Trump’s tariffs on Chinese products might impact your Christmas shopping budget after all

The Trump administration announced on Aug. 1, that it planned to levy tariffs of 10% on over $300 billion of Chinese imports. The product on the shelf may not come directly from China, but Chinese companies supply ingredients used to create many food items. Consumers with lower incomes tend to shop at budget retailers such as dollar stores and big box chains — which source a lot of products from China. As you get closer to Christmas, these latest tariffs on Chinese goods are likely going to “bit


The Trump administration announced on Aug. 1, that it planned to levy tariffs of 10% on over $300 billion of Chinese imports. The product on the shelf may not come directly from China, but Chinese companies supply ingredients used to create many food items. Consumers with lower incomes tend to shop at budget retailers such as dollar stores and big box chains — which source a lot of products from China. As you get closer to Christmas, these latest tariffs on Chinese goods are likely going to “bit
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, tariffs, chinese, items, impact, holiday, trump, china, shopping, trumps, christmas, administration, budget, product, products


Trump's tariffs on Chinese products might impact your Christmas shopping budget after all

With Trump’s trade war with China set to start impacting consumer goods in early September, experts say it may pay to start your holiday shopping earlier than usual this year. The Trump administration announced on Aug. 1, that it planned to levy tariffs of 10% on over $300 billion of Chinese imports. However, a little more than a week later, the administration changed course, delaying tariffs on electronics such as smartphones, video game consoles, as well as some clothing and toys, until December. “We’re doing this for the Christmas season,” President Donald Trump told reporters on Aug. 13. “Just in case some of the tariffs would have an impact on U.S. customers.” Tariffs are taxes are paid by the importer, not the country exporting the product. The Trump administration has introduced the tariffs in an effort to bring China to the negotiation table after claiming the country has unfair trade practices that hurt U.S. manufacturing. But many times, it’s the consumer who’s stuck paying a higher price for a product — an issue that President Trump tacitly acknowledged when his administration decided to delay the tariffs on popular holiday gift items. Once a tariff is imposed, businesses have a few options. They can pass on the tax to consumers by charging higher prices, they can eat the difference to stay competitive or they can push back on the supplier to lower the base cost of the product to account for the new taxes. In some cases, companies may even switch to a non-Chinese supplier.

What items could see price hikes

While some electronics and toys may be spared for now, the list of goods that will be impacted by the Sep. 1 tariffs still spans 122 pages and ranges from everyday grocery items like milk and tomatoes to household staples like diapers and soap, and even products like alarm clocks and sports equipment (and yes, that includes skis). With such a wide range of products in play and uncertainty around how retailers will respond, it’s hard to predict exactly how much these tariffs will affect the everyday shopper. Yet the two areas where you will most likely see price increases are on clothing and footwear, says William Reinsch, senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and contributor to The Trade Guys podcast. Last year, over 40% of all clothing and almost 70% of the footwear sold in the U.S. was imported from China, according to the American Apparel & Footwear Association. And while Trump says the delay of some tariffs is meant to protect holiday shoppers, the Association says many common Christmas items and decor still fall under the September round of tariffs, including holiday stockings. Another area that may take a hit is your grocery budget. A “considerable amount” of the food we buy at supermarkets, for example, is connected to Chinese suppliers, says Phil Lempert, a food industry analyst and editor of SupermarketGuru. The product on the shelf may not come directly from China, but Chinese companies supply ingredients used to create many food items.

The effect on consumers

JP Morgan analysts estimate the direct and indirect effect of tariffs could end up costing American families an average of $1,000 this year. That’s up from the $600 additional costs financial analysts previously predicted would hit Americans after the White House upped the tariff rate on non-consumer goods to 25% in May. While the administration could provide farmers and the agricultural industry subsidies to offset the tariffs levied earlier this year, “there is no simple way to compensate consumers,” Dubravko Lakos-Bujas, JP Morgan’s head of U.S. equity strategy, wrote in a note to clients. “The people who will be hit the hardest [by the tariffs] are poor people,” Reinsch tells CNBC Make It. Consumers with lower incomes tend to shop at budget retailers such as dollar stores and big box chains — which source a lot of products from China. And simply avoiding products with labels saying ‘Made in China’ may not help, since many items on the shelves have ingredients or parts that originated in China, even if the final product was manufactured elsewhere. It will, however, take a while for the full effect of the tariffs to kick in, Reinsch says. That’s because many of the products that will be on shelves in September and October are already in the U.S. “On Sept. 2, if you go shopping, you may not notice a big difference unless the retailer decides to take advantage of the situation and raise prices prematurely and blame it on Trump,” he says. As you get closer to Christmas, these latest tariffs on Chinese goods are likely going to “bite more,” he adds, saying budget-conscious shoppers may want to start some of their holiday shopping early to avoid paying a premium. Don’t miss: Trump increased tariffs on more Chinese products to 25%—here’s what could get more expensive Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goods, tariffs, chinese, items, impact, holiday, trump, china, shopping, trumps, christmas, administration, budget, product, products


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Here are all the ways you can buy groceries on Amazon—and how much each costs

Amazon Fresh grocery delivery truck from the Amazon Prime service parked on a suburban street in San Ramon, California, July 5, 2018. In addition to delivery, Prime Now offers curbside pickup at Whole Foods stores in 22 locations, according to SupermarketNews. If you already have a Prime membership, Prime Now can be a cost-effective grocery delivery service for natural and organic groceries. These items are eligible for exclusive Prime Pantry coupons and deals. Prime Pantry also has themed boxes


Amazon Fresh grocery delivery truck from the Amazon Prime service parked on a suburban street in San Ramon, California, July 5, 2018. In addition to delivery, Prime Now offers curbside pickup at Whole Foods stores in 22 locations, according to SupermarketNews. If you already have a Prime membership, Prime Now can be a cost-effective grocery delivery service for natural and organic groceries. These items are eligible for exclusive Prime Pantry coupons and deals. Prime Pantry also has themed boxes
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Here are all the ways you can buy groceries on Amazon—and how much each costs

There are days when schlepping to the grocery store just isn’t going to happen, but you still need to fill your fridge. Luckily, there’s an ever-expanding variety of online grocery retailers and services. Amazon is one of the biggest operators in this space, which includes Boxed, FreshDirect, Instacart and Peapod. The company offers five different grocery delivery programs, depending on how quickly you need your groceries and what you’re shopping for. Here’s a look at the groceries you can purchase from Amazon, all of the costs and delivery fees for each program, and where each service is available.

Amazon.com

Upfront cost: $0

$0 Delivery Fee: Free with order of $25 or more

Free with order of $25 or more Delivery availability: 5-8 business day shipping available anywhere Amazon delivers If you don’t have a Prime membership, which costs $119 a year, you can still buy shelf-stable groceries from Amazon’s main website. However, most of these items are sold in bulk. For example, an 8-pack of 16-ounce packages of Barilla spaghetti sells for $11.12. You can find some good deals, but don’t automatically assume that buying in bulk will net you the cheapest price — you should still shop around. Walmart sells a two pack of Barilla 32-ounce spaghetti for $4.84, which is slightly cheaper when calculating the cost per ounce, and you can get free two-day delivery. And because Amazon purchased Whole Foods Market in 2017, the online giant’s customers can purchase a limited number of Whole Foods’ 365 Everyday Value brand of products in single servings. A 16-ounce box of 365 organic whole wheat spaghetti sells for $1.49, while a 16-ounce jar of 365 organic, creamy almond butter is $10.99. If you don’t have a nearby Whole Foods and don’t want to pay for an Amazon membership, this is a great way to get pantry items delivered to your doorstep.

Amazon Fresh grocery delivery truck from the Amazon Prime service parked on a suburban street in San Ramon, California, July 5, 2018. Smith Collection/Gado | Archive Photos | Getty Images

AmazonFresh

Upfront cost: $14.99 per month + Prime membership ($119/year)

$14.99 per month + Prime membership ($119/year) Delivery Fee: Free for orders over $35, otherwise $9.99

Free for orders over $35, otherwise $9.99 Delivery availability: same-day and next-day delivery in 15 cities: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington D.C. If you’ve searched for food items on Amazon, chances are you’ve seen the little green “fresh” label underneath certain products. That stands for AmazonFresh, a subscription service available to Prime members that delivers fresh groceries from Amazon fulfillment centers. Through AmazonFresh, you can get fresh groceries, such as produce, meat and dairy, as well as pantry items, delivered to your door the day you order it or the day after. The service will cost $180 a year, but if you have a valid SNAP EBT card, you can get free access to AmazonFresh without a monthly membership fee. The service offers a wide variety of groceries, personal care items and household supplies, such as paper plates, kitchen cleaners and trash bags from all major national brands. AmazonFresh also carries Whole Foods brands such as 365 and Engine 2 plant-strong products.

Prime Now

Upfront cost: Included in Prime membership ($119/year)

Included in Prime membership ($119/year) Delivery Fee: Free for 2-hour delivery on orders over $35, otherwise starts at $4.99

Free for 2-hour delivery on orders over $35, otherwise starts at $4.99 Delivery availability: 1-hour and 2-hour delivery windows available in 88 major metros across the U.S. Prime Now, which is included for free to Prime members, delivers Whole Foods groceries from the store to your doorstep. Similar to services like Instacart, someone does the in-store shopping for you and then a courier delivers your groceries. In addition to delivery, Prime Now offers curbside pickup at Whole Foods stores in 22 locations, according to SupermarketNews. Unlike AmazonFresh, Prime Now groceries are typically sourced from nearby Whole Foods stores, so your options may be limited to products sold by the Austin, Texas-based specialty grocer. That means if you’re looking for Dixie paper plates or Tide laundry detergent, for example, you’ll need to substitute Whole Foods’ more eco-friendly products that may be sold at slightly higher prices. If you already have a Prime membership, Prime Now can be a cost-effective grocery delivery service for natural and organic groceries. Delivery is free if you select a two-hour delivery window on orders over $35. Competitor Instacart generally charges a $3.99 fee for same-day deliveries of $35 or more, according to the company (deliveries in New York City and certain stores may be higher). Instacart Express customers who pay $99 for an annual membership are not charged delivery fees on orders over $35, although a service fee may still apply.

Amazon’s PrimeNow CNBC

Prime Pantry

Upfront cost: Included in Prime membership ($119/year)

Included in Prime membership ($119/year) Delivery Fee: Free for orders over $35, otherwise $5.99

Free for orders over $35, otherwise $5.99 Delivery availability: 1-4 business day shipping available in 48 states Prime Pantry is a service that offers “low-priced grocery and household essentials in everyday sizes” to Prime members. You may have run across the blue “pantry” tag on items when browsing Amazon.com. Prime Pantry offers a range of shelf-stable products such as snacks, cereal, condiments, cleaning products and even office supplies that are sold separately from other Amazon.com orders. These items are eligible for exclusive Prime Pantry coupons and deals. Prime Pantry also has themed boxes, so you can stock up on household and pantry essentials without having to spend the time adding everything to your cart. In order to get free shipping on your orders, you do need to spend $35, otherwise it’s $5.99 for shipping. Prime Pantry also has an option for customers to pay a $4.99 monthly subscription fee so that all of your orders qualify for free shipping. If you’re ordering more than once a month, it may pay to subscribe if it’s available in your neighborhood. Unlike AmazonFresh and Prime Now, this service doesn’t offer fresh groceries and deliveries can take up to four business days to arrive. But if you’re not in a hurry to get your items and you’re already a Prime member, this may be a good way to stock up on everyday items.

At a Whole Foods Market grocery store in San Ramon, California, signage advertises new discounts for Amazon Prime members. Smith Collection/Gado | Archive Photos | Getty Images

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: megan leonhardt
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Here’s what you need to know about creating that diverse portfolio financial experts keep talking about

At the most basic level, it means you don’t want all your money invested in the same place. A balanced portfolio generally means your money is invested in different types of assets, such as stocks and bonds. Bonds typically act as a “counterweight” to stocks, Sethi explains. With stocks, for example, you typically want some of your money invested with big companies, some with international companies and some with small companies. You want to pick bonds from different issuers, such as the federal


At the most basic level, it means you don’t want all your money invested in the same place. A balanced portfolio generally means your money is invested in different types of assets, such as stocks and bonds. Bonds typically act as a “counterweight” to stocks, Sethi explains. With stocks, for example, you typically want some of your money invested with big companies, some with international companies and some with small companies. You want to pick bonds from different issuers, such as the federal
Here’s what you need to know about creating that diverse portfolio financial experts keep talking about Cached Page below :
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Here's what you need to know about creating that diverse portfolio financial experts keep talking about

The markets are coming off a wild week and many financial experts say now is the time to make sure you have a balanced, diversified investment mix.

Understanding diversification and making sure your portfolio meets that standard is an important way to build long-term wealth, personal finance coach Ramit Sethi tells CNBC Make It.

That’s good advice, but do you know what it actually means?

At the most basic level, it means you don’t want all your money invested in the same place. Instead, you want to set up your investments in a way that when one sector of the market is dipping, you are also invested somewhere else that is performing well.

“You want to have a balanced portfolio so that you’re not subject to massive amounts of risk,” says Sethi, author of the best-selling book “I Will Teach You To Be Rich.” Spreading out your money across several investments is one way to reduce your overall risk so that you won’t lose everything if the market tanks.

A balanced portfolio generally means your money is invested in different types of assets, such as stocks and bonds. Bonds typically act as a “counterweight” to stocks, Sethi explains. When stocks fall, bond prices often rise and therefore reduce the overall risk that you’ll lose money. You generally want some of both in your investment mix.

Just having stocks and bonds is not enough to keep your risk low, though. You also need to diversify your investments within these asset classes. With stocks, for example, you typically want some of your money invested with big companies, some with international companies and some with small companies.

The same is true with bonds. You want to pick bonds from different issuers, such as the federal government, corporate bonds, and municipal bonds from state and local governments.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
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Americans spend almost $700 on back-to-school shopping—here are 5 ways to save

Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of th


Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of th
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: megan leonhardt
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Americans spend almost $700 on back-to-school shopping—here are 5 ways to save

If you haven’t started picking up the requisite pencils, backpacks, lunchboxes and notebooks your kids will need as they head back to school, you’re in luck — some of the best deals can pop up last-minute. “If you’re starting to shop for back-to-school essentials now, don’t worry, there are still deals to be had,” says Sara Skirboll, shopping and trends expert for RetailMeNot. Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. The organization expects the top spending categories to be clothing and accessories, followed by electronics and shoes. And those with kids heading to college should prepare to spend big. The National Retail Federation predicts back-to-school spending for college students will average $977 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Here are five easy ways to give your wallet a break.

1. Shop clearance

Timing the back-to-school sales can be tricky. If you’re looking to score the deepest discounts, it may be worth buying a few essentials and then stocking up after the school year officially starts. Big box retailers such as Target and Walmart typically put school supplies on sale during the first week of September, with Target’s discounts ranging from 30-90% off, the Krazy Coupon Lady website reports.

Not sure what constitutes a good price? Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of the most common school supplies and what you should expect to pay.

2. Divide and conquer

Time may be running short, but it’s worth the effort and extra stops to hit up multiple stores. Staples has a range of school supplies — composition notebooks, notebook paper, Elmer’s glue, 24-pack of Crayola crayons — for 50 cents each, according to the weekly ad for a Northern New Jersey location. Even better, 70-sheet single subject notebooks are 25 cents and a 12-pack of basic #2 pencils are on sale for 75 cents, about 6 cents a pencil. Meanwhile, Walmart has folders for 15 cents a piece and 1-inch binders for less than $1, according to its weekly ad. Walmart also has some of the best deals on Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus graphing calculators for $88, down from over $100. If you’re not as worried about the brand, Target is selling Casio graphing calculators for just $43. Take advantage of cash back savings that your credit card may offer, as well as rotating offers for different stores. Chase is offering cardmembers 10% back at Dick’s Sporting Goods and Rite Aid. And Target’s REDcard gives cardmembers 5% off their purchase. “It’s a great way to save even if there isn’t a sale,” Skirboll says.

3. Use your student ID

If you’re in the market for a laptop, you can use your college email to access Apple’s education discount, which typically gives students about a 10% discount on laptops, iPads, computers, and accessories, as well as 20% off AppleCare+ coverage. Best Buy also offers a variety of student deals, and you can sign up to get alerts when new promotions start.

4. Find a backpack that goes the distance

Skip the cheap, trendy backpacks that you know will fall apart within a few months. Many of the big brands such as Jansport, Herschel and Lands’ End have lifetime warranties. And they don’t have to cost a fortune. Target has JanSport backpacks on sale starting at $28, according to the weekly ad. The Krazy Coupon Lady’s website has a fairly comprehensive list of all the manufacturer warranties offered by popular backpack producers.

5. Try before you buy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, notebooks, school, shoppinghere, backpacks, save, spend, deals, americans, youre, supplies, backtoschool, ways, 700, according, cents


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Feeling the squeeze, American parents struggle to afford child care and student loan debt

The average student loan payment is $393 a month. Earlier this year, Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren rolled out a plan for a sweeping universal child care program. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke also back forms of universal child care, supporting the Child Care for Working Families Act introduced earlier this year. The Trump administration has also tackled child care policies, with President Donald Trump signi


The average student loan payment is $393 a month. Earlier this year, Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren rolled out a plan for a sweeping universal child care program. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke also back forms of universal child care, supporting the Child Care for Working Families Act introduced earlier this year. The Trump administration has also tackled child care policies, with President Donald Trump signi
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Feeling the squeeze, American parents struggle to afford child care and student loan debt

Student loan debt is not only pushing many Americans to start families later in life, it’s also creating problems when it comes to paying for child care. Roughly one in five Americans with student loans say their debt has had a negative effect on their ability to provide or pay for child care, according to a report on the impact of student loans by the MIT AgeLab and sponsored by TIAA. About one in four Americans has student loan debt, with the average balance just over $37,000. The average student loan payment is $393 a month.

(click to expand chart) But that monthly loan payment makes balancing other monthly bills more difficult, especially when it comes to expensive fixed costs such as child care. Last year, American families with children under the age of 5 typically spent $250 a week on child care, according to an analysis by the Center for American Progress. The organization estimates that’s about 10% of the average family’s monthly income of $10,981. In fact, it’s not uncommon for child care to be a family’s largest monthly household expense — more than rent or a mortgage. That’s unaffordable, even by the federal government’s standards. Under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’s guidelines, child care is considered unaffordable if it adds up to more than 7% of the household income. Where you live can play a major role in the cost. Over half of Americans live in neighborhoods classified as child-care deserts by the Center. These are areas with an insufficient supply of licensed child-care providers, according to a comprehensive study the organization undertook last year. The average cost of full-time care for children ages 0-4 is more expensive than the average cost of in-state college tuition. In Michigan, the average family pays almost $14,000 a year in child care, while the average family living in Washington D.C. pays over $25,000 a year, according to the Care Index created by New America and Care.com.

Looking forward

The unaffordability of child care is pushing some lawmakers to take more action. Earlier this year, Democratic presidential candidate and Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren rolled out a plan for a sweeping universal child care program. Funded through a proposed new millionaires tax, Warren’s plan calls for more subsidized child-care centers nationwide to ease the burden of child-care costs on family finances. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke also back forms of universal child care, supporting the Child Care for Working Families Act introduced earlier this year. Similar to Warren’s plan, the legislation aims to offer families affordable child-care options through age 13 by relying on a cost-sharing program between the federal government and the states. Meanwhile, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who released a “Family Bill of Rights ” plan aimed at making all aspects of family care more affordable, supports tax credits for child care. And Julián Castro and Andrew Yang both support universal preschool, according to Vox. The Trump administration has also tackled child care policies, with President Donald Trump signing off an on $2.4 billion funding increase for the Child Care and Development Fund last year. Under the program, states have access to $8.1 billion to help fund child-care options for low-income families. Additionally, the president’s proposed 2020 budget released earlier this year earmarked $1 billion to increase affordable child-care options in underserved communities across America.

Juggling expenses may require sacrifice

Unfortunately, for the families currently struggling with child-care costs, there’s no easy fix. “I’m not going to discount how hard it is when dealing with two rather high costs, student loans and child care,” says Doug Boneparth, a financial advisor with New York-based Bone Fide Wealth. Juggling these costs, especially if your monthly budget is tight, is going to come down to really mastering cash flow and having an intimate understanding of where your money goes, he says. “If your income can only go up so much, and you have to deal with the fixed costs of your student loans and your child care, you’re really going to need to pay close attention to where the rest of your money is going,” Boneparth says. You may also need to see if there’s any way of making some additional money, maybe taking on a second job or a side hustle, Dan Keady, TIAA’s chief financial planning strategist, tells CNBC Make It. “If you find that you need to take on credit card debt to make your life work, you probably need to make some very big changes, maybe even some sacrifices that are going to be uncomfortable,” Boneparth says. “Nobody wants to hear that, but that’s the truth.” Don’t miss: Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it’s not helping Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, care, american, struggle, loan, feeling, average, debt, childcare, families, costs, monthly, parents, going, child, student, squeeze


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Women are traveling far and wide for affordable IVF—here’s why it’s so expensive

Over the past eight years, one Los Angeles-based prenatal health coordinator has helped thousands of women during their pregnancies. And about 7.3 million women of childbearing age in the U.S. have used fertility treatments to get pregnant. To help increase families’ chances of a successful IVF treatment, many clinics offer “guarantee” programs and pricing packages. About 71% of the women who went through IVF last year had no fertility treatment coverage, according to FertilityIQ. While Anna was


Over the past eight years, one Los Angeles-based prenatal health coordinator has helped thousands of women during their pregnancies. And about 7.3 million women of childbearing age in the U.S. have used fertility treatments to get pregnant. To help increase families’ chances of a successful IVF treatment, many clinics offer “guarantee” programs and pricing packages. About 71% of the women who went through IVF last year had no fertility treatment coverage, according to FertilityIQ. While Anna was
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Women are traveling far and wide for affordable IVF—here's why it's so expensive

Over the past eight years, one Los Angeles-based prenatal health coordinator has helped thousands of women during their pregnancies. Yet working in the field didn’t help much when it came to her own pregnancy, which proved to be a costly challenge. Anna, who asked to be identified by a pseudonym to protect her privacy, is one of thousands of women each year who opt to travel to clinics in other states (and sometimes other countries) in search of affordable in vitro fertilization, or IVF, procedures. She and her husband found that it was cheaper to travel across the country, from Los Angeles to Albany, New York, to receive treatment, than move forward with clinics closer to home. Yet they still spent about $20,000 in total to get pregnant, she tells CNBC Make It. Each year, millions of American families struggle with infertility. For every 100 couples, 12 to 13 report they’ve experienced trouble getting pregnant, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 7.3 million women of childbearing age in the U.S. have used fertility treatments to get pregnant. IVF is one of the most popular routes. It’s a multistep procedure where a medical team removes eggs from a woman’s ovaries, and then fertilizes the eggs with sperm in a laboratory. The fertilized embryo is given a few days to grow and then implanted into a woman’s uterus. In total, the process generally takes four to six weeks.

The going rate for IVF

Last year, the average patient paid more than $22,000 for a single IVF cycle, according to FertilityIQ, a database that provides information about costs and treatments. Many times, that price does not include the necessary fertility drugs and testing, which can add up to an additional $3,000 per cycle. Not to mention the expenses associated with pregnancy and a hospital delivery. Anna, however, didn’t qualify for the basic IVF, which isn’t uncommon. Women using an egg or sperm donor or those seeking genetic testing or specialized treatments such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection should expect to pay more. In her case, Anna sought out preimplantation genetic diagnosis, or PGD. This is a specialized procedure where doctors test the fertilized embryos for chromosomal or genetic abnormalities before they are implanted. Anna has a genetic nerve disease and, after undergoing multiple surgeries and treatments throughout her life, she didn’t want to pass that onto her children. But that extra testing increases the cost of treatment. At CNY Fertility, the clinic Anna and her husband opted to use, a basic round of IVF costs $3,900. The facility estimates that PGD costs roughly an additional $300 to $600 per embryo including biopsy and third-party lab fees. In Anna’s case, she and her husband chose to pay for testing on 17 viable embryos collected. In the U.S., about 34% of IVF procedures performed in 2017 resulted in live birth among women ages 35 to 37, according to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. But that success rate drops as women age — those ages 41 to 42 only have a 10% chance. To help increase families’ chances of a successful IVF treatment, many clinics offer “guarantee” programs and pricing packages. The programs differ slightly clinic to clinic, but these tend to be money-back guarantees for if the IVF does not result in a successful pregnancy and birth. Patients pay more for the guarantee than they otherwise would if they were successful after just one IVF cycle. “I’m pretty risk averse,” Anna says, adding she would have definitely paid more in advance because she was expecting to undergo several IVF cycles. But only certain patients qualify, and Anna wasn’t eligible because she chose to do PGD IVF.

Fertility treatments in the US are an insurance minefield

The reason IVF is so expensive isn’t that it’s a cutting-edge technology — in fact, the first successful procedure took place in 1978 — it’s that for many women, the cost of the treatment isn’t covered by insurance. About 71% of the women who went through IVF last year had no fertility treatment coverage, according to FertilityIQ. Only 16 states — Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas and West Virginia — require insurance companies to have some sort of coverage for families seeking infertility treatments, according to the National Conference of State Legislators. Fourteen of those states require insurance companies to actually cover infertility treatment, but California and Texas have limitations. California specifically excludes IVF from the mandate. Meanwhile, Texas law requires insurance companies to let employers know the coverage is available, but insurers are not required to provide the coverage and employers are not required to include it in their health plans.

“The only reason we’re talking about the cost of IVF is because it’s not covered by insurance,” says Betsy Campbell, chief engagement officer at Resolve, the national infertility association. “Infertility is a disease and should be covered by insurance just like other diseases,” she adds. Anna’s insurance did have a policy for PGD, so initially, she thought the procedure would be covered. But after seeing a reproductive endocrinologist, her claim was rejected. The insurance company only covered diagnosis, not treatment. So while her pretesting, such as the saline sonogram and hormonal testing, was covered, the IVF and PGD procedures were not. So she “scoured for months and months” to find the most affordable out-of-pocket option. Initially, she looked into travelling to the Caribbean for care because the clinics there offered cheaper basic IVF, but the “logistics of traveling further to go abroad were too overwhelming,” Anna says. In the end, she settled on CNY Fertility because it was the cheapest after a countrywide comparison, even with the additional travel costs.

Families finding creative ways to keep costs down

Typically, IVF patients have many expenses beyond the procedure itself that can add significantly to the overall cost, including medications, blood tests and ultrasound monitoring. To keep her expenses as low as possible, Anna ordered the priciest medications from Israel and purchased others through discounts she found using GoodRx. Plus she paid for her IVF using a newly acquired credit card to snag a promotional points offer. Those points paid for the flights to and from New York, as well as accommodations and a rental car. During the egg retrieval phase, Anna rented an Airbnb and a car, staying for about 10 days. Her job provides “pretty good benefits,” she says, so she was able to just take vacation time, but her husband was only able to join her for the last few days of the trip.

The only reason we’re talking about the cost of IVF is because it’s not covered by insurance. Betsy Campbell chief engagement officer at Resolve

Once both Anna and her husband donated the eggs and sperm, the doctors went to work. Of the roughly 40 eggs retrieved from Anna, 17 were successfully fertilized. Those embryos were then biopsied and tested, but just one turned out to be chromosomally normal. That surprised and disappointed Anna, who was hoping for a few embryos in case the transfer was not successful. “I was pretty prepared for failure, but I went back [to the clinic for the transfer],” she says. Anna flew back to Albany by herself for the frozen embryo transfer process, staying at a hotel near the clinic for three days. From there, Anna opted to do monitoring with an OBGYN in LA. Thankfully, Anna’s IVF process proved successful. “I was really, really lucky, because if it didn’t work, I would have had to pay that approximately $20,000 all over again,” Anna says. Today, she is the mother of a happy, healthy 18-month-old son. “It could have gone a totally different way,” she says. More than half of patients have to undergo a second IVF cycle, FertilityIQ reports, and almost a third must seek three or more. Anna and her husband could only afford to try one cycle without going into debt. And they had already waited years to start a family. “We waited until we were in a financial position that we could afford it,” Anna says. While Anna was able to rely on savings to pay for her fertility treatments, many women are not so fortunate. Over half of women, 52%, who were planning to undergo IVF this year say they will pay for treatment with a credit card, according to a poll of 776 women from Student Loan Hero. And many go into debt.

More employers helping couples shoulder the costs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insurance, treatments, traveling, affordable, pay, successful, covered, wide, treatment, anna, ivfheres, expensive, ivf, women, husband, far


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3 groceries you should always buy at Trader Joe’s instead of Aldi

Trader Joe’s offers some great competition, typically coming in only pennies higher than Aldi on almost all of its grocery prices. Trader Joe’s prices even beat budget retailer Aldi. Trader Joe’s sells crumbled feta cheese in a 6-ounce package for $2.69, and an organic crumbled version for $3.49. NutsMegan Leonhardt | CNBCIf you’re serious about snacking, then head to Trader Joe’s to pick up almonds, cashews and peanuts. Trader Joe’s offers 16-ounce packages of organic raw almonds and cashews fo


Trader Joe’s offers some great competition, typically coming in only pennies higher than Aldi on almost all of its grocery prices. Trader Joe’s prices even beat budget retailer Aldi. Trader Joe’s sells crumbled feta cheese in a 6-ounce package for $2.69, and an organic crumbled version for $3.49. NutsMegan Leonhardt | CNBCIf you’re serious about snacking, then head to Trader Joe’s to pick up almonds, cashews and peanuts. Trader Joe’s offers 16-ounce packages of organic raw almonds and cashews fo
3 groceries you should always buy at Trader Joe’s instead of Aldi Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, organic, cheeses, offers, selection, retailer, trader, sells, joes, buy, groceries, aldi, instead


3 groceries you should always buy at Trader Joe's instead of Aldi

Grocery chain, Trader Joe’s, is made popular with its selection of gourmet, vegetarian and organic food options.

Aldi is known for its rock-bottom prices, and when it comes to most grocery staples, the German-based retailer is tough to beat. But not always. Trader Joe’s offers some great competition, typically coming in only pennies higher than Aldi on almost all of its grocery prices. And on several items, Trader Joe’s not only wins on price, the retailer also offers a much better selection than Aldi. CNBC Make It compared prices of Northern New Jersey locations of Trader Joe’s and Aldi. New Jersey liquor laws do not allow in-store alcohol sales, so we weren’t able to put wine prices to the test. Beyond wine, here’s what you should always be stocking up on at Trader Joe’s.

Fancy cheese

Megan Leonhardt | CNBC

Trader Joe’s not only stocks a wide variety of specialty and imported cheeses, the California-based chain sells varieties at prices that won’t break your budget (unless of course you buy them all at once). Trader Joe’s prices even beat budget retailer Aldi. Trader Joe’s sells crumbled feta cheese in a 6-ounce package for $2.69, and an organic crumbled version for $3.49. Aldi’s regular and organic crumbled feta sells for 10 cents and 17 cents more per ounce. Trader Joe’s also offers a lot of unique cheeses that you can’t find elsewhere. Its Unexpected Cheddar Cheese regularly earns praise and it’s only $3.99 for a 7-ounce package. The cheese was even voted a favorite in the chain’s annual customer choice survey. If you’re looking for more basic cheeses, however, head to Aldi. The chain’s shredded cheeses, including mild cheddar and mozzarella, as well as blocks of Monterey Jack and Swiss are practically a steal.

Nuts

Megan Leonhardt | CNBC

If you’re serious about snacking, then head to Trader Joe’s to pick up almonds, cashews and peanuts. In the nuts department, Trader Joe’s beats Aldi on both selection and price. Trader Joe’s offers 16-ounce packages of organic raw almonds and cashews for $4.99 and $7.99, respectively. Aldi sells 10-ounce packages of raw organic almonds for $8.89 and 14-ounce package of raw organic cashews for $7.99.

Olive oil

Megan Leonhardt | CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, organic, cheeses, offers, selection, retailer, trader, sells, joes, buy, groceries, aldi, instead


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Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it’s not helping

Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt


Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt
Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it’s not helping Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debtand, pay, silent, americans, helping, say, debt, money, loan, school, loans, student, nathan, dont, staying


Americans are staying silent on student loan debt—and it's not helping

When it comes to uncomfortable conversations, Americans would rather talk about pretty much anything else — politics, health issues, religion — than discuss their finances. Yet the money topic Americans voted as most thorny is one that’s constantly in the news: student loans. Over a third of Americans say they see student loan debt as the biggest financial taboo, according to a Harris Poll of over 1,000 U.S. adults commissioned by TD Ameritrade.

So? What gun was held to her head forcing her to sign her name.

I guess to be anyone of any self-esteem anymore, once needs to be a victim. — Mark Frost (@FrostieCash) August 2, 2019

Absolutely no one but her made this choice for her and her inability to reason should not cost me money. 100% her responsibility and not ours! Grow up, get a 2nd job but don’t expect us to fix YOUR problem. — BadGolfer (@MatthewClynch) August 2, 2019

Those types of comments are on loans that are generally considered “good debt.” While a lot of people will cop to having student loans, it’s less common for people to comfortably disclose actual numbers, Lowry says.

Living with student loans long after class lets out

Playing his cards close to his chest is familiar territory for a 40-year-old lawyer living in South Carolina. Jay, who asked to be identified by a pseudonym to protect his privacy, says that while his loans are an open book with with his wife, he only talks in generalities with other family and friends. “Outside of how much we paid for our home, I don’t generally tell people about my finances,” he tells CNBC Make It. Despite graduating from law school eight years ago, Jay says he owes nearly $250,000 in student loans. So far, he’s paid over $80,000 on the loans, yet he owes more now than when he started. “It is frustrating,” he says. But it’s not a complaint he shares widely because he doesn’t want to deal with the judgement around his balance and his decisions. “I went to law school a little later in life. I was married with two kids so I had to borrow a little more than I wanted to,” Jay says. Adele Nathan, a 33-year-old physical therapist in Chicago, is also reluctant to share to discuss the details of her student loan debt with people. “I don’t have any shame associated with it,” she says. “That being said, unless it’s a close friend or family member, I don’t really ever share the amount I had to take out.” Nathan is paying down about $260,000 in student loans she took out for her physical therapy degree. “Most people in my profession had to take out loans for grad school, so it’s common parlance in the workplace,” she says. But while she rates herself as pretty open about money and financial topics, when she’s out with friends who work in different industries, student loans are “just not what we talk about, ” she says. “They just don’t get it,” she adds. Her debt isn’t going anywhere fast, even though she’s paying about $300 a month toward her loans. At that rate, she’s putting about 15% of her monthly take home pay toward her loans, but that doesn’t even cover the interest.

“At my salary, there’s absolutely no way for me to pay this off in less than five years while living in a major U.S. city,” Adele Nathan

“At my salary, there’s absolutely no way for me to pay this off in less than five years while living in a major U.S. city,” Nathan says. To cope, she says she “compartmentalizes” her student loan debt, ignoring it whenever she can. “I allow it to resurface every year when I have to reapply, but then I shove it right back down.” Nathan calls her loans a “baseline stressor, ” but she says it could be much worse. Her coping mechanism has allowed her to, as she puts it, “say yes” to many life experiences, including getting married, starting a family and taking new jobs. Although that may change as Nathan and her husband gear up to buy a home. “I’m waiting for the other shoe to drop — I’m wondering how much [the student loans] will impact our decision to buy and what we’re offered as a mortgage,” Nathan says.

It’s time to open up about loan experiences

Yet despite the reluctance to share the details on their student loans, overall, half of Americans in the Harris Poll say it would be healthier if people felt they could discuss money topics more freely. It would help if people talked more openly about student loans and the effect of having them, Jay says. “All the conversations are in the wrong direction in actually helping people,” he says, referring to media coverage of the Democratic presidential candidates plans to manage the country’s student loan crisis. “I don’t want someone to pay off my loans,” he says. Instead, he’d like more information and education for borrowers, specifically around repayment. “I want people to understand the trap students get stuck in when they can’t afford full payments coming out of school. They get stuck with high interest loans that they can’t refinance for a better loan,” he says. “It would have been helpful if someone was able to spell out for me what it meant to take on this amount of debt,” Nathan says. “I like my job a lot, but I didn’t realize that by signing up for this career, I was firmly shutting the door on everything else until I could pay it back.” Don’t miss: 36% of college grads with student loans say debt wasn’t worth it Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, debtand, pay, silent, americans, helping, say, debt, money, loan, school, loans, student, nathan, dont, staying


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5 groceries that are cheaper at Aldi than Trader Joe’s

If you’re shopping at Trader Joe’s to score the best prices, chances are, you’re getting a pretty good deal. “Aldi, happily, has a lot of good quality, good-tasting products at good prices,” John Karolefski, grocery store analyst and editor of Grocery Stories, tells CNBC Make It. It’s a strategy similar to the one used by Trader Joe’s, but Aldi is able to beat their prices because it also takes a stripped-down approach in its stores. It’s worth noting that Aldi U.S. and Trader Joe’s are independ


If you’re shopping at Trader Joe’s to score the best prices, chances are, you’re getting a pretty good deal. “Aldi, happily, has a lot of good quality, good-tasting products at good prices,” John Karolefski, grocery store analyst and editor of Grocery Stories, tells CNBC Make It. It’s a strategy similar to the one used by Trader Joe’s, but Aldi is able to beat their prices because it also takes a stripped-down approach in its stores. It’s worth noting that Aldi U.S. and Trader Joe’s are independ
5 groceries that are cheaper at Aldi than Trader Joe’s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, stores, groceries, products, good, youre, trader, prices, joes, grocery, cheaper, aldi


5 groceries that are cheaper at Aldi than Trader Joe's

If you’re shopping at Trader Joe’s to score the best prices, chances are, you’re getting a pretty good deal. But there are several everyday items you may be surprised to find are cheaper at Aldi.

“Aldi, happily, has a lot of good quality, good-tasting products at good prices,” John Karolefski, grocery store analyst and editor of Grocery Stories, tells CNBC Make It. “It’s one of the reasons they’ve been so successful in the U.S.”

Part of the secret to the store’s low prices is that the vast majority of their products are private label, so you’re not paying for the marketing and advertising that many brands use to attract customers.

It’s a strategy similar to the one used by Trader Joe’s, but Aldi is able to beat their prices because it also takes a stripped-down approach in its stores. There are few frills: Products are shelved in the shipping boxes they arrived in, there are fewer employees around the store to help customers, you need to bring and bag your own groceries and you rent your shopping cart for a quarter to ensure you bring it back.

It’s worth noting that Aldi U.S. and Trader Joe’s are independently operated companies with distinct but once-related corporate parents. It could be said that Aldi and Trader Joe’s are “estranged cousins.”

Next time you’re heading to the grocery store, here are five items to try purchasing from Aldi to save a bit more on your grocery budget.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, store, stores, groceries, products, good, youre, trader, prices, joes, grocery, cheaper, aldi


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