed late Monday. TikTok had requested meetings with lawmakers as the company faces mounting scrutiny over its ties to China. Lawmakers have suspected the company censors content in line with Chinese officials’ preferences and that user data could be accessed by the Chinese government. In his first interview as chief of TikTok last month, Alex Zhu refuted all a


TikTok chief Alex Zhu is postponing meetings with U.S. lawmakers that were originally expected to take place this week, the company confirmed late Monday.
TikTok had requested meetings with lawmakers as the company faces mounting scrutiny over its ties to China.
Lawmakers have suspected the company censors content in line with Chinese officials’ preferences and that user data could be accessed by the Chinese government.
In his first interview as chief of TikTok last month, Alex Zhu refuted all a
TikTok chief, facing criticism over China ties, cancels meetings with US lawmakers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: lauren feiner william feuer, lauren feiner, william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, ties, criticism, cancels, requested, chinese, zhu, user, company, meetings, told, lawmakers, data, facing, tiktoks, china, chief, tiktok


TikTok chief, facing criticism over China ties, cancels meetings with US lawmakers

TikTok chief Alex Zhu is postponing meetings with U.S. lawmakers that were originally expected to take place this week, the company confirmed late Monday.

“TikTok has no higher priority than ensuring Congress Members’ questions are addressed fully and transparently. To ensure these conversations are as productive as possible, we’re looking forward to holding these meetings after the holidays,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

TikTok had requested meetings with lawmakers as the company faces mounting scrutiny over its ties to China. Lawmakers have suspected the company censors content in line with Chinese officials’ preferences and that user data could be accessed by the Chinese government.

TikTok has repeatedly denied this is the case. In his first interview as chief of TikTok last month, Alex Zhu refuted all allegations of political censorship on the app. He told The New York Times that were China’s top official, Xi Jinping, to ask Zhu to remove a video or hand over user data, “I would turn him down.”

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo. tweeted Tuesday night that TikTok cancelled the meeting scheduled for this week. He also implied that the company was taking orders from its Chinese parent company not to meet with U.S. lawmakers.

The U.S. Army has barred soldiers from using the app following a national security concern and TikTok’s Chinese parent ByteDance faces a national security review from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS) over its 2017 acquisition of TikTok precursor Musical.ly, a person familiar with the matter previously told CNBC.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., requested the review, claiming in a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin there is “ample and growing evidence that TikTok’s platform for Western markets, including the U.S., is censoring content that is not in line with the Chinese Government and Communist Party directives.”

Rubio’s office declined a meeting TikTok requested with the senator, a congressional aide told CNBC. Zhu was scheduled to meet with Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., her office told CNBC. Blackburn wrote Zhu last month that she feared the app, popular with a younger demographic, “is paving the way for the Chinese government to gain unfettered and unsupervised access to our children’s lives.”

Despite TikTok’s claims it does not allow Chinese officials access to user data or censor content in line with the Chinese government’s views, recent controversies have opened room for doubt. In a class-action suit filed last month, for example, a California student accused the company of secretly collecting data on users and transferring private user data to China.

Also last month, head of safety at TikTok Eric Han apologized to a 17-year-old user in New Jersey after the company disabled access to her account and briefly removed one of her viral videos in which she discussed China’s mistreatment of the Uighur ethnic minority. Critics seized upon the instance as evidence of the app’s censorship on behalf of the Chinese Communist Party.

Han said TikTok was reviewing the procedure that led to the removal and said the company would create “carve-outs for things like education and satire, as other platforms do.”

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: TikTok sued in California for accusations of data transfer to China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-10  Authors: lauren feiner william feuer, lauren feiner, william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, month, ties, criticism, cancels, requested, chinese, zhu, user, company, meetings, told, lawmakers, data, facing, tiktoks, china, chief, tiktok


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Giuliani associate wants to testify that Nunes aides hid Ukraine meetings on Biden dirt from Schiff

The Nunes team’s scrapped trip to Ukraine has not been previously reported, nor have the meetings that Bondy said his client arranged in place of the overseas trip. The meetings took place in late March, and Derek Harvey, a senior investigator for Nunes, represented the congressman, according to Bondy. CNN first reported Friday that Parnas wanted to testify before the House Intelligence Committee about the Vienna trip. The latest allegations about the planned trip to Ukraine this spring, however


The Nunes team’s scrapped trip to Ukraine has not been previously reported, nor have the meetings that Bondy said his client arranged in place of the overseas trip.
The meetings took place in late March, and Derek Harvey, a senior investigator for Nunes, represented the congressman, according to Bondy.
CNN first reported Friday that Parnas wanted to testify before the House Intelligence Committee about the Vienna trip.
The latest allegations about the planned trip to Ukraine this spring, however
Giuliani associate wants to testify that Nunes aides hid Ukraine meetings on Biden dirt from Schiff Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, giuliani, meetings, committee, testify, nunes, trump, hid, dirt, schiff, biden, vienna, ukraine, ukrainian, parnas, bondy, trip


Giuliani associate wants to testify that Nunes aides hid Ukraine meetings on Biden dirt from Schiff

WASHINGTON – The lawyer for an indicted business associate of Rudy Giuliani said his client is prepared to testify under oath that aides to Rep. Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, scrapped a trip to Ukraine this year when they realized it would mean notifying Democratic Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff.

Lev Parnas would tell Congress that the purpose of the planned trip was to interview two Ukrainian prosecutors who claim to have evidence that could help President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign, Parnas’ attorney, Joseph Bondy, told CNBC. Nunes is one of Trump’s most outspoken defenders in Congress. Giuliani is one of the president’s personal lawyers.

But when Nunes’ staff realized that going to Ukraine themselves would mean alerting Schiff to their plans, they instead asked Parnas to set up the meetings for them over phone and Skype, which he did, according to Bondy.

The Intelligence Committee is leading the House’s impeachment inquiry into Trump. It wrapped up two weeks of public hearings Thursday during which several Trump administration officials described a pressure campaign to influence Ukraine into saying it would investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, the frontrunner for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, and a discredited conspiracy theory regarding the 2016 election.

Bondy is representing Parnas against federal campaign finance charges in New York. Parnas has pleaded not guilty to charges of illegally funneling money from a Ukrainian government official to Republican candidates in the U.S., including Trump.

For more than a year, Parnas has also worked closely with Giuliani to dig up dirt on Biden and his son Hunter in Ukraine in advance of the 2020 presidential election, according to Bondy. During that time, Trump and his allies in Congress have pushed unfounded claims that Biden intervened in a Ukrainian criminal investigation, and that Ukraine meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

The Nunes team’s scrapped trip to Ukraine has not been previously reported, nor have the meetings that Bondy said his client arranged in place of the overseas trip. The meetings took place in late March, and Derek Harvey, a senior investigator for Nunes, represented the congressman, according to Bondy. One of the meetings was with Ukraine’s chief anti-corruption prosecutor, Nazar Kholodnytsky, and it was held over Skype, Parnas would tell Congress. The second, Bondy said, was a phone call Parnas arranged for Harvey with a deputy in Ukraine’s Prosecutor General’s office, Konstantin Kulik.

Both Kulik and Kholodnytsky have repeatedly claimed they witnessed corruption by Democratic operatives in Ukraine during the 2016 election. Neither official has produced evidence to support his account. A Nunes spokesman did not respond to several requests for comment about what Parnas would reveal to Congress.

According to Bondy, Parnas says he began working with Harvey after Nunes, of California, and his staff traveled to Vienna in late November to meet with another potential source of political dirt on Democrats: former Ukrainian prosecutor Viktor Shokin, who claims that Biden demanded his firing because Shokin was secretly investigating a company, Burisma, that employed Biden’s son Hunter.

CNN first reported Friday that Parnas wanted to testify before the House Intelligence Committee about the Vienna trip. Since then, Nunes has threatened to sue both CNN and The Daily Beast, which also reported on Parnas’ allegations.

Asked point blank during an interview Sunday whether he met with Shokin in Vienna, Nunes refused to answer, telling Fox News that Parnas was “a criminal,” and that he would not “debate this out with the public media when 90% of the media are totally corrupt.”

The latest allegations about the planned trip to Ukraine this spring, however, suggest that Nunes’ purported efforts to dig up dirt on Biden and Democrats did not end with the Vienna trip.

They also potentially implicate Nunes and his committee staff in the same events the committee is currently investigating. Specifically, the monthslong effort by Trump, Giuliani and others to get Ukrainian officials to help them dig up dirt on Biden, and to validate far-right conspiracies about Ukraine and the 2016 election.

Trump raised both of these issues on a phone call July 25 with Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, prompting a whistleblower complaint that sparked the current impeachment investigation into the president.

During the past two weeks, nearly a dozen current and former officials in the Trump administration testified before Nunes and the rest of the Intelligence Committee about what they say was a far-reaching effort to exert pressure on Ukraine to announce the investigations Trump wanted, up to and including withholding congressionally appropriated foreign aid to the war-torn country.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-24  Authors: christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, giuliani, meetings, committee, testify, nunes, trump, hid, dirt, schiff, biden, vienna, ukraine, ukrainian, parnas, bondy, trip


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67% of workers say spending too much time in meetings distracts them from doing their job

A new report finds the majority of workers across the country feel they are being forced into counterproductive meetings and calls on a regular basis. According to a recent survey of 1,945 workers by organizational consulting firm Korn Ferry, 51% of professionals say spending too much time in meetings and on calls distracts them from making an impact at work to some extent. Overall, 67% of workers say excessive meetings keep them from getting their best work done. So just how much time are worke


A new report finds the majority of workers across the country feel they are being forced into counterproductive meetings and calls on a regular basis.
According to a recent survey of 1,945 workers by organizational consulting firm Korn Ferry, 51% of professionals say spending too much time in meetings and on calls distracts them from making an impact at work to some extent.
Overall, 67% of workers say excessive meetings keep them from getting their best work done.
So just how much time are worke
67% of workers say spending too much time in meetings distracts them from doing their job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meetings, work, spending, calls, say, week, waste, rittelmann, job, hours, workers, doing, distracts


67% of workers say spending too much time in meetings distracts them from doing their job

If sitting through a useless meeting at work sounds like your worst nightmare, you’re not alone.

A new report finds the majority of workers across the country feel they are being forced into counterproductive meetings and calls on a regular basis.

According to a recent survey of 1,945 workers by organizational consulting firm Korn Ferry, 51% of professionals say spending too much time in meetings and on calls distracts them from making an impact at work to some extent. Another 16% say this is true to a great extent.

Overall, 67% of workers say excessive meetings keep them from getting their best work done.

“Too often, the answer to any work issue is ‘let’s meet,” Cathi Rittelmann, Korn Ferry senior client partner tells CNBC Make It. “While collaboration is absolutely what drives innovation and success in today’s global marketplace, it’s time to get creative with how we use our time together.

“Meetings aren’t necessarily bad,” Rittelmann adds, “but the way we prep and lead them can sometimes derail productivity.”

So just how much time are workers spending in pointless meetings every week?

About 6% of workers say they spend more than 10 hours per week attending unproductive meetings and calls, 15% say they waste between five and 10 hours each week, 34% say they wasted between two and five hours each week and 34% say they waste between one and two hours each week.

Just 11% say that all of their meetings are productive.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meetings, work, spending, calls, say, week, waste, rittelmann, job, hours, workers, doing, distracts


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Google cancels weekly all-hands meetings amid growing workplace tensions

Google is getting rid of one of its best-known workplace features: TGIF, its weekly all-hands meeting. In his note, Pichai alluded to recent leaks that employees have given to media. Pichai’s note also stated that only 25% of Google employees watch TGIF any given week, compared to 80% a decade ago. The note stated that Google’s TGIF team will set up “small group discussions” for feedback on the changes. WATCH NOW: Google employees walk out to protest the handling of sexual harassment allegations


Google is getting rid of one of its best-known workplace features: TGIF, its weekly all-hands meeting.
In his note, Pichai alluded to recent leaks that employees have given to media.
Pichai’s note also stated that only 25% of Google employees watch TGIF any given week, compared to 80% a decade ago.
The note stated that Google’s TGIF team will set up “small group discussions” for feedback on the changes.
WATCH NOW: Google employees walk out to protest the handling of sexual harassment allegations
Google cancels weekly all-hands meetings amid growing workplace tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tgif, meetings, tensions, stated, allhands, workplace, weekly, employees, note, regularly, amid, come, cancels, company, week, google, growing, pichai


Google cancels weekly all-hands meetings amid growing workplace tensions

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, speaks to the media before the opening of the Berlin representation of Google Germany in Berlin on January 22, 2019.

Google is getting rid of one of its best-known workplace features: TGIF, its weekly all-hands meeting.

The company confirmed to CNBC that it will instead hold monthly all-hands meetings that will be focused on business and strategy while holding separate town halls for “workplace issues.” An email announcing the change was previously reported by The Verge.

Founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin started TGIFs in 1999 as a forum where employees could regularly express concerns and discuss topics open and freely with management. At that time, the company was small enough to fit in a meeting room, but the all-hands continued to grow as the employee base grew — until recently, that is. Page and Brin stopped attending regularly in 2019. A company spokesperson said that the meetings had recently become a bi-weekly instead of weekly occurrence.

The new model comes as the company cracks down on the open work culture that’s long been part of its identity of holding free discussion. Employees have increasingly voiced their concerns about everything from the handling of sexual harassment to government hires and contracts. In recent months, employees have leaked meeting notes to the media, which have shown growing tension between executives and workers.

During the summer, it said it would ban political discussions from internal messaging forums. In late October, CEO Sundar Pichai said, in a leaked video, that the company was “genuinely struggling” with employee trust.

“In other places — like TGIF — our scale is challenging us to evolve,” Pichai said in a memo to employees this week. “TGIF has traditionally provided a place to come together, share progress, and ask questions, but it’s not working in its current form.”

In his note, Pichai alluded to recent leaks that employees have given to media.

“We’re unfortunately seeing a coordinated effort to share our conversations outside of the company after every TGIF,” the note reportedly states. “I know this is new information to many of you, and it has affected our ability to use TGIF as a forum for candid conversations on important topics.

Pichai’s note also stated that only 25% of Google employees watch TGIF any given week, compared to 80% a decade ago. Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, who used to attend regularly, reportedly stopped regularly attending in early 2019.

“People come to TGIF with different expectations,” the note stated. “Some people come to hear more about Google’s product launches and business strategies, others come to hear answers on other topics. By splitting the difference every week, we’re not serving either purpose very well.”

The note stated that Google’s TGIF team will set up “small group discussions” for feedback on the changes.

WATCH NOW: Google employees walk out to protest the handling of sexual harassment allegations


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-15  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tgif, meetings, tensions, stated, allhands, workplace, weekly, employees, note, regularly, amid, come, cancels, company, week, google, growing, pichai


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Trump administration to announce policy on flavored e-cigarettes ‘very soon’

The Trump administration will announce its highly anticipated policy on flavored e-cigarettes “very soon,” President Donald Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway told reporters Wednesday. Trump and top health officials on Sept. 11 said the administration was readying a ban on flavored e-cigarettes and would introduce the policy within weeks. The administration initially said it would ban both flavors, though most industry observers expect the administration to exempt menthol, along with toba


The Trump administration will announce its highly anticipated policy on flavored e-cigarettes “very soon,” President Donald Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway told reporters Wednesday.
Trump and top health officials on Sept. 11 said the administration was readying a ban on flavored e-cigarettes and would introduce the policy within weeks.
The administration initially said it would ban both flavors, though most industry observers expect the administration to exempt menthol, along with toba
Trump administration to announce policy on flavored e-cigarettes ‘very soon’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soon, white, kids, industry, announce, meetings, mint, menthol, flavors, administration, ecigarettes, policy, conway, flavored, house, trump


Trump administration to announce policy on flavored e-cigarettes 'very soon'

The Trump administration will announce its highly anticipated policy on flavored e-cigarettes “very soon,” President Donald Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway told reporters Wednesday.

Trump and top health officials on Sept. 11 said the administration was readying a ban on flavored e-cigarettes and would introduce the policy within weeks. Nearly two months later, they have yet to introduce anything.

It was widely speculated that the administration would announce its plan Tuesday in conjunction with the publication of two studies outlining kids’ appetite for flavors, particularly mint. It wasn’t immediately clear why the announcement was delayed. Conway on Wednesday said it will be made “very soon,” with industry watchers expecting it as early as this week.

“I think the only thing that’s really changed from [first lady Melania Trump’s] initial tweet on Sept. 9 is that the data are much more harrowing and concerning than we would have expected,” Conway said outside the White House. “But the demarcation is really kids and adults. And we’re very focused on a burgeoning health crisis among kids.”

One study asked teens separately about mint and menthol. The administration initially said it would ban both flavors, though most industry observers expect the administration to exempt menthol, along with tobacco, from any ban.

“The differences between kids and adults, and I think the [Journal of the American Medical Association] made clear, kids report they use mint and other flavors like mango, bubble gum, tooty fruity, unicorn milk, pretty remarkable, and that they don’t care for menthol, which of course many smokers — I’m not one — say tastes like tobacco,” Conway said Wednesday.

The Department of Health and Human Services sent its proposal to the White House’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the end of October. A number of e-cigarette companies and advocates scheduled meetings to discuss the plan with the White House through the end of November.

The White House early Tuesday canceled all scheduled meetings, saying in emails that officials had concluded their review after taking just a handful of meetings. The industry and adults who have used e-cigarettes to quit smoking cigarettes have aggressively lobbied against banning flavors, using the hashtag on social media #WeVapeWeVote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: angelica lavito, in angelicalavito
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, soon, white, kids, industry, announce, meetings, mint, menthol, flavors, administration, ecigarettes, policy, conway, flavored, house, trump


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Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein ‘a mistake’

Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein ‘a mistake’Bill Gates sits down with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin at the New York Times DealBook Conference to discuss the lessons he’s learned from taking meetings with convicted sexual offender Jeffrey Epstein.


Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein ‘a mistake’Bill Gates sits down with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin at the New York Times DealBook Conference to discuss the lessons he’s learned from taking meetings with convicted sexual offender Jeffrey Epstein.
Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein ‘a mistake’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sexual, bill, mistake, calls, epstein, gates, meetings, sorkin, taking, sits, times, york, jeffrey


Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein 'a mistake'

Bill Gates calls his meetings with Jeffrey Epstein ‘a mistake’

Bill Gates sits down with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin at the New York Times DealBook Conference to discuss the lessons he’s learned from taking meetings with convicted sexual offender Jeffrey Epstein.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sexual, bill, mistake, calls, epstein, gates, meetings, sorkin, taking, sits, times, york, jeffrey


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Investors are hoping stocks can beat the Fed meeting curse this time

It also describes the setup ahead of each of the last five Fed meetings dating back to March. The retreats in stocks coinciding with earlier Fed meetings were not particularly violent or long-lasting. After each Fed meeting this year, too, the 10-year Treasury yield declined, at least initially, which has served as a restraint on equities. With this as the backdrop, are stocks again at risk of rolling over as eyes turn to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell Wednesday afternoon? But there are a few reason


It also describes the setup ahead of each of the last five Fed meetings dating back to March.
The retreats in stocks coinciding with earlier Fed meetings were not particularly violent or long-lasting.
After each Fed meeting this year, too, the 10-year Treasury yield declined, at least initially, which has served as a restraint on equities.
With this as the backdrop, are stocks again at risk of rolling over as eyes turn to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell Wednesday afternoon?
But there are a few reason
Investors are hoping stocks can beat the Fed meeting curse this time Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: michael santoli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, beat, support, fed, stocks, meeting, curse, growth, market, meetings, hoping, risk


Investors are hoping stocks can beat the Fed meeting curse this time

(This story is part of the Weekend Brief edition of the Evening Brief newsletter. To sign up for CNBC’s Evening Brief, click here.) We’ve been here before – several times, and not long ago. A plodding but steady rally is drawing the S&P 500 toward a new record high as investors lean on modest interest rates and firm credit conditions to support the market as corporate profits flatten out. Near the crest of a rally, a Federal Reserve policy meeting awaits. This captures the current market field position, with the S&P 500 just a hair below a record high after a nearly 7% rebound from its August low as a Fed decision awaits on Wednesday. It also describes the setup ahead of each of the last five Fed meetings dating back to March. Within days of each of those prior meetings, the S&P 500 entered a pullback of between 2% and 7% over the subsequent weeks. The most severe of those drops, at more than 6% each, came after the May 1 and July 31 meetings, which like the upcoming meeting were about halfway through an earnings-reporting season in which investors were placated by better-than-feared results. The retreats in stocks coinciding with earlier Fed meetings were not particularly violent or long-lasting. And they were not hostile reactions to any Fed surprise: The decision in each case was as anticipated, with more dovish language leading to quarter-point rate cuts both in July and September. Another quarter-point cut is generally expected for next week as well, though beyond that the outlook is less clear.

Why the sell-off?

It seems the Fed news this year simply concentrated attention on what has been an uncomfortable perceived trade-off between economic growth and easier Fed policy, with significant concern in past months that the central bank was at risk of acting too slowly or ineffectively to support the economy given the unpredictable pressure of a trade-war being felt. After each Fed meeting this year, too, the 10-year Treasury yield declined, at least initially, which has served as a restraint on equities. Stock investors have preferred higher yields as a sign the economy is holding up well and risk appetites are recovering. The 10-year Treasury has moved up appreciably from its August and early-October lows near 1.5%, settling Friday at 1.80%. This has rebuilt a positive spread between long- and short-term Treasuries, undoing the inverted yield curve which crystallized the intense recession fears of late summer.

Will stocks fall again?

With this as the backdrop, are stocks again at risk of rolling over as eyes turn to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell Wednesday afternoon? Nearly anything can serve as an excuse for stocks to back off after a good run, of course, and this includes an unsurprising decision from the Fed. And perhaps if Powell signals that the Fed will go on hold for a while after this meeting, it might cause a flutter through stock and bond portfolios. But there are a few reasons to think the market right now isn’t especially vulnerable this time to a rude awakening or lasting retrenchment coinciding with the Fed meeting. For one thing, stocks have advanced over the past two months without rising expectations for incremental Fed easing and without an outsized reliance on defensive “bond substitute stocks.” In recent weeks, stocks more geared to a reaccelerating global economy — financials, industrials, materials, small-caps, semiconductors — have been outperforming those “all-weather” growth and staples stocks. This suggests the market is watching that leading indicators of industrial activity curling higher and betting the expansion has legs. In fact, the global lift in bond yields — in the case of Europe, their move to “less negative” readings below zero — has been accompanied by an emerging belief that central banks may have approached a logical endpoint, for now, in their campaigns to stoke growth with ever-easier policies. With Christine Lagarde taking over as European Central Bank president, the talk has been about her perceived ability to marshal support for greater fiscal stimulus.

‘Mid-cycle adjustment’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-26  Authors: michael santoli
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, beat, support, fed, stocks, meeting, curse, growth, market, meetings, hoping, risk


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